Workshop Chamonix XV

Europe/Zurich
L'Esplanade du Lac, Divonne-les-Bains

L'Esplanade du Lac, Divonne-les-Bains

Description

Third LHC Project Workshop

The Workshop will address topics related to the performance and operation of the LHC as well as the construction, installation and commissioning of the project.

Steve Myers

Chairman

John Poole

Scientific Secretary & editor of the proceedings

Tjitske Kehrer

Secretariat of the Workshop

- Attendance by invitation only -


"l'Esplanade du Lac - Divonne les Bains" (map), (road map from Geneva to L'Esplande du lac)

    • Session 01 - The minimum workable LHC - plans and requirements for beam commissioning, years 1 and 2
      • 1
        Summary of overall commissioning strategy for protons
        After a brief reminder of the various requirements on the LHC, the strategy for a staged commissioning with protons is summarised. Typical machine parameters and associated performance levels are given for each stage. Dedicated runs with ions and protons are mentioned, and how machine operation may be scheduled through a year is shown.
        Speaker: Roger Bailey (CERN)
        Slides
      • 2
        Electrical circuits required for the minimum workable LHC during commissioning and first two years of operation
        In this report the issue of availability of electrical circuits, both for magnetic elements and for RF devices, is considered. Based on the agreed stages to commission and operate the LHC during the first two years, the minimum number of required circuits will be presented and discussed. The analysis will also consider how to deal with not required, but available circuits, as well as a possible schedule for making all circuits available for operation.
        Speaker: Massimo Giovannozzi (CERN)
        Slides
      • 3
        Beam measurements required in the first two years of LHC commissioning
        Many beam measurements are essential already in the first phase of the LHC commissioning. Others become necessary only as the intensity and the number of bunches is raised. I will review the beam measurements needed in the various phases of the LHC commissioning, their sequence, and the tools required for performing them. An earlier talk at Chamonix XII discussed beam measurements on the LHC flat bottom. This presentation also addresses acceleration and collision, the priority or order of the various measurements, as well as requirements for instruments and timing.
        Speaker: Frank Zimmermann (AB/ABP)
        Slides
      • 10:15 AM
        Coffee Break
      • 4
        Real Time Feedback required
        In order to counteract disturbances due to the decay and snapback of multipole moments, misalignments, ground motion, and other dynamics effects, control of the key beam parameters orbit, tune, chromaticity and energy will be an integral part of LHC operation. Manual correction of those parameters may soon reach its limit with respect to required precision and expected time-scales. The baseline and requirements of the proposed feed-forward/feedback systems are presented and their possible staging during beam commissioning discussed.
        Speaker: Ralph Steinhagen (AB/OP)
        Slides
      • 5
        Vacuum Conditions Required
        Several years will be required to reach the LHC nominal performances. During the year 1 and 2, the LHC beam current will be limited, therefore the nominal performances of the vacuum system are not required. In this context, the vacuum performances for year 1 and 2 will be analysed. Particularly, the bake-out of the Long Straight Sections could be questioned. The implications of an unbaked vacuum system onto the resources, the installation schedule, the beam life time, the quench level, the dissipated power into the cold masses and the radiation dose onto the machine elements will be discussed.
        Speaker: Vincent Baglin (CERN)
        Slides
      • 6
        Radiation Protection Constraints During the Life Time of LHC
        The moment the first protons will be sent through LHC, the installation will become subject to CERN’s radiation protection legislation. Proper pre-cautions will have to be taken before the start-up of the machine and all significant radiation parameters like prompt radiation and activation will have to be continuously monitored from then on. Based on calculations, measurements and experience the operational boundary conditions will have to be set with respect to the classification of radiation workers, access conditions, maintenance work in the tunnel, control of material leaving the tunnel, repair of material outside the tunnel and finally waste management. The talk will focus on the operational aspects and their implication on the overall operation of the LHC accelerator as function of the various LHC stages.
        Speaker: Doris Forkel-Wirth (CERN)
        Slides
      • 7
        Beam Commissioning: Required Applications
        Effective commissioning of the LHC with beam demands a well-designed, coherent suite of high level software. The challenges include a large amount of heterogeneous equipment, large distributed beam instrumentation systems, the dynamic effects of superconducting magnets and tight constraints on the key beam parameters. All of which have to be dealt with while respecting the destructive power of the beams. The large amount of required software is briefly elucidated.
        Speaker: Mike Lamont (LFC)
        Slides
    • Session 02 - The minimum workable LHC - machine protection and collimation
      • 8
        Commissioning and (early) operation - view from machine protection
        Before first beam is injected into LHC, the large part of the protection systems that does not require beam for commissioning will already have been formally validated. Some systems require to be commissioned with beam at the start of beam operation. With increasing stored energy, increased performance of some protection systems is required, and also additional systems must be commissioned. It is proposed to define operational stages with limits on the stored beam energy. An increase of the stored energy, either by filling more beam, or by increasing the maximum energy, requires formal validation of the protection systems that are required for the next stage of operation, and an agreement between operation and machine protection experts to go on. This presentation discusses the general strategy. The detailed requirements are discussed in the following presentations.
        Speaker: Jan Uythoven (CERN)
        Slides
      • 9
        What Systems request a Beam Dump
        The protection system for LHC beam operation is composed of 'client systems' that may request beam dumps, of a beam interlock system that transmits the requests and of a beam dumping system that extracts the beams to the beam dump blocks. The various players involved in beam interlocking will be presented, and the core systems that are required before beam operation may start will be highlighted. Possibilities to stage some of the systems during the commissioning phase will be discussed. Diagnostics and controls requirements will be discussed.
        Speaker: Jorg Wenninger (CERN)
        Slides
      • 10
        What is required to safely fill LHC
        Machine protection consisting of passive and active systems will be used to prevent damage during the LHC injection process. Concerning beam 2, parts of the SPS extraction and transfer line beam interlock system has already been successfully tested during the TI 8 commissioning. Key elements of the final system for beam 2 will be validated during the LHC sector test with low intensity beam, together with parts of the passive protection system, the TDI and at least one transfer line collimator TCDI. The remaining issues after the sector test will be discussed in detail, where the entire injection protection system together with post mortem, management of critical settings, sequencer and software interlocking system must be tested with beam, for different intensities and filling patterns during the LHC beam commissioning. Requirements from other systems and interdependencies for test modes, such as inject & dump, are important input for the overall LHC commissioning strategy and will be discussed.
        Speaker: Verena Kain (CERN)
        Slides
      • 3:15 PM
        Coffee Break
      • 11
        What is required to get the beam safely out of LHC
        Assuming that the trigger is provided, the Beam Dumping System LBDS must safey remove the beam. The first stages of commissioning will include individual hardware tests of the associated systems, together with overall system level tests and validation of the whole LBDS in the final operational configuration, culminating in the reliability run. There will be a further series of tests, configuration and validation of the LBDS during commissioning with beam for the different stages, at different energies. The commissioning steps are described as the intensity and energy are increased, in the different commissioning stages. The evolution of the minimum requirements on the beam instrumentation and control system (post-mortem, post-operational checks, inject and dump, ...) are detailed through the commissioning process.
        Speaker: Brennan Goddard (CERN)
        Slides
      • 12
        Beam Commissioning of the Collimation Systems
        The beam commissioning of the LHC collimators is outlined for the expected evolution of beam intensity and low beta optics in the LHC. Starting from the necessary pre-requisites concerning aperture and machine reproducibility, a commissioning scenario is developed that addresses requirements from both beam cleaning and protection. An initial minimal system for lower intensities is described, relying on fewer collimators and featuring relaxed tolerances. It is explained how this system would be set up and how it then would be gradually extended to its full performance.
        Speaker: Ralph Assmann (CERN)
        Slides
      • 13
        Critical Beam Losses during Commissioning and Initial Operation
        Since Chamonix 2005, all collimators added into model, beam losses brought down by a factor 10 compared to results, losses have been calculated for different scenarios, the sensitivity to the orbit has been addressed. From these results it can be shown that is sufficient to use a limited number of BLM's for the setup and optimization of the LHC Collimation System.
        Speaker: Guillaume Robert-Demolaize (Univ.Joseph Fourier Grenoble I (Grenoble 1))
        Slides
      • 14
        Commissioning of Beam Loss Monitors
        The commissioning steps for the beam loss monitor system will be discussed. There are different types of monitors. Since the functionality of the monitors with respect to damage and quench protection is different, the thresholds for the monitor types to trigger a beam dump needs to be established for the different types. Uncertainties in the threshold are expected to be caused by the uncertainties in the proton loss locations and in the quench level knowledge. The consequences of these uncertainties will be pointed out by discussing different scenarios.
        Speaker: Bernd Dehning (AB/BDI)
        Slides
    • Session 03 - The minimum workable LHC – providers' commitments

      The objectives of this session are to:
      - State the responsibility as understood by the different providers and identify possible overlap or missing parts at department level
      - Have a clear and up-to-date view of who is responsible for what in the project and point out eventual missing resources
      - Have a clear and up-to-date view of the providers’ commitments on the requirements listed in the 2 previous sessions. This should describe the equipment/application functionality and performance expected for the different stages and the procedures and tests foreseen to reach these objectives
      - Gather the providers’ major issues (i.e. uncovered requirements) and possible ‘Plan B’

      • 15
        ATB Commitments and Major Issues
        This presentation will state ATB responsibility and organisation for LHC collimation. It will also present ATB commitments on the requirements listed in the 2 previous sessions. In particular, it will address the collimation system functionality and performance expected for the different operation stages and the procedures and tests to be put in place to reach these objectives. Finally, current major issues (i.e. uncovered requirements) and possible ‘Plan B’ will be presented.
        Speaker: Oliver Aberle (AB/ATB)
        Slides
      • 16
        BDI Commitments and Major Issues for Distributed Instrumentation
        This presentation will state BDI responsibility and organisation for LHC distributed instrumentation, i.e. beam position and beam loss systems. It will also present BDI commitments on the requirements listed in the 2 previous sessions. In particular, it will address the BPM and BLM functionality and performance expected for the different operation stages and the procedures and tests foreseen to reach these objectives. Finally, current major issues (i.e. uncovered requirements) and possible ‘Plan B’ will be presented.
        Speaker: Barbara Holzer (AB/BDI)
        Slides
      • 17
        BDI Commitments and Major Issues for Individual Instruments
        This presentation will state BDI responsibility and organisation for LHC individual instrumentation, i.e. intensity, emittance, tune, chromaticity... It will also present BDI commitments on the requirements listed in the 2 previous sessions. In particular, it will address the instruments' functionality and performance expected for the different operation stages and the procedures and tests foreseen to reach these objectives. Finally, current major issues (i.e. uncovered requirements) and possible ‘Plan B’ will be presented.
        Speaker: Rhodri Jones (AB/BDI)
        Slides
      • 10:30 AM
        coffee break
      • 18
        RF Commitments and Major Issues
        This presentation will state RF group responsibility and organisation for LHC. It will also present RF commitments on the requirements listed in the 2 previous sessions. In particular, it will address the equipments' functionality and performance expected for the different operation stages and the procedures and tests foreseen to reach these objectives. Finally, current major issues (i.e. uncovered requirements) and possible ‘Plan B’ will be presented.
        Speaker: Edmond Ciapala (AB/RF)
        Slides
      • 19
        Commitments and Major Issues on Control Services (Timing, Interlocks, Logging, PM)
        This presentation will state CO group responsibility and organisation for LHC control services, i.e. timing, interlocks, logging, post-mortem... It will also present CO commitments on the requirements listed in the 2 previous sessions. In particular, it will address the functionality and performance expected for the different operation stages and the procedures and tests foreseen to reach these objectives. Finally, current major issues (i.e. uncovered requirements) and possible ‘Plan B’ will be presented.
        Speaker: Hermann Schmickler (AB/CO)
        Slides
      • 20
        Commitments and Major Issues on LHC Applications
        This presentation will state CO group responsibility and organisation for LHC operational applications. It will also present CO commitments on the requirements listed in the 2 previous sessions. In particular, it will address the functionality and performance expected for the different operation stages and the procedures and tests foreseen to reach these objectives. Finally, current major issues (i.e. uncovered requirements) and possible ‘Plan B’ will be presented.
        Speaker: Eugenia Hatziangeli (AB/CO)
        Slides
    • Session 04 - Magnetic Requirements for Commissioning
      • 21
        What is the Impact of Hysteresis on Orbit Correction and Feedback
        Orbit correction is a fundamental feedback action that is applied to the beam in order to counteract disturbances due to misalignments, ground motion, dynamics effects, etc. Threading the very first LHC pilot beam though the 26.7 km ring relies on the ability to properly correct the beam trajectory. The requirements for orbit correction on transfer functions and hysteresis of the LHC orbit corrector magnets will be presented and compared to the first magnetic measurement results. The requirements will be presented both for manual corrections by the operators and for real-time corrections by a feedback system.
        Speaker: Ralph Steinhagen (AB/OP)
        Slides
      • 22
        Transfer function of quadrupoles and expected beta beating
        We present data relative to the transfer function of all the quadrupoles in the machine, specifying how many different measurement system are involved, how cross-calibrations are carried out, and what is the final level of absolute and relative accuracy that will be reached according to the present baseline. Other sources of perturbation of the optic fuctions such as the precision of the power supply and the absolute accuracy relative to the transfer function of the main dipoles are considered. A final estimate of the induced beta beating in the machine is given.
        Speaker: Stephane Sanfilippo (AT/MTM)
        Slides
      • 23
        Hysteresis in magnet correctors versus tune and chromatic correction
        As a follow-up of the discussions initiated at the last LHC Project Workshop, this contribution will concentrate on the aspects of the magnetic behaviour of Trim and Tuning Quadrupoles, as well as spool and lattice Sextupoles, which may be relevant for the machine operation. The measured magnetic hysteresis and its possible influence on setting errors during operation will be presented, in particular the real-time compensation of decay and snapback in the main magnets, and the reproducibility between runs. A detailed characterization of minor hysteresis loops is presented, to explore potential effects on the stability of the feedback.
        Speaker: Walter Venturini (AT/MTM)
        Slides
      • 3:30 PM
        coffee break
      • 24
        Field model deliverables for sector test and commissioning: when and what ?
        The implemention of an accurate magnetic model will be vital for efficient LHC commissioning with beam and subsequent machine performance. Given the conclusions of the RMS review, and the resource constraints, the proposed implementation of a magnetic model is described. The present state of the implementation is given along with the proposed planning for the deliverables required for the upcoming milestones. These milestones include the sector test and initial commissioning.
        Speaker: Mike Lamont (LFC)
        Slides
      • 25
        Sorting the magnets in the machine: what did/will we gain ?
        The criteria for sorting the magnets in the machine are outlined, pointing out which are the most critical and the expected gain in terms of machine performances. The compatibility of the sorting with planning issues experienced in the past year is reviewed. The expected difference or similarity between the sectors is analysed, and the representativity of the first sector that will be tested with respect to the whole machine is discussed.
        Speaker: Luca Bottura (AT/MTM)
        Slides
      • 26
        Expected quench levels of the machine without beam: starting at 7 Tev ?
        The quench training performance of about 900 LHC main dipoles and 200 main quadrupoles cold tested to date will be presented and commented. From these results an estimate of the number of quenches that could be required to operate the whole machine at nominal energy will be presented without considering beam loss effects. The energy level at which the machine could be operated without being disturbed by training quenches at the early phase of the commissioning will also be addressed. The missing and required information necessary to improve these predictions will be pointed out.
        Speaker: Pierre Pugnat (AT/MTM)
        Slides
      • 27
        Chasing parasitic magnetic fields in the LHC
        A tnetative summary of the parasitic fields in the LHC machine is presented. The impact on the beam is evaluated. Critical cases, such as the one of the connection cryostat, are reviewed and the solutions to avoid deleterious effects on the beam dynamics are outlined. A first pass at computing in 3D the field created by the busbars in the dipole-to-dipole interconnect is discussed.
        Speaker: Arnaud Devred (AT/MAS)
        Slides
    • Session 05 - Experiment-Machine Interface
      • 28
        Commissioning the LHC Physics Programme
        All experiments will have installed their detector set-ups and will be ready for commissioning with beam at the start of LHC operation. The physics programme is expected to be rich even at the projected initial luminosities. This paper presents the requirements and expectations of the experiments for single beams, early collisions, the pilot physics run, the heavy-ion run and the special proton runs, and may be used subsequently to set priorities in order to exploit optimally the first LHC beams for physics
        Speaker: Emmanuel Tsesmelis (TS/LEA)
        Slides
      • 29
        Aspects of machine induced background in the LHC experiments
        In our report we review different aspects of the LHC Machine Induced Background and its implication on the specific experiments. On the base of current assumptions and estimates of the various parameters of the problem, we will present a few examples of the effect of this background on the experiments' detectors. Using the present understanding of the background sources and its formation in the machine structure, we attempt to predict the possible range of variation in the Machine Induced Background at various stages of LHC commissioning and operation.
        Speaker: Gloria Corti (CERN)
        Slides
      • 30
        Bringing the first LHC beams into collision at all 4 IP's
        Collision rate monitors are essential in bringing particle beams into collision and optimizing the performances of a collider. In the case of LHC the relative luminosity will be monitored by measuring the flux of small angle neutral particles produced in the collisions. The LHC rate monitors (BRAN) are being developed by Berkeley National Laboratory (USA) in the framework of the LARP collaboration and consist of a fast ionization chamber that will be installed on both sides of each IP and at about 140m from it. The monitors aim at measuring the relative luminosity of LHC bunch by bunch with a few percent resolution.
        Speaker: Enrico Bravin (AB/BDI)
      • 31
        The Solenoids and Dipole magnets of LHC experiments
        The LHC experiments are equipped with solenoids or spectrometer magnets. Both types affect the beam dynamics or constrain the choice of the optical configurations. The implications are estimated and possible limitations are discussed. The present working scenario is presented and its flexibility is subjected to a critical assessment.
        Speaker: Werner Herr (CERN AB/ABP)
        Slides
      • 10:35 AM
        Coffee break
      • 32
        Beam Dump and Injection Inhibits
        This presentation describes the proposed beam interlocking strategy for the LHC experiments and for the experimental magnets. Two different types of interlocks are foreseen: beam dump requests and beam injection inhibits. The interfaces to the LHC beam and injection interlock systems are described. Proposals for implementations and open points are presented.
        Speaker: Jorg Wenninger (CERN)
        Slides
      • 33
        Beam Condition Monitoring and Radiation Damage Concerns of the Experiments
        From the very start of LHC operations, the experiments will have a strong interest in monitoring online the beam conditions and radiation levels in and around the experimental areas. Although the equipment in these caverns is designed to tolerate the expected radiation levels in normal operation, such monitoring is seen as key to protecting the detectors from damage due to unexpected short- or long- term beam losses, and necessary for understanding how beam conditions affect the efficient operation of the experiments. This is especially important during the commissioning and early running period of the LHC. As monitoring methods and equipment protection concerns vary amongst the different experiments, this talk will address the general issues associated with reliable beam and radiation monitoring within the experimental areas and the estimation of beam loss and radiation damage in and around the experimental areas. Varying time scales are to be considered, ranging from ultra-fast beam loss, to run-by-run losses, to integrated long-term effects of radiation. Specific examples of monitoring systems being implemented by experiments will be given and implications for machine and experiment operations will be highlighted.
        Speaker: Alick Macpherson (Rutgers University/CERN)
        Slides
      • 34
        Experimental equipment interacting with beam operation
        The operation of the experimental magnets and movable devices (TOTEM/ATLAS Roman Pots, LHCb VELO, ALICE ZDC, LHCf calorimeters) will interfere with beam operation. Their operation has been discussed during the last year and the main conclusions are reviewed together with the remaining open issues. Details on the communication foreseen between the CCC and the experiments' Control Rooms will be given.
        Speaker: Daniela Macina (CERN)
        Slides
    • Session 06 - Installation
      • 35
        Schedule - Still on Time?
        The status of installation across the LHC will be given with particular attention to Sector 78 and 81. This will illustrate some of the difficulties encountered during the past year, limitations related to co-activities in narrow underground areas and safety constraints. The talk will then describe how to profit from the experience gathered on the two first LHC sectors with a view to limit the impact of the delays accumulated so far. Keywords: Schedule; Sector 78 & 81; Installation experience
        Speaker: Sylvain Weisz (TS/IC)
        Slides
      • 36
        Safety - a Reminder in Time of Intense Co-activities
        In view of the very tight schedule of the LHC project many installation activities will progress in parallel in the tunnel at many work sites. The presentation will give an overview of and recall the most important security aspects that have to be taken into account by the different project engineers responsible for equipment being installed. The LHC project engineers have the responsibility to ensure that a tight schedule does not have a negative impact on the safety of the activities for which they are responsible. The LHC project Safety co-ordination team is always available to help the project engineers to mitigate the inherent risks of a multi- activity worksite.
        Speaker: Marc Vadon (TS/HCO)
        Slides
      • 37
        LHC Access - Where do we stand
        The progress in the LHC access project will be presented. The LHC access system consists of two subsystems, the LHC Access control system (LACS) and the LHC Access Safety System (LASS). A first prototype of both subsystems has been installed in the TCR and is under acceptance testing - the results of these tests will be discussed. Extensive work has also been done on the Man Machine Interface and the supervisory system. The presentation will give a brief overview of what the operation of the LHC Acces system will look like in the CCC. The actual challenge for the project team is now to upgrade the system from a functional prototype to a robust system that can be installed confidently in the LHC. Finally the installation schedule and the constraints will be mentioned. Keywords: :LHC Access, Prototype; Schedule, Man- machine interface
        Speaker: Pierre Ninin (TS/CSE)
        Slides
      • 38
        SPS Access - What has to be done
        The SPS access system is not conforming to the requirements of a modern INB installation and an upgrade program has been launched to remedy this situation. This program is split into three phases that will be implemented, in the present planning, in the shutdowns 2006, 2007 and after the first physics run of the LHC respectively. The presentation will briefely touch on the three phases but will concentrate on changes that will be implemented for the 2006 run. Access to SPS during the run will be more restricted and will have to become much more concentrated and organised since it will require a manual intervention before and after each access by the machine operators at each access point. The locks on the access doors will be physically disabled during machine operation and must be enabled locked manually before access is permitted. The emergency exit doors in the various tunnels and caverns that can be accessed during machine operation and that cannot be padlocked for safety reasons will be connected to the power emergency stops to ensure that no beam can be present when a human presence is possible. Keywords: SPS access; INB, Constraints; upgrade; schedule
        Speakers: Elena Manola-Poggioli (TS/CSE), Patrick Lienard (AT/MAS)
        Slides
      • 3:40 PM
        Coffee break
      • 39
        QRL Installation and first Experiences of Operation
        The cryogenic distribution line (QRL) is divided in eight sectors, and each of them (about 3.2 km) is a continuous cryostat starting at the cryogenic interconnection box and ending at the return module. Each sector is sectorised in 9 vacuum subsectors, to easy installation and commissioning, and is composed of about 300 straight elements and 40 so-called service modules feeding the cryomagnets with helium at different temperature levels. At present the installation of the QRL is complete for the first two sectors (sector 8-1 and sector 4-5) and under progress in four other sectors (sector 7-8 installed by CERN, and sectors 3-4, 5-6 and 6-7 installed by the QRL Contractor). The technical objectives of the QRL installation have now been reached, such as 20 standard interconnections a week and helium leaktighness test of each subsector (about 400 m) in less than 3 weeks. The main technical choices for the installation are described in this paper together with the lessons learned and the improvement for the future. The first two sub-sectors of the sector 7-8 (about 735 m) and the full sector 8-1 have already been warm and cold commissioned. They underwent to pneumatic tests, cooldown to nominal temperatures and heat inleak measurements. The main results of the commissioning of these two sectors are presented and compared to the values specified in the technical specification. Based on the production rate of the QRL elements and the installation rate achieved up to now, it will be possible to complete the QRL installation before end of 2006. Keywords: Present state and progress of installation; first experiences of cool- down (performance and conformity with technical specs.); critical issues. Schedule
        Speaker: Germana Riddone (AT/ACR)
        Paper
        Slides
      • 40
        MME Workpackages
        The status and prospectives of two workpackages realised in TS-MME will be presented: beam instrumentation and collimators. Concerning the monitors dedicated to the beam instrumentation, the availability of the various designs and constructions will be outlined, as well as the challenges and the critical issues related to their on-time installation. For the collimators, the advancement of the Phase I workpackage, in particular the design of the special elements and masks, will be discussed as well as the actual challenges. Indications on possible R&D for the Phase II collimators will be shortly presented. Keywords: Collimators; Beam instrumentation; design and construction.
        Speaker: Vincent Vuillemin (TS/MME)
        Slides
      • 41
        Polarity and electrical quality assurance
        The presentation will discuss electrical quality assurance (ELQA) in the tunnel, and the first results from partial assembly qualifications (PAQ) and arc interconnection verification (AIV). Two major issue now confronting us are the management of ELQA on 7-8 fronts simultaneously and the polarity nonconformities in magnets and magnet sub-assemblies. Finally the polarity convention issues in the insertion regions will be revisited. Keywords: ELQA, Polarity, Non-conformities, Quality Assurance
        Speaker: Stephan Russenschuck (AT/MEL)
        Slides
    • Session 07 - I-LHC
      • 42
        I-LHC Project overview
        The LHC physics programme with heavy ions (lead-lead) collisions at a luminosity of 1027 cm-2s-1 requires an upgrade the ion injector chain: Linac3-LEIR-PS-SPS. The construction of LEIR is now finished and beam commissioning is under way. The status of the modifications in and around the PS and SPS (new injection system, rf gymnastics, stripping insertion) and the plans for their commissioning and the transition from the “Early” to “Nominal” lead ion beams are outlined,. The milestones, schedule and the impact of any changes are discussed. A tentative estimate of the lead beam brilliance and intensity in LHC is made.
        Speaker: Stephan Maury (AB/ABP)
        Slides
      • 43
        Experience with the GTS-LHC ion source
        For the heavy ion programme of the LHC a new ECRIS type heavy ion source had to be designed and built for Linac3 to fullfill the intensity requirements. Experience acquired during the installation and commissioning of the source and during operation for the LEIR ring commissioning will be presented. The performance of the source and its reliability are evaluated. Further requirements for high reliability, low down time, easy maintenance and for future physics needs will be discussed.
        Speaker: Detlef Küchler (AB/ABP)
        Slides
      • 44
        LEIR Commissioning
        After reporting on already completed phases of LEIR commissioning, an outlook and tentative schedule until completion aiming at providing the beam needed for first LHC ion runs will be given. Expected and unexpected problems and actions to tackle them are highligthed.
        Speaker: Christian Carli (AB/ABP)
        Slides
      • 10:30 AM
        break
      • 45
        Post-mortem of Experience with LEIR Controls
        The Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR was selected as a testbed, to validate certain concepts which will compose the LHC control system. LEIR is inserted between the Linac3 and PS accelerators which are completely controlled by the CPS control system. The LEIR control system is hybrid, as it is the aggregation of parts coming from the PS Complex control system and different components from the LHC. After a period of strong instabilities, modifications, adjustments and training, this control system is usable in a commissioning environment. Before it is completely operational, some components or functionalities need to be added, and others should be corrected in order to improve the speed, reliability and ergonomics.
        Speaker: Sergio Pasinelli (AB/OP)
        Slides
      • 46
        Gain of Experience for the Running-in of LHC
        The talk focuses on the results and the experience gained from the deployment of a new control system on LEIR during its running-in. From a technical viewpoint, the control system of LEIR presents challenging features. It is the result of the integration of new components foreseen for the LHC into the existing controls infrastructure deployed on the CERN [PS Complex] accelerators. As the LHC-like controls have been used for the first time in an operational context during the LEIR running-in in 2005, their successful operation represents a very valuable step in the process of the LHC Controls system validation. Moreover, LEIR also has faced a cultural challenge: make the operators confident in changing their habits and in using new controls despite some issues or reliability and maturity. The talk provides a look to the main strategies undertaken to achieve this double objective as well as the difficulties encountered and the lessons learnt in view of the LHC operation.
        Speaker: Marine Gourber-Pace (AB/CO)
        Slides
      • 47
        LEIR Electron Cooler
        For the LEIR project, a new cooler has been constructed in collaboration with BINP Novosibirsk. It will deliver up to 600 mA of electron current at an energy of 2.3 keV (corresponding to the lead ion energy of 4.2 MeV/u) and has the advantage that the radius and density profile can be varied to match the characteristics of the injected lead ion beam. The device was delivered at the end of 2004 and commissioning of the device began in November of this year with the first cooling of O4+ ions just one day after having obtained a stable 200 mA electron beam.
        Speaker: Gerard Tranquille (AB/BDI)
        Slides
    • Session 08 - Sector Test - Beam
      • 48
        Sector Test: Overview, Motivation and Scheduling
        An overview of and the motivation for the sector test are recalled. The essential components for the test are enumerated and the requisite preparation detailed. The scheduling of the preparatory steps, the test itself and recovery from the test. This is presented together with the potential impact and interaction with hardware commissioning and ongoing installation.
        Speaker: Mike Lamont (LFC)
        Slides
      • 49
        Proposed tests with beam
        An overview of the proposed tests is presented, with time and beam load estimates. The necessary instrumentation and associated requirements on controls are discussed. The tests will include optics checks, aperture scans, instrumentation performance, magnet checks, injection protection, stability and quenches. For each test the methods are outlined, with the requirements on instrumentation, equipment and controls highlighted.
        Speaker: Brennan Goddard (CERN)
        Slides
      • 50
        Magnet Quenches with Beam
        The motivation for quenching magnets during the sector test is revisited and presently assumed quench limits recalled. Which magnet (s) are planned to be used and the associated BLM layout and local aperture layout are detailed. The required beam intensity/emittance/angle to reach the quench limit in the coil is estimated and how this is to be achieved by steering beam into aperture. The current knowledge from simulations is reviewed. Requirements from further simulations, extra instruments, controls, applications and logging are briefly enumerated.
        Speaker: Alexander Koschik (AB/ABP)
        Slides
      • 3:30 PM
        Coffee break
      • 51
        Beam Instrumentation foreseen for the LHC sector test
        The state of installation and preparedness of the large distributed system - BLMs and BPMs - is covered. The required controls infrastructure is described along with the proposed series of tests that will be performed to confirm readiness before the test it self. Other discrete instrumentation - BCT and BTV - are detailed and again plans for installation and testing are presented. The need and plans for other systems, BST for example, is also mentioned. The proposed acquisition modes during the test are described along with desired measurements to assess instrumentation performance.
        Speaker: Lars Jensen (AB/BDI)
        Slides
      • 52
        Magnets
        The requirements of the sector test are described, this will cover: transfer functions, multipole errors, cycling prescription, and a de-Gauss cycle. The potential use of a field model is explored and the possible tests of this on the injection plateau following re-cycling.
        Speaker: Luca Bottura (AT/MTM)
        Slides
      • 53
        Control Requirements
        The sector test will provide an interesting milestone for the LHC control system. An overview of the infrastructure and technical systems, including the beam interlocks, that have to be in place for the test is given. The requirements on the high level software are detailed. Planning for the delivery of this software is outlined.Pre-testing of the control facilities will be vital and an outline of the test procedures and their scheduling are given.
        Speaker: Robin Lauckner (AB/CO)
        Slides
    • Session 09 - Sector Test - Preparation
      • 54
        Planning
        The planning of the installation of LHC from the injection to Pt7 for the sector test will be reviewed. Special attention will be paid to components which are on the critical path for the success of the first injection. Possible interferences with on going and future installation activities will be mentioned and their consequences on the overall LHC installation activities highlighted.
        Speaker: Esther Barbero Soto (TS/HDO)
        Slides
      • 55
        Global hardware status
        Starting from the TI8 dump (TED) up to the end of the continuous cryostat in IP7, the availability in the tunnel of all components in the beam line e.g. the vacuum, cryogenic, collimation, protection devices, beam instrumentation and magnet systems will be reviewed. The impact of delays and potential limitations will also be presented.
        Speaker: Jose Miguel Jimenez (CERN)
        Slides
      • 56
        Layout in LSS7
        The sector test requires the installation of specific equipments in LHC LSS7. The layout after the continuous cryostat in IP7, to be used during the sector test, is presented. A special emphasis will be given on the installation of the temporary equipment, like the beam dump, additional shielding, radiation monitors and beam instrumentation in this region.
        Speaker: Jan Uythoven (CERN)
        Slides
      • 57
        Hardware Commissioning
        The preparation for the injection tests of the equipment described in the two previous presentations will be given in detail. The level of the commissioning of the equipment will depend on the time available between the cool down and the end of the injection test: this level can vary from the complete commissioning up to nominal current of all the circuits to the minimum current required for the injection test only for a limited number of circuits. The implications (organization of the work, coactivities with other sectors, etc.) of these scenarios will be described.
        Speaker: Roberto Saban (CERN)
        Slides
      • 10:40 AM
        Coffee break
      • 58
        State of LHCB for the Test
        During the sector test the beam has to cross IP8 and the vacuum continuity must be ensured through the experiment. The installation schedule of the experiment will be presented and the possible mutual interferences with the sector test highlighted. The temporary layout of IP8 and the vacuum conditions for this test in the region IP8 will be shown.
        Speaker: Massimiliano Ferro-Luzzi (PH/LBD)
        Slides
      • 59
        Radiation Issue
        The radiation safety measures during the sector test will be described. The consequences of these temporary measures on the on going installation activity will be considered. The implications of the test on future activities will also be shown with a special attention to the possible activation by beam losses of LHC components and their effects on future installation activities in the zone.
        Speaker: Helmut Vincke (SC/RP)
        Slides
      • 60
        Temporary Access System
        The temporary access system required for the sector test is described. Special hardware needed will be listed as well as the software necessary to monitor the access. The procedures and limitations for accessing the zone will also be described
        Speaker: Pierre Ninin (TS/CSE)
        Slides
    • Session 10 - Closing Session
      Conveners: John (Scientific Secretary) Poole (AB), Steve (Chairman) Myers (AB)
    • Summing-up of Chamonix XV Workshop Main Auditorium (Main Auditorium)

      Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      • 61
        Summing-up of Session 1 - Plans and requirements for beam commissioning, years 1 and 2 Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Speaker: Roger Bailey (AB/OP)
        Slides
      • 62
        Summing-up of Session 2 - The minimum workable LHC - machine protection and collimation Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Speaker: Rudiger Schmidt (AB/CO)
        Slides
      • 63
        Summing-up of Session 3 - The minimum workable LHC – providers' commitments Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Speaker: Jean-Jacques Gras (AB/BI)
        ChamSumUpSes3.pdf
        Slides
      • 64
        Summing-up of Session 4 - Magnetic Requirements for Commissioning Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Speaker: Ezio Todesco (AT/MAS)
        Slides
      • 65
        Summing-up of Session 5 - Experiment-Machine Interface Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Speaker: Keith Potter (TS/HDO)
        Slides
      • 66
        Summing-up of Session 6 - Installation Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Speaker: Thomas Pettersson (TS/CSE)
        Slides
      • 3:30 PM
        Coffee break Main Auditorium (Main Auditorium)

        Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

      • 67
        Summing-up of session 7 - I-LHC Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Speaker: Oliver Bruning (AB/ABP)
        Slides
      • 68
        Summing-up of Session 8 - Sector test Beam Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Speakers: Mike Lamont (AB/OP), Verena Kain (AB/OP)
        Slides
      • 69
        Summing-up of Session 9 - Sector test Preparation Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Speaker: Pierre Strubin (AT/VAC)
        Slides
      • 70
        Summary & discussion Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Main Auditorium

        Speaker: Steve Myers (AB)