The JEM-EUSO Mission to Explore the Extreme Universe

Not scheduled
Aithousa Mitropoulos

Aithousa Mitropoulos

Megaron, Athens - Greece

Speaker

Prof. Gustavo Medina-Tanco (Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares - UNAM)

Description

The JEM-EUSO mission will explore the origin of the extreme energy comic-rays (EECRs) above 1020 eV and and can shed new light on some topics of fundamental physics. The instrument is design to observe more than 1,000 events of EECRs above 70 EeV in its five-year operation, with an exposure larger than 1 million km2 str yr. The super-wide-field (60 degrees) telescope with a diameter of about 2.5m looks down the atmosphere of the night-side of the earth to detect near UV photons (330-400nm, both fluorescent and Cherenkov photons) emitted from the giant air-shower produced by an EECR. At these energies cosmic rays have directional information and the arrival direction map, with 1,000 events, will allow the identification of point sources of EECR, in case they exist, and of their astronomical counterparts. The comparison among the energy spectra of the spatially resolved individual sources will clarify the acceleration/emission mechanism, and also finally confirm the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin process for the validation of Lorentz invariance up to γ~1011. Neutral components (neutrinos and gamma rays) can also be detected as well, if their fluxes are high enough. The JEM-EUSO mission is planned to be launched by a H2B rocket about 2015 and transferred to ISS by H2 Transfer Vehicle (HTV). It will be attached to the external experiment platform of “KIBO,” which completed ”July 2009 by STS-127 mission” of the space shuttle. The first flight of HTV by H2B rocket was successfully done in September and October 2009.

Primary author

Prof. Gustavo Medina-Tanco (Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares - UNAM)

Co-authors

A. Santangelo (Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universitt Tubingen, Sand 1, 72076 Tubingen, Deutschl) B. A. Khrenov (SINP, Lomonosov Moscow State Univ., Leninskie Gory 1 str. 2, Moscow, 119991, Russia) F. Kajino (Department of Physics, Konan University, Okamoto 8-9-1, Higashinada, Kobe 658-8501, Japan) H. Mase (RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako351-0198, Japan) I.H. Park (Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750, Korea) J. Szabelski (Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 90-950 Lodz, Box 447, Poland) M. Casolino (Department of Physics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome, Italy) M. D. Rodriguez-Frias (University of Alcala Ctra. Madrid-Barcelona, km. 33.6, E-28871, Alcala de Henares, Madrid. Spain.) M. Panasyuk (SINP, Lomonosov Moscow State Univ., Leninskie Gory 1 str. 2, Moscow, 119991, Russia) M. Teshima (Max-Planck-Institut for Physik, Fohringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich, Germany) O. Catalano (Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo, INAF, Via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo, Italy) P. Bobik (Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice, Slovakia) P. Gorodetzky (APC, Univ. of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, 10, rue A. Domon et L. Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13, France) P. Picozza (Department of Physics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome, Italy) T. Parizot (APC, Univ. of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, 10, rue A. Domon et L. Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13, France) T. Peter (Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland) Toshikazu Ebisuzaki (RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako351-0198, Japan) Yoshiyuki Takahashi (Department of Physics, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL35899, USA)

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