Sydney-CPPC

Cracking the CNO solar neutrinos challenge and great expectations with novel neutrino detectors

by Zara Bagdasarian (Forschungszentrum Jülich)

Australia/Sydney
Description

The latest breakthrough in neutrino physics is the first experimental evidence of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) fusion cycle in the Sun. The discovery was possible due to the unprecedented radiopurity of the Borexino liquid-scintillator detector (Italy), employing innovative hardware and software developments. In the future, new technologies can further facilitate access to a broad physics agenda and applications in neutrino physics. Of particular interest are the cutting-edge detection techniques and novel target materials that aim to fully utilize both scintillation and Cherenkov signals from low- and high- energy neutrino interactions. The first deployment of Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors (LAPPDs) and water-based liquid scintillator (WbLS) in the ANNIE experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (USA) will be exciting milestones in the evolution of neutrino detection. Neutrino Experiment One (NEO) will be the first ktonne-scale detector built by the Watchman collaboration at Boulby Underground Laboratory (UK). Its goal is to demonstrate, for the first time, nuclear non-proliferation capabilities using antineutrino detection. Finally, the multi-ktonne detector, THEIA, aims to detect solar neutrinos, determine neutrino mass ordering and the CP-violating phase, observe diffuse supernova neutrinos and neutrinos from a supernova burst, search for nucleon decay, and, ultimately, neutrinoless double beta decay