July 29, 2015 to August 6, 2015
World Forum
Europe/Amsterdam timezone

THE ROLE OF DRIFT ON DIURNAL ANISOTROPY OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS IN DIFFERENT PERIODS OF SOLAR MAGNETIC CYCLE

Aug 4, 2015, 4:00 PM
1h
Theater Foyer (World Forum)

Theater Foyer

World Forum

Churchillplein 10 2517 JW Den Haag The Netherlands
Board: 15
Poster contribution SH-EX Poster 3 SH

Speakers

Dr Marek Siluszyk (Siedlce University, Poland)Prof. Michael Alania (Siedlce University, Poland)Dr Renata Modzelewska (Siedlce University, Poland)

Description

The hourly neutron monitor data have been used to study the role of drift effect in the temporal changes of the diurnal anisotropy. In order to thoroughly separate sectors of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and its influence on the anisotropy of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) for positive (A>0) and negative (A<0) polarities of solar magnetic cycle, two periods (1995-1997 (A>0) and 2007-2009 (A<0)) have been considered. We study drift effects in diurnal anisotropy of GCR caused by the gradient and curvature of the regular IMF, and due to the heliospheric neutral sheet. We use the harmonic analyses method to calculate radial Ar and tangential Aφ components of the ecliptic diurnal anisotropy of GCR based on data of NM for cut of rigidities less than 5 GV. It is shown that there are differences between the diurnal anisotropy of GCR found in the reliably established various sectors (duration of each sectors is ≥ 4 days) of IMF. An interpretation of obtained results are provided based on the present modern theory of GCR propagation.
Collaboration -- not specified --
Registration number following "ICRC2015-I/" 801

Primary author

Prof. Krzysztof Iskra (Siedlce University)

Co-authors

Dr Marek Siluszyk (Siedlce University, Poland) Prof. Michael Alania (Siedlce University, Poland) Mr P. Wolinski (University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland) Dr Renata Modzelewska (Siedlce University, Poland) Mr W. Wozniak (Polish Oil and Gas Company, Warsaw, Poland)

Presentation materials

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