Sep 26 – 30, 2011
Vienna, Austria
Europe/Zurich timezone

A Reticle Size CMOS Pixel Sensor Dedicated to the STAR HFT Upgrade

Sep 28, 2011, 2:50 PM
25m
Room EI 7 (Vienna, Austria)

Room EI 7

Vienna, Austria

<font face="Verdana" size="2"><b>Vienna University of Technology</b> Department of Electrical Engineering Gusshausstraße 27-29 1040 Vienna, Austria
Oral ASICs A4 - ASICs

Speaker

Dr Hung Pham (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3)

Description

ULTIMATE is a reticle size CMOS Pixel Sensor (CPS) designed to meet the requirements of the STAR pixel detector (PXL). It includes a pixel array of 928 rows and 960 columns with a 20.7µm pixel pitch, providing a sensitive area of ~3.8cm². Based on the sensor designed for the EUDET beam telescope, the device is a binary output sensor with integrated zero suppression circuitry featuring a 320 Mbps data throughput capability. It was fabricated in a 0.35µm OPTO process early in 2011. The design and preliminary test results, including charged particle detection performances measured at the CERN-SPS, will be presented.

Summary 500 words

The tracking performances of CMOS Pixel Sensor (CPS) are now well established and the sensors are foreseen to equip several vertex detectors. The STAR HFT (Heavy Flavor Tracker) upgrade has generated the first vertex detector based on CPS. The pixel detector (PXL), composed of two layers of high resolution CPS, is presently being fabricated.

This development began more than eight years ago in collaboration with LBNL. Three generations of sensors have been designed at IPHC. The first generation sensor featured analogue outputs (MimoSTAR-1, -2 and -3) and did not integrate signal processing circuitry. A 3 sensors telescope has been constructed with MimoSTAR-2 and operated inside the STAR apparatus near the RHIC beam in 2007. It was the first test of the CPS technology in a collider environment. The second generation sensors have reticle dimensions (Phase-1 and Phase-2) and binary outputs but no integrated zero suppression logic. In 2012, an engineering prototype detector with limited coverage (1/3) will be installed with Phase-1 or Phase-2 sensors. The third generation is represented by the ULTIMATE sensor, which was designed to fulfil all STAR HFT PXL specifications, in particular those concerning hit density (2 x 105 hits/cm2/s), spatial resolution (~ 6-8 µm), power consumption (~ 100 mW/cm²), radiation tolerance (~ 100 kRad and few 1012 MeV neq/cm2 per year) and operation at room temperature (~ 30 – 35 °C). The final detector, composed of two complete layers of 400 ULTIMATE sensors, will be installed in 2013.

ULTIMATE is a full reticle size (~2x2 cm2) sensor with binary output and integrated zero suppression logic. Its main characteristics are similar to those of MIMOSA26 sensor, fabricated in 2009 for the EUDET beam telescope [1]. The design has incorporated the test results of MIMOSA26 [1]. The architecture of ULTIMATE is based on a column parallel readout with amplification and correlated double sampling (CDS) inside each pixel. Each column is ended with a high precision discriminator and is read out in rolling shutter mode at 5 MHz (200 ns / row). The discriminator outputs are processed through an integrated zero suppression micro circuit, which results are stored in two memories according to a ping-pong arrangement allowing for a continuous readout. The data are multiplexed onto two LVDS outputs at 160 MHz.

This contribution will discuss in details the design of the ULTIMATE sensor with its optimisation approaches, and show its test results, including charged particle detection performances measured at the CERN-SPS.

[1] Ch. Hu-Guo et al. "First reticule size MAPS with digital output and integrated zero suppression for the EUDET-JRA1 beam telescope", Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A, 623(2010) 480-482

Primary authors

Dr CHRISTINE HU-GUO (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Dr Isabelle Valin (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3)

Co-authors

Mr Abdelkader Himmi (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Dr Andrei Dorokhov (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Dr Auguste Besson (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Mr Cayetano Santos (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Mr Claude Colledani (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Dr Frederic Morel (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Mr Gilles Claus (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Mr Gregory Bertolone (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Mr Guy Doziere (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Dr Hung Pham (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Dr Jerome Baudot (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Mr Jia Wang (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Mr Kimmo Jaaskellainen (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Dr Marc Winter (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Dr Marie Geliin (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Mr Mathieu Goffe (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Mr Matthieu Specht (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Mr Serhiy Senyukov (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3) Dr wojciech Dulinski (DRS-IPHC (IReS), University of Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3)

Presentation materials