Toyama International Symposium on "Physics at the Cosmic Frontier"

Asia/Tokyo
A238 (Faculty of Science, University of Toyama)

A238

Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
Description

Welcome to the Toyama International Symposium on "Physics at the Cosmic Frontier"

The Research Unit for Physics at the Cosmic Frontier, the University of Toyama will host the Toyama International Symposium on "Physics at the Cosmic Frontier" from 7-9 March, 2019. The goal of the symposium is to discuss recent theoretical and experimental progress in physics exploring the cosmic frontier, and to accelerate interdisciplinary research activities.

Date

7-9 March, 2019

Place

Tamokuteki Hall (B243) A238 on the second floor of the Faculty of Science building
Gofuku Campus, University of Toyama

Deadline for Abstract Submission/Registration

22 February, 2019

Topics

  • Particle Physics
  • Cosmology
  • Astrophysics
  • General Relativity
  • Plasma Physics

Invited Speakers

  • Mayumi Aoki (Kanazawa University)
  • Takehiko Asaka (Niigata University)
  • Hiroshi Hasegawa (ISAS/JAXA)
  • Koji Ishiwata (Kanazawa Univeristy)
  • Dongbao Jia (Huaihai Institute of Technology)
  • Yuto Katoh (Tohoku University)
  • Kenichi Nagaoka (National Institute for Fusion Science/Nagoya University)
  • Tadas Nakamura (Fukui Prefectural University)
  • Masato Senami (Kyoto University)
  • Jungjoon Seough (KASI)
  • Justyna M. Sokol (Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences)
  • Hiroaki Sugiyama (Toyama Prefectural University)
  • Takashi Uchiyama (ICRR, University of Tokyo)
  • Ryo Yamazaki (Aoyama Gakuin University)

Organizing Committee

Research Unit for Physics at the Cosmic Frontier, University of Toyama

  • Masaya Hasegawa
  • Shigeki Hirobayashi
  • Mitsuru Kakizaki (Chair)
  • Kaori Kobayashi
  • Yoshiki Moriwaki
  • Yasuhiro Nariyuki
  • Kazuhiro Yamamoto

Contact

  • Mitsuru Kakizaki (University of Toyama) 
  • Phone: +81-(0)76-445-6593 / email: kakizaki _at_sci.u-toyama.ac.jp
Participants
  • Dongbao Jia
  • Haruhito Sakamoto
  • Hiroaki Sugiyama
  • Hiroshi Hasegawa
  • Hisashi Okui
  • Jisuke Kubo
  • Jungjoon Seough
  • Justyna M. Sokol
  • Kazuhiro Yamamoto
  • Kazunari Shima
  • Kenichi Nagaoka
  • Koji Ishiwata
  • Masahito Ogata
  • Masato Senami
  • Mayumi AOKI
  • Mitsuru Kakizaki
  • Ryo Yamazaki
  • Ryosuke Sugimoto
  • Shin Suzuki
  • Tadas Nakamura
  • Takashi Uchiyama
  • Takehiko Asaka
  • Yasuhiro Nariyuki
  • Yuto Katoh
    • 10:00 10:30
      Registration A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
    • 10:30 10:50
      Opening A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
    • 10:50 11:30
      Current status of KAGRA Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Telescope in Japan 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
      Speaker: Takashi Uchiyama
    • 11:30 12:10
      Cooled sapphire mirrors in KAGRA 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      KAGRA is one of 2nd generation gravitational wave detector which is at Kamioka (1 hour drive from Toyama). This detector has unique key features which other 2nd generation detectors do not have; underground site with small seismic vibration and cooled sapphire mirror to reduce thermal noise. I will explain why KAGRA adopts sapphire as mirror substrate and how we developed sapphire mirrors and its suspension. I also introduce activity for sapphire mirror at Toyama before installation at KAGRA site.

      Speaker: Kazuhiro Yamamoto (Japan/University of Toyama)
    • 12:10 13:30
      Lunch 1h 20m Cafeteria (University of Toyama)

      Cafeteria

      University of Toyama

    • 13:30 14:10
      Beyond the Standard Model 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
      Speaker: Mayumi Aoki (Kanazawa University)
    • 14:10 14:50
      Introduction to Neutrino Physics 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      I introduce basics on neutrino physics.

      Speaker: Hiroaki Sugiyama
    • 14:50 15:20
      Break 30m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
    • 15:20 16:00
      Rapid acceleration of relativistic electrons through wave-particle interactions in planetary magnetospheres 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      Wave-particle interactions play crucial roles in both wave excitation and particle energization processes in planetary magnetospheres. The acceleration mechanism of radiation belt electrons by wave-particle interactions in the terrestrial magnetosphere occurs universally in other magnetized plantes. We discuss similarities and differences of the process occurring in the planetary magnetospheres.

      Speaker: Dr Yuto Katoh (Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University)
    • 16:00 16:40
      Transport studies in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      Transport studies in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas will be reviewed. Turbulent driven transport and coherent mode driven transport are presented, and linkage to space and astrophysical plasma will be discussed.

      Speaker: Dr Kenichi Nagaoka (National Institute for Fusion Science)
    • 16:40 17:10
      Break 30m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
    • 17:10 17:50
      TBA 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
      Speaker: Masato Senami
    • 17:50 18:20
      Tour of the Gravitational Wave Research Laboratory GW Research Lab

      GW Research Lab

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

    • 19:00 21:00
      Banquet (Cafeteria AZAMI, on campus) AZAMI (University of Toyama)

      AZAMI

      University of Toyama

    • 09:00 09:40
      Counter-jet emissions from short gamma-ray bursts similar to a binary neutron star merger event GW 170817/GRB 170817A 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      The counter jet of a short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) has not yet been observed, while recent discoveries of gravitational waves (GWs) from a binary neutron star merger GW170817 and the associated sGRB 170817A have indicated that off-axis sGRB jets are detectable. We calculate the prompt emission from the counter jet of an sGRB and show that it is typically 23–26 mag in the optical–infrared band 10–1000 seconds after the GWs for an sGRB 170817A-like event, which is brighter than the early macronova (or kilonova) emission and detectable by LSST in the near future. To scrutinize the counter jets, space GW detectors like DECIGO are powerful in forecasting the merger time (<1 s) and position (<1 arcmin) (∼ a week) before the merger.

      Speaker: Prof. Ryo Yamazaki (Aoyama Gakuin University)
    • 09:40 10:20
      Analysis of Gravitational wave using multi-window NHA method 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      Gravitational waves caused by neutron stars, black holes, the early universe and supernova explosion have become a new method to observe the universe. And the gravitational wave has been successfully detected for the first time using LIGO detector, named GW150914.
      About the real data of detector, the plural line noises are appearing bigger than the gravitational wave greatly, without the notch filter to analyze and observe the gravitational wave signal in detail becomes necessary. Among the various techniques, we proposed and tried to use the Non-Harmonic Analysis (NHA) which improved the frequency resolution dramatically to analyze the gravitational wave since NHA can minimize the influence of the window length. For the model signal of gravitational wave, we compared and verified the analysis accuracy of NHA with other techniques in the time-frequency domain. Using the actual LIGO measured data to verify the analytical precision of gravitational wave signal which near the line noise by NHA.
      And NHA provides a higher-resolution analysis than other previous methods, even the information of small gravitational wave signal which be covered by the large power supply noise, it can be captured and visualized to the limit by NHA without doing the notch filter.
      Moreover, for improving the analytical precision, we proposed a new time-frequency analysis method named Multiwindow NHA based on NHA method, which perform the band division in frequency domain and provide the optimal analysis window length for each band to perform NHA. Therefore, the advantages of NHA are not only retained, but also can use multiple analysis window lengths in the entire frequency domain, and the time resolution and frequency resolution can be achieved simultaneously.
      Multiwindow NHA was used to analysis the actual GW150914 signal, and verified its validity and accuracy with state-of-the-art methods. Consequently, multiwindow NHA can be utilized to represent GW signals from the low to high frequency range accurately based on the high time-frequency resolution and analytical precision, and the influence of noise can be suppressed more effectively than if state-of-the-art methods were used.

      Speaker: Dongbao Jia (Huaihai Institute of Technology)
    • 10:20 10:50
      Photo + Break 30m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
    • 10:50 11:30
      Origin of the baryon asymmetry of the Univserse 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      I would like to review the mechanism for generating the baryon asymmetry of the Universe. Especially, its relation to neutrino masses is discussed and
      the scenarios of leptogenesis are explained.

      Speaker: Takehiko Asaka (Niigata University)
    • 11:30 12:10
      Brief review of dark matter and the detection 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      After giving a brief review of dark matter, I'll talk about direct and indirect detection experiments of dark matter.

      Speaker: Koji Ishiwata (Kanazawa University)
    • 12:10 13:30
      Lunch 1h 20m Cafeteria (University of Toyama)

      Cafeteria

      University of Toyama

    • 13:30 14:10
      Reconstruction of space plasma structures from in-situ measurements 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      Most space plasmas in the heliosphere are optically very thin and thus require in-situ measurements by spacecraft to reveal their fundamental properties. However, data interpretation often involves ambiguities about what kind of structures or phenomena are observed and how physical processes operate in regions traversed by the spacecraft. We present physics-based data analysis methods to reconstruct two- or three-dimensional space plasma structures from in-situ measurements. In particular, results from applications to state-of-the-art fast plasma measurements by the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission are discussed.

      Speaker: Dr Hiroshi Hasegawa (Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA)
    • 14:10 14:50
      From the Earth to the Local Interstellar Medium: space physics by IBEX 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      Interstellar Boundary Explorer, IBEX, is a NASA’s small explorer launched in the orbit around the Earth in 2008. IBEX is equipped with two detectors, IBEX-Lo and IBEX-Hi, to collect energetic neutral atoms of hydrogen with energies ranging from 10 eV up to 6 keV across the entire sky to image the heliosphere and its boundary region. Moreover, IBEX-Lo detects interstellar neutral gas of helium, hydrogen, neon, oxygen, and deuterium to determine properties of the local interstellar medium and Sun’s motion through it. Throughout ten years of operation, IBEX observations have brought a series of discoveries about the heliosphere, its boundary region, and the interaction processes between the solar medium and the interstellar medium. The most known are the IBEX ENA ribbon and the higher temperature of the local interstellar medium, but they are only a few of many. In this talk a review of the space physics revealed by IBEX will be presented.

      Speaker: Dr Justyna M. Sokol (Space Research Centre Polish Academy of Sciences (CBK PAN))
    • 14:50 15:20
      Break 30m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
    • 15:20 16:00
      Unity of nature -Nonlinear-supersymmetric general relativity theory- 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      On (unstable) Riemann space-time just inspired by nonlinear representation of supersymmetry(NLSUSY), whose tangent space is specified by Grassmann degrees of freedom ψ of SL(2,C) besides the ordinary Minkowski one xa of SO(1,3), we can perform the geometric argument of Einstein general relativity principle and obtain straightforwardly new Einstein-Hilbert-type action (nonlinear-supersymmetric general relativity theory(NLSUSYGR)) equipped with the cosmological term. Due to the NLSUSY nature of space-time NLSUSYGR would breaks down spontaneously to ordinary Riemann space-time(graviton) and Nambu-Goldstone(NG) fermion (primordial matter)
      The gravitational interaction of NG fermion with NLSUSY invariance gives a new paradigm for the unification of space-time and matter.
      We show by linearizing NLSUSY that the standard model(SM) of the low energy particle physics can emerge in the true vacuum of NLSUSYGR as the gravitational NG fermion composite eigenstates of super-Poincare space-time symmetry, which continues naturally to the standard Big Bang scenario of the universe.
      NLSUSYGR paradigm can bridge naturally the cosmology and the low energy particle physics and provides new insights into unsolved problems of cosmology, SM and mysterious relations among them,
      e.g. the space-time dimension four, the dark energy and matter, the dark energy density≃( neutrino mass)4 , the tiny neutrino mass, the three-generations structure of quarks and leptons, etc..

      [Ref.] K. Shima, Invited talk at Conference on Cosmology, Gravitational Waves and Particles}, 6-10, January, 2017, NTU, Singapore.. Proceeding of CCGWP, ed. Harald Fritzsch, (World Scientific, Singapore, 2017), 301.
      K. Shima Invited talk at 14th Rencontres du Vietnam on Windows on the Universe
      25th Anniversary, 8/5-11, 2018, Quy Nhon, Vietnam. Proceedings of Windows on the Univers, ed. Jacques Dumarchez, et.al, at press.

      Speaker: Prof. Kazunari Shima (Saitama Institute of Technology)
    • 16:00 16:20
      TBA 20m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
      Speaker: Hisashi Okui
    • 16:20 16:40
      Development of laser intensity stabilization system of gravitational wave telescope KAGRA 20m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
      Speaker: Haruto Sakamoto
    • 16:40 17:00
      Installation of Arm Length Stabilization system in KAGRA 20m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      Gravitational wave telescope KAGRA is a complex system composed of multiple resonators and interferometers, and they should be controlled at same time.
      Otherwise, operation of full configuration of KAGRA can never be started.
      KAGRA adopts green lasers besides main infrared laser to realize controlled interferometer, lock acquisition. This system with green laser is called Arm Length Stabilization (ALS).
      We already installed ALS system for one arm by last year. And, successfully keep resonance arm cavity by hand-over from ALS to main laser.
      I report latest updates in KAGRA site.

      Speaker: Ryosuke Sugimoto (University of Toyama)
    • 09:00 09:40
      Conformal Gravity and Inflation 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
      Speaker: Jisuke Kubo (Kanazawa University)
    • 09:40 10:20
      Gravitational waves from first order phase transition 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      Gravitational waves from first order phase transition

      Speaker: Mitsuru Kakizaki (University of Toyama)
    • 10:20 10:50
      Break 30m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
    • 10:50 11:30
      Covariant Analytical Mechanics: Hamilton Equations and Path Integral 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      A manifestly covariant expression of Hamiltonian analytical mechanics has been applied to obtain Hamilton equations and path integral. The canonical conjugate variables are defined by the external derivative of the potential in this formulation. When applied to gauge fields, this enables us to express the Hamilton equations or path integral without gauge fixing. Consequently, the resulting path integral is free from ghost particles due to the Faddeev-Popov determinant.

      Speaker: Tadas Nakamura
    • 11:30 12:10
      What regulates temperature anisotropy in the expanding solar wind plasmas? 40m A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan

      The solar wind plasmas possess temperature anisotropies that cannot be described by the prediction of double-adiabatic theory. It is commonly accepted that the pervasive features of temperature anisotropy observed in the solar wind are thought to result from a combination of physical mechanisms including the expansion, turbulent heating, kinetic instabilities, and Coulomb collisions. In this study, we develop an expanding box model of velocity moment-based quasilinear kinetic analysis that includes the above-mentioned physical ingredients. By incorporating the local kinetic physics into the large scale expansion and/or Parker spiral magnetic field in the present model, we describe how the solar wind temperature anisotropy is formed and evolves in interplanetary space.

      Speaker: Dr Jungjoon Seough (Korera Astronomy and Space Science Institute)
    • 12:10 12:30
      Summary, Closing A238

      A238

      Faculty of Science, University of Toyama

      3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan