3-8 September 2017
The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK.
Europe/London timezone

Design and characterization of pixelated needle probe for molecular neuroimaging on awake and freely moving rats

7 Sep 2017, 12:40
1h 50m
Hub Theatre (OU) ()

Hub Theatre (OU)

The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA

Speaker

Julian Heymes (IPHC)

Description

IMIC is a Monolithic Active Pixels Sensor prototype designed for the MAPSSIC project, which aims at developing wireless intracerebral probes dedicated to the local counting of low energy positrons in situ in the brain of awake and freely moving rats. Former experiments using a passive PIXSIC circuit validated the proof of concept, but have also clearly demonstrated the need to improve signal-to-noise ratio and robustness. The IMIC circuit features a matrix of 16 x 128 pixels of 30 x 50 µm2 size. The sensor has a needle-like aspect ratio of 610 µm x 12 000 µm. The sensitive layer consists in a thin 18 µm thick high-resistivity epitaxial layer preceded by a 10 µm thick integrated electronic layer.

The foreseen application requires high sensitivity to ß+ rays while being immune to gamma-ray background. Another important constraint is the limited power dissipation to avoid thermal-induced damages in the brain of the rat, hence requiring low electrical power consumption. The sensor is a fully-programmable digital output sensor. The pixel design is based on the front-end architecture of the ALPIDE chip developed at CERN. However, modifications have been made to mark fired pixels between two readouts.

Laboratory tests confirm the designed low power consumption, which reaches 161 µW for the whole sensor. Characterizations using a $^{55}$Fe X-ray source, and a $^{90}$Sr ß– source with various metallic shielding thicknesses show a constant measured activity for short, and long integration times if the activity is sufficiently low not to saturate the sensor. Various measurements with a $^{18}$F source indicate an excellent response to ß+ rays with a low sensitivity to the background 511 keV annihilation gamma rays.

In this paper, we will present the probe design in detail together with the principal features of the needle shaped sensor. We will also discuss complete characterization results.

Primary authors

Julian Heymes (IPHC) Luis Ammour (IMNC UMR 8165, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay, France) Matthieu Bautista (Aix Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM, Marseille, France) Grégory Bertolone (IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS/UDS) Andrei Dorokhov (IPHC) Sylvain Fieux (LNRC, CNRS/INSERM, Univ. Lyon 1, Lyon, France) Fabrice Gensolen (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (FR)) Mathieu Goffe (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (FR)) Christine Guo Hu (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (FR)) Maciej Kachel (IPHC CNRS) Françoise Lefèbvre (IMNC UMR 8165, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay, France) Frédéric Pain (IMNC UMR 8165, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay, France) Mr Patrick Pangaud (CPPM, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3 (FR)) Laurent Pinot (IMNC UMR 8165, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay, France) Marc Winter (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (FR)) Pascale Gisquet-Verrier (NeuroPSI, CNRS/INSB, Univ. Paris Sud, Orsay, France) Philippe Lanièce (IMNC UMR 8165, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay, France) Christian Morel (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (FR)) Marc-Antoine Verdier (IMNC UMR 8165, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay, France) Luc Zimmer (LNRC, CNRS/INSERM, Univ. Lyon 1, Lyon, France) Jerome Baudot (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (FR))

Presentation Materials