EPS HEP 2013 Stockholm

Europe/Stockholm
KTH and Stockholm University Campus

KTH and Stockholm University Campus

Description
News and Updates

Proceeding information now available here



Older news

Tuesday 23rd  

Schedule

To deal with a delay due to a late-running talk this morning, the agenda is currently shifted by 15 minutes i.e. morning coffee break and poster session will take place at 11:15 rather than 11:00 and the afternoon session starts at 14:45 rather than 14:30.

Lunches
An extra line has been added for picking up lunches at Lantis. 
 
Posters
The second and last poster session will take place this morning Tuesday 23 during the morning coffee break (11:00-11:30).The presenters will be there to discuss their work. As for the previous session, judges from poster prize committee will also be in attendance. The winners of the prize (sponsored by Elsevier) will be announced later today or tomorrow.

Vasa tickets 
If you have a Vasa ticket and you know you won't attend the dinner, please let us know asap (at the registration desk) since there is a waiting list for folk who registered late. 

Those on the waiting list should come to the registration desk at the end of the lunch break. 

Vasa directions 
Directions to Vasa can be found at: 
http://eps-hep2013.eu/EPS_HEP2013_Venues.pdf
The map is also in the information package in the conference bags. 

Monday 22nd  Pictures, plenaries and posters

The conference now carries on in the Aula Magna at SU.

The group conference photograph will take place at 16:00 outside of the Aula Magna before coffee.

Posters are now shown in the following areas:
Floor 4: QCD, Higgs and New Physics 
Floor 5: Top/ew, heavy ions, detectors/data, accelerators, astroparticle, flavour, cosmology, neutrinos.

The last poster session will take place on Tuesday 23, 2013 between 11:00 and 11:30. The posters summarise interesting research and are also an excellent opportunity for young scientists show their work. Please show your support by attending.


Direction to Stockholm University Campus
You can reach the Stockholm University campus with the subway (T-bana) red line and travel north to the station "Universitetet" in the direction of Mörby.


Support
    • 16:30 20:00
      Registration & Welcome Drink AlbaNova

      AlbaNova

    • 09:00 10:35
      Astroparticle Physics D2 (KTH Campus)

      D2

      KTH Campus

      • 09:00
        Recent Developments in Neutrino Astronomy in Ice and Water 30m
        Observing astrophysical neutrinos can provide a unique insight into the acceleration mechanism of cosmic ray sources: because neutrinos should be produced in hadronic interactions and are neither absorbed nor deflected so they point directly back to their sources. This talk will give a short overview of the field of neutrino astronomy, including a summary of recent results from the ANTARES detector in the Mediterranean and the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica, and will briefly discuss future projects including KM3NeT and PINGU. It will cover recent searches in IceCube for high-energy neutrinos (> 100 TeV), which have produced the first evidence for a neutrino flux beyond standard expectations from neutrinos generated by interactions of cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere. This includes the observation of events with energies above 1 PeV -- the highest energy neutrinos ever observed. The current status of these astrophysical neutrino searches and prospects for the future will be discussed.
        Speaker: Claudio Kopper
        Slides
      • 09:30
        Neutrinos from charm production in the atmosphere 15m
        Atmospheric neutrinos are produced in interactions of cosmic rays with Earth's atmosphere. At very high energy, the contribution from semi-leptonic decays of charmed hadrons, known as the prompt neutrino flux, dominates over the conventional flux from pion and kaon decays. This is due to the very short lifetime of the charmed hadrons, which therefore do not lose energy before they decay. The calculation of this process is difficult because the Bjorken-x at which the parton distribution functions are evaluated is very small. This is a region where QCD is not well understood, and large logaritms must be resummed. Available parton distribution functions are not known for such small x and extrapolations must be made. Theoretically, the fast rise of the structure functions for small x ultimately leads to parton saturation. We have previously (Enberg, Reno and Sarcevic, 2008) calculated the prompt flux including parton saturation effects in the QCD production cross section of charm quarks. This calculation has been used by e.g. the IceCube collaboration as a standard background. We are now updating this calculation to take into account the recent LHC data on the charm cross section, as well as recent theoretical developments in QCD. In this talk I will describe this update and some of the issues involved.
        Speaker: Rikard Enberg (Uppsala University)
        Slides
      • 09:45
        Anisotropy studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory 15m
        We report recent results of the distribution of the arrival directions of ultra high energy cosmic rays recorded by the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We discuss the search for large scale anisotropies expressed in terms of dipolar and quadrupolar coefficients as a function of the right ascension and declination at the EeV energy scale. For cosmic rays at highest energies (above 55 EeV) we present an analysis of the correlation with active galactic nuclei drawn from the Veron-Cetty and Veron catalog. We also discuss a search for point sources of EeV neutrons in the Galaxy.
        Speaker: Ugo Giaccari (Universidade Federal do Rio De Janeiro)
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Hunting for cosmic neutrinos deep under the sea: The ANTARES experiment 15m
        More than one hundred years after the first observations of cosmic rays, problems connected with their origin and propagation have not been completely solved. Astrophysical objects such as Supernova Remnants, Active Galactic Nuclei, Quasars and Microquasars, which are likely sources of high energy cosmic rays and gamma rays, could emit high energy neutrinos as well. The detection and the study of their properties would shed light on production and acceleration mechanisms acting inside possible cosmic accelerators. Measuring the arrival direction and energy of such neutrinos requires very massive targets, whose size is far beyond those of present, conventional underground detectors. A possible solution is the use of the sea as a Cerenkov target-detector. ANTARES is the first undersea neutrino telescope. It has been built in the Mediterranean Sea by a large European collaboration and has been in data taking since 2008, demonstrating the feasibility of this technique. The detection principle, the sensitivity of the experiment and the results obtained so far will be presented.
        Speaker: Annarita Margiotta (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 10:15
        First Light with the HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory 15m
        The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory (HAWC) is currently under construction 4,100 meters above sea level on the slope of Pico de Orizaba, Mexico. HAWC is a large field-of-view instrument capable of continuously monitoring the gamma-ray sky between roughly 50 GeV and 100 TeV. The detector will be used to record both steady and transient gamma-ray sources and to provide an unbiased survey of the northern sky. Upon completion, HAWC will comprise 300 large light-tight water tanks covering an area of 20,000 square meters. Each tank will be instrumented with four photomultipliers to detect particles from extensive air showers produced by gamma rays and cosmic rays. Since September 2012, the first 30 tanks have been operating in data acquisition mode. Event statistics and sensitivity are already sufficient to perform studies of cosmic rays and flaring gamma-ray sources. In this talk, we report results from the first months of detector operation, including the detection of large- and small-scale anisotropy of cosmic rays.
        Speaker: Stefan Westerhoff (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:35
      Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ions E2 (KTH Campus)

      E2

      KTH Campus

      • 09:00
        Two–particle correlations and balance functions in p–Pb and Pb–Pb collisions at LHC energies with ALICE 16m
        Recent measurements of two–particle correlations in high–multiplicity p–Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV revealed a long–range structure (large separation in ∆η) at the near– (∆φ ≃ 0) and away–side (∆φ ≃ π) of the triggering particle [1, 2, 3]. At LHC energies, these ridge–like structures have already been observed in Pb–Pb collisions [4], but also in high–multiplicity pp collisions [5]. In the first case, this phenomenon is commonly related to collectivity in hadron production, i.e. hydrodynamic evolution, whereas in the latter, mechanisms like longitudinal color connections and multi–parton interactions might play an important role. To shed light on the particle production mechanisms in p–Pb and Pb– Pb collisions and answer the question for collectivity, we extend the two–particle correlation analysis for hadrons in two directions: identified particles, which should show a characteristic pattern in case of collective motion in a hydrodynamic medium, and charge dependent correlations studied with the balance function, which are sensitive to charge dependent effects like local charge conservation. References [1] CMS Collaboration, Phys. Lett. B 718 (2013) 795. [2] B. Abelev et al., ALICE Collaboration, Phys.Lett. B 719 (2013) 29. [3] G. Aad et al., ATLAS Collaboration, CERN-PH-EP-2012-366. [4] K. Aamodt et al., ALICE Collaboration, Phys. Lett. B 708 (2012) 249. [5] V. Khachatryan et al., CMS Collaboration, JHEP 1009 (2010) 091.
        Speaker: Michael Weber (University of Houston (US))
        Slides
      • 09:16
        Global characteristics of p-Pb collisions at LHC with ATLAS 16m
        The ATLAS experiment has studied the centrality dependence of global event characteristics in proton-lead collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=5.02 TeV. A total integrated luminosity of 30nb-1 was collected during LHC proton-lead runs in the fall and winter of 2012-13. The centrality of proton-lead collisions was characterized using the total transverse energy measured in the ATLAS forward calorimeter on the Pb-going side of the detector. Results will be presented for measurements of charged particle pseudo-rapidity and transverse momentum spectra measured over a wide pseudo-rapidity range 
(|eta| < 2.5) covered by the ATLAS inner detector. That wide pseudorapidity coverage also allows the study of long-range particle correlations. Results of two and multi-particle correlation measurements in p+Pb collisions using different analysis techniques will be presented in the talk.
        Speaker: Mauro Villa (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 09:32
        Measurements of two- and four-particle correlations in pPb collisions with CMS 16m
        Measurements of two- and four-particle angular correlations for charged particles emitted in pPb collisions are presented over a wide range in pseudorapidity and full azimuth at CMS. The results are compared to 2.76 TeV semi-peripheral PbPb collision data, collected during the 2011 PbPb run, covering a similar range of particle multiplicities. The observed correlations are characterized by the near-side associated pair yields and the azimuthal anisotropy Fourier harmonics (v_n). The second-order (v_2) and third-order (v_3) anisotropy harmonics are extracted using the two-particle azimuthal correlation technique. A four-particle correlation method is also applied to obtain the value of v_2 and further explore the multi-particle nature of the correlations. Both associated pair yields and anisotropy harmonics are studied as a function of particle multiplicity and transverse momentum.
        Speaker: Monika Sharma (Vanderbilt University (US))
        Slides
      • 09:48
        Flow in proton-nucleus collisions 20m
        There is little doubt that flow has been observed in heavy ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC, mainly based on results on azimuthal anisotropies, but also on particle spectra of identified particles, perfectly compatible with hydrodynamic expansions. Surprisingly, in pPb collisions one observes a quite similar behavior. So do we observe hydrodynamic dynamics as well in pPb? We will try to answer this question.
        Speaker: Klaus Werner (Univ Nantes)
        Slides
      • 10:08
        Spectator charge splitting of directed flow in heavy ion collisions 20m
        We estimate the electromagnetic effect of the spectator charge on azimuthal anisotropies observed in heavy ion collisions. For peripheral Pb+Pb reactions at the top energy of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron, $\sqrt{s_{NN}}=17.3$ GeV, we predict this effect to bring very large distortions to the observed directed flow, $v_1$, of positive and negative pions emitted close to beam rapidity. The overall magnitude of this effect is comparable to values of $v_1$ reported by the WA98 experiment. We argue that also at lower rapidities, the spectator induced electromagnetic effect may result in the splitting of values of $v_1$ observed for positive and negative pions. Such a splitting is visible also in the data reported by the STAR Collaboration from the RHIC Beam Energy Scan. Both effects are sensitive to the space-time scenario assumed for pion emission. Therefore, the electromagnetic splitting brings new information on the collision dynamics. The presentation will be based on our recent preprint [1]. 1) A. Rybicki and A. Szczurek, arXiv:1303.7354, submitted to Phys. Rev. {\bf C}.
        Speaker: Antoni Szczurek (Institute of Nuclear Physics)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:35
      Higgs and New Physics F1 (KTH Campus)

      F1

      KTH Campus

      • 09:00
        Search for heavy resonances with the ATLAS detector 12m
        Resonances decaying into a pair of particles are an obvious place to look for phenomena beyond the Standard Model. This talk summarises recent results on searches for resonances in pairs of jets, lepton pairs, leptons and missing transverse energy and pairs of photons. Various models models are considered such the Z' and W', the Randall-Sundrum gravitons as well as the ADD large extra dimension scenario, excited quarks, quantum black hole and contact interactions. Results from sqrt(s) = 8 TeV are presented.
        Speaker: Elizabeth Castaneda Miranda (University of Johannesburg (ZA))
        Slides
      • 09:15
        Search for Heavy Resonances with leptons, photons, and jets at CMS 12m
        Additional heavy vector bosons such as the Z' and W' are predicted by a number of new physics models. So are leptoquarks, which are particles that carry both lepton and quark number. Extra dimensions models predict the existence of massive diphoton resonances. In this talk, we present the latest results on heavy resonances and leptoquarks at CMS. Searches included are dilepton resonances, diphoton resonances, lepton+MET resonances, and lepton+jet resonances.
        Speaker: Edmund A Berry (Princeton University (US))
        Slides
      • 09:30
        Searches gravity effects at the TeV scale with the ATLAS detector 12m
        Events containing several leptons or lepton of similar flavour and electric charge are useful probes of new phenomena due to the low background from Standard Model processes. We look for anomalous production of prompt like-sign leptons or events with three or more leptons, as well as search for excited leptons, heavy leptons and heavy neutrinos. The searches use data recorded in 2012 at sqrt(s)=8 TeV centre-of-mass energy by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.
        Speaker: Tracey Berry (University of London (GB))
        Slides
      • 09:45
        Search for new physics in multijet final states 12m
        The latest results on new physics searches in multijet final states are presented. Searches for new physics with dijets, b-tagged dijets, dijet angular distributions, dijet pairs, and jet triplets are all considered. Also presented will be the search for TeV-scale gravity in two complementary final states: high jet multiplicity final states and the inclusive jet search for extinction.
        Speaker: Claudia Seitz (Rutgers, State Univ. of New Jersey (US))
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Inclusive searches for squarks and gluinos with the ATLAS detector 12m
        Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results on inclusive searches for supersymmetric squarks and gluinos in events containing jets, missing transverse momentum with and without light leptons, taus or photons.
        Speaker: Aleksej Koutsman (TRIUMF (CA))
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Inclusive SUSY searches at the LHC using the CMS detector 12m
        We present a set of generic searches for R-parity conserving SUSY performed by CMS using the 20 fb-1 collected at sqrt(s)=8 TeV during 2012. Both hadronic and leptonic final states are considered, with or without tagged bjets. We look for a SUSY signal as an excess on a falling background distribution in the kinematic planes identified by several sets of variables. The results are interpreted in many SUSY simplified models. A prescription to implement the analysis in phenomenology study is discussed.
        Speaker: Christian Autermann (Rheinisch-Westfaelische Tech. Hoch. (DE))
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:35
      Top and Electroweak Physics F2 (KTH Campus)

      F2

      KTH Campus

      • 09:00
        Electroweak measurements from W and Z/gamma* properties with the ATLAS detector 20m
        W and Z boson production have been measured in the electron, muon and tau decay channels. Total and differential cross sections, defined in terms of the decay lepton kinematics, have been measured as a function of rapidity and transverse momentum. Precise measurements of W and Z production, including the polarisations of W bosons and of tau leptons produced in W decays are presented. They provide tests of lepton universality and constrain electroweak parameters. A measurement of the forwardbackward asymmetry for the neutral current Drell Yan process is also presented. The asymmetry is measured using dielectron and dimuon final states. For the dielectron channel, the measurement includes electrons detected in the forward calorimeter which extends the covered phase space to the region less sensitive to the PDF uncertainties. The result is then used to extract a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle.
        Speaker: Massimiliano Bellomo (CERN)
        Slides
      • 09:20
        W and Z boson production at CMS 20m
        We present selected measurements done with W and Z bosons performed with the CMS detector, based on samples of events collected during 2011 and 2012 physics runs. Measurements include W and Z inclusive cross sections, the lepton charge asymmetry in W events, and differential cross sections of Z and Drell-Yan production.
        Speaker: Sangeun Lee (Kyungpook National University (KR))
        Slides
      • 09:40
        Measurements of W/Z properties at the Tevatron 20m
        We present measurements by the CDF and D0 collaborations of properties of W and Z bosons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at Fermilab's Tevatron Collider. These measurements provide stringent tests on perturbative QCD calculations and are sensitivive to parton distribution functions.
        Speakers: Stefan Soldner-Rembold (University of Manchester) , Stefan Soldner-Rembold (University of Manchester (GB))
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Measurements with electroweak gauge bosons at LHCb 15m
        We report measurements of electroweak boson production in the forward region, using data collected at the LHCb experiment with a centre of mass energy of √s=7 TeV with an integrated luminosity of up to 1.0 fb–1. W and Z bosons are reconstructed in leptonic decay channels, and their cross-sections determined using data-driven techniques. All results are compared to NNLO predictions.
        Speaker: Tara Shears (University of Liverpool (GB))
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Elastic Z0 production at HERA 15m
        A search for events ep-> ep Z0 has been performed in ep collisions at HERA using the ZEUS detector. The search is based on the entire HERA-I and HERA-II data set, amounting to 0.49 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. The Z0 was searched in the di-jet decay mode with elastic condition defined by etamax < 3, where etamax is defined as the pseudorapidity of the energy deposit in the calorimeter closest to the proton beam direction.A di-jet mass peak is observed at the Z0 mass and the number of signal events is extracted from a fit to the mass spectrum. The elastic Z0 production cross section is determined and compared to SM prediction.
        Speaker: Dr. Junpei Maeda (Tokyo Metropolitan University)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:35
      Flavour Physics and fundamental symmetries D1 (KTH Campus)

      D1

      KTH Campus

      • 09:00
        Lattice QCD results for precision b and c physics 15m
        I will give a brief summary of lattice QCD calculations which have an impact on precision heavy flavour physics, focusing on the present status and future outlook.
        Speaker: Dr. Matthew Wingate (University of Cambridge)
        Slides
      • 09:15
        Mass of the b-quark from QCD sum rules for fB and fBs 15m
        We demonstrate that Borel QCD sum rules for heavy-light currents yield a very strong correlation between the b-quark mass and the resulting decay constant of the B-meson. This opens the possibility of an accurate determination of the b-quark mass from the sum rule using the values of fB and fBs as inputs. Combining recent accurate lattice QCD determinations of fB and fBs with our sum-rule analysis based on the three-loop heavy-light correlation function leads to an accurate value $\overline{m}_b(\overline{m}_b)=4.245\pm 0.025$ GeV.
        Speaker: Dmitri Melikhov (M. V. Lomonosov State University)
        Slides
      • 09:30
        Studies of asymmetries in semileptonic B decays at LHCb 15m
        LHCb has recorded large samples of semileptonic B decays. These provide potential to study CP violation effects in the B0 and Bs0 systems. Decay time-integrated or time-dependent asymmetries between charge-conjugate final states probe CP violation in B(s)0 mixing through the measurement of the parameter Afs (sometimes referred to as Asl). These measurements rely on data-driven techniques to obtain excellent control of systematic uncertainties. We present the status of the analyses.
        Speaker: Thomas Ruf (CERN)
        Slides
      • 09:45
        Semileptonic B and Bs decays at Belle 15m
        We present measurements of exclusive and inclusive semileptonic $B_s$ decays using 121 $\rm{fb}^{-1}$ of data collected with the Belle detector near the $\Upsilon(5S)$ resonance. The inclusive branching fraction ${\cal B}(B_s \to X^- \ell^+ \nu_\ell)$ is measured in a sample enhanced in $B_s^{(*)0}\bar{B}_s^{(*)0}$ pair events by reconstructing a tag $D_s^+$ meson. The signal lepton $\ell^+ = e^+,\mu^+$ is required to be of the same-sign charge as the tag $D_s^+$ meson to ensure that both stem from different $B_s^0$ mesons. The branching fraction is extracted by comparing the ratio of measured $D_s^+$ and $D_s^+\ell^+$ yields to known production and branching fractions. The exclusive decays $B_s^0 \to D_s^{(*)-} \ell^+ \nu_\ell$ are studied in events where a lepton candidate $\ell^+$ is paired with a $D_s^-$ of the opposite-sign charge. We exploit the knowledge of the collision energy to identify signal decays based on the zero mass hypothesis for the unreconstructed neutrino.
        Speaker: Aleksey Sibidanov (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP))
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Semileptonic decays of B mesons at BaBar 15m
        We report on recent results of studies of semileptonic B decays with the BaBar detector. In particular, we discuss the determination of |Vub| and |Vcb| from both recent exclusive and inclusive measurements. These include the measurement of the exclusive B -> pi/eta/eta'/omega l nu decays with tagged and untagged event reconstruction, the study of the q^2 and lepton energy distribution in inclusive B -> Xu l nu, and the study of untagged B -> D/D*/D** l nu decays.
        Speaker: Florian Bernlochner (Stanford)
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Study of leptonic and semileptonic kaon decays at CERN 15m
        A lepton universality test by measurement of the helicity suppressed ratio RK of leptonic decay rates of the charged kaon has been performed by the NA62 experiment. A precision measurement of the ratio RK of the rates of kaon leptonic decays K+- to e+- nu and K+- to mu+- nu with the full minimum bias data sample collected with low intensity 75 GeV/c beam by the NA62 experiment at CERN in 2007-2008 is reported. The result, obtained by analyzing ~150,000 reconstructed K+- to e+- nu candidates with 11% background contamination, has a record precision of 0.4% and is in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. The record accuracy of 0.4% constrains the parameter space of new physics models with extended Higgs sector, a fourth generation of quarks and leptons or sterile neutrinos.
        Speaker: Riccardo Fantechi (Sezione di Pisa (IT))
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:35
      QCD: Strong coupling constant alpha_s E1 (KTH Campus)

      E1

      KTH Campus

      • 09:00
        PDF and alphaS constraints from jet measurements at CMS 15m
        We present CMS results related to constraints on parton distribution functions and the strong coupling constant. Results include recent jet measurements performed with 2011 data taken at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 2012 data taken at 8 TeV, including alphaS constraints from multijet events and PDF+alphaS constraints from jet production cross sections.
        Speaker: Dr. Panos Kokkas (University of Ioannina (GR))
        Slides
      • 09:15
        Strong coupling from the tau-lepton hadronic width 15m
        We determine the strong coupling constant $\alpha_s$ from the $\tau$ hadronic width using renormalization group summed expansion of the QCD Adler function. The main theoretical uncertainty in the extraction of $\alpha_s$ is due to the way in which renormalization group invariance is implemented and the yet uncalculated higher order terms in the QCD perturbative series. We show that new expansion exhibits nice renormalization group improvement and the behaviour of the series is similar to standard CIPT expansion. We further study the convergence properties of this expansion improved by Borel transformation and the analytical continuation in the Borel plane. We find that the new, non-power expansions for different conformal mappings have remarkable convergence. Finally we provide the value of strong coupling $\alpha_s$ using the new, non-power perturbative expansions which is $\alpha_s(M_\tau^2)= 0.3189^{+ 0.0145}_{-0.0115}$, which translates to $ \alpha_s(M_Z^2)= 0.1184^{+0.0018}_{-0.0015}$.
        Speaker: gauhar abbas (IMSc Chennai, India)
        Slides
      • 09:30
        Multi-jet cross section ratios and a determination of the strong coupling constant in ppbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV 15m
        We present measurements of three different multi-jet cross section ratios. These include the very first measurements of the new quantities $R_{\DeltaR}$ and $R_{\Delta\phi}$, and a measurement of $R_{3/2}$. The variable $R_{\DeltaR}$ measures the average number of neighboring jets for jets from an inclusive jet sample. The variable $R_{\Delta\phi}$ measures the fraction of the inclusive dijet events in which the azimuthal separation of the two jets with the highest transverse momenta is less than a specified value of the parameter $\Delta\phi_{\rm max}$. The quantity $R_{3/2}$ is the ratio of the inclusive 3-jet and 2-jet cross sections. All three measurements use an event sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $0.7\,$fb$^{-1}$ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The results are compared to predictions of perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order in the strong coupling with corrections for non-perturbative effects. In most kinematic regions, the theory predictions describe the data well. The $R_{\Delta R}$ data are used to determine the strong coupling constant over a large range of momentum transfers from 50-400 GeV, testing the predictions of the renormalization group equation for its running in a new range of momentum transfers.
        Speaker: Avtandyl Kharchilava
        Slides
      • 09:45
        Normalised Multi-jet Cross Sections using Regularised Unfolding and Extractions of alpha_s(M_Z) in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at high Q^2 at HERA 15m
        New results on normalised inclusive jet, di-jet and trijet differential cross sections in neutral current deep-inelastic ep scattering (DIS) based on a regularised unfolding procedure are presented. Detector effects like acceptance and migrations as well as statistical correlations between the multi-jets and the inclusive DIS events are taken into account in this procedure. The DIS phase space of this measurement with the H1 detector is given by the virtuality of the exchanged boson (gamma*,Z^0) 150 < Q^2 < 15000 GeV^2 and the inelasticity of the interaction 0.2 < y < 0.7. The jets are reconstructed in the Breit frame of reference using the k_t jet algorithm. In all cases the jet pseudorapidities in the laboratory frame are required to be in the range -1.0 < eta_lab < 2.5. For inclusive jets the transverse momenta in the Breit frame are 7 < P_T < 50 GeV. The di-jet and tri-jet phase space are defined by requiring 5 < P_T,i < 50 GeV, and the invariant mass of the two leading jets M_1,2 > 16 GeV. Compared to a previously published result on normalised multi-jet cross sections, the new features are an extended range in jet pseudorapidity, an improved hadronic energy scale uncertainty of 1% and the adoption of a regularised unfolding procedure. The unfolded normalised jet cross sections are compared to QCD calculations at NLO and values for the strong coupling alpha_s(M_Z) are extracted.
        Speaker: Mr. Daniel Britzger (DESY)
        Slides
      • 10:00
        $\alpha_S$ from $F_\pi$ and Renormalization Group Optimized Perturbation 15m
        A variant of variationally optimized perturbation, incorporating renormalization group properties in a straightforward way, is used at three successive orders to calculate the nonperturbative ratio $F_\pi/\Lambda$ of the pion decay constant and the basic QCD scale in the MSbar scheme. We demonstrate the good stability and (empirical) convergence properties of this modified perturbative series for this quantity. Using the experimental $F_\pi$ input value we determine $\Lambda$ for $n_f=2$ and $n_f=3$ and estimate the theoretical uncertainties of the method. Combining the $\Lambda(n_f=3)$ results with a standard perturbative evolution provides a new independent determination of the strong coupling constant at various relevant scales, in particular $\alpha_S (m_Z)$, with an accuracy well comparable to recent single determinations of $\alpha_S$.
        Speaker: Jean-Loic Kneur (U)
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Inclusive and dijet jet production measured with the ATLAS detector 15m
        Inclusive jet and dijet double­differential cross sections have been measured in proton­proton collisions using the ATLAS detector. The cross sections were measured using jets clustered with the anti­kT algorithm. The data are compared to expectations based on next­to­leading order QCD calculations corrected for non­perturbative effects, as well as to next­to­leading order Monte Carlo predictions. Ratios of cross sections measured at different centre­of­mass energies allow for reduced experimental and/or theoretical uncertainties. An NLO QCD analysis of the data indicates constraining power for the gluon density.
        Speaker: Lucy Anne Kogan (University of Oxford (GB))
        Slides
    • 10:35 11:00
      Coffee 25m
    • 11:00 13:05
      Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ions E2 (KTH Campus)

      E2

      KTH Campus

      • 11:00
        Identified charged pion, kaon, and proton production in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies measured with ALICE 16m
        \begin{center} {\large \bf Identified charged pion, kaon, and proton production in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies measured with ALICE} {\bf P.~Christiansen}$^{\rm a}$ for the ALICE Collaboration. \vspace{12pt} $^{\rm a}$Department of Physics, Particle Physics, Lund University,\\ SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden,\\ \textit{peter.christiansen@hep.lu.se} \vspace{12pt} \vspace{12pt} \end{center} ALICE has unique capabilities among the LHC experiments for particle identification (PID) at mid-rapidity ($|y| < 1$) over a wide range of transverse momentum ($p_{\rm T}$). For $p_{\rm T}$ from 100 MeV/$c$ up to 3-4 GeV/$c$ (anti)protons, charged pions and kaons can be separated on a track-by-track basis through the measurement of the specific energy loss, d$E$/d$x$, and the time of flight. The identification of protons can be extended up to 6 GeV/$c$ by the Cherenkov detector. For $3 < p_{\rm T} < 20$~GeV/$c$, statistical PID can be done thanks to the relativistic rise of the d$E$/d$x$ in the TPC. In this talk, the spectra for charged pions, kaons, and (anti)protons from pp (at $\sqrt{s} = 2.76$ and 7 TeV) and Pb-Pb (at $\sqrt{s_{\text{NN}}} = 2.76$ TeV) collisions will be presented. The results from pp collisions are important both as a baseline for Pb-Pb measurements and for our understanding of the hadronization process with a focus here on jet fragmentation. \\ Low $p_{\rm T}$ results in Pb-Pb collisions provide information regarding bulk production and collective flow, and will be discussed in the context of the statistical model and hydrodynamic calculations. The intermediate $p_{\rm T}$ region is interesting due to the anomalous large peak in the proton to pion ratio that can be an indication for new hadronization processes in Pb-Pb such as recombination. Finally, high $p_{\rm T}$ results provide insight into jet quenching via the nuclear modification factor, $R_{\text{AA}}$.
        Speaker: Peter Christiansen (Lund University (SE))
        Slides
      • 11:16
        Hadron production in pA collisions 20m
        This talk reviews theory predictions for charged hadron production in pA collisions at LHC energies. In particular the emphasis is on the difference between models incorporating initial and final state effects on the production of (semi)hard particles.
        Speaker: Tuomas Lappi (University of Jyvaskyla)
        Slides
      • 11:36
        Particle production in p-Pb and Pb-p collisions at the LHC with LHCb 20m
        With a unique forward acceptance, and excellent vertexing and particle identification capability, LHCb is well-placed to make important contributions to heavy ion physics through measurements performed using data taken during pA and Ap collisions. The first studies of these data will be presented. These include measurements of particle multiplicity and studies of strange and charmed particle and onia production.
        Speaker: Fanfan Jing (Tsinghua University (CN))
        Slides
      • 11:56
        Measurements of hadron production in pPb collisions in CMS 16m
        Spectra of inclusive and identified charged hadrons measured in p-Pb collisions at the LHC at sqrt(sNN) = 5 TeV are presented. Charged pions, kaons, and protons in the transverse-momentum range pT = 0.1-1.7 GeV/c and for central rapidities are identified via their energy loss in the CMS silicon tracker. Inclusive charged hadron spectra are studied as a function of pseudorapidity. The fully corrected pT spectra and integrated yields are compared to pp data at various collision energies and to several Monte Carlo event generators.
        Speaker: Krisztian Krajczar (CERN)
        Slides
      • 12:12
        Transverse momentum distribution of charged particles and identified hadrons in p--Pb collisions at the LHC with ALICE 16m
        Hadron production has been measured at mid-rapidity by the ALICE experiment at the LHC in proton-lead (p--Pb) collisions at $\sqrt{s_{\rm NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV. The transverse momentum ($p_{\rm T}$) distribution of primary charged particles and of identified light-flavoured hadrons ($\pi^{\pm}$, K$^{\pm}$, K$^{0}_{\rm S}$, p, $\bar{\rm p}$, $\Lambda$, $\bar{\Lambda}$) are presented in this report. Charged-particle tracks are reconstructed in the central barrel over a wide momentum range and furthermore they can be identified by exploiting specific energy loss (d$E$/d$x$), time-of-flight and topological particle-identification techniques. Particle-production yields, spectral shapes and particle ratios are measured in several centrality/multiplicity classes and are compared with results obtained in Pb--Pb collisions at the LHC. The measurement of charged-particle transverse momentum spectra and nuclear modification factor R$_{\rm pPb}$ indicates that the strong suppression of high-$p_{\rm T}$ hadrons observed in Pb--Pb collisions is not due to initial-state effects, but it is rather a fingerprint of jet quenching in hot QCD matter. The systematic study of the hadronic spectral shapes as a function of the particle mass and of particle ratios as a function of charged-particle density provides further insights into collective phenomena, as observed in Pb--Pb collisions. Similar features that could be present in high-multiplicity p--Pb collisions will also be discussed.
        Speaker: Roberto Preghenella (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 12:28
        Precision measurements of inclusive hadron production in p+p and p+C interactions at the CERN SPS 16m
        In the framework of a general study of hadron production in elementary and nuclear interactions at the CERN SPS the NA49 experiment has produced new and complete sets of inclusive meson and baryon cross sections in p+p and p+C interactions [1-8]. This work is aimed at providing precision data over most of the available phase space with a special emphasis on completeness, internal consistency and on the comparison to a wide range of existing experimental results. In particular a new critical analysis of kaon pruction in p+p collisions from threshold to collider energies [3] as well as a survey of backward pion and proton production from 1 to 400 GeV/c beam momentum in p+C interactions [7] has been provided. The corresponding physics analysis allows for a model-independent study of soft hadronic production with a view to a critical assessment of the applicability of the current approaches to the non-perturbative sector of QCD. In this context the precision study of p+A interactions opens a new access to the scrutiny and understanding of multiple hadronic collisions concerning specifically detailed nuclear and isopin effects including strangeness. In addition these data may serve as a reference for neutrino and astro-particle physics. 1. C. Alt et al., Eur. Phys. J. C45 (2006) 343 2. T. Anticic et al., Eur. Phys. J. C65 (2010) 9 3. T. Anticic et al., Eur. Phys. J. C68 (2010) 1 4. C. Alt et al., Eur. Phys. J. C49 (2007) 897 5. G. Barr et al., Eur. Phys. J. C49 (2007) 919 6. B. Baatar et al., arXiv:1207.6520v1 [hep-ex] 7. O. Chvala et al., arXiv:1210.6775[nucl-ex] 8. p+C-> kaons to be published
        Speaker: Martin Makariev (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (BG))
        Slides
      • 12:44
        Slavnov-Taylor identity for the Effective Field Theory of the Color Glass Condensate 20m
        We show that a very powerful Slavnov-Taylor (ST) identity exists for the Effective Field Theory (EFT) of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC), allowing to control by purely algebraic means the full dependence on the background fields of the ultra-fast gluon modes, as well as the correlators of the quantum fluctuations of the classical gluon source. We use this formalism to study the change of the background ultra-fast modes (in the Coulomb gauge), induced by the quantum corrections of the semi-fast gluons; we also establish the evolution equation for the EFT of the CGC. This points towards an algebraic derivation of the JIMWLK evolution equation. Being based on symmetry-arguments only, the approach can be used to extend the analysis to arbitrary gauges and to higher orders in the perturbation expansion of the EFT.
        Speaker: Andrea Quadri (INFN, Sez. di Milano)
        Slides
    • 11:00 13:05
      Top and Electroweak Physics F2 (KTH Campus)

      F2

      KTH Campus

      • 11:00
        Measurement of the mass of the W boson at DØ 20m
        We present a measurement of the mass of the W boson using the D0 detector and the full Run II dataset. Decays of the W into e \nu are selected and the transverse momentum of the electron, the transverse momentum of the neutrino, the transverse mass of the system, and other new variables are considered in the extraction of the mass.
        Speaker: Tibor Kurca (Universite Claude Bernard-Lyon I (FR))
        Slides
      • 11:20
        Prospects in W mass measurement 15m
        We will review the present status in MW measurements, discussing the recent progress in the development of the Montecarlo generators used in the extraction of the mass value and commenting the role of the proton PDFs as one important source of systematic uncertainty.
        Speaker: Alessandro Vicini (Università degli Studi e INFN Milano (IT))
        Slides
      • 11:35
        Testing the closure of the Standard Model: Tera-Z and Oku-W's at TLEP 15m
        After the Higgs boson discovery by the LHC experiments at 126 GeV, the Standard Model has no free parameters left and measurements sensitive to Electroweak radiative corrections constitute powerful tests of the existence of weakly interacting New Physics beyond the TeV scale. TLEP is a high luminosity circular e+e- collider to be fit in a 80-100 km tunnel as precursor and companion of a 100 TeV pp collider (VHE-LHC), as part of a possible long term vision for HEP. The machine covers the energy range from the Z pole up to above the top quark pair threshold. Luminosity at 240GeV (Higgs factory) is 5.1034 /cm2/s at each of four collision points, yielding 2 Million Higgs decays in 5 years. Luminosity increases rapidly at lower energies, offering the prospects of 1012 Z bosons or 108 W pairs per year. Transverse beam polarization for exquisite beam energy calibration should be achievable at the Z pole and WW production threshold, and longitudinal polarization at the Z peak. As a result, many precision measurements and rare decays can be revisited. The Z mass and width can be measured to better than 100 keV, the W mass better than 1 MeV, the top quark mass to 30-100 MeV and the effective weak mixing angle at the Z pole to a few 10-6. Some of the associated experimental and theoretical challenges will be highlighted.
        Speaker: Alain Blondel (Universite de Geneve (CH))
        Slides
      • 11:50
        Vector-boson pair production at the LHC 25m
        Vector-boson pair production is of great phenomenological importance at the LHC. These processes not only constitute irreducible backgrounds SM Higgs production and various new physics signatures, they may also allow us to study the non-abelian structure of the SM at highest energies and provide the opportunity to search for anomalous couplings. In this talk we review the status of the corresponding theory predictions, where we focus on recent results on electroweak radiative corrections.
        Speaker: Tobias Kasprzik (KIT, Karlsruhe)
        Slides
      • 12:15
        Measurements of heavy flavour production in association with W and Z bosons with the ATLAS detector 15m
        The production of heavy flavour in association with a W or Z boson represents an important process to study QCD. High precision is achieved in measurements of differential cross sections and comparisons are made to state­of­the­art NLO QCD calculations. Measurement of W+c production cross section has a unique sensitivity to the strange­quark density, which is poorly known at low x. W+b production, on the other hand, probes the b­quark production by higher order QCD processes. Cross sections are measured differentially as a function of jet multiplicity and transverse momentum of the leading b­jet, for the W+b measurement and as a function of lepton pseudorapidity for the W+c measurement.
        Speaker: Ben Cooper (University of London (GB))
        Slides
      • 12:30
        W + Heavy Flavor Jet Measurements with CMS 15m
        Production and hadronization of heavy quarks (b and c) in association with the W boson in proton-proton collisions is only partially understood. Experimental measurements are necessary to choose amongst the phenomenological models and parameters. Using the LHC proton-proton collision data collected in 2011 at a centre of mass energy of 7 TeV, we present two studies (1) W+c production, where charm jet is identified by reconstruction of a secondary vertex with an identified charmed meson, or a muon-tagged jet and (2) W+bb production, where both b-jets are tagged by the secondary vertices. In both cases, the W-boson is tagged by the presence of one isolated lepton accompanied by missing transverse energy. A precise W+c measurement at the LHC may significantly reduce the uncertainties on the strange parton distribution function (PDF). A thorough understanding of the Wbb measurement is required to improve search for W-associated Higgs to bb production, or BSM searches in modes tagged by a W and a pair of b-jets.
        Speaker: Isabel Ojalvo (University of Wisconsin (US))
        Slides
      • 12:45
        Measurement of vector boson plus photon production with the ATLAS detector and associated constraints on new physics 15m
        The integrated and differential fiducial cross sections for the production of a W or Z boson in association with a highenergy photon are measured. Events are selected using leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons, including the Z->nu nu decay channel. The data are used to test the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and search for evidence for new phenomena. The measurements are used to probe anomalous triplegaugeboson couplings and to search for the production of vector resonances decaying to Zgamma and Wgamma.
        Speaker: Louis Helary (Boston University (US))
        Slides
    • 11:00 13:05
      Flavour Physics and fundamental symmetries D1 (KTH Campus)

      D1

      KTH Campus

      • 11:00
        Heavy flavour spectroscopy at LHCb 15m
        The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations by Belle and CDF. Using the data collected at pp collisions at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment we present studies of the X(3872) properties as well as preliminary studies and prospects for studies of putative states such as the Z(4430)+.
        Speaker: Giovanni Carboni (Roma 2)
        Slides
      • 11:15
        Studies of the properties and decays of the Bc meson at LHCb 15m
        Using the large data sample collected by the CERN LHCb experiment, we present studies of Bc mesons. The results include first observations of several new decay modes as well as high precision measurements of its properties.
        Speakers: Niels Tuning (Nikhef) , Niels Tuning (NIKHEF (NL))
        Slides
      • 11:30
        New particles at Belle 15m
        It has been nearly ten years since the narrow $X(3872)$ state has been discovered in charged $B$ decays by the Belle experiment and its nature still remains unclear. To provide further insight on its properties, we report the search for the $X(3872)$ in the decays $B \to X(3872) K \pi$, $X(3872) \to J/\psi \pi^+ \pi^-$. The analysis is based on full data sample collected at the $\Upsilon(4S)$ with the Belle detector at the KEKB collider.
        Speaker: Tomoko Iwashita (Nara Women's Univ.)
        Slides
      • 11:45
        Y(nS) decays and spectroscopy at Belle 15m
        We report the results of a study of 352 million $\Upsilon(4S)$ decays in which the final state $\eta \Upsilon(1S)$ is observed. We observe two transitions, $\Upsilon(4S) \to \eta \Upsilon(1S)$ and $\Upsilon(1D) \to \eta \Upsilon(1S)$. The results on a search for $\chi_b (3P)$ spin triplet bottomonium states are presented as well. The data are produced by the KEKB $e^+e^-$ collider and collected by the Belle detector.
        Speaker: Pavel Krokovny (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (RU))
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Recent results on exotic quarkonium physics at CMS 15m
        The large production cross-sections at LHC energies, combined with a adapted trigger strategy and good detector resolutions, has enabled CMS to collect large data samples and to perform detailed studies of Beauty hadron properties. In this talk we will report our latest results, including decay rate measurements from B hadrons, spectroscopy, and the asymmetries arises from B mixing, if they are approved in time.
        Speaker: Kai-Feng Chen (National Taiwan University (TW))
        Slides
      • 12:15
        Properties of b-hadrons with ATLAS 15m
        ATLAS has performed searches and accurate measurement of heavy hadrons, with results including the first observation of the chi_b(3P) Bottomonium states and the most accurate measurement of the Lambda_b lifetime. New results in this program are discussed, including searches for excited b-hadrons, and the study of parity violation in the decay Lambda_b into Lambda and J/psi.
        Speaker: John Baines (STFC - Science & Technology Facilities Council (GB))
        Slides
      • 12:30
        Spectroscopy of orbitally excited B mesons with the CDF detector 15m
        We present a measurement of the properties of orbitally excited L=1 B mesons, using 10/fb of data collected by the CDF II detector. The masses, widths and relative production ratio times the branching fraction of the observed decays are determined for the two states B_1$ and B_2^*. The measurement is performed for excited B^0, B^+ and B_s mesons separately.
        Speaker: Manuel Kambeitz
        Slides
      • 12:45
        Recent results from the BESIII experiment 15m
        The BESIII experiment has collected the world's largest samples of J/psi, psi', psi(3770), Y(4260) and Y(4360) decays and is producing a large amount of results in charmonium, light hadron, open charm and XYZ physics. An overview of the most recent results on charmonium decays, D meson decays, light hadron spectroscopy, and searches for XYZ states will be given along with an outlook to the physics perspectives.
        Speakers: Liaoyuan Dong (Institute of High Energy Physics) , liaoyuan dong (ihep)
        Slides
    • 11:00 13:05
      Astroparticle Physics D2 (KTH Campus)

      D2

      KTH Campus

      • 11:00
        Indirect Dark Matter Detection: Gamma Rays 30m
        The nature of dark matter (DM) remains obscure. On Earth, we have been unable to observe its production at high-energy facilities, and direct, matter-interaction signals are tentative at best. There are regions of the galaxy, however, where the DM density is expected to be many times greater than the local value. Weak self-interaction in such places that produces photons could be observable as an 'indirect detection.' Popular theories predict a high (hundreds of GeV) mass for the DM particle, which places the bulk of such radiation in the gamma-ray regime. Air Cherenkov detectors such as H.E.S.S. and VERITAS, along with the Fermi satellite, represent the state of the art in gamma-ray observation. I will review the current status of DM searches with these instruments, including constraints and possible signals.
        Speaker: Brandon Anderson (U)
        Slides
      • 11:30
        Latest Results on Searches for Dark Matter from IceCube 15m
        The cubic-kilometer sized IceCube neutrino observatory, constructed in the glacial ice at the South Pole, offers new opportunities for neutrino physics with its in-fill array "DeepCore". IceCube searches indirectly for dark matter via neutrinos from dark matter self-annihilations and has a high discovery potential through striking signatures. We report on the latest results from searches for dark matter self-annihilations in the Milky Way and signals from the Sun. The latter are sensitive to the WIMP-proton scattering cross section, which initiates the WIMP capture process in the Sun. The latest limits from a search with the 79-string configuration of IceCube for WIMP masses in the range 20–5000 GeV are the most stringent spin-dependent WIMP-proton cross section limits to date above 35 GeV for most WIMP models.
        Speaker: Matthias Danninger
        Slides
      • 11:45
        Deep survey of the Segue 1 dwarf spheroidal galaxy with the MAGIC Telescopes 15m
        Discovering the nature of dark matter is one of the most exciting tasks of modern science. Among the targets suitable for dark matter searches, dwarf spheroidal galaxies are considered to be excellent candidates and, among them, Segue 1 stands out with mass-to-light ratio estimated to order of 1000. We present the results of the first stereoscopic observations of Segue 1 with MAGIC Telescopes, carried out during 2011 and 2012. With 110 hours of good quality data, this is the deepest observational campaign on any dwarf galaxy carried so far by any Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope. The analysis of the data is performed using a dedicated likelihood approach, optimized for signals with characteristic spectral features. We search for dark matter particles with mass in the 100 GeV - 10 TeV range, considering theoretical scenarios with different final state Standard Model particles, annihilation with internal bremsstrahlung and monochromatic line signals.
        Speaker: Jelena Aleksic (IFAE)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Potential of LHC to determine the Dark Matter properties in IDM 15m
        We consider a scalar Dark Matter candidate from the Inert Doublet Model in the light of the discovery of the 125 GeV SM-like Higgs boson at LHC. Using the relic density constraints we explore potential of LHC to determine the properties of the Dark Matter particles independently on the direct and indirect DM detection experiments. Talk based on arXiv:1303.7102, 1212.4100, 1209.5725 and new ongoing analysis.
        Speaker: Dorota Sokolowska (University of Warsaw)
        Slides
      • 12:15
        Microwave background and neutrino telescope likelihoods for global fits, and implications for the MSSM 15m
        A deal of recent effort has gone into creating generic astroparticle likelihood functions that can be directly included in global fits to Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) theories. I will detail new generalised constraints from the cosmic microwave background on dark matter annihilation into any combination of SM particles, and discuss methods for including event-level data from neutrino searches for dark matter annihilation in the Sun. Finally, I will show some of the implications of these searches for supersymmetry in the 25-parameter weak-scale miminmal supersymmetric SM (MSSM-25).
        Speaker: Pat Scott (McGill University)
        Slides
      • 12:30
        Vector dark matter and Fermi LAT gamma ray line 15m
        We propose a model for vector dark matter with an extra U(1) gauge symmetry broken by the VEV of a complex singlet scalar. Due to the mixing between the singlet scalar and the Standard Model Higgs doublet, the relic density of vector dark matter can be consisitent. The model may contain a charged scalar. the annihilation of vector dark matter into two photons can be sizable enough to account for the excess of the Fermi-LAT gamma ray line.
        Speaker: Osamu Seto
        Slides
      • 12:45
        Constraining dark matter capture and annihilation cross sections by searching for neutrino signature from the Earth core 15m
        We study the sensitivity of IceCube/DeepCore detector to dark matter (DM) annihilations in the Earth core. We focus on annihilation modes DM DM-->nu anti-nu, tau^+ tau^-, b anti-b, and W^+W^-. Both track and cascade events are considered in our analysis. By fixing the DM annihilation cross section at some nominal values, we study the sensitivity of IceCube/DeepCore detector to DM spin-independent capture cross section for a DM mass range from few tens of GeV to 10 TeV. This sensitivity is compared with the existing IceCube 79 string constraint on the same cross section , which was obtained by searching for DM annihilations in the Sun. We also compare this sensitivity to DM direct detection results, in particular the XENON 100 (2012) limit and the parameter regions by DAMA and CRESST-II experiments. We also present IceCube/DeepCore sensitivity to DM annihilation cross section as a function of DM mass by fixing DM spin-independent capture cross section at XENON 100 (2012) and XENON 1T limits. This sensitivity is compared with the preferred DM parameter range derived from the combined fitting to PAMELA and AMS02 positron fraction data. We conclude that the search for DM annihilations in the Earth core provides competitive constraints on DM capture and annihilation cross sections in the case of low-mass DM.
        Speaker: Guey-Lin Lin (National Chiao-Tung University)
        Slides
    • 11:00 13:05
      Higgs and New Physics F1 (KTH)

      F1

      KTH

      • 11:00
        Title: Measurement of Properties of the Higgs boson in the ZZ (4l) and WW (lnln) channels using the ATLAS detector 17m
        Abstract: A detailed review of the latest results on the main properties of the Higgs boson in the ZZ-­?to-­?four-­?leptons and in the WW to lnulnu channels, with the ATLAS detector using approximately 25 fb-­?1 of pp collision data collected at 7 TeV and 8 TeV in 2011 and 2012, is given. The measurements discussed are the mass, couplings, and in the four-­?leptons channel through various production processes.
        Speaker: Douglas Michael Schaefer (University of Pennsylvania (US))
        Slides
      • 11:20
        The study for a Higgs boson decaying into ZZ to four charged leptons and into WW in the final states of two leptons and two neutrinos in CMS 17m
        The most recent CMS results on the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the ZZ channel, where the Z bosons decay into two charged leptons each (including taus), and in the WW channel, where the W bosons decay into two leptons and two neutrinos, using the full dataset recorded at the LHC from pp collisions at center of masss energies of 7 and 8 TeV, will be presented. The measured Higgs boson properties, such as the mass and spin, will be discussed.
        Speaker: Cristina Botta (CERN)
        Slides
      • 11:40
        The study of a Higgs decaying into two photons in CMS 12m
        The most recent CMS results on the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the two photon channel, using the full dataset recorded at the LHC from pp collisions at centre of mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, will be presented. The measured Higgs boson properties, such as the mass and spin, will be discussed.
        Speaker: Mauro Donega (Eidgenoessische Tech. Hochschule Zuerich (CH))
        Slides
      • 11:55
        Measurement of Properties of the Higgs boson in the diphoton channel using the ATLAS detector 12m
        Abstract: A detailed review of the latest results on the main properties of the Higgs boson in the diphoton channel, with the ATLAS detector using approximately 25 fb-­?1 of pp collision data collected at 7 TeV and 8 TeV in 2011 and 2012, is given. The measurements discussed are the mass, couplings, and in the diphoton channel through various production processes.
        Speaker: Mr. Jean-Baptiste De Vivie De Regie (Universite de Paris-Sud 11 (FR))
        Slides
      • 12:10
        Higgs at Last 12m
        We analyze the experimental constraints on the parameters of the Higgs effective Lagrangian. We combine the most recent LHC Higgs data in all available search channels with electroweak precision observables from SLC, LEP-1, LEP-2 and the Tevatron.
        Speaker: Dr. Alfredo Urbano (SISSA)
        Slides
      • 12:25
        Search for the Higgs boson and spin/parity studies of the Higgs-like particle at 125 GeV massat with D0 17m
        We present the combination of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV, using the full Run 2 dataset collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The major contributing processes include associated production (WH or ZH) and gluon fusion (gg->H), in which the Higgs boson further decays to two bottom quarks, two photons or two weak vector bosons. Both leptonic and hadronic decays of the weak bosons are considered. We also present searches for the Higgs boson in events with l+tau+X, where l=e,mu and tau is a tau-lepton with a decay including hadrons, as well as a search for neutral supersymmetric Higgs bosons in the bh->bbb and bbh->bbbb final states. The significant improvements across the full mass range resulting from the larger data sets, improved analyses and inclusion of additional channels are discussed. We further present tests of different spin and parity hypotheses for a particle H of mass 125 GeV produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a pair of b-quarks. We use the combined analysis of the WH-->lvbb, ZH-->vvbb, and ZH-->llbb channels using the full Run 2 dataset collected at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.
        Speaker: Kenneth Richard Herner (University of Michigan (US))
        Slides
      • 12:45
        Searches for Higgs and Higgs-like particles at LHCb 12m
        The LHCb detector is a forward single arm spectrometer designed primarily for the study of CP-violation and other rare phenomena in the decays of beauty and charm particles. LHCb is very powerful in probing New Physics by performing indirect searches. Nevertheless, a program of direct searches for Higgs and Higgs-like particles also exists. Here we present some recent results and perspectives.
        Speaker: Marcin Kucharczyk (Universita & INFN, Milano-Bicocca (IT))
        Slides
    • 11:00 13:05
      QCD: Jet Physics (I) E1 (KTH Campus)

      E1

      KTH Campus

      • 11:00
        Properties of the jet production in pp collisions measured with the ATLAS detector 15m
        Several aspects of the jet production in pp collisions have been measured by the ATLAS collaboration. Measurements of multi­jet systems, including heavy flavour production, with or without a veto on additional jets, probe QCD radiation effects. A measurement of the inclusive multiplicity ratio is sensitive to the strong coupling constant alpha_S and has reduced sensitivity to the uncertainties due to parton distribution functions. Measurements of jets containing charm and beauty hadrons are also presented. Measurement of splitting scales in the kt clustering algorithm using jets from W+jet events provide a way to investigate jet clustering at different resolution scales. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime, overall a good agreement with QCD expectations is observed.
        Speaker: Sanya Solodkov (Institute for High Energy Physics (RU))
        Slides
      • 11:15
        Jet performance in CMS 15m
        Calibration and reconstruction of jets critically rely on the performance of the calorimeters. Extending from out to $\eta < 5$, jets must critically rely on the interplay between forward calorimeters, central calorimeters and the tracker. The high pileup scenario poses further complications. These difficulties are overcome in CMS using the "particle flow approach". A summary of the measurements of the jet energy calibration in CMS is presented, performed with data samples collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 12.1/fb. The final jet energy calibration is based on dijet, γ+jet and Z+jet events. The effect of pile-up interactions and the state of the art mitigation techniques used in CMS and we describe the main sources of uncertainty on the jet energy calibration.
        Speaker: Mr. Henning Kirschenmann (Hamburg University (DE))
        Slides
      • 11:30
        Integrand reduction at NLO and beyond 15m
        I will present a novel approach for reduction of scattering amplitudes, based on multivariate polynomial division. This technique extends the one-loop integrand reduction yielding the complete integrand decomposition for arbitrary amplitudes,regardless of the number of loops. It allows for the determination of the residue at any multi-particle cut, whose knowledge is a mandatory prerequisite for applying the integrand-reduction procedure. The method relies on the division modulo Groebner basis, and leads to a simple integrand recurrence relation generating the multi-particle pole decomposition for arbitrary multi-loop amplitudes. Applications at one and two loops will be discussed as well.
        Speaker: Tiziano Peraro (Max Planck Institute for Physics - Munich)
        Slides
      • 11:45
        Studies of jet shapes and substructure with ATLAS 15m
        The internal structure of jets produced at the LHC is important both as a direct test of perturbative QCD and as a tool to identify boosted electroweak­scale objects decaying to hadrons. The transverse energy distribution around the jet core has been measured, as well as the fragmentation of a jet into charged particles. Jet shapes, single­jet masses, and jet substructure have the potential to identify jets coming from massive, boosted particles decaying hadronically, such as vector bosons. Techniques have also been developed for reducing the sensitivity of jet physics to soft QCD and to multiple proton­proton collisions. A selection of such variables is measured and compared to a range of QCD calculations and phenomenological models.
        Speaker: Peter Loch (University of Arizona (US))
        Slides
      • 12:00
        CMS results on boosted-objects & jet substructure 15m
        Speaker: Alexander Schmidt (University of Hamburg)
        Slides
      • 12:15
        Tools for calculations in color space 15m
        Both the higher energy and the initial state colored partons contribute to making exact calculations in QCD color space more important at the LHC than at its predecessors. This is applicable whether the method of assessing QCD is fixed order calculation, resummation, or parton showers. In this talk I will discuss tools for tackling the problem of performing exact color summed calculations. I will start with "theoretical tools" in the form of the (standard) trace bases and the orthogonal multiplet bases (for which a general method of construction was recently presented). Following this, I will focus on two new packages for performing color structure calculations: one easy to use Mathematica package, ColorMath, and one C++ package, ColorFull, which is suitable for more demanding calculations, and for interfacing with event generators.
        Speaker: Malin Sjodahl (Lund University)
        Slides
      • 12:30
        Charged jet spectra in proton-proton collisions with the ALICE experiment at the LHC 15m
        Jets are collimated sprays of particles resulting from fragmentation of associated hard scattered partons. They are measured in different types of collisions at different energies to test perturbative Quantum Chromodynamic calculations and are used to study the hard scattering, fragmentation, hadronisation and other properties of partons. These properties studied in simple systems such as proton-proton collisions, serve as a baseline to investigate their modifications by hot and dense nuclear matter created in high energy heavy-ion collisions. We have analysed data from minimum bias proton-proton collisions at \sqrt{s} of 2.76 and 7 TeV collected using the ALICE detector system at the LHC and reconstructed the inclusive jet cross-section from charged tracks at midrapidity. We present jet spectra reconstructed using modern anti-k_T and k_T algorithms with underlying event subtraction and correction for detector effects via unfolding and its systematics study for both energies. Furthermore, results from fragmentation function analyses and jet shape observables are shown. All results are compared with other experimental results and with Monte Carlo generators.
        Speaker: Michal Vajzer (Acad. of Sciences of the Czech Rep. (CZ))
        Slides
      • 12:45
        Soft-gluon resummations and NNNLO expansions 15m
        I discuss the effectiveness of soft-gluon resummations in desribing higher-order corrections. I present a comparison of recent resummation approaches and their relative successes in approximating complete NNLO corrections. I also discuss fixed-order expansions through NNNLO and present some recent applications to QCD hard-scattering processes.
        Speaker: Nikolaos Kidonakis (Kennesaw State University)
        Slides
    • 13:05 14:30
      Lunch 1h 25m
    • 14:30 16:00
      Astroparticle Physics D2 (KTH Campus)

      D2

      KTH Campus

      • 14:30
        Status of Direct Dark Matter Detection with Cryogenic Detectors 30m
        Latest results from precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) indicate that about a quarter of the Universe consists of Dark Matter (DM). Well motivated particle candidates to account for DM are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) which should be directly detectable in ultra-low background experiments on Earth. After a brief introduction to the field of Dark Matter physics and the direct detection approach this talk will give an overview on the most important direct DM search experiments with special emphasis on those using low-temperature solid state detectors as well as liquid noble gas detectors. In this context the present results of the various DM searches will be discussed and future perspectives in the field will be presented.
        Speaker: Jean-Côme Lanfranchi (T)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Recent Results from the XENON Experiment 15m
        The XENON100 experiment is a direct dark matter search experiment using a dual-phase xenon time projection chamber situated at the Laborati Nazionali de Gran Sasso (LNGS) underground laboratory. Due to its ultra-low background level it has been able to set the most stringent excluding level for the cross-section of scattering of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) off nucleons. In this talk new results on spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon scattering interactions, as well as precise studies of the low energy response to nuclear recoils will be presented. In addition the status of the ongoing measurements and the next generation XENON1T detector will be briefly described.
        Speaker: Ms. Annika Behrens (University of Zurich)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Semi-annihilating scalar dark matter 15m
        Scalar dark matter models invariant under a discrete Z_3 or Z_4 symmetry are studied. Unlike in the usual Z_2 case, their phenomenology can contain semi-annihilations -- processes in which two dark sector particles scatter into a dark sector and a SM particle. The simplest such model has complex scalar singlet DM stabilised by Z_3. Compared to the well-known Z_2 case, the new processes can significantly change relic abundance and prospects for direct detection. The requirement that Z_3 be not broken spontaneously, however, places a lower bound on the direct detection cross section and will allow the whole parameter space to be tested by XENON1T. Addition of new scalars can stabilise the Higgs potential up to the GUT scale. In case of the Z_4 symmetry the minimal model with semi-annihilation contains an inert doublet in addition to the singlet, and dark matter can be two-component.
        Speaker: Kristjan Kannike (Nat. Inst. of Chem.Phys. & Biophys. (EE))
        Slides
      • 15:30
        The CAST experiment: results and perspectives 15m
        The status of the solar axion search with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) will be discussed. Recent results from the second part of CAST phase II where the magnet bores were filled with 3He gas at variable pressure achieving sensibilities on the axion mass up to 1.2 eV will be presented. In the next two years CAST is expecting to improve sensitivity to solar axions with rest mass below 0.02 eV/c^2 by upgrading the X-ray detectors and by the implementation of a second X-ray optic. Expected goals and sensibilities will be given. At a longer term, the fourth generation of axion helioscope aims to improve the current axion-photon coupling by 1-1.5 order of magnitudes. This will be possible by building a dedicated magnet and dedicated optics and X-ray detectors.
        Speaker: Mr. Theopisti Dafni (Universidad de Zaragoza (ES))
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Impact of axion-like particles on observations with IACTs 15m
        Very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays undergo pair production with low energy photons of background radiation fields. This leads to an attenuation of the primary gamma-ray flux of extragalactic sources in the interaction with the extragalactic background light which stretches from ultraviolet to far-infrared wavelengths. In the presence of magnetic fields, gamma-rays could oscillate into hypothetical axion-like particles (ALPs). This might lead to a reduced opacity of the Universe for VHE gamma-rays, as ALPs circumvent pair production. Here, the impact of photon-ALP conversions on blazar spectra in different magnetic-field configurations is presented. Possible photon-ALP couplings are derived if evidences of a low opacity of the Universe for VHE gamma-rays are interpreted within ALP scenarios.
        Speaker: Manuel Meyer (University of Hamburg)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ions E2 (KTH Campus)

      E2

      KTH Campus

      • 14:30
        Heavy flavour production in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 2.76 TeV with the ALICE detector 16m
        Hadrons containing heavy flavours are unique probes of the properties of the hot and dense QCD medium produced in heavy ion collisions. Due to their large masses, heavy quarks are produced at the initial stage of the collision, almost exclusively via hard partonic scattering processes. Therefore, they are expected to experience the full collision history propagating through and interacting with the QCD medium. The parton energy loss, which is sensitive to the transport coefficients of the produced medium, can be studied experimentally by measuring the nuclear modification factor (R$_{AA}$) which accounts for the modification of the heavy flavoured hadron yield in Pb-Pb with respect to pp. In semi-central collisions, the degree of thermalization of charm quarks in the QCD medium can be accessed via the measurement of the heavy flavour elliptic flow $v_2$ at low p$_T$. At high p$_T$, $v_2$ is sensitive to the path length dependence of heavy quark in-medium energy loss. The ALICE collaboration has measured the production of open heavy flavour hadrons via their hadronic and semi-leptonic decays at mid-rapidity and in the semi-muonic decay channel at forward rapidity in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at $\sqrt{s}$ = 7 and 2.76 TeV and at $\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV respectively. In this talk the latest results on open heavy flavour R$_{AA}$ and $v_2$ will be presented.
        Speaker: Alessandro Grelli (University of Utrecht (NL))
        Slides
      • 14:46
        Open charm hadron production in $p+p$ and Au+Au collisions at STAR 16m
        In relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC, heavy quarks are expected to be created from initial hard scatterings. Their large masses are not easily affected by the strong interaction with QCD medium, thus they carry clean information from the system at early stage. The interaction between heavy quarks and the medium is sensitive to the medium dynamics, therefore heavy quarks are suggested as an ideal probe to quantify the properties of the strongly interacting QCD matter. In this talk, we will present the STAR results of open charm hadron production at mid-rapidity in $p+p$ and Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV. Open charm mesons were reconstructed directly via hadronic decay channels with daughter particles identified by TPC and TOF detectors. With abundant statistics of Au+Au collisions collected by STAR in the year 2010 and 2011, the D-meson is measured at $p_T$ from 0.2 to 6 GeV/c in minimum bias Au+Au collisions. The centrality dependence of D-meson $p_T$ spectra as well as the nuclear modification factor will be presented. A first measurement of the $D^{0}$ elliptic flow in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions will be reported. These measurements are compared to theoretical model calculations and physics implications will be discussed. Finally, we will discuss the open charm hadron measurement in $\sqrt{s}=500$ GeV $p+p$ collisions to study the energy dependence of charm production.
        Speaker: Mr. David Tlusty (NPI ASCR)
        Slides
      • 15:02
        The measurement of non-photonic electrons in STAR 16m
        Hot and dense matter in which quarks and gluons are deconfined is created in heavy-ion collisons at RHIC. The properties of this strongly interacting matter, Quark-Gluon Plasma, could be studied using heavy quarks, namely charm and bottom. Due to their large masses, they are produced during the initial phase of heavy ion collisions via gluon fusion. Non-photonic electrons (NPE) are mainly produced by semileptonic decays of charmed and bottomed hadrons, hence the study of NPE in hadron-hadron and ion-ion collisions provides the information about heavy quarks production as well as the medium properties. The nuclear modification factor of NPE measured in central Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV at STAR is comparable to that of light hadrons. NPE $v_2$ measurement is necessary to distinguish between different energy loss scenarios and can be a good proxy to reveal heavy flavor collectivity, which can improve our understanding of the medium thermalization. This talk presents the recent STAR measurements of NPE $p_T$ spectrum, and its suppression in Au+Au $\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV, and azimuthal anisotropy at $\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV. The analysis status for d+Au collisions will also be reported.
        Speaker: Olga Hajkova (C)
        Slides
      • 15:18
        Heavy Quarks in Heavy-Ion Collisions 20m
        The heavy charm and bottom quarks and the associated open heavy-flavor mesons (D and B) are a valuable probe for the interactions in the hot and dense medium created in heavy-ion collisions. They are produced in the primordial hard collisions of partons within the nuclei and then traverse the hot and dense partonic (QGP) and hadronic (hadron gas) medium, which shows collective behavior, describable as flow of a nearly ideal fluid. This implies a fast thermalization and a strong coupling of the QGP. Due to their larger mass the heavy quarks are expected to be less equilibrated and thus the pT spectra (nuclear modification factor R_AA) and elliptic flow v_2 of open heavy-flavor mesons and "non-photonic electrons" from their semileptonic decay provide important insight about the coupling mechanisms of heavy quarks/open heavy-flavor mesons with the medium. This is investigated with help of Fokker-Planck/Langevin simulations of heavy quarks in a realistic bulk-medium background described with help of the UrQMD-hydro-hybrid model. The comparison of the results concerning R_AA and v_2 of D-mesons as well as non-photonic electrons with these simulations provide some information about the possible microscopic interaction mechanisms within the hot and dense medium responsible for the strong coupling of the medium and its early thermalization.
        Speaker: Hendrik van Hees (Goethe University Frankfurt)
        Slides
      • 15:38
        Prospects for heavy-flavour measurements in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC with the new ALICE inner tracker 16m
        The ALICE experiment at the LHC studies Pb-Pb, pp, and p-Pb collisions with the aim of investigating the properties of the high-density state of strongly-interacting matter, expected to be produced in Pb-Pb collisions. Heavy quarks are sensitive probes to test the medium transport properties and its degree of thermalization since they are formed at shorter time scale with respect to the deconfined state. The present heavy-flavour measurements in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC show a large suppression of D meson production at high transverse momentum pT in central collisions and a non-zero elliptic flow in semi-central collisions. Those measurement are limited by the large combinatorial background especially in the low pT region, which is most interesting. The measurement of heavy-flavour baryon production is sensitive to the heavy quark hadronization mechanism. This measurement is difficult to be achieved with the current tracking resolution due to the small displacement (tens of microns for the case of the Λc) of the decay tracks from the primary vertex. The new Inner Tracking System (ITS) will be composed of 7 layers of silicon detectors with a material budget as low as 0.3% of the radiation length per layer. The tracking spatial resolution will improve by a factor 3 (5) in the transverse (longitudinal) direction. The new ITS together with the upgraded readout systems of the other central barrel detectors, will allow ALICE to record Pb-Pb events at a rate 100 times higher than with the current detectors, thus fully exploiting the increased Pb-Pb interaction rate provided by LHC after 2018. These upgrades will open the possibility to separate charm and beauty, measuring B mesons, Λb and Λc baryons in their charged decay channels down to pT ~2 GeV/c, in addition to D mesons down to zero pT. New studies about the heavy-flavour content of jets are also being addressed. The main features of the inner tracker upgrade and the expected performance for heavy flavour measurements will be presented.
        Speaker: Chiara Bianchin (University of Utrecht (NL))
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Top and Electroweak Physics F2 (KTH Campus)

      F2

      KTH Campus

      • 14:30
        Vector boson plus photon production at CMS 15m
        We present studies of diboson production in pp collisions at 7 TeV and 8 TeV center-of-mass energy based on data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC in 2011 and 2012. These include precise measurements of W and Z production in association with a photon, as well as diphoton production. The results are interpreted in terms of constraints on anomalous triple gauge couplings.
        Speaker: Chia-Ming Kuo (National Central University (TW))
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Measurement of WW production with the ATLAS detector and constraints on associated triple gauge couplings 15m
        The measurement of the WW diboson production cross section in protonproton interactions is reported from the ATLAS experiment. The analysis requires heavy bosons to decay leptonically, using ee, emu and mumu final states associated with large missing energy. The data are used to test the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and search for evidence for new phenomena. The cross section results are first obtained in phase space regions defined by the decay kinematics and then extrapolated to the full phase space. Differential and total cross sections for WW production are compared to NLO predictions of the standard model and used to place constraints on anomalous triplegaugeboson couplings.
        Speaker: Jianbei Liu (Univ. of Science & Tech. of China (CN))
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Measurement of WZ production with the ATLAS detector and constraints on associated triple gauge couplings 15m
        The measurement of the WZ diboson production cross section in 7 and 8 TeV protonproton interactions is reported from the ATLAS experiment. The measurement is derived from events in which bosons decay leptonically with electrons, muons, and missing energy in the final state. The data are used to test the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and search for evidence for new phenomena. The cross section results are first obtained in phase space regions defined by the decay kinematics and then extrapolated to the full phase space. Differential and total cross sections for WZ production are compared to NLO predictions of the standard model and used to place constraints on anomalous triplegaugeboson couplings.
        Speaker: Advait Neel Nagarkar (Ohio State University (US))
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Measurement of ZZ production with the ATLAS detector and constraints on associated triple gauge couplings 15m
        The measurement of the ZZ diboson production cross section in 7 and 8 TeV protonproton interactions is reported from the ATLAS experiment. The measurement is derived using purely leptonically decaying bosons with electrons, muons, and missing energy in the final state. The data are used to test the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and search for evidence for new phenomena. The cross section results are first obtained in phase space regions defined by the decay kinematics and then extrapolated to the full phase space. Differential and total cross sections for ZZ production are compared to NLO predictions of the standard model and used to place constraints on anomalous triplegaugeboson couplings.
        Speaker: Andrea Bocci (Duke University (US))
        Slides
      • 15:30
        WW, WZ, and ZZ production at CMS 15m
        We present studies of diboson production in pp collisions at 7 TeV and 8 TeV center-of-mass energy based on data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC in 2011 and 2012. These include precise measurements of WW, WZ, and ZZ production at the LHC. The results are interpreted in terms of constraints on anomalous triple gauge couplings.
        Speaker: Jordi Duarte Campderros (Universidad de Cantabria (ES))
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Measurements of WW, ZZ cross section and search for anomalous quartic gauge couplings at D0 15m
        We present measurements of WW and ZZ production cross sections, and anomalous quartic gauge couplings in p\bar{p} collisions at 1.96 TeV with Run II data from 8.6 fb−1 to 9.9 fb−1 collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. In the WW cross section measurement, the WW -> ee + MET, WW -> \mu\mu + MET, and WW -> e\mu + MET decay channels are used to measure the total and differential cross sections for WW production. The measured cross section is consistent with the standard model expectation and differential cross section measurements provide additional information to test higher order predictions. In the ZZ cross section measurement, we examine the final states eeee, ee\mu\mu, and \mu\mu\mu\mu. Based on selected data the measured cross section for ZZ is consistent with the standard model expectation. We extend these results to search for the standard model Higgs boson between 115 and 200 GeV. We also present a search for anomalous quartic gauge couplings (\gamma\gamma WW) using a sample of di-electron events with large missing energy. No excess above the SM background has been observed and limits on the anomalous parameters a_0^W and a_C^W are extracted.
        Speaker: Sudeshna Banerjee (Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research (IN))
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Flavour Physics and fundamental symmetries D1 (KTH Campus)

      D1

      KTH Campus

      • 14:30
        Bounding hadronic uncertainties in c to u decays 15m
        Time-dependent CP asymmetry measurements in D to h^+h^- decays, where h=pi or rho can be used to constrain the angle beta_c of the cu unitarity triangle up to theoretical uncertainties. Here we discuss the theoretical uncertainty from penguin contributions that can be mitigated through the use of isospin analyses. We show that uncertainty from penguin pollution on a measurement of beta_c in D^0 to pi^+pi^-$ (rho^+rho^-) decays is 2.7 deg (4.6 deg). We also comment on the applicability of this method to rho pi decays.
        Speaker: Adrian Bevan (University of London (GB))
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Improved tests for CP violation in charm decays 15m
        LHCb experiment over a year ago, opened up a new avenue to investigate the phenomena of CP violation via their first observation of direct CP asymmetry in $D^0 \to \pi^+ \pi ^-$ and to $K^+ K^-$. This observation, though, presents a serious new challenge for theorists, as reliable, quantitative calculations for D decays to hadronic final states are extremely difficult since the charm mass is neither light enough for ChPT or heavy enough for heavy quark effective theory to work. Bearing those difficulties in mind, CP violation in charm decays is further studied in light of more recent experimental results and also incorporating new theoretical developments, in particular from improved understanding from the lattice for the origin of the Delta I=1/2 enhancement. Decisive tests for distinguishing new physics contribution from the SM will be emphasized. The talk will be based primarily on three recent papers, arXiv:1202.3795; arXiv:1211.1026 and arXiv:1212.1474.
        Speaker: Amarjit Soni (BNL)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        SU(3)_F in nonleptonic charm decays 15m
        We give a comprehensive treatment of SU(3)$_F$ breaking in nonleptonic charm decays without theory bias aiming at a clean interpretation of CP-asymmetries including $\Delta A_{CP}$. We show how reasonable input from QCD factorization sharpens the SU(3)$_F$ fit.
        Speaker: Stefan Schacht (TU Dortmund)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Studies of charm mixing and CP violation at LHCb 15m
        LHCb has collected the world's largest sample of charmed hadrons. This sample is used to search for direct and indirect CP violation in charm, and to measure D0 mixing parameters. Preliminary measurements from several decay modes are presented, with complementary time-dependent and time-integrated analyses.
        Speaker: Carla Gobel Burlamaqui De Mello (Pontificia Universidade Catolica (BR))
        Slides
      • 15:30
        CP violation in charm decays at Belle 15m
        We report the measurements of mixing parameter $y_{CP}$, of a CP violating parameter $A_\Gamma$ and of a time integrated CP asymmetries $A_{CP}$ in decays $D^0 \to K^+ K^-$ and $\pi^+\pi^-$ using the Belle final data sample of 976 fb$^{-1}$.
        Speaker: Byeong Rok Ko
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Measurement of D0 D0bar mixing with CDF 15m
        The full CDF Run II data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.3/fb of proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV, is used to measure the time-dependent ratio of decay rate for D0 -> K+ pi- to that for D0 -> K-pi+. The ratio is used to determine the mixing parameters R_D, x'^2, and y', and the significance of excluding the no-mixing hypothesis x' = y' = 0.
        Speaker: Jonathan Lewis (Fermilab)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Higgs and New Physics F1 (KTH Campus)

      F1

      KTH Campus

      • 14:30
        Search for heavy resonances decaying to top quarks 12m
        In many models of physics beyond the Standard Model the coupling of new physics to third generation quarks is enhanced. We present a review of searches for heavy particles beyond the standard model decaying to final states with top and bottom quarks. This includes searches for heavy gauge bosons and excited states. Several final states originating from the top are considered and the event reconstruction is optimized accordingly. We use data collected with the CMS experiment during the year 2012, in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV.
        Speaker: Roman Kogler (Hamburg University (DE))
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Searches for ttbar resonances with the ATLAS detector 12m
        Being the heaviest fermion various extensions of the Standard Model predict new Physics to couple first to the top quark. The talk presents results from searches for new resonances decaying to a top-antitop pair, including the use of boosted top quark reconstruction techniques. In addition we will review searches for b* resonances decaying to a W boson and a single top quark as well as W', a heavy gauge boson, which decays to a top and a b quarks These searches use the data sample recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.
        Speakers: Diedi Hu (Columbia University (US)) , Diedi Hu (Columbia University (US))
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Search for exotic heavy top and bottom quark partners with CMS 12m
        We present searches for massive top and bottom quark partners at CMS using data collected at sqrt(s)=7 and 8 TeV. Such partners can be found in models predicting (vector-like) quarks to solve the Hierarchy problem and stabilize the Higgs mass. The searches span a range of final states, from multi-leptonic to entirely hadronic, and limits are set on mass and production cross sections as a function of branching ratios.
        Speaker: Devdatta Majumder (National Taiwan University (TW))
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Searches for fourth generation vector-like quarks with the ATLAS detector 12m
        Various extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of new types of quarks. We report on several search channels such as vector-like quarks decaying to a Higgs boson and a top quark or to a gauge boson and a b quark. Some of the search channels contain decays to top quarks, including the use of boosted top quark reconstruction techniques. These searches use the data sample recorded in 2012 at sqrt(s)=8 TeV centre-of-mass energy by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.
        Speaker: Antonella Succurro (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ES))
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Search for resonant diboson production with the ATLAS detector 12m
        The study of electroweak boson pair production is a powerful test of the spontaneously broken gauge symmetry of the Standard Model (SM) and can be used to search for phenomena beyond the SM. Heavy particles decaying to gauge boson pairs are predicted by many scenarios of new physics, including Extra Dimensions, and Technicolor models. We present generic searches for a heavy particle decaying to a pair of boson. The talk presents results from searches done in several gauge bosons decay channels collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC with sqrt(s) = 8 TeV.
        Speaker: Viviana Cavaliere (Univ. Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (US))
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Searches for heavy resonances decaying to pairs of massive vector bosons 12m
        We present results of searches for heavy BSM resonances decaying to pairs of SM bosons, including W's, Z's, and h's at sqrt(s)=8 TeV. Several new physics scenarios predict the existence of BSM resonances that decay with high branching ratio to pairs of bosons, including extra dimensions and composite Higgs models. Several final states are consider including WW, WZ, ZZ, and hh. Jet grooming techniques are used to reconstruct merged dijet resonances and increase the acceptance for TeV resonances.
        Speaker: Andreas Hinzmann (CERN)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      QCD: Deep-inelastic scattering (I) E1 (KTH Campus)

      E1

      KTH Campus

      • 14:30
        Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at High Q2 with Longitudinally Polarised Lepton Beams at HERA 17m
        Inclusive e\pmp single and double differential cross sections for neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering processes are measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The data were taken at a centre-of-mass energy of \surds = 319GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 333.7 pb-1 shared between two lepton beam charges and two longitudinal lepton polarisation modes. The differential cross sections are measured in the range of negative fourmomentum transfer squared, Q2, between 60 and 50 000GeV2, and Bjorken x between 0.0008 and 0.65. The measurements are combined with earlier published unpolarised H1 data to improve statistical precision and used to determine the structure function xF_3^gammaZ. A measurement of the neutral current parity violating structure function F_2^gammaZ is presented for the first time. The polarisation dependence of the charged current total cross section is also measured. The new measurements are well described by a next-to-leading order QCD fit based on all published H1 inclusive cross section data which are used to extract the parton distribution functions of the proton.
        Speaker: Zhiqing Philippe Zhang (Universite de Paris-Sud 11 (FR))
        Slides
      • 14:47
        Combination and QCD Analysis of Charm Production Cross Section Measurements in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA 17m
        Measurements of open charm production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations are combined. Reduced cross sections sigma_red^{c\bar{c}} for charm production are obtained in the kinematic range of photon virtuality 2.5 < Q2 < 2000 GeV2 and Bjorken scaling variable 0.00003 < x < 0.05. The combination method accounts for the correlations of the systematic uncertainties among the different data sets. The combined charm data together with the combined inclusive deep-inelastic scattering cross sections from HERA are used as input for a detailed NLO QCD analysis to study the influence of different heavy flavour schemes on the parton distribution functions. The optimal values of the charm mass as a parameter in these different schemes are obtained. The implications on the NLO predictions for W^{\pm} and Z production cross sections at the LHC are investigated. Using the fixed flavour number scheme, the running mass of the charm quark is determined.
        Speaker: Katerina Lipka (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
        Slides
      • 15:04
        Measurement of charm production in DIS with D mesons and extraction of F2cc 17m
        Charm production in deep inelastic ep scattering was measured with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. Charm quarks were identified by reconstructing D+ mesons in the D+ -- > K- π+π+ decay channel. Lifetime information was used to reduce combinatorial background substantially. Differential cross sections were measured in the kinematic region 5 < Q2 < 1000 GeV2, 0.02 < y < 0.7, 1.5 < p_T(D+)<15 GeV and |eta(D+)| < 1.6, where Q2 is the photon virtuality, y is the inelasticity, and p_T(D+) and eta(D+) are the transverse momentum and the pseudorapidity of the D+ meson, respectively. Next-to- leading-order QCD predictions are compared to the data. The charm contribution, F2cc, to the proton structure-function F2 was extracted.
        Speaker: Massimo Corradi (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 15:21
        Isolated photons+jet in DIS 17m
        Isolated-photon+jet production in ep collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of up to 300 pb-1. Measurements of prompt-photon+jet cross sections are presented as functions of the photon transverse energy and pseudorapidity in a wide range of exchanged-photon virtuality. In addition, differential gamma+jet cross sections are presented as functions of the jet transverse energy and pseudorapidity. Leading- logarithm parton-shower Monte Carlo predictions and perturbative QCD calculations were compared to the data.
        Speaker: Dr. Peter John Bussey (University of Glasgow (GB))
        Slides
      • 15:38
        High Precision DIS with the LHeC 22m
        The Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) is a proposed facility which will exploit the new world of energy and intensity offered by the LHC through collisions with a new 60 GeV electron beam. This contribution summarises the detailed simulation studies on precision QCD topics included in the Conceptual Design Report, plus its relation with the LHC, and the outlook towards a Technical Design Report for 2015. Highlights include a new level of precision and flavour decomposition for the extraction of parton densities in a much extended kinematic range towards low Bjorken-­x and higher Q^2. In addition to inclusive neutral and charged current cross sections, more exclusive processes such as jet and heavy flavour production are included, and the possibilities for a high-accuracy measurement of the strong coupling constant. The implications on searches at the LHC, particularly for its proposed high-luminosity phase, will be discussed.
        Speakers: Amanda Cooper-Sarkar , Amanda Sarkar (University of Oxford (GB))
        Slides
    • 16:00 16:30
      Tea 30m
    • 16:30 18:30
      Astroparticle Physics D2 (KTH Campus)

      D2

      KTH Campus

      • 16:30
        Measurement of Cosmic Rays with the AMS-02 detector on the ISS 30m
        The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a state of the art particle detector, measuring the cosmic rays on the International Space Station (ISS) since May 19th 2011. AMS-02 measures all the compounds of cosmic rays up to iron in an energy range from MeV to TeV. The seven subsystems of the detector allow for redundant particle identification with unprecedented accuracy. With its proton rejection in the order of 10^6 a very high purity of the antiparticle spectra can be obtained. The talk will give insight on the detector operation, particle identification and an overview of the first results and its various astroparticle physics interpretations.
        Speaker: Melanie Heil (KIT - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (DE))
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Particle physics measurements at the highest energies with the Pierre Auger Observatory 15m
        The Pierre Auger Observatory measures cosmic rays with energies between 10^17.5 eV and 10^20 eV, based on air shower sampling at ground, complemented with shower development measurements with a smaller 12% duty-cycle. The cross-section for the primary interaction of 10^18 eV protons with air has been measured by analysing the maximum of shower development in the atmosphere. This corresponds to a centre-of-mass energy of 57 TeV, and the LHC results later confirmed the observed evolution of the proton-proton cross-section at intermediate energies. The depth of shower maximum is sensitive to cross-section and primary mass. Its energy evolution indicates a change towards the behavior expected for heavier primaries or larger cross-sections. We will show also the results on other observables related to primary nuclear mass composition. The results of the Observatory include also limits on the possible fluxes of photons and neutrinos, which will be briefly reviewed.
        Speaker: Sofia Andringa Dias (LIP Laboratorio de Instrumentaco e Fisica Experimental de Particulas)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Measurement of the Energy Spectrum of Cosmic Rays above 3 10^17 eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory 15m
        We report the measurement of the flux of cosmic rays with unprecedented precision and statistics using data collected at the Pierre Auger Observatory until 31 December 2012. The fluorescence observation of the air-showers provide intrinsically a calorimetric energy measurement. Based on the hybrid nature of the experiment, the energy scale for the surface detector is obtained with minimal use of Monte Carlo simulations. The energy spectrum deduced with the more denser array of 750 m, which provides the extension of the energy range from 1.5 10^18 eV down to 3 10^17 eV will be emphasised. The spectral features are presented in detail and the systematic uncertainties are addressed. We also present the current enhancements of the Pierre Auger Observatory.
        Speaker: Ioana Maris
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Physics results of the LHCf experiment 15m
        The LHCf experiment has been installed at +/- 140 m from the Atlas LHC interaction region, to precisely measure the neutral particle energy spectra (mainly photons, neutral pions and neutrons) produced very forward in the LHC collisions. The experiment has successfully taken data both in p-p collisions (at 900 GeV, 2.76 TeV, and 7 TeV center of mass energy) and in the p-Pb collisions at the beginning of 2013. The main LHCf physics results will be presented, emphasizing their relevance both in the forward physics of the high energy hadronic interactions and the in the high energy cosmic ray field. An overview of the ongoing upgrade activities in view of the 13 TeV p-p collisions will also be given.
        Speaker: Alessia Tricomi (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 17:45
        High-energy cosmic rays measured with KASCADE-Grande 15m
        With KASCADE-Grande, the detection of high-energy cosmic rays above a few hundred TeV is realized by the observation of extensive air-showers. By using a multi-detector setup, energy spectrum, elemental composition, and anisotropies of high-energy cosmic rays in the energy range from below the knee up to 2 EeV are investigated. In addition, the large high-quality data set permits distinct tests of the validity of hadronic interaction models used in interpreting air-shower measurements. After more than 16 years, the KASCADE-Grande experiment terminated measurements end of 2012. Main results of the data analysis exhibited a knee-structure in the spectrum of the primary cosmic rays of light elements at a few PeV; a knee-like structure in the spectrum of heavy primaries at c.90 PeV; and an ankle-like structure for the light primaries at c.120 PeV. The implications of these findings to astrophysical models for the transition from galactic to extragalactic origin of cosmic rays will be discussed.
        Speaker: Andreas Haungs (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Results in astroparticle physics from the ARGO-YBJ experiment 15m
        The ARGO-YBJ experiment, located in the Tibet region of China at 4300 meters a.s.l., has run uninterruptedly for over 5 years, namely from November 2007 till the beginning of 2013. It was designed to study astronomical gamma-ray sources in the energy range from a few hundred GeV up to about 100 TeV, and cosmic-ray physics in the energy range from about 1 TeV up to few PeV. The full-coverage structure of the ARGO-YBJ detector allowed to lower the energy threshold for air-shower detection with respect to conventional sampling arrays. By using a full-coverage layer of Resistive Plate Chambers (78 x 74 m^2), surrounded by a guard ring, with a full area of approximately 11000 m^2, the ARGO-YBJ experiment obtained important results in gamma-ray astronomy and cosmic-ray astrophysics: the observation of point-like gamma sources, the monitoring of AGN gamma flares, the measurement of the medium-scale cosmic-ray anisotropy and the light-component cosmic-ray spectrum will be presented and discussed.
        Speaker: Dr. Paolo Camarri (University of Roma "Tor Vergata")
        Slides
      • 18:15
        Experimentally Viable Mass of the Fermionic Dark Matter 15m
        We take into account a generic form of a Dirac fermionic dark matter (DM), which communicates with the Standard Model quarks via a scalar mediator, in a model-independent way. Four special interaction scenarios are investigated, where one is parity conserving and the other three are parity violating. Three of them result in the v suppressed DM-nucleon cross sections, where v ~10^-3c is the velocity of the DM in the laboratory frame. We constrain the masses of the dark matter and mediator as well as the couplings from the thermal relic abundance, and the recent results of the XENON100 direct detection and collider experiments involving the two channels: (i) monojet plus large missing transverse energy, and (ii) dijet. The current monojet constraint is not stronger than that from the requirement of the correct relic density and the null result by the XENON100 direct detection. We find that the dijet resonance measurements can exclude a large portion of the parameter space (m_\chi, mY ), where the couplings for the mediator coupled to the dark matter and to the quarks are small and have roughly the same magnitude. The constraint from indirect detections and diphoton resonance searches is also briefly discussed.
        Speaker: Ho-Chin Tsai
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:15
      Higgs and New Physics F1 (KTH Campus)

      F1

      KTH Campus

      • 16:30
        Dynamical origin for the 125 GeV Higgs 12m
        I will describe a hybrid framework for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB), in which the Higgs mechanism is combined with a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio mechanism. The model introduces an unconstrained (i.e., acts as "fundamental" but not the SM field) scalar and a strongly coupled doublet of heavy quarks with a mass around 500 GeV, which forms a condensate at a compositeness scale \Lambda ~ O(1 TeV). This setup is matched at that scale to a tightly constrained hybrid two Higgs doublet model, where both the composite and unconstrained scalars participate in EWSB. This allows us to get a good candidate for the recently observed 125 GeV scalar which has properties very similar to the Standard Model Higgs. The heavier (mostly composite) CP-even scalar has a mass around 500 GeV, while the pseudoscalar and the charged Higgs particles have masses in the range 200 -300 GeV.
        Speaker: Shaouly Bar-Shalom (Technion, Israel)
        Slides
      • 16:45
        Search for the Higgs boson in the tau + tau-­ channel using the ATLAS detector 12m
        Abstract: Since the discovery of a Higgs-­?like boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC, the emphasis has shifted towards measurements of its properties and the search for the search in the less sensitive channels in order to determine whether the new particle is the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson. Of particular importance is the direct observation of the coupling of the Higgs boson to leptons. In this presentation a comprehensive review of ATLAS results in the search for the Higgs boson in the tau-­?tau decay channel and in various production modes (VBF, VH, ttH, and gluon fusion) will be given.
        Speaker: Dugan O'Neil (SFU Simon Fraser University (CA))
        Slides
      • 17:00
        The study Higgs boson decaying into tau tau in CMS 12m
        The most recent CMS results on the search for a Standard Model Higgs boson in the tau tau channel, using the full dataset recorded at the LHC from pp collisions at centre of mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, will be presented. Various tau decay channels are explored as well as several Higgs production channels
        Speaker: Michal Bluj (CNRS-IN2P3/LLR-Ecole Polytechnique (FR))
        Slides
      • 17:15
        The search for associated Higgs boson production with Higgs decaying to bb in CMS 12m
        The most recent CMS results on the search for a Higgs boson in the bb channel, produced in association with a Z or W boson, or in vector-fusion mode, using the full dataset recorded at the LHC from pp collisions at centre of mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, will be presented.
        Speaker: Michele De Gruttola (University of Florida (US))
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Search for the Higgs boson in VH(bb) channel using the ATLAS detector 12m
        Abstract: Since the discovery of a Higgs-­?like boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC, the emphasis has shifted towards measurements of its properties and the search for the search in the less sensitive channels in order to determine whether the new particle is the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson. Of particular importance is the direct observation of the coupling of the Higgs boson to b-­?quarks and the top-­?quark. In this presentation a comprehensive review of ATLAS results in the search for the Higgs boson in b-­?quark pair decay channel and in the VH and ttH will be given
        Speaker: David Lopez Mateos (Harvard University (US))
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Higgs boson plus jet at NNLO 12m
        I will present new results for the fully differential Higgs plus jet cross section at NNLO in perturbative QCD. I will review some technical details of the computation, and discuss its impact for Higgs analyses at the LHC.
        Speaker: Fabrizio Caola (Johns Hopkins University)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        The search for tt associated Higgs production in CMS 12m
        The most recent CMS results on the search for a Higgs boson produced in association with a top quark, using the full dataset recorded at the LHC from pp collisions at centre of mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, will be presented. The Higgs decays studied cover all major decays channels, such as bb, gamma gamma, ZZ, WW, tau tau.
        Speaker: Fabrizio Margaroli (Universita e INFN, Roma I (IT))
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:10
      Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ions E2 (KTH Campus)

      E2

      KTH Campus

      • 16:30
        Measurement of anti- and hyper-matter production with the ALICE experiment 16m
        The unprecedented high collision energies at the Large Hadron Collider give rise to a significant production of light anti- and hyper-nuclei in proton-proton and, even more, in Pb-Pb collisions. With its excellent particle identification capabilities based on the specific energy loss (dE/dx) in the Time Projection Chamber and time-of-flight measurements, the ALICE experiment is very well suited for the detection of these rare stable particles. Results for (anti)deuterons, (anti)tritons, (anti-)3He and (anti- )4He will be presented. With the help of the Inner Tracking System, secondary (anti-)nuclei originating from the decays of light (anti-)hyper- nuclei can be clearly separated from primary particles. This allows not only for the topological identification of the hyper-triton via its mesonic decay (3_Λ_H -> 3He + pion), but also for the search for even lighter hyper- matter systems, i.e. Λ-Λ and Λ-neutron bound states. The results will also be compared with the expectations from thermal and coalescence models.
        Speaker: Alexander Philipp Kalweit (CERN)
        Slides
      • 16:46
        Onset of deconfinement and search for the critical point of strongly interacting matter at CERN SPS energies 16m
        The exploration of the QCD phase diagram and particularly the search for a phase transition from hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom and possibly a critical endpoint, is one of the most challenging tasks in present heavy-ion physics. As observed by the NA49 experiment, several hadronic observables in central Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS show qualitative changes in their energy dependence. These features are not observed in elementary interactions and indicate the onset of a phase transition in the SPS energy range [1,2]. Further information about the existence and nature of a phase transition in the SPS energy range can be gained from the studies of event-by-event fluctuations of final state hadron distributions and yields performed by the NA61/SHINE [3], a successor of the NA49 experiment. New results on p+p interactions at 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/c will be shown. They will include: - inclusive spectra of pi+, pi-, K-, and protons as a function of transverse momentum/mass and rapidity, - event-by-event fluctuations of transverse momentum, azimuthal angle and chemical composition. The new NA61 data will be compared with the corresponding results of NA49 on central Pb+Pb collisions as well as with the predictions of Monte Carlo models. The NA61/SHINE future plans will be presented. [1] C. Alt et al., Phys. Rev. C 77 (2008) 024903 [2] M. Gazdzicki et al., J. Phys. G 30 (2004) S701 [3] N.Antoniou et al. [NA61/SHINE Collaboration], CERN SPSC-2007-019, (2007).
        Speaker: Maciej Rybczynski (Jan Kochanowski University (PL))
        Slides
      • 17:02
        Results from STAR Beam Energy Scan Program 16m
        Results from the Beam Energy Scan (BES) program conducted recently by STAR experiment at RHIC are presented. The data from Phase-I of the BES program collected in Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energies (\sqrt{s_{NN}}) of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV cover a wide range of baryon chemical potential \mu_B (100-400 MeV) in the QCD phase diagram. Several STAR results from the BES Phase-I aimed to search for "turn-off" of strongly inter- acting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP) signatures and signals of QCD phase boundary are reported. In addition to this, an outlook is presented for the future BES Phase-II program and a possible fixed target program at STAR.
        Speaker: Michal Sumbera (Acad. of Sciences of the Czech Rep. (CZ))
        Slides
      • 17:18
        The effective potential of the confinement order parameter in the Hamiltonian approach 20m
        The effective potential of the order parameter for confinement is calculated for SU(N) Yang-Mills theory in the Hamiltonian approach. Compactifying one spatial dimension and using a background gauge fixing, this potential is obtained within a variational approach by minimizing the energy density for given background field. Thereby, the inverse length of the compactified dimension represents the temperature. Using Gaussian trial wave functionals we establish an analytic relation between the propagators in the background gauge at finite-temperature and the corresponding zero temperature propagators in Coulomb gauge. In the simplest truncation, neglecting the ghost and using the ultraviolet form of the gluon energy we recover the Weiss potential. We explicitly show that the neglect of the ghost drastically enhances the transition temperature. From the full non-pertubative potential (with the ghost included) we extract a critical temperature of the deconfinement phase transition of 269 MeV for the gauge group SU(2) and 275MeV for SU(3).
        Speaker: Prof. Hugo Reinhardt (Tuebingen University)
        Slides
      • 17:38
        Hadronic resonance production in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC with the ALICE experiment 16m
        Hadronic resonance production in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC with the ALICE experiment Enrico Fragiacomo INFN Trieste on behalf of the ALICE Collaboration Abstract Resonances, with their lifetime comparable to the lifetime of the partonic plasma phase, are a valuable tool to study the dynamics of the high energy density medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. Resonance measurements can be potentially used to estimate the time span between the chemical and kinetic freeze-out and interaction cross sections in the hadronic phase. Measurements of resonances in proton-proton collisions provide an important baseline for heavy-ion data as well for tuning QCD-inspired particle production models. The ALICE collaboration has measured K*(892)0 and ϕ(1020) production in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN=2.76 TeV and in pp collisions at 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV . The production of the ϕ meson has been studied in pp collisions at 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV, while K*(892)0 and baryonic resonance production (Σ*(1385)± and Ξ*(1530)0) have been measured in 7 TeV pp collisions. Characteristics of resonance production in these collisions systems will be discussed, in particular transverse momentum spectra and ratios such as ϕ/π, ϕ/K, K*/K , (Ω+anti-Ω)/ϕ, Σ*/Ξ, Σ*/π and Σ*/K. A comparison between central and peripheral production as well as one with QCD inspired models (for pp collision data) and thermal models will be shown.
        Speaker: Dr. Enrico Fragiacomo (INFN Trieste (IT))
        Slides
      • 17:54
        Recent heavy ion results from ATLAS experiment 16m
        During the first three years of operation the ATLAS experiment has collected an integrated luminosity of 0.15 nb-1 for sqrt(s_NN)=2.76 TeV lead-lead collisions, 30 nb-1 for 5.02 TeV proton-lead collisions, and 5 pb-1 for sqrt(s)=2.76 TeV proton-proton collisions. The proton-lead and the high-statistics 2.76 TeV proton-proton data recorded during the highly successful 2013 LHC heavy ion run provide valuable control measurements for interpreting results from lead-lead collisions. Results will be presented for measurements in lead-lead collisions of inclusive jets, jet fragmentation, electroweak bosons, and boson-jet correlations. These measurements provide new insight into the mechanism of in-medium parton energy loss. Measurements of bulk particle production will also be presented with a focus on studies of elliptic and higher-order collective flow. Included in these results will be measurements of event-by-event collective flow. In addition to providing baseline measurements for the lead-lead program, the proton-lead data also provide a unique opportunity to study the physics of soft and hard scattering in a high parton density environment. An overview of relevant proton-lead results will be presented.
        Speaker: Dr. Rikard Sandstrom (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (D)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:00
      Flavour Physics and fundamental symmetries D1 (KTH Campus)

      D1

      KTH Campus

      • 16:30
        Charmed hadrons and decays at Belle 15m
        We present a measurement of the rate for the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay $D^{0} \to K^+\pi^-\pi^+\pi^-$ relative to that for the Cabibbo-favored decay $D^0 \to K^-\pi^+\pi^-\pi^+$. The branching fractions are measured using 801 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB collider.
        Speaker: Ruslan Chistov (Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics)
        Slides
      • 16:45
        Measurement of gamma from three-body B decays 15m
        It was recently shown that the weak phase $\gamma$ can be extracted from three-body B decays. Using a flavor-SU(3)-symmetric approach, we extract $\gamma$ from the BaBar measurements of the Dalitz plots of $B \to K\pi\pi$ and $B \to KK\bar K$ decays. We find four possible solutions: $31^{+2}_{-3}$, $77\pm3$, $258^{+4}_{-3}$ and $315^{+3}_{-2}$, in degrees. In all cases the error includes first-order flavor-SU(3) breaking effects. One solution -- $77\pm3$ -- is consistent with the standard model; its error is smaller than that obtained using two-body B decays. We present recent updates of the results.
        Speaker: Maxime Imbeault (Cégep de Saint-Laurent)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Measurements of B → DK decays to constrain the CKM unitarity triangle angle γ at LHCb 15m
        The angle γ of the CKM unitarity triangle remains the least precisely measured parameter of the CKM mixing matrix. The precision measurement of this parameter is one of the main goals of the LHCb experiment. We present a wide range of measurements of CP violation and partial rates in B→DK decays, as well as the latest LHCb measurement of γ combining all the individual inputs.
        Speaker: Paolo Gandini (Syracuse University (US))
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Measurements of phi_3 at Belle 15m
        The neutral $B$-meson decay, $B^0\to D^*\pi$, provides a sensitivity to $\sin(2\phi_1+\phi_3)$, where $\phi_1$ and $\phi_3$ are the angles of the unitary triangle. There are two ways that the initial $B^0$ goes to a final state $D^{*-}\pi^+$. One is a Cabbibo-favoured decay (CFD) and the other is via $B^0 \to \bar{B}^0$ mixing followed by a doubly-Cabbibo-suppressed decay (DCSD). The former does not have a weak phase while the latter has a phase of $2\phi_1+\phi_3$ from mixing and decay, thus, CP violation can be measured from time dependent analysis. However, since DCSD is suppressed by $O(\lambda^2)$, expected CP violation is small and large number of events are required. We measured CP violating parameters in this decay with the complete dataset of 710 fb$^{-1}$ accumlated by Belle.
        Speaker: Kentaro Negishi (Tohoku Univ.)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Measurements of the hadronic cross-sections with the CMD-3 and SND detectors at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider 15m
        Regular data taking with the CMD-3 and SND detectors at the VEPP-2000 electron-positron collider in Novosibirsk is underway since 2010. The luminosity up to 10**31 cm-2s-1 has been reached at the energy 2E=2 GeV, and another order of magnitude will be achieved after construction of the new positron source. The already collected physical data sample corresponds to about 36 inversed picobarns of integrated luminosity in the energy range from phi-meson up to 2 GeV and currently the first scan from 2 pion threshold up to 1 GeV with about 6 pb-1 has been performed to get a new precision measurement of the e+e- -> pi+pi- cross section. Preliminary results on cross sections of a number of multi-hadron final states from CMD3 and SND detectors is reported. The obtained results are in good agreement with previous experiments and have a comparable or better statistical precision. Besides the study on dynamic of multihadron production, knowledge of e+e- -> hadrons cross-sections with high accuracy at low energies is required to evaluate the hadronic contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon and the fine structure constant at Z boson mass. While the previous set of experiments allowed the comparison of the muon (g-2) value measured at BNL with SM prediction, revealing more than a 3 sigma difference, the goal on precision of experiments at VEPP-2000 is to match an accuracy of new muon (g-2) measurement at FermiLab and J-PARC.
        Speaker: fedor ignatov
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:00
      Top and Electroweak Physics F2 (KTH Campus)

      F2

      KTH Campus

      • 16:30
        NNLO top quark pair production 20m
        I give an overview on the current theoretical status of the top quark pair production total cross section focusing on the recently derived NNLO result for the gluon fusion channel, which completes the fixed order NNLO calculations. Using our result to provide the NNLO+NNLL prediction for the total cross section, I discuss its phenomenological impact and compare it with the most precise LHC and Tevatron data. In particular I explain the influence of the available NNLO PDF sets on the theoretical prediction as well as how top quark pair production can be used to constrain the gluon PDF at large x, which can lead to improved predictions for Beyond the Standard Model processes at the LHC.
        Speaker: Paul Fiedler
        Slides
      • 16:50
        Measurement of the inclusive top quark pair cross section in pp collisions at 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector 20m
        Measurements of the top quark production cross sections in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider are presented. The measurement require no, one or two electrons or muons in the final state (single lepton, dilepton, hadronic channel). In addition, the decay modes with tau leptons are tested (channels with tau leptons).
        Speaker: Anna Henrichs (Yale University (US))
        Slides
      • 17:10
        Measurement of the inclusive top quark pair cross section in pp collisions at 7 and 8 TeV with the CMS detector 20m
        Precision measurements are presented of the top-quark pair inclusive production cross section in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies of 7 !TeV and 8 !TeV. The data are collected with the CMS experiment during the years 2011 and 2012. The analyses include all top quark pair final states with the exception of events with two tau-leptons in the final state. In most analyses b-jet identification is used to increase the purity of the selection. The backgrounds are determined using data-driven techniques. The results are combined with each other and compared with theory predictions. Indirect constraints on both the top quark mass and alpha_s are obtained through their relation to the inclusive cross section.
        Speaker: Michael Maes (Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) - Interuniversitary Institute for high energies (IIHE))
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:00
      QCD: Deep-inelastic scattering (II) E1 (KTH Campus)

      E1

      KTH Campus

      • 16:30
        HERAFitter - an open source QCD fit framework 17m
        The proton parton distribution functions (PDFs) are essential for precision physics at the LHC and other hadron colliders. Their current level of accuracy dominates the theory uncertainties in Higgs production and it affects substantially theory predictions for Beyond Standard Model high mass production. The determination of the PDFs is a complex endeavor involving several physics process. The main process is the lepton proton deep- inelastic scattering (DIS), with data collected by the HERA ep collider covering a large kinematic phase space needed to extract PDFs. Further processes (fixed target DIS, ppbar collisions etc.) provide additional constraining powers for flavour separation. In particular, the precise measurements obtained or to come from LHC will continue to improve the knowledge of the PDF. HERAFitter project is an open source QCD fit framework ready to extract PDFs and assess the impact of new data which we would like to present here. The framework includes modules allowing for a various theoretical and methodological options, capable to fit a large number of relevant data sets from HERA, Tevatron and LHC. This framework is already used in many analyses at the LHC. A new release is available publicly with added features for different parametrisation methods, alternative options to assess the impact of new data based on bayesian reweighting techinque, different representation of the chisquare, as well as the option to accomodate for asymmetric systematic uncertainties.
        Speaker: Andrey Sapronov (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (RU))
        Slides
      • 16:47
        Impact of ATLAS data on parton density functions 17m
        Various measurements provided by the ATLAS collaboration have significant impact on parton density functions. Inclusive production of W and Z bosons have been analysed using an NNLO QCD fit and found to constraint the strange­quark density at medium and low Bjorken­x. The inclusive jet production at different centre­of­mass energies, measured by ATLAS are used in an NLO QCD fit and show impact for the gluon density. Off­resonance Drell Yan production may be used to constrain anti­quark density at high x. The measurements have higher impact when they are used in a common fit, taking into account correlations of the systematic uncertainties.
        Speaker: Dr. Voica Ana Maria Radescu (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
        Slides
      • 17:04
        Latest results from the HERMES experiment 22m
        HERMES had taken a wealth of deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) data using the 27.6 GeV polarized lepton beam at HERA and various pure gas targets, both unpolarized and polarized, which opened the door to several unique results. Among them are the first evidences for the naive-T-odd Sivers and Collins effects but also the recent first measurements of azimuthal modulations in the unpolarized semi-inclusive DIS cross section for charged kaons and pions, of beam-helicity asymmetries in exclusive leptoproduction of real photons using recoil-proton detection, and the high-precision data set on light-meson multiplicities. An overview of HERMES results will be given with emphasis on the exploration of the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon.
        Speakers: charlotte Van Hulse , Charlotte Van Hulse
        Slides
      • 17:26
        New results on the proton spin-dependent structure function g1p at COMPASS with E=200 GeV 17m
        New results of the double spin asymmetry A1p and the spin-dependent structure function of the proton g1p as a function of $x_{Bj}$ and $Q^2$ will be presented. New COMPASS data on longitudinal polarized NH$_3$ target were collected during the year 2011 with beam of positive muons with energy E = 200 GeV}. It allows us to cover low $x$ region down to 0.025 in the range $Q^{2}>1~\mbox{GeV}/c^{2}$ for the first time.
        Speaker: Elena Zemlyanichkina (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (RU))
        Slides
      • 17:43
        COMPASS results on transverse-spin asymmetries in hadron pair production in SIDIS 17m
        The transversity parton distribution remains a poorly known cornerstone in the nucleon spin structure. While the Collins effect in spin asymmetries in Semi-Inclusive DIS (SIDIS) is one crucial tool to address the transversity function, the most promising alternative is the azimuthal asymmetry in SIDIS when a hadron pair is detected in the final state. In this case, the chiral-odd transversity function is coupled to another chiral-odd function, i.e. the hadron-pair interference fragmentation function (IFF). The measurement of azimuthal asymmetries in hadron-pair production on a transversely polarized nucleon target has been performed at COMPASS using a 160 GeV/c muon beam of CERN's M2 beam line. Results from the 2007 and 2010 recent measurements will be presented and compared to model predictions.
        Speaker: Nour Makke (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
    • 19:00 20:30
      Reception at Stockholm City Hall 1h 30m Stockholm City Hall

      Stockholm City Hall

    • 09:00 10:35
      Top and Electroweak Physics F2 (KTH Campus)

      F2

      KTH Campus

      • 09:00
        Differential cross sections for top-pair and single-top production 15m
        I present higher-order results, based on NNLL resummation, for differential transverse momentum and rapidity distributions in processes involving top quarks. In particular results are presented for top-pair production and for single-top production in all three channels,
        Speaker: Nikolaos Kidonakis (Kennesaw State University)
        Slides
      • 09:15
        Measurement of differential cross sections in top pair production in pp collisions with the CMS detector 20m
        Differential top quark pair production cross sections are measured in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 !TeV, using data collected by the CMS experiment in the years 2011 and 2012. The differential cross sections are measured as functions of various kinematic observables, including the transverse momentum and rapidity of the (anti)top quark and the top-antitop system and the jets and leptons of the event final state. Multiplicity and kinematic distributions of the jets produced in addition to the top pair are investigated. First measurements of the associate production of top quark pairs with vector bosons and with additional b-quarks in the final state are also presented.
        Speaker: Philip Hugh Symonds (Brunel University (GB))
        Slides
      • 09:35
        Measurement of differential cross sections in top pair production in pp collisions with the ATLAS detector 20m
        Measurements of the top quark production cross sections in proton proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider are presented. The measurement require no, one or two electrons or muons in the final state (single lepton, dilepton, hadronic channel). In addition, the decay modes with tau leptons are tested (channels with tau leptons). The main focus are measurements of differential spectra of ttbar final states, in particular, measurements that are able to constrain the modelling of additional parton radiation like the jet multiplicity distribution.
        Speaker: Ford Garberson (Yale University (US))
        Slides
      • 09:55
        Inclusive and differential top quark production at the Tevatron 20m
        We present the most recent measurements by the CDF and D0 Collaborations of inclusive and differential top quark pair cross sections in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV at Fermilab's Tevatron Collider . The measured spectra, binned in several observables, are compared to those obtained from the Monte Carlo simulation and QCD at approximate NNLO.
        Speaker: Maria Veronica Sorin (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ES))
        Slides
      • 10:15
        t tbar b bbar production at NLO accuracy matched with parton shower 15m
        We simulate the hadroproduction of a t tbar pair in association with a b bbar pair at the LHC using the PowHel program. The generated events are stored according to the Les-Houches event format. We interface those events to the PYTHIA shower Monte Carlo program, allowing for decays of massive particles, showering and hadronization, thus leading to predictions for differential distributions at the hadron level.
        Speaker: Zoltan Laszlo Trocsanyi (University of Debrecen (HU))
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:35
      Cosmology and Gravity F3 (KTH Campus)

      F3

      KTH Campus

      • 09:00
        Listening to the Universe with eLISA: A Gravitational Wave Detector in Space 45m
        More than 90 years ago, Einstein predicted the existence of Gravitational Waves as a consequence of his theory of General Relativity. They are minute distortions of space and time, created by rapidly accelerating large masses, and propagating at the speed of light. Several kilometer-size laser-interferometric gravitational wave detectors are currently operating on the earth. They will soon be joined by space detectors with armlengths of millions of kilometers, looking at the signals from massive black holes in the whole universe. The European Space Agency has recently called for the submission of science themes for the L2 and L3 large mission launch opportunities. This talk will describe the science theme „The Gravitational Universe“ and eLISA as strawman mission concept for its realization.
        Speaker: Karsten Danzmann (AEI , Hannover)
        Slides
      • 09:45
        LISA Pathfinder 45m
        LISA Pathfinder is a mission of the European Space Mission aimed at demonstrating the space-time metrology required for space-borne gravitational wave observatories like eLISA. In particular the mission aims at experimentally test the detailed physical model of the eLISA instrument using the hardware, which is going to be flown on eLISA. This model predicts that no true forces on test-bodies will compete with gravitational signals in excess to fN/Hz^(-1/2). The mission is in phase C/D and is due to launch in two years. The talk will describe the mission, its development status, and the metrology under test.
        Speaker: Stefano Vitale (University of Trento)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:35
      Detector R&D and data handling E2 (KTH Campus)

      E2

      KTH Campus

      • 09:00
        TOP Detector for Particle Identification at the Belle II Experiment 15m
        The Belle II experiment is an upcoming experiment based on the SuperKEKB e+e- collider, which will provide almost two orders of magnitude higher instantaneous luminosity than the KEKB e+e- collider. We aim to measure precisely the parameters of the Standard Model and search for physics beyond the Standard Model. We report here on the time-of-propagation (``TOP'') detector, which plays an essential role in the identification of charged particles at the Belle II experiment. Each TOP counter consists of a quartz radiator and 32 micro-channel-plate photomultiplier tubes (``MCP-PMTs''). The Cherenkov photons traveling in the quartz radiator are detected by the MCP-PMTs, and the time and the position are used to reconstruct the Cherenkov angle corresponding to the velocity. The quartz radiator is polished with a roughness of < 0.5 nm in RMS and a flatness of < 6.3 um to ensure photon efficiency and maintain the angles of the Cherenkov photons, respectively, over hundreds of reflections at the quartz surfaces. The MCP-PMTs can detect single photons with a timing resolution better than 50 psec. The key features of the TOP counter as well as a performance study using a full-size prototype are presented. We plan to install 16 TOP counters in the Belle II detector in early 2015. The status and the plan for the construction are also shown.
        Speaker: Prof. Yasuyuki Horii
        Slides
      • 09:15
        The ARICH detector at Belle II experiment 15m
        We will present overview of Aerogel Ring Imaging CHerenkov counter (ARICH) which is developed as a particle identification detector in next generationB-factory experiment, the Belle II. The ARICH consists of aerogel radiator and photo sensor. When charged particle goes through the radiator, it emits Cherenkov light to the direction which depends on the particle mass. Using this dependance, we identify the particle by reproducing the ring image with high sensitive photon sensor array. We develop new photon sensor named Hybrid Avalanche Photo Detector (HAPD) to collect a small number of Cherenkov photon distributed in large area effectively. We set up a part of ARICH detector and perform beam tests using electron and hadron beam line at KEK, CERN and DESY. From the obtained results, we expect that it is possible to separate kaon and pion by 4 sigma deviation level if we use this system. To evaluate the effect of radiation for HAPD in long period experiment, we perform radiation hardness tests using 60Co gamma-ray source and neutron beam line. Mass production of HAPD and electronics has been started and ARICH will be constructed from this year. Installation to the Belle II detector will be completed in 2015.
        Speaker: Prof. Yosuke Yusa (Niigata University)
        Slides
      • 09:30
        First results of the Focusing DIRC prototype, an innovative detector for charged particle identification 15m
        The FDIRC (Focusing Detector of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) is a charged particle identification (PID) detector which separates efficiently kaons from pions up to a few GeV/c. It is the successor of the BaBar DIRC, which was successfully operated at the PEP-II B-Factory during a decade, and benefits from the knowledge accumulated with a first focusing DIRC prototype, built and operated at SLAC in the recent years. The FDIRC is a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector based on the same concept as the BaBar DIRC. Yet, its design has been significantly improved to be able to operate at much higher luminosity (10^36 cm^-2s^-1) and with larger backgrounds. Indeed, the FDIRC was intended to cover the barrel region of the SuperB detector, a new generation flavour factory cancelled at the end of 2012 due to lack of funding. The FDIRC photon camera has been completely redesigned, moving from a huge tank of ultra-pure water to much smaller focusing cameras with sophisticated solid fused silica optics. The BaBar camera was sensitive to background and its operation required constant attention due to the possibility of having water leaking inside the rest of the detector. The new cameras are instrumented with highly-pixelated Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs, readout by new fast front-end digitizing electronics. The goal is to have a detection chain about 10 times faster than in BaBar, allowing the FDIRC to reject more background hits and to measure Cherenkov angles more accurately. A full-scale prototype of a FDIRC sector (1/12th of the whole detector) has been successfully built at SLAC and is taking data in the Cosmic Ray Telescope facility since the beginning of 2013. The primary goals of this R&D program are to validate the innovative camera design, to test the full detection chain and to measure the FDIRC Cherenkov angle resolution. In this contribution, we briefly review the FDIRC design and the construction of the SLAC prototype. Then, we focus on the challenges associated with the FDIRC data analysis and present the methods which are being developed to convert photon hits in the MaPMT pixels to Cherenkov angles. This work is based upon a detailed Geant4-based simulation of the test facility. Finally, we summarize the status of the ongoing data taking phase and present the first preliminary results based on data.
        Speaker: Mr. Martino Borsato
        Transparents
      • 09:45
        Upgrade of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter for High-Luminosity LHC Operation 15m
        The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the LHC is a hermetic, fine grained, homogeneous calorimeter, comprising 75,848 lead tungstate scintillating crystals, located inside the CMS superconducting solenoidal magnet. It was designed to operate for a minimum of ten years at the LHC, with an instantaneous luminosity of 2x10^34/cm^2/s and for an integrated luminosity of 500/fb. The high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is expected to provide an instantaneous luminosity of around 5 x 10^34/cm^2/s and integrate a total luminosity of around 3000/fb by about 2035 (ten years of data taking). The evolution of the CMS ECAL at HL-LHC is being assessed. We present results of an intensive campaign of component irradiations and ageing studies, complemented by simulations of the physics performance of the aged detector. Several upgrade options are shown, including replacements of the electronics to provide greater triggering flexibility, and new endcap detectors. The latter is the subject of much ongoing R&D and several potential technologies are presented here.
        Speaker: Francesca Cavallari (Universita e INFN, Roma I (IT))
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Dual-readout calorimetry - excellent precision for ALL particles, and NO calibration issues 15m
        Simultaneous detection of the Cherenkov light and scintillation light produced in hadron showers makes it possible to measure the electromagnetic shower fraction event by event and thus eliminate the detrimental effects of fluctuations in this fraction on the performance of hadron calorimeters. In the RD52 (DREAM) project, the possibilities of this dual-readout calorimetry are investigated and optimized. In this talk, the latest results of this project will be presented. These results concern beam tests of the new full-scale Dual-Readout fiber calorimeter that were recently carried out at CERN.
        Speaker: Richard wigmans (Texas Tech)
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Development of highly granular calorimeters in CALICE 15m
        The design of calorimeter systems for a detector at a future Linear Collider (ILC, CLIC) is largely driven by the requirements of jet reconstruction. The particle flow technique has been shown to be capable of achieving an energy resolution ~30%/sqrtE, permitting the discrimination of W and Z bosons in their hadronic decays. Such performance requires the separation of neutral and charged energy deposits in the calorimeters, which in turn demands that they have high spatial granularity both transversely and longitudinally, and be placed within the magnet coil. CALICE has been developing prototype calorimeters to meet these requirements. The electromagnetic calorimeter is based on tungsten absorber read out using either silicon pads of ~5x5 mm^2 and/or crossed short scintillator strips of ~5x45 mm^2. The hadronic calorimeter could use iron or tungsten absorber, sampled using either scintillator tiles of ~3x3 cm^2 or gaseous detectors with ~1x1 cm^2 readout. The scintillator option uses analogue readout, while the gas detectors (RPCs, Micromegas or GEMs) use either digital (1 bit) or semi-digital (2 bit) readout. All these options are being pursued in CALICE. Key issues include: extreme compactness (so that the calorimeters can be located inside the magnet), hermeticity and scalability, power cycling (exploiting the time structure of the accelerator to minimise the need for cooling), and precise timing (especially for CLIC applications). We report on recent R&D and test beam activities from CALICE which address all these key questions.
        Speaker: Maximilien Chefdeville (LAPP, Annecy)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:35
      Higgs and New Physics F1 (KTH Campus)

      F1

      KTH Campus

      • 09:00
        Custodial Leptons and Higgs Decays 12m
        In this talk, I will describe the effects of extended fermion sectors, respecting custodial symmetry, on Higgs production and decay. The resulting protection for the Z->b_L b_L and Z->\tau_R\tau_R decays allows for potentially interesting signals in Higgs physics, while maintaining the good agreement of the Standard Model with precision tests. The setups can be motivated as the low energy effective theories of the composite Higgs models MCHM_5 and MCHM_10, where the spectra can be identified with the light custodians present in these theories. I will show that these describe the relevant physics in the fermion sectors in a simplified and transparent way. In contrast to previous studies of composite models, the impact of a realistic lepton sector on the Higgs decays is taken into account.
        Speaker: Adrian Carmona (ETH Zurich)
        Slides
      • 09:15
        Combination of the Higgs Boson Main Properties Measurements using the ATLAS Detector 12m
        Abstract: The combined measurements of the properties of the recently discovered Higgs boson in individual channels using the ATLAS detector and up to 25 fb -­?1 of 7 TeV and 8 TeV pp collision data collected in 2011 and 2012, are discussed.
        Speaker: Michael Duehrssen-Debling (CERN)
        Slides
      • 09:30
        The Study of Higgs properties in the CMS experiment 12m
        Combining all Higgs analysis results, the properties of the new particle at about 125 GeV are examined. The mass, spin and couplings are studied. These results are based on the full data sample of the first run of the LHC collider with data collected by the CMS experiment.
        Speaker: Josh Bendavid (CERN)
        Slides
      • 09:45
        Methods for studies of spin, parity, and the tensor couplings of a Higgs boson 12m
        The discovery of the new boson with the mass around 125 GeV at the LHC opens a way for experimental studies of its properties such as spin, parity, and couplings to the Standard Model particles. We present the methods for identifying and measuring various types of tensor couplings that are consistent with assumed symmetries and Lorentz invariance for a given spin assignment. New developments in the measurement strategies are presented, such as production-independent spin tests and study of CP violation in the Higgs couplings. We discuss advances in the Monte Carlo simulation techniques and expectations for the future experimental facilities.
        Speaker: Yanyan Gao (Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (US))
        Slides
      • 10:00
        High Mass Higgs boson Searches in ATLAS and CMS 17m
        The latest results from ATLAS on the search for SM-like Higgs bosons with masses substantially above the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson are presented. Extending previous results, these include ZZ and WW decay modes, and masses from 200 GeV to 1TeV are explored.
        Speaker: Joana Machado Miguens (LIP Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Part)
        Slides
      • 10:20
        Viability of light-Higgs strongly-coupled scenarios 12m
        We present a one-loop calculation of the oblique S and T parameters within strongly-coupled models of EW symmetry breaking with a Higgs-like boson and analyze the phenomenological implications. Using dispersive representations free of unphysical cut-offs, we obtain S and T at the one-loop level in terms of a few resonance parameters. On the contrary to a widely spread believe, we demonstrate that strongly coupled EW models with massive resonances are not in conflict with the experimental S and T and the recently discovered Higgs-like particle. Nevertheless, the masses of the new vector and axial-vector resonance are forced to lie in general above the TeV scale and the hWW coupling must be very close to that in the Standard Model. Our conclusions are generic and apply to more specific scenarios such as the minimal SO(5)/SO(4) composite Higgs model.
        Speaker: Juan Jose Sanz-Cillero (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:35
      Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ions D3 (KTH Campus)

      D3

      KTH Campus

      • 09:00
        Quarkonia production in Pb-Pb and pp collisions at forward rapidity with the ALICE experiment 16m
        Ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions produce strongly interacting matter at high temperature and energy density. Under such extreme conditions a deconfined partonic phase called Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) is formed. The measurement of quarkonia (charmonia and bottomonia) is expected to provide essential information on the QGP properties. In pp collisions high precision data serve as crucial test for several competing models of quarkonium hadroproduction and provide the essential baseline for the measurements in AA collisions. Within the ALICE Muon Spectrometer, quarkonia production can be measured down to zero transverse momentum at forward rapidity (2.5
        Speaker: Massimiliano Marchisone (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 09:16
        Heavy-quarkonium suppression in p-A collisions from parton energy loss in cold QCD matter 20m
        The effects of parton energy loss in cold nuclear matter on heavy-quarkonium suppression in p-A collisions are studied. It is shown from first principles that at large quarkonium energy E and small production angle in the nucleus rest frame, the medium-induced energy loss scales as E. Using this result, a phenomenological model depending on a single free parameter is able to reproduce J/psi and Upsilon suppression data in a broad xF and pT range and at various center-of-mass energies. These results strongly support energy loss as the dominant effect in heavy-quarkonium suppression in p-A collisions. Predictions for J/psi and Upsilon suppression in p-Pb collisions at the LHC are made.
        Speaker: Francois Arleo (LAPTH, Annecy-le-Vieux)
        Slides
      • 09:36
        Vector meson photoproduction at the LHC studied by the ALICE experiment 16m
        The strong electromagnetic fields surrounding the Pb-ions accelerated at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) allow two-photon and photonuclear interactions to be studied in a new kinematic regime. These interactions can be studied in ultra-peripheral collisions, where the impact parameters are larger than the sum of the nuclear radii and hadronic interactions are suppressed. During the heavy-ion runs at the LHC in 2010 and 2011, and during the proton- lead run in 2013, the ALICE experiment implemented dedicated triggers to select ultra-peripheral collisions. These triggers were based on the Muon spectrometer, the Time-of-Flight detector, the Silicon Pixel detector, and the VZERO scintillator array. Information from other detectors was also used in the analysis. The cross section for photoproduction of J/Psi meson at mid and forward rapidities in Pb-Pb collisions will be presented. The results will be compared to model calculations and their implications for nuclear gluon shadowing will be discussed. First results on J/Psi photoproduction in p-Pb collisions will also be discussed.
        Speaker: Joakim Nystrand (University of Bergen (NO))
        Slides
      • 09:52
        The LHeC as an energy frontier eA collider 20m
        The Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) is a proposed facility which will exploit the LHC heavy ion beam for electron-­nucleus scattering, using a new 60 GeV electron accelerator. The kinematic coverage extends beyond previous deep inelastic lepton-­ion experiments by nearly four orders of magnitude at low Bjorken-x and towards higher Q^2. This contribution summarises the content of the simulations in the Conceptual Design report, plus its relation with the LHC with emphasis on pPb data, and the outlook towards a Technical Design report for 2015. After an introduction on the open problems in pA and eA collisions and the expected impact on the heavy ion program, we show inclusive observables and the resulting constraints on nuclear parton densities. We then analyse the possibilities for inclusive and exclusive diffraction and the opportunities that they offer to reveal the non-­linear dynamics which tame the low-x growth of parton densities. Finally, we discuss semi-­inclusive measurements that will clarify the mechanism of hadronisation and QCD radiation inside the nuclear medium.
        Speaker: Max Klein
        Slides
      • 10:12
        Recent results from the PHENIX experiment 20m
        As the study of the hot and dense medium created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions advances from an exploratory phase to a more quantitative and detailed approach, the PHENIX experiment is exploiting the unique opportunities offered by the versatility of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Measurements from d+Au collisions are providing crucial new information about the cold nuclear matter effects that one needs to take into account in interpreting observations made in Au+Au collisions. Recent results from PHENIX on electromagnetic probes, quarkonia, open heavy flavor and two particle correlations will be shown.
        Speaker: Ermias Atomssa (Stony Brook University)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:35
      Flavour Physics and fundamental symmetries D1 (KTH Campus)

      D1

      KTH Campus

      • 09:00
        Status of B to D(*) tau nu decays in two-Higgs-doublet models 15m
        In this talk I will discuss the recent status of B to D(*) tau nu decays in the context of two-Higgs-doublet models. The BaBar collaboration has reported an excess in semileptonic b -> c tau nu transitions that has gathered recent interest as a possible signature of new physics. I will discuss the sensitivity of this decays to charged Higgs boson contributions, taking into account the constraints from other semileptonic and leptonic meson decays in which the charged Higgs would enter at the same level.
        Speaker: Alejandro Celis (IFIC CSIC-Universitat de Valencia)
        Slides
      • 09:15
        Flavour-phenomenology of two-Higgs-doublet models 15m
        In this talk we show the effects of adding a second Higgs doublet to the SM particle content on flavour observables. After updating the constraints of the 2HDM of type II (which respects natural flavour conservation) we constrain the flavour structure of the 2HDM of type III (with general Yukawa coupling) from FCNC processes. Interestingly, respecting these constraints, sizable effects in B->tau nu and B->D(*) tau are possible and in all three decays the tensions between the SM and experiment can be removed.
        Speaker: Andreas Crivellin (University Bern)
        Slides
      • 09:30
        Looking for new physics through semileptonic decays 15m
        We discuss the possibilities for observing the new physics effects at low energies through a detailed analysis of the angular distribution of the decay products. In particular we find new observables that are accessible experimentally and that can be very useful in searches for the effects of physics beyond the Standard Model at low energies. We show the potential of this research on a specific example of $B\to D\ell\nu$ and $B\to D^\ast \ell \nu$ decays.
        Speaker: Mr. Andrey Tayduganov (ITEP Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (RU))
        Slides
      • 09:45
        New physics searches at Belle 15m
        We report the first branching fraction measurement of the inclusive Cabibbo favoured semileptonic decay $B\to X_c \tau\nu$ by the Belle experiment. The branching fraction of this kinematically suppressed mode is highly sensitive to new physics beyond the Standard Model, such as a charged Higgs, which couples strongly to the massive $\tau$ lepton and interfere with the Standard Model process. This measurement will shed light on the contributions from all tauonic $B$ decay modes, including high mass and non-resonant contributions, $B \to D^{**}/D^{(*)}n\pi \tau \nu$ which may be the cause for observed excesses above the SM in the exclusive channels. The full Belle dataset is used, containing 772 million $B\bar{B}$ meson pairs recorded near the $\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider. The $B$ meson events are tagged by fully reconstructing one $B$ in a hadronic mode. The charm meson on the signal side is identified by the presence of a wrong-sign lepton, and the $\tau$ is reconstructed in several leptonic and hadronic modes. Multivariate selection techniques are used to optimise the signal selection.
        Speaker: Jan Hasenbusch (Univ. of Bonn)
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Beyond-SM searches in B -> D(*) tau nu and rare decays at BaBar 15m
        We present the measurement of  the B -> D(*) tau nu decay, which is sensitive at tree level to New Physics in the form of a charged Higgs Boson. The measured branching fraction is 3.4 sigma  larger than the SM predictions, and excludes the 2HDM of type 2 at 99.88% confidence for all tan(beta)/mHiggs values. Additional studies of the momentum transferred to the lepton system show that the result can be accommodated by more general  two-Higgs-Doublet models. Searches for rare decays sensitive to New Physics, as  B -> K(*) nu anti-nu, are also reported.
        Speaker: Eli Ben Haim (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (FR))
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Quark flavour observables in 331 models in the flavour precision era 15m
        I will discuss a variant of the 331 model,a new Physics scenario in which the gauge group of the SM is extended to SU(3)_C X SU(3)_L X U(1)_X. As a main consequence, new sources of flavour and CP violation are present that originate dominantly through the flavour violating interactions of ordinary quarks and leptons with a new heavy Zprime gauge boson. I will focus on correlations among the observables in the Bd,Bs and K systems, identifying the most important ones to test this NP scenario.
        Speaker: Fulvia De Fazio (INFN - Sezione di Bari)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:35
      QCD: Jet physics (II) E1 (KTH Campus)

      E1

      KTH Campus

      • 09:00
        e+p high Q2 neutral current cross sections and structure function xF3 15m
        The cross sections for neutral current deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam have been measured using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The single-differential cross-sections dsigma/dQ2, dsigma/dx and dsigma/dy and the double-differential cross sections in Q2 and x are measured in the kinematic region Q2 > 185 GeV2 for both positively and negatively polarised electron beams and for each polarisation state separately. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 136 pb-1 taken in 2006 and 2007 at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions xF3 and xF3{γZ} are determined by combining the e+p results presented in this analysis with previously measured e-p neutral current data. The measured cross sections are compared to the predictions.
        Speakers: Allen Caldwell (Max Planck Institute) , Allen Christopher Caldwell (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (D)
        Slides
      • 09:15
        Measurement of positron-proton neutral current cross sections at high Bjorken-x with the ZEUS detector at HERA 10m
        New measurements of the differential cross sections for neutral current deep inelastic ep collisions up to Bjorken-x values equal to one are presented. The measurements were performed using the data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA with sqrt(s) = 318 GeV and an integrated luminosities of 142(187) pb-1 for e+p(e-p) collisions. A new method was employed to reconstruct the kinematic variables and measure the cross sections for Q2 > 575 GeV^2. The data are considerably more precise than previously published measurements in this kinematic region and provide interesting tests of the parameterizations of the behavior of the cross section up to x=1.
        Speakers: Allen Caldwell (Max Planck Institute) , Allen Christopher Caldwell (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (D)
        Slides
      • 09:40
        Jet production measurements at CMS 15m
        We present CMS results related to jet production cross sections, which pose a central test to perturbative QCD predictions. Results include recent jet, dijet, and multijet differential cross section measurements performed with 2011 data taken at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 2012 data taken at 8 TeV.
        Speaker: Sanmay Ganguly (Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research (IN))
        Slides
      • 09:55
        NLO QCD Production of Higgs plus jets with GoSam 20m
        After reviewing the main features of the GoSam framework for automated one-loop calculations, we will show a selection recent phenomenological results obtained with it. In particular, we will present results for NLO QCD corrections to the production of Higgs boson in conjunction with jets at the LHC.
        Speaker: Giovanni Ossola (City University of New York (US))
        Slides
      • 10:15
        NLO QCD corrections to the production of W+W+jj in vector-boson fusion at the LHC 15m
        Vector-boson fusion processes involving the scattering of vector bosons constitute an irreducible background to Higgs-boson production in association with two jets, as they share the same kinematical characteristics. It is therefore desirable to obtain accurate theoretical predictions and error estimates for these background processes with accuracy that goes beyond the leading order. I show an efficient method for calculating the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to both resonant and non-resonant contributions to the vector boson fusion processes and present results for a class of processes associated with production of two W+, including the complete set of electroweak leading-order diagrams for the six-particle final state and quantitatively assessing the size of the s-channel and interference contributions in VBF kinematics. The QCD corrections stay below about 10% for all considered observables, while the residual scale dependence is at the level of ~1%.
        Speaker: Lucia Hosekova
        Slides
    • 10:35 11:00
      Coffee 25m
    • 11:00 13:00
      Top and Electroweak Physics F2 (KTH Campus)

      F2

      KTH Campus

      • 11:00
        Top-quark Pair Production in a Running Mass Scheme 20m
        Between the Tevatron and LHC, top-quark physics is now becoming an area for precision physics. This has lead to an increase in theoretical activity to match the experimental accuracy of top anti-top production. In this talk I discuss the difficulty in properly defining the top-quark mass as measured by experiments and present results for differential distributions of top-quark pair production in a running mass scheme. The use of such a scheme shows better convergence in the perturbative expansion and improves the scale dependence as opposed to the typical on-shell scheme.
        Speaker: Matthew Dowling (DESY)
        Slides
      • 11:20
        Top quark mass measurements in ATLAS 20m
        Measurements of the top quark mass in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider are presented. They are performed in various channels: single lepton, dilepton and all-hadronic final states. The most precise measurement is obtained in the single lepton channel using a 3-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor, and a relative b-jet to light-jet energy scale factor.
        Speaker: Gabriele Compostella (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (D)
        Slides
      • 11:40
        CMS Measurements of the Top Quark Mass 20m
        Measurements of the top quark mass are presented using data collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. Analyses in several decay channels of top quark pair events are employed to determine the top quark mass. The results are combined and compared to the world average.
        Speaker: Dr. Hartmut Stadie (Hamburg University (DE))
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron 20m
        The top quark is the heaviest known elementary particle and its mass is a free parameter of the Standard Model. We present the most recent measurement of the top quark mass by the D0 collaboration at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider in lepton-plus-jet and dilepton channels.
        Speaker: Reinhild Peters (Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen (DE))
        Diapositivas
      • 12:20
        New approaches in determining the mass of the top quark: alternative techniques and differential measurements 20m
        Measurements of the top quark mass employing alternative methods are presented using data collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at the LHC in the years 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 !TeV. The alternative methods include the use of endpoint distributions as well as the study of possible model dependencies of the top mass measurement on the event kinematics. Measurements of the difference between the masses of top and anti-top quarks are also presented. Furthermore, the top quark mass and also alpha_S are extracted from the measured top quark pair cross section.
        Speaker: Stijn Blyweert (Vrije Universiteit Brussel (BE))
        Slides
      • 12:40
        Top quark mass measurements at and above threshold in e+e- collisions at Linear Colliders 20m
        Linear electron-positron colliders provide possibilities for top quark mass measurements with unprecedented precision, which are of high relevance to explore the stability of the Standard Model. Two complementary techniques for the measurement of the top mass in e+e- annihilation exist: The direct reconstruction of the invariant mass of the top quark decay products at energies above the top pair production threshold and the measurement of the mass in a threshold scan. Both of these approaches have recently been studied for CLIC using GEANT4-based detector simulations and full event reconstruction including realistic physics and beam-induced background levels. For both techniques, total errors of around 100 MeV or better are achieved, including a first study of expected systematic uncertainties. For the threshold scan, the precision at ILC is also studied to provide a comparison of the two linear collider technologies.
        Speaker: Dr. Philipp Roloff (CERN)
        Slides
    • 11:00 13:00
      Higgs and New Physics F1 (KTH Campus)

      F1

      KTH Campus

      • 11:00
        On the vacuum stability of SUSY models 12m
        The existence of multiple non-equivalent minima of the scalar potential in SUSY models both raises technical challenges and introduces interesting physics. The technical challenges are now that one has to find several minima and evaluate which is the deepest, as well as calculate the tunneling time from a false vacuum to the true vacuum. In this talk I will present studies of the vacuum stability and R-parity violating minima in a B-L extended MSSM, color and charge breaking minima in the MSSM and the technical framework used for this analysis in the form of the newly developed software package "Vevacious".
        Speaker: José Eliel Camargo Molina (W)
        Slides
      • 11:15
        Search for RP violating Supersymmetry 12m
        In this talk, the latest results from CMS on RP violating Supersymmetry are reviewed. We present results using up to 20/fb of data from the 8 TeV LHC run of 2012. Interpretations of the experimental results in terms of production of squarks, gluinos, charginos, neutralinos, and sleptons within RP violating susy models are presented.
        Speaker: Altan Cakir (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
        Slides
      • 11:30
        Searches for supersymmetry in resonance production, R-parity violating signatures and events with long-lived particles with the ATLAS detector 12m
        An extended QCD sector beyond the minimal supersymmetric standard model or the admission of R-parity violation introduces new signatures to the search for supersymmetry at the LHC. Strongly interacting resonances may decay to jets, sleptons may decay via lepton-flavour violating processes and lightest supersymmetric particles may decay into many leptons with or without missing transverse momentum. Several supersymmetric models also predict massive long-lived supersymmetric particles. Such particles may be detected through abnormal specific energy loss, appearing or disappearing tracks, displaced vertices, long time-of-flight or late calorimetric energy deposits. The talk presents recent results from searches supersymmetry in resonance production, R-parity violating signatures and events with long-lived particles with the ATLAS detector.
        Speaker: Wolfgang Ehrenfeld (Universitaet Bonn (DE))
        Slides
      • 11:45
        LHC searches examined via the RPV MSSM 12m
        We confront a diverse set of simplified models from the R-parity violating MSSM with the ATLAS and CMS new physics searches. We identify weakly constrained final states and discuss ideas for analysis techniques that would be able to address some of them.
        Speaker: Yevgeny Kats (Rutgers University)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Searches for highly displaced jets with the ATLAS detector 12m
        The discovery of a Higgs particle at the LHC makes it even more interesting to look for extensions of the SM in which a Higgs particle is decaying to a hidden sector particle. These searches require good understanding of the detector as they look for vertices far away from the interaction point. We report on searches for highly displaced jets using data recorded in 2012 at sqrt(s)=8 TeV centre-of-mass energy by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.
        Speaker: Massimo Corradi (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 12:15
        Search for long-lived particles at CMS 12m
        The latest results on long-lived particles at CMS are presented. Searches include the search for displaced jets, multiply charged particles, fractionally charged particles, and R hadrons.
        Speaker: Loic Quertenmont (Universite Catholique de Louvain (BE))
        Slides
      • 12:30
        Search for Magnetic Monopoles in Volcanic Rock 12m
        A direct search for relic monpoles has been made with a SQUID-based magnetometer using volcanic rock samples from the Arctic and Antarctic regions. Relic monopoles would have drifted due to the Earth's internal magnetic field. Enhanced monopole concentrations would therefore occur in the geomagnetic poles, thereby suppressing the sensitivity of previous matter searches. This search was sensitive to monopoles carrying the Dirac charge and with masses up to 10^13 GeV.
        Speaker: Dr. David Milstead (Stockholm University)
        Slides
      • 12:45
        Magnetic monopole searches with the MoEDAL experiment at the LHC 12m
        The magnetic monopole appears in many new physics theories and its existence would explain the quantisation of electric charge. MoEDAL is the latest approved LHC experiment, designed to search directly for monopoles. It has now taken data for the first time. The MoEDAL detectors are based on two complementary techniques: nuclear-track detectors are sensitive to the high-ionisation signature expected from a monopole, and the new magnetic monopole trapper (MMT) relies on the stopping and trapping of monopoles inside an aluminium array which is then analysed with a superconducting magnetometer. Preliminary results obtained with the MoEDAL MMT will be presented, where monopoles with charge above the fundamental unit magnetic charge or mass above 1.5 TeV are probed for the first time at the LHC.
        Speaker: Philippe Mermod (Universite de Geneve (CH))
        Slides
    • 11:00 13:00
      Flavour Physics and fundamental symmetries D1 (KTH Campus)

      D1

      KTH Campus

      • 11:00
        Implications of Br(μ-> e γ) and Δa_mu on muonic lepton flavour violating processes 15m
        We study the implications of the experimental results on the \mu -> e\gamma decay rate and the muon anomalous magnetic moment, on muonic lepton flavor violating processes, such as \mu -> 3 e and \mu N -> e N. We use a model independent approach in this analysis, where these processes are considered to be loop induced by exchanging spin 1/2 and spin 0 particles. We explore two complementary cases, which has no or has an internal (built-in) cancellation mechanism in amplitudes. Our main results are as following. (a) Bounds from rates are used to constrain parameters, such as coupling constants and masses. These constraints can be easily updated by simple scalings, if the experimental situations change. (b) The muon g-2 data favors non-chiral interactions. (c) In \mu -> 3 e and \mu N -> e N processes, Z-penguin diagrams may play some role, while box diagrams contributions are usually highly constrained. (d) In the first case (without any built-in cancellation mechanism), using the recent \mu -> e\gamma bound, we find that \mu -> 3e and \mu N -> e N rates are bounded below the present experimental limits by two to three orders of magnitudes in general. Furthermore, by comparing \Delta a_\mu and Br(\mu->e\gamma) data, the couplings of \mu and e are found to be highly hierarchical. Additional suppression mechanism should be called for. (e) In the second case (with a built-in cancellation mechanism), mixing angles can provide additional suppression factors to satisfy the \Delta a_\mu and Br(\mu -> e\gamma) bounds. While the \mu-> 3 e rate remains suppressed, the bounds on \mu N -> e N rates, implicated from the latest \mu -> e\gamma bound, can be relaxed significantly and can be just below the present experimental limits.
        Speaker: Chun-Khiang Chua
        Slides
      • 11:15
        Latest results of the MEG experiment 15m
        We present recent results of the MEG experiment, which has been searching for the Lepton Flavour Violating decay mu->e gamma since several years. In a combined dataset corresponding to 3.6 x 10**14 stopped muons on target we didn't find any evidence for this decay and we established an upper bound on the mu->e gamma branching ratio of 5.7 x 10**(-13) at 90% C.L., which improves our world best limit by a factor four. We discuss also the expected final sensitivity of the MEG experiment.
        Speaker: Fabrizio Cei (U)
        Slides
      • 11:30
        Upgrade of MEG experiment 15m
        We present the upgrade program of MEG experiment to search for the lepton-flavor-violating decay, mu to e gamma, aiming for a sensitivity enhancement of one order of magnitude compared to the final MEG result. The key feature of this program is to increase the rate capability of all detectors to enable running at more than twice higher beam intensity, which is the intensity frontier of DC muon beam provided by PSI accelerator facility, with significantly improving the efficiency and resolutions of detectors at both positron and gamma sides. In this talk, we present how we achieve it. The progress of R&D, which has been underway since 2011, is also reported. Data-taking could start in 2016 and the goal sensitivity will be achieved for a running time of 3 years. The upgraded MEG will push the unprecedented exploration of physics beyond the SM and lead the intensity frontier of particle physics in LHC era.
        Speaker: Yusuke Uchiyama (The University of Tokyo)
        Slides
      • 11:45
        Measurements of tau hadronic branching fractions and spectra, and search for second class current tau decays at BaBar 15m
        We present a set of preliminary and final results on tau branching fractions and invariant mass spectra, and a search for the second class current decay tau -> pi eta'(958) nu_tau. The results include new studies of a large number 3 and 5-prong tau decay modes either inclusive or classified according the hadronic resonance content (K0S, eta, omega, etc.). All results are based on the analysis of the complete BaBar data set consisting on 430 million tau lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb^-1, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e+ e− storage rings.
        Speaker: Prof. Roger Barlow (MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Belle II at SuperKEKB, a super B factory 15m
        B factories have successfully confirmed that the Standard Model with the CKM matrix offers a correct description of the quark weak transitions and of CP violation. The next generation B factory (the so called super B factory) will search for New Physics effects by looking for departures from the Standard Model predictions in precision measurements. For such studies, a 50 times larger data sample is needed, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 50 ab^-1. To achieve the necessary increase of event rates by a factor of 40, a substantial upgrade is required both of the accelerator complex as well as of the detector. To maintain the excellent performance of the detector, the critical issue will be to mitigate the effects of higher backgrounds (by a factor of 10 to 20), leading to an increase in occupancy and radiation damage, as well as fake hits and pile-up noise in the electromagnetic calorimeter. Higher event rates require substantial modifications in the trigger scheme, DAQ and computing relative to the current experiments. In addition, improved vertex detection and hadron identification are needed, and similarly good (or better) hermeticity is required. We will discuss the motivation for a future super B factory at KEK and its expected physics potential, as well as the requirements for the accelerator and for the detector. Finally, the present status of the project will be presented together with the plans for the future.
        Speaker: Zdenek Dolezal (Charles University (CZ))
        Slides
      • 12:15
        Identifying New Physics through correlations in quark flavour violating processes 25m
        I will review detailed analyses of flavour violation in a number of extensions of the Standard Model performed in 2012 and 2013. In addition to various model independent patterns of flavour violation originating in tree-level FCNCs mediated by Z', Z and heavy scalars I will present the results in a Minimal Theory for fermion masses. Particular emphasis will be put on correlations between various observables. In addition to Delta F=2 transitions most prominent rare $B_d$, $B_s$ and K decays like $B_{s,d}\to\mu^+\mu^-$, $B\to K(K*)\nu\bar\nu$ and $K\to\ pi \nu\bar\nu$ will be discussed.
        Speaker: Andrzej Buras (TU-Munich)
        Slides
    • 11:00 13:00
      Cosmology and Gravity F3 (KTH Campus)

      F3

      KTH Campus

      • 11:00
        Gravitational waves from first order phase transitions 45m
        A first order phase transition in the early universe acts as a source of gravitational waves. The gravitational waves are produced by the collision of the broken phase bubbles and by the magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the primordial plasma stirred by the bubble collision. It will be shown how the shape and amplitude of the gravitational wave spectrum can be predicted by general arguments based on the source properties, such as its time evolution and space structure. Detection prospects will be discussed especially for the electroweak phase transition, in connection with the eLISA mission.
        Speaker: Chiara Caprini (CEA-Saclay)
        Slides
      • 11:45
        Cosmology and particle physics beyond Higgs boson 45m
        If LHC finds no signatures of new physics (thus confirming the Standard Model) the necessity to explain the observed beyond-the-Standard-Model (BSM) phenomena, in particular neutrino masses, Dark Matter and matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe, should largely shape the further development of particle physics. I will describe a unique testable approach that provides the resolution of all these BSM problems. I will outline an experimental programme (combination of accelerator searches for new particles with high intensity proton beams and an X-ray cosmic mission) that is capable of discovering the particles responsible for all three mentioned major BSM phenomena, determining their properties and having non-trivial cross-check between accelerator and cosmic experiments. In the case of negative result the proposed program will rule out the whole model completely.
        Speaker: Oleg Ruchayskiy (EPFL)
        Slides
      • 12:30
        Cosmological implications and LHC signatures of the E6 inspired SUSY models 30m
        We consider the implications of the $E_6$ inspired supersymmetric (SUSY) models with an additional $U(1)_N$ gauge symmetry under which right--handed neutrinos have zero charge for collider phenomenology and cosmology. To ensure anomaly cancellation and gauge coupling unification the low energy matter content of these models involve three $27$ representations of $E_6$ and a pair of $SU(2)$ doublets from additional $27$ and $\overline{27}$. Thus the considered models predict $Z'$ boson and extra exotic matter beyond the MSSM. We argue that exotic states can play a key role in generation of baryon asymmetry of the Universe through leptogenesis. In particular, the results of our analysis suggest that the successful thermal leptogenesis can be achieved without encountering problems related with the overproduction of gravitinos. Exotic states can also give rise to new channels of Higgs decays. We study the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and explore the two--loop renormalisation group (RG) flow of couplings in the framework of these models. We also consider the production of the Z' and exotic quarks at the LHC that may provide spectacular new physics signals. In the considered models there can be two states which are absolutely stable and can contribute to the dark matter density.
        Speakers: Dr. Roman Nevzorov (University of Glasgow) , Roman Nevzorov (University of Hawaii) , Roman Nevzorov (ITEP)
    • 11:00 13:00
      Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ions D3 (KTH Campus)

      D3

      KTH Campus

      • 11:00
        Recent developments in jet quenching theory 20m
        Motivated by the new experimental capabilities of the LHC and the new results from heavy-ion experiments, several extensions of the standard calculations of energy loss have been made recently. In this presentation, I will provide a short overview of recent developments in jet quenching theory. First, I will discuss some improvements computed by different groups to implement energy-momentum conservation in a rigorous way, relaxing some of the assumptions that were made in the standard jet quenching calculations. Second, quantum interference effects between different parton emitters when propagating through an extended coloured medium will be considered, within a quark-antiquark antenna as a model setup. Finally, other recent extensions as the modification of the colour flow inside a jet in a QCD medium with respect to vacuum, and the use of SCET to compute transverse momentum broadening and medium-induced gluon radiation, will be very briefly presented.
        Speaker: Liliana Apolinario (Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (ES))
        Slides
      • 11:20
        Minimum Bias Charged Jet Spectra in Proton-Lead Collisions with the ALICE Detector at the LHC 16m
        Rüdiger Haake, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany on behalf of the ALICE collaboration Highly energetic jets are sensitive probes for the kinematics and the topology of high energy collisions. They are produced in an early stage of the collision from hard scattered partons that hadronize and eventually form jets as a spray of charged and neutral particles. The measurement in pPb provides an important reference to study the effects of cold nuclear matter on jet production and hadronization. This is possible because the formation of a hot and dense medium like in PbPb is not expected. Besides the comparison to PbPb collisions, pPb analyses can also be an important constraint for the nuclear parton density functions. In terms of analysis techniques, the exact evaluation of the background from the underlying event is an important ingredient. It is much smaller than in PbPb so that the methods for background estimation need to be refined. Our jet analysis of pPb collisions at \sqrt{s_NN} = 5.02 TeV is performed on data taken by the ALICE detector at the LHC in the beginning of 2013. The focus of our analysis lies on the minimum bias jet spectra and their comparison to the spectra from pp collisions. For this analysis various estimates for the background and its fluctuations have been tested in pPb and PYTHIA MC simulations. Also, different unfolding settings have been evaluated.
        Speaker: Rudiger Haake (Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (DE))
        Slides
      • 11:36
        Inclusive Spectrum of Fully Reconstructed Jets in Central Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s)=200 GeV by the STAR Collaboration 16m
        Jets are collimated sprays of particles arising from the fragmentation of hard-scattered partons in high-energy collisions. In collisions of heavy nuclei, jets serve as probes of the hot and dense nuclear matter created, and the study of the modification of their structure due to interaction with the surrounding medium (known as "jet quenching") is an important tool for understanding the medium properties. One can learn much about jet quenching from studying single particles and few-particle correlations, however, only full jet reconstruction can lead to a comprehensive understanding of jet quenching and corresponding medium properties. Due to the large and fluctuating background, full jet reconstruction in heavy-ion collisions is an extremely challenging task. In this talk, we present a new measurement of the inclusive spectrum of fully reconstructed jets in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s)=200 GeV, by the STAR collaboration at RHIC. We utilize an experimental technique in which the jet reconstruction is stable against emission of an additional soft hadron ("infrared safety"), even in the high-multiplicity environment of such events. The large combinatorial background is suppressed by a threshold cut on the leading hadron of each jet candidate. This cut is however unsafe against collinear splitting of hard partons (i.e. a true jet may be rejected for certain splitting configurations), and its systematics are explored. The influence of the background density fluctuations on the inclusive jet spectrum is then corrected by an iterative unfolding technique based on Bayes's Theorem. We compare this measurement to the jet spectrum in p+p and d+Au collisions, and to model predictions.
        Speaker: Jan Rusnak (N)
        Slides
      • 11:52
        Baryon production mechanisms and jet energy loss in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies 20m
        Hadron production in relativistic heavy ion collisions usually consists of two main channels in the intermediate-pT region at RHIC and LHC energies: parton coalescence/recombination and jet fragmentation. We have explored a new channel, namely hadron production from strong time dependent coherent field produced in heavy ion collisions. One can investigate direct hadron production from strong field or quark-antiquark production and later hadron formation from these elementary ingredients. We focus on pair-production and investigate the influence of this new channel on baryon production. In the momentum window of 5 GeV/c < pT < 25 GeV/c this channel could yield an extra baryon production not considered earlier. However, in this momentum window jet energy loss is strongly modifying hadron spectra in heavy ion collisions. The overlap of hadron production yields and energy loss effects creates a very complex environment, which is worthwhile to investigate for obtaining information on the hot and dense partonic matter produced in heavy ion collisions. We study the details of this overlap and investigate it at RHIC and LHC energies. We present our recent results obtained on the basis of our previously published papers [1][2]. [1] P. Levai, D. Berenyi, A. Pasztor, V.V. Skokov, J. Phys. Rev. G 38, 124155 (2011); [2] D. Berenyi, A. Pasztor, V.V. Skokov, P. Levai, arXiv: 1208.0448 [hep-ph].
        Speaker: Peter Levai (Hungarian Academy of Sciences (HU))
        Slides
      • 12:12
        Probing pPb collisions with jets in CMS 16m
        Jets are an important tool to probe the medium produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. In PbPb collisions a significant energy loss (jet quenching) of the partons traversing the hot and dense medium has been observed and quantified through a variety of measurements: dijet momentum imbalance, photon-jet correlations, measurements of the fragmentation pattern and the jet shapes, charged hadron nuclear modification factors. It is expected that in pPb collisions the hot medium is not produced. It is important to study the effect of the cold nuclear medium on the hard-scattering probes. The first CMS measurements of jets in pPb collisions will be presented.
        Speaker: Matthew Nguyen (Ecole Polytechnique (FR))
        Slides
      • 12:28
        High-pT probes in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector 16m
        ATLAS presents the first result of the measurement of the jets and electroweak bosons in proton-lead collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=5.02 TeV. The data was obtained during the LHC 2013 proton-lead with integrated luminosity of approximately 30nb-1. Forward jet production in proton-lead collisions is expected to be sensitive to saturation of parton distribution in the lead nucleus. ATLAS measurements of the dijet azimuthal angle difference distributions in p+Pb collisions will be presented as a function of centrality and compared to similar measurements in p+p collisions at 2.76 TeV. The first results on the electroweak boson production rates and rapidity distributions as a function of collision centrality shed light on significance of the initial state effect in proton-lead collisions at LHC.
        Speaker: Ewelina Maria Lobodzinska (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
        Slides
      • 12:44
        Jet quenching with CMS 16m
        An overview of the most recent results on jet quenching physics obtained using PbPb collision data collected with the CMS experiment at 2.76 TeV will be presented. These measurements make use of many different observables, including momentum imbalance of dijet and photon-jet events, nuclear modification factor RAA, as well as jet fragmentation functions, jet shapes, and flavor dependence of jet quenching. All these measurements in PbPb collisions will be presented and compared with observations in 2.76 TeV pp collisions to probe for distortions from energy loss in the hot and dense medium. Since many of these observables have low correlation to one-another they serve as useful independent confirmations of the quenching properties.
        Speaker: Pelin Kurt Garberson (University of Illinois at Chicago (US))
        Slides
    • 11:00 13:00
      Detector R&D and data handling E2 (KTH Campus)

      E2

      KTH Campus

      • 11:00
        Intrinsic n-well MAPS for particle physics 15m
        The Arachnid collaboration has been set up in the UK to develop CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors. The first device of this collaboration is named Cherwell. The Cherwell device consists of several arrays of pixels optimised either for vertexing or for calorimetry. For the former, two subarrays were designed. The first one has 96x48 pixels on a 25 um pitch. Each pixel consists of a low-noise 4T pixel, lifted from the previously tested sensor FORTIS. The readout is on a rolling shutter base with a fine resolution 12-bit, single-slope column parallel ADC. The second array has a similar structure but the column-parallel ADC was folded back into the array, to generate strixels. The use of the INMAPS process allows the PMOS transistors for the ADC to be isolated into deep P-wells islands, thus preserving the 100% fill factor of the pixel. The pixels for calorimetry are arranged into 2 arrays: one of 96x48 pixels on a 25um pitch and the one of 48x24 pixels on a 50 um pitch. Readout is done through column-parallel ADCs as the ones used for the tracking array. The pixel architecture is built around the same 4T pixel mentioned above, but has additional devices to provide snapshot and in-pixel correlated double sampling (CDS) capability. At the periphery of the 25um pixel array, additional circuitry is added to provide charge summing of 2x2 pixels during readout. The Cherwell sensor was manufactured on a standard resistivity as well as on high (>1kOhm cm) epitaxial wafers. This latter would allow the charge collection to be helped by an electric drift field. The sensor has been characterised with different sources of radiation, and studied in test-beam CERN. Experimental results will be presented at the conference. We have also designed a new device, Cherwell 2, as a prototype for a silicon tracker to be used in the upgrade of ALICE.
        Speaker: Tamsin Nooney (University of London (GB))
        Slides
      • 11:15
        Radiation-hard Active Pixel Detectors based on HV-CMOS Technology for HL-LHC Detector Upgrades 15m
        State-of-the-art particle physics detectors at colliders contain a pixel detector as heart of their particle tracker to cope with the large density of particle tracks near the interaction point. For radiation damage reasons, mostly hybrid detectors were used which comprise a silicon pixel sensor fabricated on high-resistivity FZ silicon and a bump-bonded readout chip in deep sub-micron technology. The requirement for bump-bonding and mechanical demands constrained the pixel pitch/size to larger than ~50-100µm and also led to elevated costs which prevented the instrumentation of larger areas with pixel detectors. This is an issue in particular for HL-LHC upgrades of the existing trackers where the areas instrumented with pixel detectors will be significantly larger due to the higher occupancy at elevated luminosities. Deep-submicron HV CMOS processes feature moderate bulk resistivity and HV capability and are therefore good candidates for drift-based radiation-hard monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS). It is possible to apply up to 100V of bias voltage leading to a depletion depth of ~10-20 um. Thanks to the high electric field, charge collection is fast and nearly insensitive to radiation-induced trapping. Due to the still rather high dopant concentration, almost no radiation effect is expected to the depletion voltage. We explore the concept of using such a HV CMOS process to produce a drop-in replacement for traditional radiation hard silicon sensors. Such active sensors contain only simple circuits to amplify and either discriminate or condition the basic pulses created by charged particles. A traditional readout chip is still needed to receive and organize the data from the active sensor and handle high level functionality such as trigger management. The devices are tested with the ATLAS FE-I4 pixel readout chip and the the ATLAS ABCN and the LHCb Beetle strip readout chips. Either strip-like or pixel-like readout can be selected on the same device. While a readout chip is still needed (unlike the case of an ideal MAPS device that contains all sensing and processing functionality in one), the active sensor approach offers many advantages: such sensors can be fabricated in a fully commercial CMOS process without need for special substrates or processing and will therefore cost less than traditional diode sensors, they can be thinned to the limit of the collection layer resulting in much lower mass, they require relatively low bias voltage, and they can operate at room temperature or with only moderate cooling after irradiation. In addition, they can contain sub-pixels with smaller pitch than the readout chip and improve the spatial resolution compared to standard sensors by encoding the hit sub-pixels in the signal sent to the readout chip. From a practical perspective, maintaining the traditional separation between sensing and processing functions lowers development cost and makes use of existing infrastructure. Active sensors can also be seen as a first step towards 3D-integrated electronics in which the analogue tier contains the sensor. To explore the performance and radiation hardness of active sensors, the HV2FEI4 ASIC was produced in the AMS H18 process. It is compatible with the pixel and strip readout chips mentioned above and features a matrix of 60 by 24 pixels with a pixel cell size of 33 by 125 um. Thanks to relying on active circuits, capacitive coupling to the pixel readout chip is feasible and is explored with HV2FEI4 chips glued to FE-I4s. The option to replace the expensive and time-consuming bump-bonding by gluing would significantly lower the cost of future large-scale Pixel Detector upgrades and enable the instrumentation of larger areas with pixel detectors. For comparison, bump-bonding the HV2FEI4 with gold stud-bumps is still possible. The HV2FEI4 pixels are combined to match the readout multiplicity of the respective chips: for the pixel readout, three HV-CMOS pixels are multiplexed onto one FE-I4 pixel such that the hit pixels are encoded by the pulse height. In this way, the position resolution of the HV-CMOS sensor can be significantly better than the granularity of the readout chip suggests. For the strip readout, the pixel cells are combined to form virtual strips. Here, the z-position of the hit is encoded via the discriminator's pulse height and can be evaluated by analogue strip readout electronics like the Beetle chip. The presentation will give an overview of the characterization results of the HV2FEI4 chip and highlight first experience with both pixel and strip readout. In addition, the status of the irradiation programme will be summarized and future prospects will be discussed.
        Speaker: Sergio Gonzalez Sevilla (Universite de Geneve (CH))
        Slides
      • 11:30
        DEPFET pixel detectors for future electron-positron experiments 15m
        The DEPFET Collaboration develops highly granular, ultra-thin pixel detectors for outstanding vertex reconstruction at future collider experiments. A DEPFET sensor, by the integration of a field effect transistor on a fully depleted silicon bulk, provides simultaneously position sensitive detector capabilities and in-pixel amplification. The characterization of the latest DEPFET prototypes has proven that a comfortable signal to noise ratio and excellent single point resolution can be achieved for a sensor thickness of 50 micrometers. The close to final auxiliary ASICs have been produced and found to operate a DEPFET pixel detector of the latest generation with the required read-out speed. A complete detector concept is being developed for the Belle II experiment at the new Japanese super flavour factory. DEPFET is not only the technology of choice for the Belle II vertex detector, but also a solid candidate for the ILC. Therefore, in this talk, the status of DEPFET R&D project is reviewed in the light of the requirements of the vertex detector at future electron-positron colliders.
        Speaker: Dr. Carlos Marinas (University of Bonn)
        Slides
      • 11:45
        Development of inner tracking systems equipped with CMOS pixel sensors for future collider experiments 15m
        The physics goals of a growing number of subatomic physics experiments assume vertexing and tracking performances calling for a specific pixel technology, which offers a high data rate capability as well as precision, low power and cost standards departing from those of the most widely used devices. CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS), and the ultra-light systems they equip, address this challenge. Because of their micron level resolution, their 10-20 µm thin sensitive volume and their fully integrated, low power, FEE, CPS have already been chosen for vertex detectors of heavy ion collision experiments (STAR at RHIC, CBM at FAIR, ...). A new step was achieved in 2012 with the decision to base on CPS the upgrade of the whole, nearly 10 m2 wide, Inner Tracker System of the ALICE experiment at LHC. CPS are actually being considered for a number of AA, pp and e+e- collision experiments, where the reconstruction of displaced vertices and tracks calls for micrometric precision in a high hit density environment. The capability of CPS to comply with the most ambitious of these requirements relies on a recently addressed CMOS technology, which was extensively tested with beam particles at the CERN-SPS in 2012. The test results confirm the possibility to deal with particle rates in the order of 10^7/cm2/s and with radiation loads in the order of 1-10 MRad and 10^13-10^14 n_eq/cm2, depending on the operating temperature. The proposed talk will provide an overview of the measured performances for these CPS prototypes and explain the proposed development path to reach real size sensors with full functionality. We will finally underline how the design of inner tracking systems could benefit from the CPS performances flexibility, through the combination of several layers equipped with CPS featuring different optimizations.
        Speaker: Isabelle Ripp-Baudot (IPHC Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Diamond Sensors for HE Frontier Experiments 15m
        With the first three years of the LHC running complete, ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond has been used extensively in beam condition monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and all LHC experiments. This talk will describe the lessons learned in constructing the ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) and Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM) both of which are based on CVD diamond with the goal of elucidating the issues that should be addressed for future diamond based detectors. The talk will also present the first beam test results of prototypes of a new diamond detector geometry which should further enhance the radiation tolerance of diamond.
        Speaker: Dmitry Hits (Eidgenoessische Tech. Hochschule Zuerich (CH))
        Slides
      • 12:15
        Development of large size Micromegas detectors for the upgrade of the ATLAS experiments. 15m
        The luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN foresees a luminosity increase by a factor 5 compared to the LHC. To cope with the corresponding rate increase, the Muon System of the ATLAS experiment at CERN needs to be upgraded. In the first station of the high rapidity region, micromegas detectors have been chosen as the main tracking chambers but will, at the same time, also contribute to the trigger. We describe the R&D efforts that led to the construction of the first 2.4 x 1 m2 large micromegas detectors at CERN and outline the next steps towards the construction of the 1500 m2 of micromegas detectors for the ATLAS upgrade. The technical solutions, including the resistive spark protection, adopted in the construction of the two chambers as well as results on the detector performance with cosmic rays are shown.
        Speaker: Michele Bianco (CERN)
        Slides
      • 12:30
        Precision Tracking with small-strip Thin Gap Chamber (sTGC): from Test Beam to ATLAS NSW Upgrade 15m
        The super-LHC (sLHC) is expected to operate with a luminosity of 7x1034 cm-2s-1 after the forthcoming luminosity upgrade which will increase by approximately a factor five, both the physics event rate and the beam background. It is essential to update the present inner most Muon Spectrometer components in the forward region to cope with these high rates. The small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) has been chosen to provide both a fast trigger and high precision muon tracking for the ATLAS New Small Wheel (NSW). Developments of sTGC detector have been carried out over the past years, different chambers have been tested with cosmic rays, in test beam and under different irradiations. Large prototypes (1.2 x 0.8 m2) containing four gas gaps, each gap providing pads, strips and wires, yielded a position resolution better than 70µm at perpendicular incidence angle and less than 130µm for 30 degrees incidence angle. The results have been repeated with different front-end electronics and have been confirmed during a combined TGC-sMDT test beam where sMDT provided precision tracking. The detectors have been shown to withstand a high total irradiation dose equivalent to 6 Coulomb/cm of wire. The tests of a new electronic chain (including the new VMM chip under development by BNL) have also been realized. The results of these various tests are presented. The new, 8 layer sTGC and 8 layer MM (MicroMegas) based, ATLAS New Small Wheel (NSW) muon detector under high beam background will be reviewed and dedicated simulation studies will be presented. The simulation includes the response of the detector and the readout electronics. These studies show that the 8 layer sTGC detector provides robust precision tracking with high efficiency, where the expected muon PT resolution is around 10% for muons with 1TeV transverse momentum.
        Speaker: Yan Benhammou (Tel Aviv University (IL))
        Slides
      • 12:45
        Upgrade of the CMS Muon System 15m
        The CMS muon system is based on three types of gaseous detectors, RPC, CSC and DT. While operating very well in the present conditions, upgrades are foreseen for each of the subsystems, necessary to cope with the increased pile-up, coming along with higher rates and radiation. Electronics can be modernized by profiting from recent developments. In addition, detector R&D is ongoing, to possibly install other types of detectors, allowing to improve the trigger and tracking capabilities in the forward region. The upgrade programs and the relative R&D will be outlined in this presentation.
        Speaker: Marcello Abbrescia (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
    • 11:00 13:00
      QCD: QCD + Electroweak physics E1 (KTH Campus)

      E1

      KTH Campus

      • 11:00
        Exclusive diboson production and anomalous quartic gauge couplings at CMS 15m
        We present studies of exclusive WW production via photon-photon exchange, using data collected by the CMS detector at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV. The results are interpreted in terms of limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings.
        Speakers: Jonathan Hollar (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) , Jonathan Jason Hollar (Universite Catholique de Louvain (BE))
        Slides
      • 11:15
        Photon, diphoton and photon+jet production measured with the ATLAS detector 15m
        Isolated prompt photons provide a direct probe of short­distance physics, complementary to that provided by measurements of jets or vector­bosons. The data are sensitive to the gluon density of the proton. The inclusive prompt photon cross sections have been measured over a wide range of transverse momenta; the diphoton cross section has also been measured as a function of diphoton mass, total transverse momentum and azimuthal separation; the cross section for photons produced in association with jets is also measured. The results are compared to the predictions of next­to­leading­order QCD.
        Speaker: Mark Stockton (McGill University (CA))
        Slides
      • 11:30
        Electroweak production of Z bosons with forward-backward jets at CMS 15m
        Speaker: Pedro Vieira De Castro Ferreira Da Silva (CERN)
        Slides
      • 11:45
        Measurement of W and Z boson production with the ATLAS detector 10m
        The production of the W and Z bosons is a standard candle process at the LHC. Precise total cross section measurements, in the fiducial region of the measurement and extrapolated to full phase space are presented. The differential Z/gamma∗ and the charge dependent W+ and W­ cross sections are provided in bins of boson rapidity and lepton pseudorapidity, respectively. The results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and to predictions computed at NNLO QCD for different NNLO sets of parton distribution functions. A measurement of angular correlations in Drell–Yan lepton pairs for neutral current process via the phi* observable is also presented. This variable probes the same physics as the Z/gamma* boson transverse momentum (pT) with a better experimental resolution, especially for low transverse momenta. The measurement using phi* and the direct measurement of pT are compared to predictions based on QCD calculations and predictions from different Monte Carlo event generators.
        Speaker: Alessandro Tricoli (CERN)
        Slides
      • 11:55
        Measurements of jet production in association with W and Z bosons with the ATLAS detector 10m
        The production of jets in association with a W or Z boson in proton­proton collisions at 7 TeV represent an important process to study QCD in a multi­scale environment. The cross sections, differential in several kinematics variables, have been measured up to high jet multiplicities and compared to new higher­order QCD calculations. The ratio of (Z + a single jet)/(W + a single jet) can provide a very precise test of QCD and has also been measured. Overall, the cross sections demonstrate the need for the inclusion of higher­multiplicity matrix elements in the calculations, even in cases where a parton shower simulation is present.
        Speaker: Alessandro Tricoli (CERN)
        Slides
      • 12:05
        Measurement of W/Z boson + jet production differential cross sections 10m
        Associated production of a W/Z bosons with jets are studied as a function of various kinematic observables. We present measurements of the ratios of cross sections, $\sigma(p\bar{p}\to Z+b~\text{jet})$/$\sigma(p\bar{p}\to Z+\text{jet})$, $\sigma(p\bar{p}\to Z+c~\text{jet})$/$\sigma(p\bar{p}\to Z+\text{jet})$ and $\sigma(p\bar{p}\to Z+c~\text{jet})$/$\sigma(p\bar{p}\to Z+b~\text{jet})$, performed by the DO Collaboration in Run II of the Tevatron \ppbar collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96~TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7~fb^{-1}. Results are compared to predictions from next-to-leading order calculations and various Monte Carlo event generators. We also present a comprehensive analysis of inclusive $W(\to e\nu)+n-jet (n\geq 1,2,3,4)$ production in proton-antiproton collisions. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of a variety of kinematic variables. In addition, the mean number of jets in an event containing a W boson is measured as a function of H_T, and as a function of the rapidity separations between the two highest-p_T jets and between the most widely separated jets in rapidity. Finally, the probability for third-jet emission in events containing a W boson and at least two jets is studied by measuring the fraction of events in the inclusive W+2-jet sample that contain a third jet over a p_T threshold. Regions of the phase space where there is agreement or disagreement with the data are discussed for the different theoretical models tested.
        Speaker: Bjoern Penning (University of Chicago (US))
        Slides
      • 12:15
        Measurement of the photon + b/c-jet and diphoton production differential cross section in ppbar collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV 10m
        We present measurements of the differential cross section dsigma/dpT_gamma for the inclusive production of a photon in association with a b/c-quark jet. The results are based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb^-1, recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron ppbar collider at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The measured cross sections are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations using different sets of parton distribution functions as well as to predictions based on the kT-factorization QCD approach, and those from the Sherpa and Pythia Monte Carlo event generators. We also present measurements of the direct photon pair production cross sections using 8.5 fb^-1 of data collected with the D0 detector. The results are shown as differential distributions with respect to the photon pair mass, pair transverse momentum, azimuthal angle, and polar scattering angle in the Collins-Soper frame. Measurements are performed for the photon transverse momenta pT > 17 and 18 GeV with rapidities |y|<0.9. The results are compared with the predictions from NNLO, NLO QCD and Monte Carlo event generators.
        Speaker: Bjoern Penning (University of Chicago (US))
        Slides
      • 12:25
        Vector boson + jets measurements at CMS 15m
        The associated production of jets and vector bosons allows for stringent tests of perturbative QCD calculations and is sensitive to the possible presence of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Measurements of jet production rates in association with W, Z or photons, in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and 8 TeV center-of-mass energy are presented, using data collected with the CMS detector. Measurements include inclusive jet multiplicity and differential jet cross sections.
        Speaker: Matthias Artur Weber (Univ. of California Los Angeles (US))
        Slides
      • 12:40
        NNLO W Pair Production at the LHC: Status Report 15m
        We will discuss the result with full mass dependence for the two-loop virtual QCD corrections to the W boson pair production in the quark-anti-quark annihilation channel. We will also report on our progress regarding the treatment of the double-real and virtual-real radiative corrections which are the other two necessary ingredients for a theoretical prediction of the total cross section to NNLO accuracy.
        Speaker: Grigorios Chachamis (IFIC (CSIC/UV) Valencia)
        Slides
    • 13:00 14:30
      Lunch 1h 30m
    • 14:30 16:30
      Flavour Physics and fundamental symmetries D1 (KTH Campus)

      D1

      KTH Campus

      • 14:30
        Enhanced B0_d --> mu+ mu- Decay: What if? 15m
        The very rare B0_d --> mu+ mu- decay may be the last chance for New Physics in flavor sector at the LHC, before the 13 TeV run in 2015. Partially motivated by the known tension in sin(2beta/phi_1), enhancement beyond (3-4) x 10^-10 would likely imply the effect of a fourth generation of quarks. If observed at this level, the 126 GeV boson may not be the actual Higgs boson, while the b --> d quadrangle (modulo m_t') would jump out. The 2011-2012 data is likely not sensitive to values below 3 x 10^-10, and the mode should continue to be pursued with the 13 TeV run. We update to latest data, as well as make projections towards 13 TeV run.
        Speaker: Masaya Kohda (National Taiwan University)
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Searches for very rare decays to purely leptonic final states at LHCb 15m
        We present a review of the searches for very rare decays to muon final states performed at LHCb. Flavour changing neutral current processes, such as Bs→μ+μ– are highly suppressed in the Standard Model (SM). Such decays therefore allow the contributions from new processes or new heavy particles to significantly modify the expected SM rates. Charged lepton flavour violating processes (LFV), such as the neutrinoless τ+→μ+μ–μ+ decay, have vanishingly small decay rates in the SM, but can be significantly enhanced in extended models. We report that latest results on these channels from the LHCb dataset.
        Speaker: Flavio Archilli (Frascati-LNF)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Studies of rare Bs and B0 decays to dimuons at CMS 15m
        Rare beauty meson decays B_s,d to mu+mu- are searched in pp collisions at LHC using a data sample collected by the CMS experiment. These decays are highly suppressed in the standard model. They can only proceed through the flavor-changing neutral currents, which are forbidden at tree-level diagrams. These decays are an excellent probe to the new physics; any difference between the measured branching fraction and the standard model prediction could provide a smoking gun signal of new physics.
        Speaker: Urs Langenegger (Paul Scherrer Institut (CH))
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Studies of rare and suppressed processes in B meson decays and of mixing/CP violation in the Bs system with the ATLAS detector 15m
        Evidence for New Physics signatures is searched in processes that are naturally suppressed in the Standard Model. Recent results on the angular distribution parameters AFB and FL describing the decay Bd -> K*mu+mu- -> K+pi-mu+mu- are presented. The accuracy obtained from data collected in 2011 is comparable to the best previous measurement in the region q^2(mu+mu-)>16 GeV^2. New results on the search for the rare decay Bs (B0) -> mu+mu- are presented.
        Speaker: Jochen Schieck (Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (DE))
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Search for the rare decay B_s -> mu mu at DØ 15m
        The decay B_s -> mu mu is heavily suppressed in the standard model, but many scenarios for physics beyond the standard model predict large enhancements in this process. We report an updated search for this decay using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We use the full Run II data set, corresponding to approximately 10.4 fb-1 of integrated luminosity in p \bar{p} collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. We determine that the branching ratio Br(Bs-> mu mu) is less than 15 x 10^-9 at the 95% CL.
        Speaker: Mark Williams
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Measurement of anomalously large CP violation in the dimuon charge asymmetry at D0 15m
        The DO Collaboration has published three measurements of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The result is significantly different from the standard model prediction. We present the final measurement of this CP-violating asymmetry, using the full 10 fb^-1 of data collected during Run II, and discuss its possible interpretations.
        Speaker: Bruce Hoeneisen (Universidad San Francisco de Quito)
        Slides
      • 16:00
        Rare charm decays at LHCb 15m
        Flavour-changing neutral current decays such as c→ul+l– are highly suppressed in the Standard Model (SM), but may be enhanced by New Physics. For D0→μ+μ–, the SM decay rate is dominated by long distance contributions but is still a few order of magnitudes below the current experimental limit. In decays such as D+→π+μ+μ–, measuring the differential branching ratio as a function of the μ+μ– invariant mass is a sensitive probe for New Physics contributions. We present the latest results of searches for rare charm decays at LHCb.
        Speaker: Olga Kochebina (Universite de Paris-Sud 11 (FR))
        Slides
      • 16:15
        Test of leptonic universality in J/psi decays 15m
        The ratio of the partial width of $J/\psi$ decays into $e^+e^-$ and $\mu^+\mu^-$ pairs are measured using a data sample of $7\cdot10^{6}$ \(J/\psi\) events recorded by the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M collider. Our preliminary result are: \[\Gamma_{ee}/\Gamma_{\mu\mu}=0.9965\pm0.0045\pm0.0050.\]
        Speaker: Evgenii Baldin (BINP)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:30
      Neutrino Physics D3 (KTH Campus)

      D3

      KTH Campus

      • 14:30
        The latest results from T2K on the neutrino oscillation and interactions 25m
        The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) experiment is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment situated in Japan. A high intensity neutrino beam is produced at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, in Tokai, Japan. A near detector complex, situated 280 m from the neutrino production target, and the far detector at 295 km, are used to detect the neutrinos from this beam. This talk will present the latest T2K results on the neutrino oscillation, using the data collected up to summer 2013. We, T2K collaboration, is aiming to release brand new results at this presentation.
        Speaker: Michael Wilking (TRIUMF)
        Slides
      • 14:55
        Recent results of the OPERA neutrino experiment 15m
        The OPERA experiment built in the underground Gran Sasso laboratory (LNGS) has been designed to detect neutrino oscillations in direct appearance mode in the mu-neutrino to tau-neutrino channel. The apparatus consisting of 150 000 lead/emulsion modular targets complemented by electronic detectors is placed in the long-baseline CERN to Gran Sasso neutrino beam (CNGS) 730 km away from the source. The running of the detector and the extraction of data from the photographic emulsions will be described, with the special procedures used to locate the interactions vertices and to detect short decay topologies. CNGS neutrinos interactions have been recorded from 2008 to 2012. Since the report of the two first tau-neutrino candidate events last year, a large amount of additional data has been analyzed. The latest results on oscillations with the increased statistics will be presented.
        Speaker: Alessandra Pastore (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 15:10
        NOvA Experiment 15m
        The NOvA is the new generation long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment using a beam of neutrinos sent from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Illinois, US) to 810 km distant far detector at Ash River (Minnesota, US). Functionally identical near and far detectors, now under construction, will be used to search for CP-violating effects in the neutrino sector and to study the ordering of the neutrino mass eigenstates. This talk will cover the goals of the the NOvA experiment, describe the current status of the detector construction and commissioning, and discuss expected sensitivities to determination of the mass hierarchy, constraint of the theta-23 octant, and the measurement of the CP-violating parameter delta-CP.
        Speaker: Abbey Waldron (S)
        Slides
      • 15:25
        Double Chooz experiment 20m
        The double Chooz expeirment is one of the few experiements currently measuring the neutrino mixing angle téta 13 , and the only one located in Europe. It gathers 10 European universities and laboratories (Germany,France,Spain) and about 2à form USA,Russia , Japan and Brazil. The expeirment will update this year its 2012 results, with more statistics. The current data analysis will developp also the tagging of oscillation through neutron capture on H2. A combined analysis with the regular tagging through a capture on Gd is also being prepared. The neutrino direction measurement is in progress : Double Chooz has only 2 neighbouring reactors , which provides beams of neutrinos for such studies. In the same time, the near detector will be installed, to have a full experiement running in the Spring 2014, to wards a full experiment precision soon after.
        Speaker: Dr. Christian Buck (Max Planck Institute für Kernphysik)
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Precise Measurement of Electron Antineutrinos Disappearance From the Daya Bay Experiment 15m
        In 2012 the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has observed the disappearance of electron antineutrinos at about 2 km. Within the three-neutrino flavor framework this result can be used for measuring a value of sin2( 2θ13) for the neutrino mixing angle θ13. The latest published result of sin2( 2θ13) = 0.089±0.010(stat.) ±0.005(syst.) from the Daya Bay experiment is to date the most precise measurement of sin2( 2θ13). A non-zero value of the θ13 makes it possible for future neutrino experiments to probe the conservation of the combination of charge conjugation and spatial reflection in the lepton sector. Short overview of the experiment and results will be presented.
        Speaker: Rupert Leitner (Charles University (CZ))
        Slides
      • 16:00
        Hadron production measurement from NA61/SHINE 15m
        New results of NA61/SHINE on determination of charged hadron yields in proton-carbon interactions are presented. They aim to improve predictions of the neutrino flux in the T2K experiment. The data were recorded using a secondary-proton beam of 31 GeV/c momentum from CERN SPS which impinges on a graphite target. To determine the inclusive production cross-section for charged pions, kaons and protons the thin ($0.04\lambda_I$) target was exploited. Results of this measurement are used in the T2K beam simulation program to reweight hadron yields in the interaction vertex. At the same time, NA61/SHINE results obtained with the T2K replica target ($1.9\lambda_I$) allow to constrain hadron yields at the surface of the target. It would correspond to the constraint up to 90\% of the neutrino flux, thus reducing significantly a model dependence of the neutrino beam prediction. All measured spectra are compared to predictions of hadron production models. In addition a status of the analysis of data collected by NA61/SHINE for the NuMI target (Fermilab) is reviewed. These data will be used further in neutrino beam calculations for the MINERvA, MINOS(+) and LBNE experiments.
        Speaker: Dr. Alexander Korzenev (Universite de Geneve (CH))
        Slides
      • 16:15
        Charged Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering at MINERvA 15m
        MINERvA (Main INjector Experiment for v-A) is a neutrino scattering experiment in Fermilab's NuMI high-intensity neutrino beam. MINERvA was designed to make precision measurements of low energy neutrino and antineutrino cross sections on a variety of materials including plastic scintillator, C, Fe, Pb, He and water. We will focus on our recent results from analyses of quasi-elastic candidates. Additionally, we will discuss prospects for future measurements using different reconstruction techniques and other nuclear targets.
        Speaker: Cheryl Patrick (N)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:30
      Cosmology and Gravity F3 (KTH Campus)

      F3

      KTH Campus

      • 14:30
        First cosmological results from the Planck satellite 45m
        The Planck satellite, selected by ESA in 1996, was launched in 2009 and delivered on March 21st 2013 its first full sky maps of the millimetric emission at 9 frequencies, and maps derived from them, in particular the map of the anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). I will briefly recall the characteristics of the Planck instruments, and describe the data processing performed to obtain these high resolution maps. The CMB anisotropies reveal the primordial fluctuations which initiate the growth of the large scale structures of the Universe transformed by the action of gravitation during the first 370,000 years, until the Universe became transparent, forming the image we record today. The statistical characteristics of these anisotropies allow constraining jointly the physics of the creation of the primordial fluctuations and their evolution and finding the values of the parameters of the models which we confront to data. I will describe the Planck estimates of the density of constituents of the Universe and their implication in terms of derived quantities like the expansion rate or the spatial curvature. I will review what we learnt on the generation of fluctuations (inflation) and will discuss the extensions of the standard cosmological model (neutrinos, cosmic strings, …). I will also show the results on the matter distribution which slightly distort the CMB image by gravitational lensing.
        Speaker: Cyrille Rosset (APC Paris)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        The Planck and LHC results and particle physics 45m
        I will discuss the recent LHC and Planck results, which both are completely compatible with the Standard model of particle physics, and Standard cosmological mode (LambdaCDM), respectively. I will discuss, that the extension of the Standard Model is, of course, required, but can be very minimal. The theoretically nicest extension should also be scale invariant. I will discuss what future measurements may be important to test this approach.
        Speaker: Fedor Bezrukov (LMU)
        Slides
      • 16:00
        Minimal Supersymmetric Hybrid Inflation in Light of WMAP 9 and PLANCK 30m
        The minimal F-term hybrid inflation model is defined by a unique renormalizable superpotential, fixed by a U(1) R-symmetry, and employs a minimal canonical Kaehler potential. The inflationary potential takes into account both radiative and supergravity corrections, as well as an important soft supersymmetry breaking term. With n_s in the vicinity of 0.96-0.97, as strongly indicated by the recent PLANCK and WMAP-9yr measurements, the model predicts that the tensor to scalar ratio r is extremely tiny, of order 10^-14 - 10^-11, and therefore well outside the reach of PLANCK and other contemporary experiments. It also predicts that |dn_s/dlnk|~ 4 x 10^-4. If inflation is associated with the spontaneous breaking of a local U(1) symmetry such as B-L, the symmetry breaking scale is predicted to be 1-2 x 10^15 GeV. Consequently, this scenario is naturally compatible with seesaw physics and non-thermal leptogenesis can be readily implemented. We also comment on the constraints that arise due to cosmic strings from the U(1) symmetry breaking.
        Speaker: Qaisar Shafi
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:30
      Detector R&D and data handling E2 (KTH Campus)

      E2

      KTH Campus

      • 14:30
        The ATLAS Detector: Performance Results 15m
        The ATLAS Detector: Performance Results - The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. During Run I data taking, the ATLAS trigger system has been used to collect a rich data sample which supports a wide variety of physics analyses. The 2012 run saw larger luminosities and pile-up than 2011, which placed large demands on both the trigger system and analyses. The efficient reconstruction and identification of the different leptons, b-jets and missing transverse energy played a key role in the different analyses, specially in the discovery of the Higgs boson announced in 2012. This talk reports about efficiency, resolution, and general performance of the ATLAS detector by using proton-proton collision data at sqrt(s)=8 TeV collected in year 2012.
        Speaker: Dr. Imma Riu (IFAE Barcelona (ES))
        Slides
      • 14:45
        CMS Detector: Performance Results 15m
        The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector is one of the two multipurpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). CMS entered a phase of maintenance and upgrade in February 2013, when LHC stopped operation. The talk will present a brief selection of performance results obtained during the 2012 run, focusing on the objects that lead to the Higgs discovery measurements and putting some emphasis on pp collision event pileup dependencies.
        Speaker: Dr. Ignacio Redondo Fernandez (Centro de Investigaciones Energ. Medioambientales y Tecn. - (ES)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        The LHCb trigger system: performance and outlook 15m
        The LHCb experiment is a spectrometer dedicated to the study of heavy flavor at the LHC. The rate of proton-proton collisions at the LHC is 15 MHz, of which only 5 kHz can be written to storage for offline analytsis. For this reason the LHCb data acquisition system -- trigger -- plays a key role in selecting signal events and rejecting background. In contrast to previous experiments at hadron colliders, the bulk of the LHCb trigger is implemented in software and deployed on a farm of 20k parallel processing nodes. This system, called the High Level Trigger (HLT) is responsible for reducing the rate from the maximum at which the detector can be read out, 1.1 MHz, to the 5 kHz which can be processed offline, and has, on average, 20 ms to decide whether to accept an event. The inherent flexibility of this software trigger allowed LHCb to run at twice its design instantaneous luminosity in 2012. Simultaneously, the HLT performed far beyond the nominal design in terms of signal efficiencies, in particular for charm physics. It also showcased a number of pioneering concepts, for example : the deployment of an inclusive multivariate B-hadron tagger as the main physics trigger of the experiment, buffering of events to local disks in order to leverage the otherwise idle resources when the LHC does not produce collisions, and simulation-free event-by-event trigger efficiency corrections. This talk will cover the design and performance of the LHCb trigger system, and discuss planned improvements beyond LS1, in particular plans for real-time detector alignment and calibration in order to allow the trigger to perform offline quality selections, as well as plans for the LHCb upgrade trigger.
        Speakers: Christoph Michael Langenbruch (CERN) , Christoph Michael Langenbruch (CERN)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        GPU for Real Time processing in HEP trigger systems 15m
        We describe a pilot project for the use of GPUs (Graphics processing units) in online triggering applications for high energy physics experiments. Two major trends can be identified in the development of trigger and DAQ systems for particle physics experiments: the massive use of general-purpose commodity systems such as commercial multicore PC farms for data acquisition, and the reduction of trigger levels implemented in hardware, towards a pure software selection system (trigger-less). The very innovative approach presented here aims at exploiting the parallel computing power of commercial GPUs to perform fast computations in software both in early trigger stages and in high level triggers. General-purpose computing on GPUs is emerging as a new paradigm in several fields of science, although so far applications have been tailored to the specific strengths of such devices as accelerator in offline computation. With the steady reduction of GPU latencies, and the increase in link and memory throughputs, the use of such devices for real-time applications in high-energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems is becoming ripe. We will discuss in details the use of online parallel computing on GPU for synchronous low level trigger with fixed latency. In particular we will show the preliminary results on a first field test in the CERN NA62 experiment. The use of GPUs in high level triggers will be also considered, the CERN ATLAS experiment (and in particular the muon trigger) will be taken as a study case of possible applications.
        Speaker: Gianluca Lamanna (Sezione di Pisa (IT))
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Roostats: a framework for advanced statistical analysis 15m
        RooStats is a project providing advanced statistical tools required for the analysis of LHC data, with emphasis on discoveries, confidence intervals, and combined measurements in the both the Bayesian and Frequentist approaches. The tools are built on top of the RooFit data modelling language, where mathematical concepts such as variables, (probability density) functions and integrals are represented as C++ objects. RooFit and RooStats are built on top of mathematics libraries and persistence technology of the ROOT framework. These advanced statistical tools have been developed in collaboration with the LHC experiments and used by them to produce numerous physics results, the discovery of the the Higgs boson by ATLAS and CMS Higgs, using models with more than 1000 parameters. We will present the tools currently used by the LHC experiments to estimate confidence intervals, exclusion limits and discovery significances such as those based on frequentist statistics or the asymptotic properties of the likelihood function. We will also review the new developments which have been included in RooStats and the performance optimizations, required to cope with such complex models used by the LHC experiments.
        Speaker: Lorenzo Moneta (CERN)
        Slides
      • 15:45
        The LHCb upgrade [Upgrade 15m
        The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and search for New Physics using the enormous flux of beauty and charmed hadrons produced at the LHC. The operation and the results obtained from the data collected in 2010 and 2011 demonstrate that the detector is robust and functioning very well. However, the limit of 1 fb–1 of data per nominal year cannot be overcome without improving the detector. We therefore plan for an upgraded spectrometer by 2018 with a 40 MHz readout and a much more flexible software-based triggering system that will increase the data rate as well as the efficiency specially in the hadronic channels. Here we present the LHCb detector upgrade plans, based on the Letter of Intent and Framework Technical Design Report.
        Speakers: Julien Cogan (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (FR)) , Julien Cogan (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (FR))
        Slides
      • 16:00
        Upgrade of the CMS Detector 15m
        to be provided by the CMS Collaboration
        Speaker: Prof. Costas Fountas (University of Ioannina (GR))
        Slides
      • 16:15
        ATLAS Upgrades Towards the High Luminosity LHC: extending the discovery potential 15m
        After successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV in 2011 and 2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades, culminating roughly 10 years from now in the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of order five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity levelling. The final goal is to extend the data set from about few hundred fb-1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb-1 by around 2030. Current planning in ATLAS also has significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades to accommodate running already beyond nominal luminosity this decade. The challenge of coping with HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for an all-new inner-tracker, significant upgrades in the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. This presentation summarises the various improvements to the ATLAS detector required to cope with the anticipated evolution of the LHC instantaneous luminosity during this decade and the next.
        Speaker: Dr. Peter Vankov (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:30
      Higgs and New Physics F1 (KTH Campus)

      F1

      KTH Campus

      • 14:30
        LHC constraints on two-Higgs doublet models 12m
        A new Higgs-like boson with mass around 126 GeV has recently been discovered at the LHC. The available data on this new particle is analyzed within the context of two-Higgs doublet models without tree-level flavour-changing neutral currents. Keeping the generic Yukawa structure of the Aligned Two-Higgs Doublet Model framework, we study the implications of the LHC data on the allowed scalar spectrum. We analyze both the CP-violating and CP-conserving cases, and a few particular limits with a reduced number of free parameters, such as the usual models based on discrete Z_2 symmetries.
        Speaker: Victor Ilisie (I)
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Beyond-­the-­Standard Model Higgs Physics using the ATLAS Experiment 17m
        Abstract: The discovery of a Higgs-­?like boson with a mass of about 125 GeV has prompted the question of whether or not this particle is part of a much larger and more complex Higgs sector than that envisioned in the Standard Model. In this talk, we outline the current results from the ATLAS Experiment regarding Beyond-­?the-­?Standard Model (BSM) Higgs hypothesis tests. Searches for additional Higgs bosons are presented and interpreted in well-­?motivated BSM Higgs frameworks, such as two-­?Higgs-­?doublet Models and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.
        Speaker: Wolfgang Wagner (Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal (DE))
        Slides
      • 15:05
        Constraining extended Higgs sectors with HiggsSignals 12m
        We present the new public code HiggsSignals, which provides a consistent test of arbitrary Higgs sectors against measurements at hadron colliders, including the signal for a Higgs-like particle observed at the LHC. Using information on the measured mass and decay rates in all the available channels from ATLAS, CMS, and the Tevatron experiments, we derive constraints on extended Higgs sectors. The results are presented both in a model-independent framework, which can be used to parametrize deviations from the Standard Model, and in a model-dependent example with results from a comprehensive analysis of the MSSM parameter space.
        Speaker: Oscar Stål (DESY)
        Slides
      • 15:20
        Searches for BSM Higgs-like bosons with CMS 17m
        The most recent CMS results from the search for a MSSM Higgs boson in the bb and tau tau channesl, using the full dataset recorded at the LHC from pp collisions at centre of mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, will be presented. Results are also presented on charged Higgs boson searches as well as searches of Higgs-like particles beyond MSSM.
        Speaker: Aruna Nayak (CEA/IRFU,Centre d'etude de Saclay Gif-sur-Yvette (FR))
        Slides
      • 15:40
        The search for rare decays of the Higgs boson with ATLAS and CMS 17m
        The Higgs-­like boson discovered by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations is a candidate for the last unobserved particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM). The next experimental step is the measurement of its properties, most notably its couplings. This contribution presents the searches for the SM Higgs boson via decays in rare modes such as Z-gamma and di-­muon final states, and for invisible decays.
        Speaker: Johannes Elmsheuser (Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (DE))
        Slides
      • 16:00
        Beta-function for the Higgs self-interaction in the Standard Model at three-loop level 12m
        The beta-function describing the evolution of the Higgs self-coupling is of special interest due to its close connection to the question of Vacuum Stability in the Standard Model. With the finding of a Higgs candidate at 126 GeV this question has become one for precision physics as this value of the Higgs mass leads to a second minimum of the effective Higgs potential close to the Planck scale but nearly at the same energy level as the one at the Fermi scale. In this talk an introduction to this problem and its connection to the evolution of couplings will be given. Then the calculation and the results for the three-loop beta-function of the Higgs self-interaction will be presented. Finally, the effect of these results on the evolution of this coupling and on the Stability problem will be analyzed for a 126 GeV Higgs boson.
        Speaker: Max Zoller (KIT)
        Slides
      • 16:15
        Search for light Higgs and dark photons at BaBar and Belle 12m
        Many extensions of the Standard Model (SM) introduce an additional U(1) interaction, which is mediated by a U(1) boson, often by a Higgs mechanism adding a dark Higgs (or dark Higgses) to the models. This gauge boson, also known as the ``Dark Photon,'' typically has very weak coupling to the SM particles. Experimental results from direct Dark Matter searches, (e.g. DAMA/LIBRA) and other experimental anomalies (e.g. $g-2$), can be explained by such an additional interaction. Dark gauge bosons are typically of low mass; of order MeV to GeV. The ideal tools to discover such particles are therefore low-energy high-luminosity collider experiments such as Belle and BaBar, or dedicated fixed target experiments, several of which are planned or already under construction in several places. In Belle, the search of the dark photon focuses on the so-called Higgs-strahlung channel, where a dark photon and a dark Higgs are produced. Preliminary results will be presented and discussed in this presentation.
        Speaker: MING-CHUAN CHANG (FU JEN CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:30
      Top and Electroweak Physics F2 (KTH Campus)

      F2

      KTH Campus

      • 14:30
        Measurement of the single top quark production cross section in pp collisions with the ATLAS detector 20m
        Measurements of the single top quark production cross sections in proton proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider are presented. Measurements of single topquark production in the tand Wtchannels are shown and determination of the CKM matrix element |Vtb| is discussed. We also discuss the separate measurement of the top and antitop quark cross section and the ratio. These measurements are sensitive to the parton distribution function in the proton. In addition, the schannel production is explored and the results of a search for flavor changing neutral currents in the single top production is presented.
        Speaker: Attila Krasznahorkay (New York University (US))
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Measurement of t-channel single top quark production in pp collisions with the CMS detector 15m
        Measurements are presented of t-channel single top quark production in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, using data collected with the CMS experiment during the years 2011 and 2012. The analyses consider decay channels where the W from the top decays into electron-neutrino or muon-neutrino, and makes use of kinematic characteristics of electroweak single top production for the separation of signal from backgrounds using multivariate methods. The results are compared with the most precise standard model theory predictions. Measurements of various differential single top quark production cross sections are also presented.
        Speaker: Alberto Orso Maria Iorio (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 15:05
        Measurement of single top production in the tW-channel in pp collisions and search for FCNC with the CMS detector 15m
        Measurements of single top quark production in the tW-channel in pp collisions are presented. In the tW-channel a top quark is produced in association with a W boson. The data were collected in the years 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The experimental signature is similar to top pair production, and there is interference at higher orders between the two processes. The measurements are perfomed using final states in which the associated W boson as well as the one originating from the top quark decay leptonically. Multivariate methods are used to extract the cross section. The result is compared with current standard model theory predictions. Furthermore, a search for flavor changing neutral currents in top quark decays is presented.
        Speaker: Dr. Gabriele Benelli (University of Kansas (US))
        Slides
      • 15:20
        Single top quark production cross section at the Tevatron 20m
        We present the most recent results from the CDF and D0 Collaborations on searches for electroweak top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV at Fermilab's Tevatron Collider. Single top signal is separated from background processes using multivariate analysis methods. The final result is compared to state-of-art theory predictions.
        Speaker: Aran Garcia-Bellido Alvarez De Miranda (University of Rochester (US))
        Slides
      • 15:40
        Search for Single-Top Production in ep Collisions at HERA 20m
        A search for single-top production, ep -> etX, has been performed with the ZEUS detector at HERA using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.37 fb-1. No evidence for top production was found, consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model. Limits were computed for single-top production via flavour changing neutral current transitions. The result was combined with a previous ZEUS result yielding a total luminosity of 0.50 fb-1. A 95% credibility level upper limit of 0.13 pb was obtained for the cross section at the centre-of-mass energy of sqrt{s}=315 GeV.
        Speaker: Stefano Antonelli (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 16:00
        Top Decays with Flavor Changing Neutral Higgs Interactions at the LHC 15m
        We investigate the prospects for discovering a top quark decaying into one light Higgs boson along with a charm quark in top quark pair production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A general two Higgs doublet model is adopted to study the signature of flavor changing neutral Higgs decay $t \to c\phi^0$, or $\bar{t} \to \bar{\phi^0$ where $\phi^0$ could be CP-even ($H^0$) or CP-odd ($A^0$). The dominant physics background is evaluated with realistic acceptance cuts as well as tagging and mistagging efficiencies. For a reasonably large top-charm-Higgs coupling ($\lambda_{tc}/\lambda_{t} \agt 0.09$), the abundance of signal events and the reduction in physics background allow us to establish a $5\sigma$ signal for $M_\phi \sim 125$ GeV at the LHC with a center of mass energy ($\sqrt{s}$) of 8 TeV and an integrated luminosity of $20$~fb$^{-1}$. The discovery potential will be greatly enhanced with the full energy of $\sqrt{s} = 14$ TeV.
        Speaker: Chung Kao
        Slides
      • 16:15
        Probing for the t->ch decay at the LHC 15m
        The Higgs boson $h$ and the top quark $t$ are the two most massive and newest particles ever discovered. If $t\to ch$ occurs at a couple of percent level, the observed $ZZ^*$ and $\gamma\gamma$ signal events for the Higgs boson may have accompanying $cbW$ activity coming from $t\bar t$ feeddown. A general two Higgs doublet model brings in new $ct$, $cc$ and $tt$ couplings that modify properties of the light Higgs $h$, and $t\to ch$ can be searched for via $h \to ZZ^*$, $\gamma\gamma$, $WW^*$ and $b\bar b$ (even $\tau^+\tau^-$) modes in $t\bar t$ events. We show that existing data should be able to push ${\cal B}(t\to ch)$ down to below the percent level.
        Speaker: George Wei-Shu HOU
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:30
      QCD: Diffraction & photoproduction E1 (KTH Campus)

      E1

      KTH Campus

      • 14:30
        Inclusive diffraction, DVCS and vector meson production at HERA 20m
        Inclusive diffraction, DVCS and vector meson production at HERA (agreed talk with H1/ZEUS collaborations)
        Speaker: Dr. Marta Ruspa (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Recent H1 results on diffraction 15m
        Recent H1 results on diffraction (agreed talk with H1/ZEUS collaborations)
        Speaker: Sergey Levonian (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
        Slides
      • 15:05
        Higher twist effects in diffractive DIS at HERA 15m
        I discuss a twist decomposition of difractive structure functions in the difractive deep inelastic scattering (DDIS) at HERA. At low photon virtuality and at large energy the data exhibit a strong excess above the twist-two NLO DGLAP description. It is found, that complementing the DGLAP fit by twist 4 and 6 components of the GBW saturation model leads to a good description of data. In conclusion, HERA provides the first, strong evidence of higher twist effects in DIS.
        Speaker: Mariusz Sadzikowski (Jagiellonian University)
        Slides
      • 15:20
        Inclusive Jets in PHP 15m
        Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q2 < 1 GeV2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory using the kt cluster algorithm in the longitudinally inclusive mode. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, etajet, and the jet transverse energy, Etjet. In addition, measurements of double-differential inclusive-jet cross sections are presented as functions of Etjet in different regions of etajet. These cross sections have the potential to constrain the gluon density in the proton and the photon when included as input to fits to extract the proton parton distribution functions. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements. A value of alphas(Mz) has been extracted from the measurements. The energy-scale dependence of the coupling has also been determined.
        Speakers: Dr. Philipp Roloff (CERN) , Mr. Philipp Roloff (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY)) , Philipp Roloff (DESY)
        Slides
      • 15:35
        Recent H1 results on Heavy Flavour Photoproduction 15m
        Recent H1 results on Heavy Flavour Photoproduction (agreed talk with H1/ZEUS collaborations)
        Speaker: Michel Sauter
        Slides
      • 15:50
        Review of H1 results on the hadronic final state at HERA 20m
        Speaker: Lidia Goerlich (Kraków Univ)
        Slides
      • 16:10
        Recent cross section, diffractive and forward multiplicity measurements with TOTEM 20m
        TOTEM is dedicated experiment at the LHC to the measurements of elastic, diffractive and other forward processes. Elastically and diffractively scattered protons are measured using silicon detectors in Roman Pots (RP) and charged particles by the T1 and T2 telescopes covering the pseudorapidity range 3.1 to 6.5. TOTEM has measured the luminosity-independent total, elastic and inelastic proton-proton cross-sections at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and 8 TeV using dedicated beta* = 90 m optics runs. At sqrt(s) = 7 TeV, the cross-sections were also determined using the CMS luminosity giving results that are in excellent agreement with the luminosity-independent measurements, despite having very different systematic dependencies. TOTEM has also studied soft single- and double-diffractive processes at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. Preliminary results for single diffraction with masses above 3.4 GeV with the proton measured in the RPs as well as for double diffraction with masses in the 3.4-8 GeV range will be shown. In addition, TOTEM has performed an inclusive forward charged particle pseudorapidity density measurement in the 5.3 to 6.4 range using T2. Furthermore, TOTEM has repeated the charged particle density measurement at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV using a dedicated run taken with a common CMS/TOTEM trigger in three different event samples: an inclusive, a non-single diffractive enhanced with charged particles in both T2 arms and a single-diffractive enhanced with only charged particles in one T2 arm. Finally, TOTEM has together with CMS studied soft central diffraction (by measuring both protons) and hard single and central diffraction (by measuring one or two protons plus central jets) at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. A summary of these measurements will be reported.
        Speakers: Kenneth Osterberg (University of Helsinki) , Kenneth Osterberg (University of Helsinki)
        Slides
    • 16:30 17:00
      Coffee and poster session I 30m

      Poster session at KTH near coffee areas. Rooms: E34 (QCD), E35 (Higgs/NP), D34 (top/SM, heavy ions, detectors/data/accelerators), D35 (astro, flavour, cosmo, neutrinos).

    • 17:00 19:20
      Neutrino Physics D3 (KTH Campus)

      D3

      KTH Campus

      • 17:00
        Analysis of oscillations with 3 and 3+N neutrinos 25m
        The vast majority of solar, atmospheric, reactor and accelerator neutrino data are presently well explained by the hypothesis that neutrinos are massive and that flavor conversion occurs among the three known neutrino flavors. However, a few experiments seem to indicate deviations from this scenario. In this talk I will first present an up-to-date global analysis of neutrino data in the framework of three-neutrino oscillations, and then I will discuss the case where new sterile neutrino states exist in addition to the three active ones.
        Speaker: Michele Maltoni (Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC)
        Slides
      • 17:25
        Leptonic CP Violation in Neutrino Oscillation Experiments 15m
        One of the main goals of the ongoing and forthcoming neutrino oscillation experiments is to determine the leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase, which is one of the fundamental constants in nature. We first examine the radiative corrections to the CP-violating phase, which should be taken into account when one confronts the theoretical prediction at a high-energy scale with the experimental observations at the low-energy scale. Then the CP-violating effects in neutrino oscillation experiments are discussed by using neutrino oscillograms. Finally, we consider the effects of non-standard neutrino interactions on the leptonic CP violation.
        Speaker: Shun Zhou (KTH)
        Slides
      • 17:40
        A lepton CP violation discovery experiment using a unique neutrino Super Beam 15m
        The European Spallation Source linac has the potential to become the proton driver of - in addition to the world’s most intense pulsed spallation neutron source - the world’s most intense neutrino beam. The physics performance of this neutrino beam in conjunction with a megaton water Cherenkov neutrino detector installed ca 1000 m down in a mine at a distance of ca 500 km from ESS will be described. The superior potential of such a neutrino experiment for lepton CP violation discovery, with the potential to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in Universe, is discussed as well as the sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy. In addition, the megaton neutrino detector will enable very high sensitivity proton-decay and astrophysics searches. The equipment required to operate the ESS linac for neutrino beam production in parallel with neutron production, like increased radio-frequency power sources, a pulse compressor accumulator ring and a neutrino target,will also be discussed.
        Speaker: Tord Johan Carl Ekelof (Uppsala University (SE))
        Slides
      • 17:55
        The Hyper-Kamiokande project 15m
        The Hyper-Kamiokande, which we are currently developing, is designed to be the next decade's flagship experiment for the study of neutrino oscillations, nucleon decays, and astrophysical neutrinos. The detector is the third generation underground water Cherenkov detector at Kamioka. Holding 1 million ton water target being about 20 times larger than the Super-Kamiokande, the detector will extend the sensitivity to search for baryon-number-violated proton (and bound neutron) decays by one order of magnitude or more to test various grand unified theories. It also aims to explore the full picture of neutrino masses and mixings by using intense accelerator and atmospheric neutrinos. These experimental studies would become windows to see physics at the grand unification scale of $\sim10^{16}$ GeV which is far beyond the energy scale of accelerator based particle physics. The detector also serves as an astrophysical neutrino observatory aiming to study the explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernova, the history of star formation and heavy element synthesis in the universe, WIMP dark matters trapped in the Sun, Earth, and Galaxy, and other astrophysical neutrino sources. Physics potential of the Hyper-Kamiokande is estimated based on the well proven water Cherenkov technology and its detector performance. Feasibility of the one megaton size detector has been shown by its baseline design, and the detector design is being optimized at present. By taking into account the production rate of photo-sensors and estimated construction period, the Hyper-Kamiokande is expected to start its operation in 2023.
        Speakers: Hide-Kazu Tanaka (ICRR) , Hidekazu TANAKA (ICRR)
        Slides
      • 18:10
        Complementarity between long-baseline and atmospheric neutrino experiments 15m
        Recent measurements have shown that the value of $\theta_{13}$ in nature is moderately large. This allows the possibility of measuring the neutrino mass hierarchy, octant of $\theta_{23}$ and CP-violating phase $\delta_{CP}$ at the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. Long-baseline experiments have very good energy resolution, and hence are well suited to measure the mass-square differences, mixing angles and CP phase to a high degree of precision. Atmospheric neutrino experiments can access neutrinos over a wide range of baselines and energies and can resolve the problems of determining the mass hierarchy and octant of $\theta_{23}$, due to resonant matter effects. The sensitivity of long-baseline experiments to the unknown neutrino oscillation parameters depends on the value of $\delta_{CP}$ in nature. In fact, for unfavourable combinations of these parameters, the capabilities of long-baseline experiments are severely limited. On the other hand, the capabilities of atmospheric neutrino experiments have been shown to be independent of $\delta_{CP}$. We explore the reasons for the $\delta_{CP}$-independence of atmospheric neutrino results. We then study the synergy between atmospheric and long-baseline experiments. We find that there is a marked improvement in the sensitivity of long-baseline experiments for unfavourable values of parameters, when data from atmospheric experiments are also taken into account. We present our results in the context of planned upcoming oscillation experiments.
        Speaker: Sushant Raut
        Slides
      • 18:25
        LBNE in the Precision Era of Neutrino Oscillation 15m
        LBNE (Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment) is an accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment. LBNE will produce a muon-neutrino beam using protons from Fermilab's Main Injector and will detect electron-neutrino appearance and muon-neutrino disappearance using a Liquid Argon TPC located at a distance of 1300 km at Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. The primary physics motivation of LBNE is to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, to determine the octant of the neutrino mixing angle theta_23, to search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, and ultimately, to precisely measure the size of any CP-violating effect that is discovered. I will describe the status of LBNE, the first phase of which is currently in the detailed-design stage of planning, and the physics potential of the LBNE research program.
        Speaker: Elizabeth Worcester
        Slides
      • 18:40
        Hierarchy and Octant determination potential of LBNE and LBNO 15m
        Recent measurement of a moderately large value of theta13 has opened up exciting possibilities for current and future neutrino oscillation experiments, in particular to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and the octant of theta23. Determination of these parameters will provide us with crucial additional inputs to develop a theory of neutrino masses. Current experiments can determine these quantities only for favourable ranges of parameters at limited C.L. Hence, future facilities are mandatory to cover the entire parameter space at discovery level. In this work, we explore the capabilities of LBNE and LBNO, whose large matter effects will enable them to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and the octant of theta23.LBNO has about 10 sigma hierarchy discovery even for the most unfavorable combination of neutrino parameters. The hierarchy reach of LBNE is more limited. In particular, if theta23 happens to be in the lower octant, then even a 3 sigma discrimination would not be possible for LBNE in its first stage, for the most unfavorable values of deltaCP. If the current experiments find a hint that the parameter combination is unfavorable, then LBNE should increase their exposure. Regarding the octant, the first stage of LBNO has a 4 sigma discovery potential and that of LBNE has 3 sigma.
        Speaker: Sankagiri Umasankar (IIT Bombay)
        Slides
    • 17:00 19:20
      Detector R&D and data handling E2 (KTH Campus)

      E2

      KTH Campus

      • 17:00
        The Silicon Vertex Detector of the Belle II Experiment 15m
        The Belle experiment in Tsukuba (Japan) has been designed to measure rare decays in the B system with high statistics. Currently, both the KEK-B e+/e- collider and the Belle experiment are being upgraded to provide and cope with an ultimate luminosity of 8x10^35 cm-2 s-1. Since the previous Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) cannot be operated with the 40-fold increased luminosity after the upgrade, it needs to be replaced. The future Belle II SVD will also consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors, but on larger radii and based on 6" silicon wafers, compared to its predecessor. Moreover, an inner double-layer with pixel detectors based on DEPFET technology will complement the SVD as innermost detector and the SVD itself will now contain a slanted forward part. Since the KEK B-factory operates at relatively low energy, material inside the active volume has to be minimized in order to reduce multiple scattering. This can be achieved by thin, double sided silicon sensors, which are arranged to ladders in the so-called "Origami chip-on-sensor concept", and a very light-weight mechanical support structure made from carbon fiber reinforced Airex foam. Moreover, CO2 cooling of the front-end chips will ensure high efficiency at minimum material budget. Fast-shaping readout amplifiers will be used in conjunction with an online hit time reconstruction algorithm in order to reduce the occupancy to the level of a few percent at most. In this talk, we will report the status of Belle II SVD, covering the silicon sensors, front-end detector ladders, readout electronics, mechanics and cooling.
        Speaker: Thomas Bergauer (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Overview of the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) Project 15m
        The upgrades for the ATLAS Pixel Detector will be staged in preparation for high luminosity LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel Detector will be the construction of a new pixel layer which is currently under construction and will be installed during the first shutdown of the LHC machine, in 2013-14. The new detector, called the Insertable B-layer (IBL), will be installed between the existing Pixel Detector and a new, smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. The IBL required the development of several new technologies to cope with increased radiation and pixel occupancy and also to improve the physics performance through reduction of the pixel size and a more stringent material budget. Two different silicon sensor technologies, planar n-in-n and 3D, will be used, connected with the new generation 130nm IBM CMOS FE-I4 readout chip via solder bump-bonds. In total 32 FEs with sensors are glued to a light weight carbon-carbon structure which incorporates a titanium cooling tube for a CO2 cooling system. In total the barrel layer will consist of 14 support structures and will cover 0.2m2 active area with 12 million pixels. A production quality control test bench was setup in the ATLAS inner detector assembly clean room to verify and rate the performance of the detector elements before integration around the beam pipe. Bias voltage sensor measurements as well as front end chip functionality measurements are complemented with 241Am and 90Sr sources as well as cosmic muon measurements to rate the bump bond quality and charge measurement calibration. During the integration process these measurements are repeated to spot integration issues and optimize the final operation performance. A realistic CO2 cooling plant will allow to perform quick warm and cold tests to verify the electrical functioning integrity of the sensors and readout front-ends. An overview of the IBL project, of the module design, the qualification for these sensor technologies, the integration quality control setups and recent results will be presented and discuss