9-13 September 2019
University of Geneva A100 Sciences II
Europe/Zurich timezone

IMF of the first enrichment sources and their contribution to galaxy evolution

Not scheduled
20m
A100 Sciences II, 30 quai Ernest Ansermet, 1205 Geneva (University of Geneva A100 Sciences II)

A100 Sciences II, 30 quai Ernest Ansermet, 1205 Geneva

University of Geneva A100 Sciences II

30, quai Ernest Ansermet 1205 Geneva
Invited presentation

Speaker

Prof. Chiaki Kobayashi (University of Hertfordshire, UK)

Description

First I will show the initial mass function (IMF) of the first enrichment sources obtained with our abundance fitting analysis. We compare the elemental abundance patterns of about 200 extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars to our nucleosynthesis yields of primordial supernovae. As a result, the IMF spans 13-100 Msun with a peak at 25 Msun with a large fraction of hypernovae. The majority of the primordial supernovae have ejected 0.01-0.1 Msun of 56Ni, leaving behind a compact remnant (either a neutron star or a black hole), with a mass in the range of ~1.5-5 Msun. The masses of the first stars responsible for the first metal enrichment are predominantly <40 Msun. This implies that the higher-mass first stars were either less abundant, directly collapsed into a black hole without ejecting heavy elements, or a supernova explosion of a higher-mass first star inhibits the formation of the next generation of low-mass stars at [Fe/H]<-3. I will then focus the stars fitted with 13M sun or 100 Msun models, which have relatively low alpha/Fe ratios, connecting super-luminous supernovae. Finally, I will predict galactic chemical evolution with these first supernovae, which can be tested with future observations with JWST.

Primary author

Prof. Chiaki Kobayashi (University of Hertfordshire, UK)

Presentation Materials

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