Real-time Imaging of prompt gammas in proton therapy using improved Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC)

3 Jun 2014, 16:50
20m
Administratiezaal (Beurs van Berlage)

Administratiezaal

Beurs van Berlage

Oral Technology transfer: 5b) Health and healthcare V.b Health & Bio

Speaker

Toru Tanimori (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Japan)

Description

We have developed an Electron-Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC) for medical imaging due to its wide energy dynamic range (200 - 1500keV) and abilities of background rejection and clear imaging using the tracking information of the recoil electron. Thus this camera has a potential of developing the new reagents for molecular imaging. Until now we have carried out several imaging reagent studies such as : (1) F-18-FDG (511keV) and I-131-MIBG (364keV) for double clinical tracer imaging, (2) Zn-65(1116keV),Mn-54, Fe-59 in mouse for high energy gamma emitting RI imaging. In addition, ETCC can image continuum spectral gamma-rays by removing background particle using dE/dx of the track. ETCC has a potential of real-time monitoring of the Bragg peak location by detecting prompt gammas. We successfully obtained the images of both 511keV and continuum high energy gamma rays (800-2000keV) from the water target irradiated by 140MeV proton (Kurosawa, Cur. Apl. Phys, 12 (2012), pp. 364). In 2013 we have completed a 30cm cube ETCC to catch gamma-rays, of which tracking efficiency was improved with 10 times. It enables to select the Compton event contained in TPC using only the energy loss rate of the track with distinguishing it from all backgrounds. Eventually its sensitivity is improved by a factor of 100. A similar imaging test for prompt gammas using 140MeV proton beam was recently carried out, of which intensity was increased more 10 times than previous experiment. Here I present new performance of the improved ETCC and the results of the beam test.

Primary author

Toru Tanimori (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Japan)

Co-authors

Dr Atsushi TAKADA (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) Dr Dai TOMONO (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) Prof. Hidetoshi KUBO (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) Dr Joseph PARKER (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) Prof. Kentaro MIUCHI (Department of Physics, Kobe University, Japan) Dr Kiseki NAKAMURA (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) Dr Shinya SONODA (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) Mr Shogo NAKAMURA (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) Mr Shotaro KOMURA (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) Dr Shunsuke KUROSAWA (Institute of Material Research, Tohoku Univ. Japan) Dr Tatsuya MIZUMOTO (Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto Univ.Japan) Mr Tatsuya SAWANO (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) Mr Yoshihiro MATSUOKA (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) Dr Yoshitaka MIZUMURA (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) Mr makoto ODA (Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan)

Presentation Materials