8-10 June 2016
Asia/Bangkok timezone

Ionization in Earth’s atmosphere near polar regions following the solar storm on January 20, 2005

Jun 9, 2016, 9:00 AM
15m
Room E1

Room E1

Oral presentaion Environmental Physics, Atmospheric Physics, Geophysics and Renewable Energy Session XVII

Speaker

Dr Achara Seripienlert (Division of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Thanyaburi, Pathum Thani 12110, Thailand, National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand (NARIT), Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand)

Description

Cosmic-ray induced ionization in the lower atmosphere (below ~ 15 km) is mainly caused by Galactic cosmic rays. However, some strong solar events can produce high energy ions with large intensity, which can penetrate to the lower atmosphere and produce significant ionization. We have modeled this effect for the solar storm of 20 January 2005, one of the strongest solar particle events ever recorded. This event produced energetic particles that can be detected by ground-based detectors, especially near the polar regions. We use the cosmic ray intensity vs. time as inferred from two neutron monitors, one located near the north pole (Inuvik) and the other located near the south pole (McMurdo). Then we performed Monte Carlo simulations of particle-air interactions using a realistic atmospheric model created from measured meteorological data to calculate atmospheric ionization at different altitudes and times for Inuvik and McMurdo. For the case of galactic cosmic rays, our simulation results of atmospheric ionization are consistent with balloon measurements. We have also studied the equivalent dose rate at airplane altitude. This research project is supported by Mahidol University and the Thailand Research Fund.

Primary author

Dr Warit Mitthumsiri (Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand)

Co-authors

Dr Achara Seripienlert (Division of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Thanyaburi, Pathum Thani 12110, Thailand, National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand (NARIT), Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand) Dr Alejandro Saiz (Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand) Prof. David Ruffolo (Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand) Dr Pierre-Simon MANGEARD (Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand, National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand (NARIT), Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand) Ms Usanee Tortermpun (Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand)

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