10-16 June 2018
Dalhousie University
America/Halifax timezone
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Real-time arrangement of atoms into a low-entropy state using high-resolution optical tweezers

14 Jun 2018, 14:00
15m
SUB 302 (cap. 40) (Dalhousie University)

SUB 302 (cap. 40)

Dalhousie University

Oral (Non-Student) / Orale (non-étudiant(e)) Division of Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, Canada / Division de la physique atomique, moléculaire et photonique, Canada (DAMOPC-DPAMPC) R3-2 Light-Matter Interactions II (DAMOPC/DCMMP) | Interactions lumière-matière II (DPAMPC/DPMCM)

Speaker

Mahmood Sabooni (Institute for Quantum Computing, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo)

Description

Designing and assembling highly complex quantum systems from their individual constituents provide an important milestone in quantum information science and quantum many-body physics. Cavity QED provides a means for efficient light-matter quantum interfaces, where the internal states of individual atoms can encode the information of the material system, whereas the cavity vacuum can act as the bosonic channel that mediates effective spin-spin interaction. Here, we investigate a new regime of cavity QED, which we call many-body QED. In this regime, the optical strong coupling of the light-matter interaction competes with the internal atom-atom interaction in the form of Rydberg excitations.
In our research group, we are pursuing an approach of introducing Rydberg excitations into a spatially regularized array of neutral atoms in an ultra-high-finesse optical cavity. A critical element required for this vision is the capability to resolve and identify Rydberg excitations, as well as to perform the real-time arrangement of atoms into a low-entropy state. We discuss how to do the trapping and manipulation of single neutral atoms in reconfigurable arrays of optical traps with micrometer resolution. This method is based on employing a Texas Instruments Digital Micro-Mirror Device (DMD) as a dynamical holographic phase-amplitude modulator with about 20 kHz update rate. The desired arrangement of traps (the Fourier transform of the mask) is produced in the focal plane of a microscope objective with NA of about 0.5, with a new phase-amplitude algorithm based upon superpixel techniques. We are trying to show how to perform high-precision modulations on laser beam profiles to create arbitrary potential landscapes or prepare the initial atomic states at the individual quanta level. In addition, we are trying to demonstrate a robust scheme to measure and compensate wavefront distortions of laser systems in-situ using a DMD as a holographic spatial light modulator. Our technique can be employed for resolving and trapping ultracold atoms in optical lattices, trapped ions, NV centers or other small, localized and fluorescent objects. We discuss the limitations of the technique and the scope for technical improvements.

Primary authors

Mahmood Sabooni (Institute for Quantum Computing, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo) Mr Youn Seok Lee (Institute for Quantum Computing, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada) Mrs Hyeran Kong (Institute for Quantum Computing, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada) Dr Chang Liu (Institute for Quantum Computing, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada) Dr Ying Dong (Institute for Quantum Computing, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada) Kyung Soo Choi (Institute for Quantum Computing, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada 2. Waterloo Artificial Intelligence Institute, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada 3. Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5, Canada 4. Center for Quantum Information Science, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea)

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