5-12 July 2017
Venice, Italy
Europe/Zurich timezone
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The NA62 Calorimeter Level 0 Trigger Operation and Performances

6 Jul 2017, 11:30
15m
Room Amici (Palazzo del Casinò)

Room Amici

Palazzo del Casinò

Parallel Talk Detector R&D and Data Handling Detectors and data handling

Speaker

Andrea Salamon (INFN e Universita Roma Tor Vergata (IT))

Description

The NA62 experiment at CERN SPS aims to measure the Branching Ratio of the very rare kaon decay K+ -> pi+ nu nubar collecting ~100 events with a 10% background to make a stringent test of the Standard Model in two years of data taking.

The Calorimeter Level 0 Trigger is used to suppress one of the main backgrounds, the K+ -> pi+ pi0 decay, and to select events with a pi+ in the final state.

The Calorimeter Level 0 Trigger identifies clusters in electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters. It prepares time-ordered lists of reconstructed clusters together with the arrival time, position, and energy measurements of each cluster. It also provides trigger decisions based on complex energy and cluster multiplicity combinations.

The main parameters of the trigger processor are the high design hit rate (30 MHz) and the required single cluster time resolution (1.5 ns).

The calorimeter trigger processor is a parallel system composed of 37 boards, 111 mezzanines and 221 high-performance programmable devices housed in three 9U crates.

The Calorimeter Level 0 Trigger also provides a coarse-grained readout of the calorimeters that might be used in software trigger levels.

The NA62 experiment is currently taking data and the calorimetric trigger is used to suppress the background coming from the K+ -> pi+ pi0 decay and to trigger on many other medium-rare and exotic decays.

The design, operation and performances of the Calorimeter Level 0 Trigger are presented.

Experimental Collaboration NA62

Primary authors

Roberto Ammendola (Universita e INFN Roma Tor Vergata (IT)) Mattia Barbanera (INFN Sezione di Pisa, Universita' e Scuola Normale Superiore, P) Mr Daniele Battista (Department of Physics, University of Roma “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy and INFN — Sezione di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy) Marco Bizzarri (Universita e INFN (IT)) Vincenzo Bonaiuto (Universita e INFN Roma Tor Vergata (IT)) Augusto Ceccucci (CERN) Bruno Checcucci (Universita e INFN, Perugia (IT)) Nico De Simone (CERN) Riccardo Fantechi (Universita & INFN, Pisa (IT)) Luca Federici (INFN e Universita Roma Tor Vergata (IT)) Adolfo Fucci (Universita e INFN Roma Tor Vergata (IT)) Matteo Lupi (Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Univ. (DE)) Giovanni Paoluzzi (Universita e INFN Roma Tor Vergata (IT)) Andrea Papi (Universita e INFN, Perugia (IT)) Elena Pedreschi (Universita di Pisa & INFN (IT)) Roberto Piandani (INFN Sezione di Pisa, Universita' e Scuola Normale Superiore, P) Mauro Piccini (INFN - Sezione di Perugia (IT)) Vladimir Ryjov (CERN) Andrea Salamon (INFN e Universita Roma Tor Vergata (IT)) Gaetano Salina (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) Fausto Sargeni (Universita e INFN Roma Tor Vergata (IT)) Antonino Sergi (University of Birmingham (GB)) Dario Soldi (Universita e INFN Torino (IT)) Franco Spinella (Universita di Pisa & INFN (IT)) Stefano Venditti (CAEN) Michal Zamkovsky (Charles University (CZ))

Presentation Materials