CERN School of Computing 2018

Asia/Jerusalem
Tel Aviv University and Bnei Dan Hostel

Tel Aviv University and Bnei Dan Hostel

Tel Aviv University: Tel Aviv-Yafo, 6997801, Israel Bnei Dan hostel: Bnei Dan 36, Tel Aviv 62260, Israel
Sebastian Lopienski (CERN)
Description

Welcome to the 41st CERN School of Computing (CSC 2018). This year’s School is organized in collaboration with Tel Aviv University (TAU), and will take place from 1 to 14 October 2018 in the vibrant city of Tel Aviv, Israel.

Academic programme

The two-week programme consists of 53 hours of lectures and hands-on exercises, covering three main themes: base technologies, physics computing, and data technologies. Students who pass the final optional exam will receive a diploma from CSC and TAU.

Other activities

However, it's not all study; the social and sport programme is also a vital part of the School. We will have ample opportunities to explore and experience some of Israel's great cultural, historical and natural attractions, and profit from Tel Aviv’s location by the sea.

Who can apply?

Applications are now closed.

The School is aimed at postgraduate (ie. minimum of Bachelor degree or equivalent) engineers and scientists, working at CERN or at other research institutes, with experience in particle physics, in computing or in related fields. We welcome applications from all nationalities, and encourage all qualified persons to apply. Limited financial support may be available.

Important dates

  • Late March - registration opens
  • Sunday 13 May (midnight CEST/GMT+2) - deadline for applications
  • By Friday 1 June - you will be informed of outcome of selections
  • Monday 18 June - latest date for School fees payment if you are accepted
  • Monday 1 October (afternoon/evening) - student arrivals at Bnei Dan, Tel Aviv
  • Sunday 14 October (morning) - departure

 

    • 3:00 PM
      Arrival and registration Bnei Dan

      Bnei Dan

      For all participants of the CSC 2018

    • 7:30 PM
      Dinner Bnei Dan

      Bnei Dan

    • 8:45 AM
      Bus to Tel Aviv University
    • 1
      Opening Ceremony Porter Building, Department of Environmental Studies, Tel Aviv University

      Porter Building, Department of Environmental Studies, Tel Aviv University

      George Wise St., Tel Aviv https://goo.gl/maps/UXkz4ZGfe6P2
      • a) Welcome speech by prof. Yaron Oz
        Speakers: Yaron Oz (Tel Aviv University) , Yaron Oz (Unknown)
      • b) Welcome speech by prof. Eliezer Rabinovici
        Speakers: Eliezer Rabinovici (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (IL)) , Eliezer Rabinovici (Unknown)
      • c) Welcome speech by prof. Erez Etzion
        Speaker: Erez Etzion (Tel Aviv University (IL))
      • d) Welcome speech by dr Pippa Wells
        Speaker: Pippa Wells (CERN)
      • e) "Some computing challenges for next generation LHC physics" by Frederic Hemmer
        Speaker: Frederic Hemmer (CERN)
      • f) "Introduction to CERN School of Computing" by Sebastian Lopienski
        Speaker: Sebastian Lopienski (CERN)
    • 11:00 AM
      Welcome coffee
    • 2
      Introduction to Physics Computing L1: Hadron Collider Physics

      Here we will focus on the physics of particle collisions, theoretical aspects of the standard model of particle physics, its predictive power as well as its shortcomings. Experimental aspects such as collider facilities and modern particle physics experiments as well as example physics questions and corresponding data analyses will be discussed. Furthermore, the compute models with the resulting amount of recorded data and simulated Monte Carlo events will be described.

      Speaker: Arnulf Quadt (University of Göttingen)
    • 12:45 PM
      Lunch
    • 3
      Tools and Techniques L1: Introduction

      To start, we discuss some of the characteristics of software projects for high energy physics, and some of the issues that arise when people want to contribute to them. This forms the framework for the Software Technologies Track. We then continue with a brief introduction to software engineering from the perspective of the individual contributor, both as a formal process and how it actually affects what you do. The lecture discusses several categories of tools & techniques you can use to make yourself more productive and effective. Continuous testing and documentation has proven to be important in producing high quality work, but it's often difficult to do; we discuss some available approaches. Many problems require specific tools and techniques to solve them effectively: We discuss the examples of performance tuning and memory access problems.

      Speaker: Bob Jacobsen (LBNL)
    • 4
      Announcements
    • 2:45 PM
      Afternoon coffee
    • 5
      Tools and Techniques L2: Tools for Collaboration, Software Engineering Across the Project

      HEP software is built by huge teams. How can this be done effectively, while still giving people satisfying tasks to perform? Large systems are a hard problem, and this lecture focuses on the current techniques for dealing with it. Use of central source control (e.g. SVN) has become routine, so we build on that understanding to discuss distributed systems like Git. We then discuss the larger area of release & distributing via a package versioning system (e.g. SVN and CMT) vs. a distributed build system (e.g. Git and CMake). Now that we've covered both individual and group work, we go back to the software engineering topics of the first lecture to see how these fit together. How does our individual work affect the ability of the entire project to proceed? What are tools and techniques that will improve both our individual work, and out contributions to the whole? We close with a summary of observations.

      Speaker: Bob Jacobsen (LBNL)
    • 6
      Introduction to Physics Computing L2: Digital Data, Simulation and Reconstruction in Modern Particle Physics Experiments

      Here, a focus will be placed on specific detector sub-components and their data readout concepts as well as data reconstruction techniques, simulation techniques and analysis techniques.

      Speaker: Arnulf Quadt (University of Göttingen)
    • 5:00 PM
      Free time at Tel Aviv University
    • 7:00 PM
      Welcome dinner
    • 8:45 PM
      Bus to Bnei Dan
    • 7
      Tools and Techniques E1

      The first three exercises provide some direct experience with the tools and techniques described in Lectures 1 and 2. Teams of two students will work together on through examples designed to show the strengths and weaknesses of various tools and approaches. This will be followed by small projects for additional development experience.

      Speaker: Bob Jacobsen (LBNL)
    • 8
      Tools and Techniques E2

      The first three exercises provide some direct experience with the tools and techniques described in Lectures 1 and 2. Teams of two students will work together on through examples designed to show the strengths and weaknesses of various tools and approaches. This will be followed by small projects for additional development experience.

      Speaker: Bob Jacobsen (LBNL)
    • 9
      Announcements
    • 11:00 AM
      Morning coffee
    • 10
      Software Security L1: Introduction

      First lecture starts with a definition of computer security and an explanation of why it is so difficult to achieve. The lecture highlights the importance of proper threat modelling and risk assessment. It then presents three complementary methods of mitigating threats: protection, detection, reaction; and tries to prove that security through obscurity is not a good choice.

      Speaker: Sebastian Lopienski (CERN)
    • 12:45 PM
      Lunch
    • 1:45 PM
      Study time / daily sports
    • 3:30 PM
      Afternoon break
    • 11
      Guest lecture: Start Up Nation

      Karin Gattegno is the VP of Strategic Partnerships at Start-Up Nation Central, building links between Israel – the Start-up Nation, and companies, countries, governments, and entrepreneurs worldwide, connecting them to the Israeli innovation and tech ecosystem.

      Karin has over 10 years of experience working with High-Tech companies. Prior to joining Start-Up Nation Central, she headed up the Hi-Tech business development in PwC Israel, working with hundreds of start-ups and advising them on various issues including fundraising and M&A's. Before this, Karin worked at Tamir Fishman, a local investment house, as an investment banker in the Corporate Finance department and then as the head of operations and investor relations of DFJ-Tamir Fishman, the local affiliation of Draper Fisher Jurvetson.

    • 12
      Tools and Techniques E3

      The first three exercises provide some direct experience with the tools and techniques described in Lectures 1 and 2. Teams of two students will work together on through examples designed to show the strengths and weaknesses of various tools and approaches. This will be followed by small projects for additional development experience.

      Speaker: Bob Jacobsen (LBNL)
    • 13
      Tools and Techniques E4

      After the two-person teams acquire some experience with the development and release tools, we will group projects to demonstrate some of the real-world issues discussed in the lecture. Groups of two teams will first work together to create a functional release from individual sub-projects at various stages of completion to show the strengths and weaknesses of test and release tools. This is followed by a larger scale exercise with groups of teams.

      Speaker: Bob Jacobsen (LBNL)
    • 14
      Tools and Techniques E5

      After the two-person teams acquire some experience with the development and release tools, we will group projects to demonstrate some of the real-world issues discussed in the lecture. Groups of two teams will first work together to create a functional release from individual sub-projects at various stages of completion to show the strengths and weaknesses of test and release tools. This is followed by a larger scale exercise with groups of teams.

      Speaker: Bob Jacobsen (LBNL)
    • 7:30 PM
      Bus to Japanika
    • 7:45 PM
      Dinner and pub quiz at Japanika
    • 10:00 PM
      Bus to Bnei Dan
    • 15
      Multivariate Classification L1: An Introduction to Machine Learning

      The aim of this lecture is to make the audience aware of multivariate classification (MVC) methods. Commonly used classification methods are introduced and the fundamental concepts behind them are explained. In particular boosted decision trees and artificial neural networks are discussed in detail.

      Speaker: Thomas Keck (KIT)
    • 16
      Multivariate Classification L2: Deep Learning - Selected Ideas and Concepts

      The aim of this lecture is to make the audience aware of multivariate classification (MVC) methods. Commonly used classification methods are introduced and the fundamental concepts behind them are explained. In particular boosted decision trees and artificial neural networks are discussed in detail.

      Speaker: Thomas Keck (KIT)
    • 17
      Announcements
    • 11:00 AM
      Morning coffee
    • 18
      Software Security L2: Security in different phases of software development

      The second lecture addresses the following question: how to create secure software? It introduces the main security principles (like least-privilege, or defense-in-depth) and discusses security in different phases of the software development cycle. The emphasis is put on the implementation part: most common pitfalls and security bugs are listed, followed by advice on best practice for security development.

      Speaker: Sebastian Lopienski (CERN)
    • 12:45 PM
      Lunch
    • 19
    • 3:15 PM
      Afternoon break
    • 20
      Software Security E1

      In the practice session, a range of typical security vulnerabilities will be presented. The goal is to learn how they can be exploited (for privilege escalation, data confidentiality compromise etc.), how to correct them, and how to avoid them in the first place! Students will be given small pieces of source code in different programming languages, and will be asked to find vulnerabilities and fix them. The online course documentation will gradually reveal more and more information to help students in this task. Additionally, students will have a chance to try several source code analysis tools, and see how such tools can help them find functionality bugs and security vulnerabilities.

      Speaker: Sebastian Lopienski (CERN)
    • 21
      Software Security E2

      In the practice session, a range of typical security vulnerabilities will be presented. The goal is to learn how they can be exploited (for privilege escalation, data confidentiality compromise etc.), how to correct them, and how to avoid them in the first place! Students will be given small pieces of source code in different programming languages, and will be asked to find vulnerabilities and fix them. The online course documentation will gradually reveal more and more information to help students in this task. Additionally, students will have a chance to try several source code analysis tools, and see how such tools can help them find functionality bugs and security vulnerabilities.

      Speaker: Sebastian Lopienski (CERN)
    • 22
      Software Security E3

      In the practice session, a range of typical security vulnerabilities will be presented. The goal is to learn how they can be exploited (for privilege escalation, data confidentiality compromise etc.), how to correct them, and how to avoid them in the first place! Students will be given small pieces of source code in different programming languages, and will be asked to find vulnerabilities and fix them. The online course documentation will gradually reveal more and more information to help students in this task. Additionally, students will have a chance to try several source code analysis tools, and see how such tools can help them find functionality bugs and security vulnerabilities.

      Speaker: Sebastian Lopienski (CERN)
    • 7:30 PM
      Dinner
    • 23
      Multivariate Classification E1
      Speaker: Thomas Keck (KIT)
    • 24
      Multivariate Classification E2
      Speaker: Thomas Keck (KIT)
    • 25
      Announcements
    • 11:00 AM
      Morning coffee
    • 26
      Software Security L3: Web application security, exercise debriefing

      This third hour consists of a debriefing of the exercises, and in particular those web-related. Various vulnerabilities typical to web applications (such as Cross-site scripting, SQL injection, cross-site request forgery etc.) are introduced and discussed.

      Speaker: Sebastian Lopienski (CERN)
    • 12:45 PM
      Lunch
    • 1:45 PM
      Free time
    • 7:30 PM
      Dinner Bnei Dan

      Bnei Dan

    • 27
      Software Design L1: Physics and Computing Challenges to Experiment Software

      Even though the miniaturization of transistors on chips continues like predicted by Moore's law, computer hardware starts to face scaling issues, so-called performance 'walls'. Probably, the best known is the 'power wall', which limits clock frequencies. Amongst others, a way of increasing processor performance remains now to integrate many cores in the same chip. At the same time, the upcoming LHC upgrade will increase the required CPU power drastically. Both problems challenge the current way of software design in high energy physics (HEP). Developers in high energy physics are forced to re-think their ways of software design and need to move to massively parallel applications. This lecture will explain the current HEP software design, the hardware and physics issues that need to be tackled, and possible approaches to achieve the required level of parallelization.

      Speaker: Enric Tejedor (CERN)
    • 28
      Computer Architecture & Performance Tuning L1: Hardware vs. software vs. you – who’s the boss?

      Considering the rise of complex many-core processors, a sufficient understanding of their architecture and of the applicable performance tuning opportunities has become an indispensable element of software development.

      In this lecture, the anatomy of a modern PC (x86) server is discussed, with a particular focus on the CPU. Multiple resources and strategies to achieve optimal performance exist, both in hardware and in software – but how to take control of them?

      Non-x86 architectures of growing importance, such as ARM and NVIDIA, will also be briefly covered. The lecture will be supported by relevant examples from the physics domain.

      Speaker: Andrzej Nowak
    • 29
      Announcements
    • 11:00 AM
      Morning coffee
    • 30
      Computer Architecture & Performance Tuning L2: Architectural Details and Performance Studies

      Although by using various tools we are often able to get a generous peek both inside hardware and software, drawing meaningful high-level conclusions is not always straightforward. More challenges come from accelerators and co-processors, where different computing paradigms take precedence, such as extreme data parallelism, different math capabilities, the importance of special languages as well as memory size and topology changes. The objective of this lecture is to bring the audience closer to "where it matters" in modern computing systems, and to identify important paths for high performance.

      Speaker: Andrzej Nowak
    • 12:45 PM
      Lunch
    • 1:45 PM
      Study time / daily sports
    • 4:00 PM
      Afternoon break
    • 31
      Computer Architecture & Performance Tuning E1

      The aim of the exercises in this series is to give the attendees a practical introduction to performance oriented programming on Linux. Advanced tools will be used during the course, enabling the participants to discover how the interaction of the code and the hardware influences performance. The participants will also be given the task of correlating performance figures with certain programming decisions. In addition, the participants will understand the limits of performance optimization and the ways to establish at which point inside those limits their workload is placed. The exercises will be supported by demonstrating real world problems in production environments, including multi-threaded examples.

      Speaker: Andrzej Nowak
    • 32
      Computer Architecture & Performance Tuning E2

      The aim of the exercises in this series is to give the attendees a practical introduction to performance oriented programming on Linux. Advanced tools will be used during the course, enabling the participants to discover how the interaction of the code and the hardware influences performance. The participants will also be given the task of correlating performance figures with certain programming decisions. In addition, the participants will understand the limits of performance optimization and the ways to establish at which point inside those limits their workload is placed. The exercises will be supported by demonstrating real world problems in production environments, including multi-threaded examples.

      Speaker: Andrzej Nowak
    • 33
      Computer Architecture & Performance Tuning E3
      Speaker: Andrzej Nowak
    • 7:30 PM
      Dinner
    • 8:45 PM
      Bar night
    • 34
      Software Design L2: Concurrent Programming in Action 1

      This and the following lecture will explain the concepts behind various parallelization methodologies.
      First, a theoretical introduction into threads, thread-safety and concurrent data access will be given. As the new C++ standard (C++11) now provides build-in support for parallel programming, the new features of this standard will be shown. Finally, concrete solutions for the theoretical problems will be discussed.

      Speaker: Danilo Piparo (CERN)
    • 35
      Software Design L3: Concurrent Programming in Action 2

      The focus of this lecture lies in concurrent programming based on the 'task model', using TBB as implementation library. There will be a deeper look into concurrent data access and lock and lock-free data formats. Using the learned concepts, we will look again at the data challenges from lecture 1 and see, how a future-proof software design might look like.

      Speaker: Danilo Piparo (CERN)
    • 36
      Announcements
    • 11:00 AM
      Morning coffee
    • 37
      Software Design L4: Patterns for Parallel Software Development

      This lecture will present a set of common patterns in parallel programming. The sequential origin of these patterns will be discussed, as well as the restrictions that they impose. A particularly successful combination of patterns, Map-Reduce, will be described in detail and examples of its everyday use at large scale will be given. On the other hand, it will be shown how high-level features like C++ lambdas, the TBB library or the Spark framework can help get started with the aforementioned parallel patterns.

      Speaker: Enric Tejedor (CERN)
    • 12:45 PM
      Lunch
    • 1:45 PM
      Special sports afternoon
    • 38
      Software Design E1

      The exercises will cover the topics of lectures 1 to 4 at a hands-on basis, based on C++11, TBB and Spark. It covers examples for the new C++11 functionality related to threads and thread safety. In addition, there will be examples for concurrent access to data, lock and lock-free data structures, and task based programming.  Finally, there will be an exercise to practise the Map-Reduce pattern by using the Spark parallel data processing framework.

      Speakers: Danilo Piparo (CERN) , Enric Tejedor (CERN)
    • 39
      Software Design E2

      The exercises will cover the topics of lectures 1 to 4 at a hands-on basis, based on C++11, TBB and Spark. It covers examples for the new C++11 functionality related to threads and thread safety. In addition, there will be examples for concurrent access to data, lock and lock-free data structures, and task based programming.  Finally, there will be an exercise to practise the Map-Reduce pattern by using the Spark parallel data processing framework.

      Speakers: Danilo Piparo (CERN) , Enric Tejedor (CERN)
    • 40
    • 11:00 AM
      Morning coffee
    • 41
      Software Design E3

      The exercises will cover the topics of lectures 1 to 4 at a hands-on basis, based on C++11, TBB and Spark. It covers examples for the new C++11 functionality related to threads and thread safety. In addition, there will be examples for concurrent access to data, lock and lock-free data structures, and task based programming.  Finally, there will be an exercise to practise the Map-Reduce pattern by using the Spark parallel data processing framework.

      Speakers: Danilo Piparo (CERN) , Enric Tejedor (CERN)
    • 12:45 PM
      Lunch
    • 42
      Data Visualization L1
      Speaker: Eamonn Maguire
    • 43
      Data Technologies L1: Setting the scene: Storage technologies

      The lecture presents the various Storage Models, and the supporting management techniques including Name Servers and interfaces for Data Management.

      Storage Reliability and performance
      The lecture will also discuss the various solution to ensure long data preservation and reliability with the consequences on performance, including when using Peer to Peer Storage and data transfers.

      Speaker: Alberto Pace (CERN)
    • 3:45 PM
      Afternoon break
    • 4:00 PM
      CSC 2018 School Photo
    • 44
      Data Visualization L2
      Speaker: Eamonn Maguire
    • 5:15 PM
      Study time / daily sports
    • 7:30 PM
      Dinner
    • 45
      Special evening talk

      Books mentioned during the special evening talk by Ivica:
      Sean Carroll - “The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself”, OneWorld Publications, 2016
      Steven Pinker - “Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress”, Penguin Books, 2018
      Hans Rosling, Anna, Rosling Roennlund, Ola Rosling - “Factfulness: Ten Reasons We're Wrong About the World-and Why Things Are Better Than You Think”, Flatiron Books, 2018
      Yuval Noah Harari - “Homo Deus: a Brief History of Tomorrow”, Harvill Secker, 2015
      Yuval Noah Harari - “21 Lessons for the 21st Century”, Jonathan Cape, 2018
      Max Tegmark - “Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence”, Knoph, 2017
      Thomas L. Friedman - “Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist's Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations” Macmillan Publisher, 2016

      Speaker: Ivica Puljak (U.Split)
    • 8:30 AM
      Excursion to Jerusalem and the Dead Sea
    • 46
    • 47
      Data Visualization E2
      Speaker: Eamonn Maguire
    • 48
      Announcements
    • 11:00 AM
      Morning coffee
    • 49
      Networking Performance L1: Internet Quality of Service options

      This first topic discusses the status and the option to master and improve on the Quality of Service of the Internet. Indeed, modern scientific applications require fast transfers high-bit rate connections, as well as network predictability and high availability. On the other hand, the Internet historical technology is not naturally best suited to deterministic behaviour. This lecture explains the technical challenges and the range of options available to improve QoS guarantees in Internet-based networks.

      Speaker: Francois Fluckiger
    • 12:45 PM
      Lunch
    • 50
      Data Analysis L1: Introduction to data analysis and Monte Carlo method

      First lecture in Data Analysis series discuss graphical techniques used in exploratory data analysis, gives an introduction to concept of probability, and descriptive statistics summarizing the basic features of the data gathered from experiments. Monte Carlo method is introduced and explained with examples from engineering and high energy physics.

      Speaker: Ivica Puljak (FESB)
    • 51
      Data Technologies L2: Cryptography, authentication authorization and accounting 1

      These lectures give elements of computer security that are relevant to data management. The lectures address the various technologies used in data storage systems to ensure data encryption, integrity, confidentiality and access control

      Speaker: Alberto Pace (CERN)
    • 3:45 PM
      Afternoon break
    • 4:15 PM
      Traditional CSC football match
    • 7:30 PM
      Dinner
    • 52
      Data Analysis L2: Distributions and estimators

      In this lecture commonly used probability distributions are introduced with basic properties and few examples. Parameter estimation with maximum likelihood and least-squared methods is explained.

      Speaker: Ivica Puljak (FESB)
    • 53
      Networking Performance L2: Multimedia over the Internet

      The Internet is not only a network of computer resources but also a network of people cooperating to use these resources, in particular in professional scientific environment. Part of the collaborative tools scientists are increasingly using include audio and video systems. They place new challenging requirements on the networking systems. The class discusses these requirements and their consequences on the end-systems as well as within the underlying network.

      Speaker: Francois Fluckiger
    • 54
      Announcements
    • 11:00 AM
      Morning coffee
    • 55
      Data Technologies L3: Cryptography, authentication authorization and accounting 2

      These lectures give elements of computer security that are relevant to data management. The lectures address the various technologies used in data storage systems to ensure data encryption, integrity, confidentiality and access control.

      Speaker: Alberto Pace (CERN)
    • 12:45 PM
      Lunch
    • 56
      Data Technologies E1

      The first part of hands-on exercises aims to improve understanding of basic parameters in IO systems:
      • network and media latency
      • access patterns
      • OS caching
      • bottlenecks and optimization strategies for local and remote data access.
      Few essential Linux tools will be introduced to monitor and measure IO performance avoiding bias introduced by OS caching. Students will experience and measure the impact of latency and access patterns on IO performance.
      The second part covers the concept of parallelism and redundancy in storage system. We will apply the technology of Cloud storage systems to store and retrieve files in our local desktop cluster using a distributed hash table to locate files or file fragments and a REST interface to do GET, PUT or DELETE operations on these.
      The exercises conclude with the implementation and performance tuning of a RAID verification algorithm.

      Speaker: Andreas Peters (CERN)
    • 57
      Data Technologies E2

      The first part of hands-on exercises aims to improve understanding of basic parameters in IO systems:
      • network and media latency
      • access patterns
      • OS caching
      • bottlenecks and optimization strategies for local and remote data access.
      Few essential Linux tools will be introduced to monitor and measure IO performance avoiding bias introduced by OS caching. Students will experience and measure the impact of latency and access patterns on IO performance.
      The second part covers the concept of parallelism and redundancy in storage system. We will apply the technology of Cloud storage systems to store and retrieve files in our local desktop cluster using a distributed hash table to locate files or file fragments and a REST interface to do GET, PUT or DELETE operations on these.
      The exercises conclude with the implementation and performance tuning of a RAID verification algorithm.

      Speaker: Andreas Peters (CERN)
    • 3:45 PM
      Afternoon break
    • 58
      Data Technologies E3

      The first part of hands-on exercises aims to improve understanding of basic parameters in IO systems:
      • network and media latency
      • access patterns
      • OS caching
      • bottlenecks and optimization strategies for local and remote data access.
      Few essential Linux tools will be introduced to monitor and measure IO performance avoiding bias introduced by OS caching. Students will experience and measure the impact of latency and access patterns on IO performance.
      The second part covers the concept of parallelism and redundancy in storage system. We will apply the technology of Cloud storage systems to store and retrieve files in our local desktop cluster using a distributed hash table to locate files or file fragments and a REST interface to do GET, PUT or DELETE operations on these.
      The exercises conclude with the implementation and performance tuning of a RAID verification algorithm.

      Speaker: Andreas Peters (CERN)
    • 59
      Data Technologies E4

      The first part of hands-on exercises aims to improve understanding of basic parameters in IO systems:
      • network and media latency
      • access patterns
      • OS caching
      • bottlenecks and optimization strategies for local and remote data access.
      Few essential Linux tools will be introduced to monitor and measure IO performance avoiding bias introduced by OS caching. Students will experience and measure the impact of latency and access patterns on IO performance.
      The second part covers the concept of parallelism and redundancy in storage system. We will apply the technology of Cloud storage systems to store and retrieve files in our local desktop cluster using a distributed hash table to locate files or file fragments and a REST interface to do GET, PUT or DELETE operations on these.
      The exercises conclude with the implementation and performance tuning of a RAID verification algorithm.

      Speaker: Andreas Peters (CERN)
    • 6:00 PM
      Study time / daily sports
    • 7:30 PM
      Dinner
    • 60
      Special evening talk
      Speaker: Francois Fluckiger
    • 61
      Data Technologies L4: Additional component for Data Replication, Caching, Monitoring, Alarms and Quota 1

      This lecture describes the various possible technologies used to implement data workflows and complex data transfer processes. It also discusses problems with data caching and Garbage Collection to conclude on monitoring and quota enforcement.

      Speaker: Alberto Pace (CERN)
    • 62
      Data Analysis L3: Confidence intervals

      Determining the errors on the parameters, which is equivalent to the confidence interval estimation is shown with specific examples on maximum likelihood and least-squared methods in one and more than one dimension. Uncertainties in physics and error propagation are also discussed.

      Speaker: Ivica Puljak (FESB)
    • 63
      Announcements
    • 11:00 AM
      Morning coffee
    • 64
      Data Analysis L4: Statistical tests

      Hypothesis testing is introduced with examples of goodness-of-fit tests and the most recent examples from high energy physics. Particular emphasis is given on the p-values and when we claim the discoveries.

      Speaker: Ivica Puljak (FESB)
    • 12:45 PM
      Lunch
    • 65
      Data Analysis E1: Monte Carlo method and Fitting with Root

      • Generating random numbers
      • Monte-Carlo toy experiments
      • Modeling signal and background. 
      • Fitting with ROOT packages (finding peaks).

      Speaker: Ivica Puljak (FESB)
    • 66
      Guest lecture: FLSH, Innovation and stupidity

      Speaker: Dov Moran

      Dov Moran is an Israeli entrepreneur, inventor and investor, best known as the inventor of the USB memory stick, and one of the most prominent Israeli hi-tech leaders in the world. [From Wikipedia]

    • 3:15 PM
      Afternoon break
    • 67
      Data Analysis E2: Confidence interval

      • Finding errors on fit parameters 
      • Extracting confidence intervals

      Speaker: Ivica Puljak (FESB)
    • 68
      Data Analysis E3: Hypothesis testing

      • Finding p-value
      • Converting p-values to significance
      • Low count experiments and hypothesis testing

      Speaker: Ivica Puljak (FESB)
    • 5:30 PM
      Study time / daily sports
    • 7:30 PM
      Dinner
    • 69
      CSC examination
    • 9:45 AM
      Morning coffee
    • 70
      Announcements
    • 71
      Data Technologies L5: Additional component for Data Replication, Caching, Monitoring, Alarms and Quota 2

      This lecture describes the various possible technologies used to implement data workflows and complex data transfer processes. It also discusses problems with data caching and Garbage Collection to conclude on monitoring and quota enforcement.

      Speaker: Alberto Pace (CERN)
    • 72
      Guest lecture: The Israeli cyber landscape

      dr David Primor is ex CERN PhD student (ATLAS); currently cyber advisor and entrepreneur with extensive cyber governmental background

    • 73
      Guest lecture: Sequence Alignment for Ride Sharing

      As researchers and developers, we constantly face new problems, and challenge existing solutions to old problems. On beautiful circumstances, solved problems from one domain shed light on new problems from totally different domains.

      This happened to me while I was researching a Ride Sharing problem of optimally grouping multiple riders on a single taxi - a DNA Sequence Alignment algorithm gave inspiration for a hybrid solution, that turned out to be significantly more efficient than the original one.

      By sharing with you this story and its resulting algorithm, I hope to entertain your curiosity, spark your creativity, and encourage you to venture into unexpected solution spaces.

      Speaker: Dalya Gartzman - Algorithms Researcher (Via - On Demand Transit)

      A mathematician at heart, an algorithmatician in practice. After receiving my MSc. in math from TAU I ventured into data science and algorithms domains, glad to discover that the real world is at least as exciting as the abstract. Currently algorithms researcher at Via - On Demand Transit, applying both my theoretical and practical passions. Founder of Algorithms Israel and co-organizer of PyData Tel Aviv MeetUps.

    • 12:45 PM
      Lunch
    • 1:45 PM
      Free time
    • 5:15 PM
      Afternoon break
    • 74
      Graduation and closing ceremony
    • 7:30 PM
      Bus to Herzliya
    • 7:45 PM
      Closing dinner with live music
    • 10:30 PM
      Bus to Bnei Dan

      Optional - for those who want to go back

    • 8:45 AM
      Departure