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8th "Trento" Workshop on Advanced Silicon Radiation Detectors (3D and p-type)

Europe/Zurich
"Stringa" Conference Hall (FBK, Trento)

"Stringa" Conference Hall

FBK, Trento

Via Sommarive, 18 38123 Povo - Trento ITALY
Gian-Franco Dalla Betta (University of Trento and INFN)
Description
Continuing in its tradition, the goal of the workshop is to bring together experts on sensor technology (design and processing), front-end electronics, system issues, detector applications (e.g., particle tracking, medical and biological imaging), etc. for discussions of the present state of the art, establishment of requirements of the fields  and future programs.
 
The workshop will consist of invited talks and contributed presentations, with ample time for discussions.
    • 08:45 09:30
      Registration Lobby

      Lobby

      FBK, Trento

      Via Sommarive, 18 38123 Povo - Trento ITALY
    • 09:30 11:00
      Introduction "Stringa" Conference Hall

      "Stringa" Conference Hall

      FBK, Trento

      Via Sommarive, 18 38123 Povo - Trento ITALY
      Convener: Maurizio Boscardin (FBK)
      • 09:30
        Welcome 15m
        Speaker: Massimo Gentili (FBK)
      • 09:45
        TIFPA 15m
        Speaker: Roberto Battiston (University of Trento and INFN)
      • 10:00
        Upgrade Planning for the ATLAS Tracker 30m
        A series of upgrades leading to those required for the HL-LHC phase of ATLAS is described with emphasis on those relating to the tracking part of the experiment. Aspects of the proposed ATLAS HL-LHC tracker layout and recent results on prototyping performance are presented. The wider context of ATLAS Upgrade planning is also briefly discussed along with current understanding of scheduling. The expected performance of the upgraded tracker in the presence of high pile-up is shown to motivate the baseline detector choices although possible alternative layouts are also mentioned.
        Speaker: Prof. Philip Patrick Allport (University of Liverpool (GB))
        Slides
      • 10:30
        Diamond Sensors for HE Frontier Experiments 30m
        With the first three years of the LHC running well underway, ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond has been used extensively in beam condition monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and all LHC experiments. This talk will present the issues which arose in the ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) and Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM) projects both of which are based on CVD diamond with the goal of elucidating the issues that should be addressed for future diamond based detector systems. The talk will also present the first beam test results of prototypes of a new diamond detector geometry which should further enhance the radiation tolerance of diamond.
        Speaker: Harris Kagan (Ohio State University (US))
        Slides
    • 11:00 11:20
      Coffee Break 20m Lobby (FBK)

      Lobby

      FBK

    • 11:20 13:20
      Running and upcoming experiments "Stringa" Conference Hall

      "Stringa" Conference Hall

      FBK, Trento

      Via Sommarive, 18 38123 Povo - Trento ITALY
      Convener: Gregor Kramberger (Jozef Stefan Institute (SI))
      • 11:20
        Performance and radiation hardness of the LHCb Velo 30m
        LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study New Physics in the decays of heavy hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Heavy hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the VELO, the retractable silicon-strip vertex detector surrounding the LHCb interaction point at only 7 mm from the beam during normal LHC operation. Both VELO halves comprise 21 silicon micro-strip modules each. A module is made of two n-on-n 300 μm thick half-disc sensors with R- and -measuring geometry, mounted on a carbon fibre support paddle. The minimum pitch is approximately 40 μm. The detector is also equipped with the only n-on-p module operating at the LHC. The performance of the VELO in its three years of successful operation during the LHC physics runs will be presented. Highlights will include alignment, cluster finding efficiency, single hit resolution, and impact parameter and vertex resolutions. The VELO module sensors receive a large and non-uniform radiation dose having inner and outer radii of only 7 and 42 mm, respectively. In this extreme and highly non-uniform radiation environment type-inversion of the inner part of the n-on-n sensors has already been measured. Radiation damage is monitored and studied in three ways: (1) dependence of sensor currents on voltage and temperature; (2) noise versus voltage behaviour; and (3) cluster finding efficiency. Results will be presented in all three areas with updates based on recent results from the 2012 LHC running.
        Speaker: Tomasz Szumlak (AGH University of Science and Technology (PL))
        Slides
      • 11:50
        Overview of the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) Project. 30m
        The ATLAS experiment will upgrade its Pixel Detector with the installation of a new pixel layer in 2013-14. The new sub-detector, named Insertable B-layer (IBL), will be installed between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. Furthermore, the physics performance should be improved through the reduction of pixel size while targeting for a low material budget should be imposed, pushing for a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system. An overview of the IBL project and the status of the two pre-series staves made before going into production in order to qualify the assembly procedure, the loaded module electrical integrity and the read-out chain will be presented.
        Speaker: Alessandro La Rosa (Universite de Geneve (CH))
        Slides
      • 12:20
        3D modules production for the IBL detector 20m
        The first upgrade of the ATLAS Pixel Detector will consist in the installation of a new pixel layer during the shutdown of the LHC machine in 2013. The new detector, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be inserted between the existing Pixel Detector and a new (smaller radius) beam-pipe, at an average sensor radius of 3.4 cm. The IBL requires the development of several new technologies to cope with the increase of radiation and pixel occupancy at such a reduced radius. In particular 3D sensors will be installed in the outermost part of the new detector. An overview of the 3D sensor production for IBL done at CNM and FBK will be given, together with first results after module integration with FE-I4 and full assembly.
        Speaker: Andrea Gaudiello (INFN and University of Genova)
        Slides
      • 12:40
        Characterization of 3D CNM prototypes for the ATLAS forward detector 20m
        Due to the successful performance of the IBL 3D sensors, the technology was selected for the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) project. The AFP presents a new challenge due to the need for a reduced dead area with respect to IBL, and the in-homogeneous nature of the radiation dose distribution in the sensor. Electrical characterization of the first CNM AFP prototypes and beam test studies of 3D pixel devices irradiated non-uniformly will be presented.
        Speaker: Sebastian Grinstein (IFAE/ICREA - Barcelona)
        Slides
    • 13:20 13:30
      Conference Photograph 10m FBK

      FBK

    • 13:30 15:00
      Lunch Break 1h 30m Canteen

      Canteen

      FBK, Trento

    • 15:00 16:20
      Planar Sensors 1 "Stringa" Conference Hall

      "Stringa" Conference Hall

      FBK, Trento

      Via Sommarive, 18 38123 Povo - Trento ITALY
      Convener: Yoshinobu Unno (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (JP))
      • 15:00
        Recent Achievements of the ATLAS Upgrade Planar Pixel Sensors R&D Project 20m
        To extend the physics reach of the LHC, upgrades to the accelerator are planned which will increase the peak luminosity by a factor 5 to 10. To cope with the increased occupancy and radiation damage of the inner trackers, the ATLAS experiment plans to introduce an all-silicon inner tracker with the HL-LHC upgrade. To investigate the suitability of pixel sensors using the proven planar technology for the upgraded tracker, the ATLAS Planar Pixel Sensors R&D Project was established comprising 17 institutes and more than 80 scientists. The presentation will give an overview of the recent accomplishments of the R&D project. Among these are beam test results obtained with pixel sensors irradiated to HL-LHC fluences at realistic b-layer inclination angles and with unirradiated read-out electronics bumped to irradiated sensors, thus eliminating the uncertainty of FE-chip related effects. In addition, first results obtained with heavily irradiated modules using the new ATLAS FE-I4 readout will be shown. On the topic of edge efficiencies, significant progress has been made with respect to the application of the SCP (scribe-cleave-passivate) post-processing technology which enables the creation of almost active edges even for originally non-slim-edge sensors. New results will be shown for both n-in-n and n-in-p sensors and will be compared to initial TCAD simulations. In addition, first results of planar active edge projects using DRIE trench etching will be presented.
        Speaker: Jens Weingarten (Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen (DE))
        Slides
      • 15:20
        Characterization of thin n-in-p planar pixel sensors with active edges before and after irradiation 20m
        We report about the characterization of silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 150µm, produced at MPI/HLL, and 100µm with active edges, produced at VTT in Finland. The thinned sensors are designed to reduce the signal degradation and ensure radiation hardness even after high fluences. Moreover the n-in-p technology only requires a single side processing and is a cost-effective alternative to the n-in-n pixel technology presently employed in LHC experiments. High precision beam test measurements of the hit efficiency have been performed with high energy pions at the SpS CERN with different bias voltages and beam incidences. Results obtained on 150µm thick sensors, assembled with the new ATLAS FE-I4 chip and irradiated up to a fluence of 4e15 n_eq cm^-2, show that they are excellent candidates for larger radii of the silicon pixel tracker in the ATLAS Phase II. In addition, the active edge technology maximises the active area of the sensor and therefore suits the requirements for the innermost layers. The edge pixel perfomance of VTT modules has been compared to the central region and a first analysis of the charge collection of these devices after irradiation was performed in the laboratory using radioactive sources.
        Speaker: Stefano Terzo (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (D)
        Slides
      • 15:40
        Update on CCE results with very thin (50µm) Si detectors 20m
        The effect of thickness on the CCE performances after irradiation is here investigated with measurements taken with a 50µm thick microstrip detectors irradiated at about 2.2 Neq cm-2.
        Speaker: Gianluigi Casse (University of Liverpool (GB))
        Slides
      • 16:00
        PTP and the inter-strip capacitance and resistance for irradiated ATLAS07 mini-sensors. 20m
        PTP against beam splashes together with the inter-strip capacitance and resistance have been measured on the heavily irradiated (4e14, 2e15 and 1e16neq/cm^2) and non-irradiated samples of n-on-p HPK ATLAS07 mini-sensors. Each sample consists of four mini-sensors with special PTP structures A, B, C and D and with three different ion concentrations of p-stop and p-stop with p-spray n-strip isolation: 2e12, 4e12 and 1e13 ion/cm^2. There were found no onsets of micro-discharges below of -600 V of reverse bias. Punch through voltage is increasing with growing fluency and reaches its valuable maximum at fluency 2e15 neq/cm^2 for sample of 1e13 ion/cm^2. PTV is smallest at 1e16neq/cm^2 from all tested fluencies including zero one. Inter-strip capacitance does not depend on fluency up to 1e16 neq/cm^2 and on the p-stop ion concentration. Inter-strip resistance is decreasing with fluency. Study is continuing.
        Speaker: Dr. Jan Bohm (Institute of Physics ASCR Prague)
        Slides
    • 16:20 16:40
      Coffee Break 20m Lobby (FBK,)

      Lobby

      FBK,

    • 16:40 18:30
      Planar Sensors 2 "Stringa" Conference Hall

      "Stringa" Conference Hall

      FBK, Trento

      Via Sommarive, 18 38123 Povo - Trento ITALY
      Convener: Gianluigi Casse (University of Liverpool (GB))
      • 16:40
        Study of Behaviour of n-in-p Silicon Sensor Structures Before and After Irradiation 20m
        Radiation-tolerant n-in-p silicon sensors were developed for use in very high radiation environments. Novel n-in-p silicon strip and pixel sensors and test structures were fabricated, tested and evaluated, in order to understand the designs implemented. The resistance between the n-implants (interstrip resistance), the electric potential of the p-stop, and the punch-through-protection (PTP) onset voltage, leakage current breakdown at n-implant at very high voltage were measured before and as a function of fluence after irradiation. The technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations were used to understand the radiation damage and fluence dependence of the behavior of structures.
        Speaker: Yoshinobu Unno (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (JP))
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Fabrication of new p-type pixel detectors with enhanced multiplication effect in the n-type electrodes. 20m
        In the framework of the RD50 collaboration New p-type pixel detectors with small gain will soon be fabricated in the clean room at the CNM. Our new design will allow for thinner structures with moderate multiplication factors and ultra short collection times. The mask of the new structures will be presented and the results of some electrical simulations on these new devices will be discussed.
        Speaker: Marta Baselga Bacardit (Universidad de Valencia (ES))
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Charge collection studies on special diodes from RD50 multiplication run 20m
        Silicon diodes with special design of the implant - so called ``spaghetti diodes'' - were used to study the impact of implantation process on charge multiplication after irradiations to very large equivalent fluences of 8e16 cm-2. The samples were found to work even at this unprecedented levels of irradiation. Different implantation processes were implemented on samples for studying the impact of implantation on charge multiplication. The spaghetti diodes of different thicknesses were also compared to conventional strip detectors and normal pad detectors in order to determine the impact of different weighting field on the collected charge.
        Speaker: Gregor Kramberger (Jozef Stefan Institute (SI))
        Slides
      • 17:40
        Ultra-Fast Silicon Sensors 20m
        Ultra-fast silicon sensors will combine short collection time with internal gain. I will present motivation, principle of operation, implementation and first results for ultra-fast silicon sensors.
        Speaker: Hartmut Sadrozinski (SCIPP, UC santa Cruz)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Discussion 30m
    • 19:30 20:30
      Welcome Cocktail 1h Santa Chiara

      Santa Chiara

    • 09:00 11:00
      3D Sensors 1: Fabrication and characterization "Stringa" Conference Hall

      "Stringa" Conference Hall

      FBK, Trento

      Via Sommarive, 18 38123 Povo - Trento ITALY
      Convener: Alessandro La Rosa (University of Geneva)
      • 09:00
        Production of 3D silicon pixel sensors at FBK for the ATLAS IBL 20m
        We report on the results from the production of the 3D silicon pixel sensors for the ATLAS IBL. We present the fabrication process and some selected results from the electrical characterization of detectors and test structures. The main technological aspects related to the production yield optimization will also be addressed.
        Speaker: Dr. Maurizio Boscardin (FBK)
        Slides
      • 09:20
        Characterization results of recent CNM 3D productions 20m
        The results of the CNM 3D sensor development and productions, including sensors for the ATLAS IBL detector, will be briefly reviewed. Testbeam results of irradiated and non-irradaited sensors and recent burn-in tests of 3D prototypes will be presented.
        Speaker: Andrea Micelli (IFAE Barcelona)
        Slides
      • 09:40
        Investigation of the electrical characteristics of double-sided silicon 3D sensors after irradiation with different particles 20m
        We have previously reported on the impact of layout on the electrical characteristics of double-sided silicon 3D sensors fabricated at FBK. In the past year, our study has been continued to account for radiation damage effects. To this purpose, different irradiation campaigns have been conducted in collaboration with some external groups. Several sets of 3D diodes with different layout and test structures have been irradiated with 800-MeV protons and reactor neutrons up to 5e15 neq/cm^2, i.e., the fluence of interest for the ATLAS IBL. Moreover, additional irradiations have been performed with X-rays, in order to focus on surface damage alone. The characterization of parameters such as leakage current, breakdown voltage and capacitance, performed through measurements at different temperatures, has shown a good correspondence with theoretical model for radiation damage. TCAD simulations incorporating radiation damage models have also been performed in order to better understand the device behavior in view of future layout and technology optimization. Selected results will be presented at the workshop.
        Speaker: Mr. Roberto Mendicino (University of Trento, INFN Padova (gruppo collegato di Trento))
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Charge Collection Measurements of Irradiated 3D Sensors 20m
        In collaboration with the University of Trento we have measured the charge collection response of three different FBK 3D sensor designs. The sensors have been irradiated with 800 MeV protons to various fluences exceeding 1x10^16 neq/cm^2, and the relative CCE has been characterised with source and laser stimulus.
        Speaker: Martin Hoeferkamp (University of New Mexico (US))
        Slides
      • 10:20
        Characterization of 3D-DDTC strip sensors with passing-through columns 20m
        We report on the characterization of newly developed Double-sided Double Type Column (DDTC) 3D detectors produced by FBK in Trento. Pre-irradiation measurements on these sensors include charge collection measurements using a Beta source to test the sensors performance in terms of absolute charge deposited, as well as laser can measurements in order to investigate the spatial uniformity of the sensors response. Current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements as well as simulation of the punch-through biasing of the sensors were also carried out.
        Speaker: Christopher Betancourt (Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg (DE))
        Slides
      • 10:40
        Testbeam and laboratory characterization of 3D CMS pixel sensors 20m
        The pixel detector at the heart of the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC will be exposed to unprecedented radiation fluences, i.e. 1x1016 neq/cm2, at the high-luminosity LHC upgrade in 2020. Standard planar technology was shown to be unable to meet the CMS physics requirements at this high fluence regime. Ultra radiation-hard 3D technology is one of the most promising candidates for replacement due to its superior features. The CMS 3D pixel sensors, fabricated at FBK, have been tested thoroughly both in laboratory and beam tests before and after irradiation. Characterization measurements were carried out for the CMS 3D sensors, diode, and test structures from different batches. We will report on our 3D test results obtained so far.
        Speaker: Prof. Ada Solano (Universita di Torino e INFN (IT))
        Slides
    • 11:00 11:20
      Coffee Break 20m Lobby

      Lobby

      FBK, Trento

    • 11:20 13:30
      3D Sensors 2: New developments "Stringa" Conference Hall

      "Stringa" Conference Hall

      FBK, Trento

      Via Sommarive, 18 38123 Povo - Trento ITALY
      Convener: Cinzia Da Via (University of Manchester)
      • 11:20
        3D Diamond Detectors 20m
        I shall present on the fabrication and characterization of the first prototype 3D diamond detector for particle physics applications. A femto-second laser was used to create arrays of graphitic columns in single crystal and polycrystalline diamond samples, these conductive columns are a few microns in diameter and create a 3D readout similar to that produced in silicon. Creating a 3D structure within diamond has two main objectives; firstly, to increase the radiation hardness compared to that of planar diamond detectors and secondly, to increase the signal response from polycrystalline diamond. Polycrystalline diamond has crystal boundaries within its bulk which act as charge traps reducing the un-irradiated drift path to ~ 250μm compared to >1000μm in single-crystal, however, as a material it is much cheaper than single-crystal diamond. Both prototype single-crystal and polycrystalline detectors were tested in particle beams at CERN (proton/pion) using a charge integrating readout. Other laboratory tests are currently being conducted to fully understand the detector characteristics.
        Speaker: Mr. Iain Haughton (The University of Manchester)
        Slides
      • 11:40
        Latest developments for the improvement of double-sided 3D detectors fabrication at FBK 20m
        Double-side 3D sensor technology developed at FBK (Trento, Italy) in collaboration with INFN turned out successful not only in the performance demonstration of prototypes but also to supply good quality detectors for the ATLAS-IBL with a good fabrication yield. Although obtained results are satisfactory, the performance of these devices can be further improved and a simplification of the fabrication technology will be desirable to reduce the time required for a medium volume production. This paper reports on the modifications at the layout and fabrication levels aimed at improving the sensor breakdown voltage, both before and after irradiation, while reducing the number of lithographic steps required during fabrication. The new adopted layout solutions will be shown together with TCAD simulations supporting them. A modified 3D technology with full passing ohmic columns and junction columns stopping at about 25 microns from the opposite surface will be introduced. Preliminary results will be reported from the electrical characterization of a new 3D detector batch fabricated at FBK and implementing the proposed improvements.
        Speaker: Nicola Zorzi (FBK)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Numerical simulation of thin 3D detectors with built-in charge multiplication 20m
        One of the required features of tracking devices for the futures upgrades of LHC experiments will be a reduced thickness, in order to decrease the material budget and to achieve lower multiple scattering. The main drawback related to a reduced sensor thickness is a decrease in the total sensing volume, which translates in a large reduction of the signal available for particle detection. To counteract this effect, charge multiplication can be exploited to increase the sensor signal without significantly affecting the noise figure of the system. We present a numerical simulation study aimed at defining an innovative thin 3D sensor topology with built-in charge multiplication, able to obtain moderate gains at relatively low voltages. After proving that the simulator accurately reproduces charge multiplication effects recently observed in 3D detectors, the new sensor concept is presented. The effects of the sensor geometry on the electrical characteristics and the charge multiplication properties are studied both before and after heavy irradiation. The excess noise factor of the proposed sensors is also estimated by using an analytical model, and a preliminary layout and process sketch are proposed.
        Speaker: Dr. Marco Povoli (University of Trento)
        Slides
      • 12:20
        3D Double-Sided sensors for the CMS phase-2 vertex detector 20m
        By 2020 a two stage upgrade of the accelerator complex, the High Luminosity-LHC (HL-LHC), will increase the instantaneous luminosities up to a factor of ten compared to the current design. The particle fluxes at CMS experiment will increment substantially with special impact on the inner tracking detector which will be subjected to large occupancies and radiation damage. In order to cope with the higher instantaneous luminosities CMS will upgrade its current vertex detector. The so-called 3D sensors are a very promising technology as they offer efficient operation at moderate bias voltages after fluences above 1x1015cm-2 1 MeV neutron equivalent.
        Speaker: Dr. Giulio Pellegrini (IMB-CNM-CSIC)
        Slides
      • 12:40
        Modelling of 3D detectors and comparison with data 20m
        Modelling of charge collection in 3D silicon detectors is described. The modelling is extended to irradiated devices using the deep acceptor model and combined with avalanche multiplication. Modelling of charge transport in the electrodes for full-3D devices is described. The results are compared to data from test beams and also x-ray scans at the Diamond synchrotron at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Conclusions are made on defect modelling at high fluences, avalanche effects, and charge transport in electrodes.
        Speaker: Stephen Watts
        Slides
      • 13:00
        Discussion 30m
    • 13:30 15:00
      Lunch Break 1h 30m Canteen

      Canteen

      FBK, Trento

    • 15:00 16:20
      CMOS Sensors and Electronics "Stringa" Conference Hall

      "Stringa" Conference Hall

      FBK, Trento

      Via Sommarive, 18 38123 Povo - Trento ITALY
      Convener: Nanni Darbo (Universita e INFN (IT))
      • 15:00
        First experience with radiation-hard active sensors in 180 nm HV CMOS technology 20m
        CMOS processes are cost-efficient and commercially available. We explore the concept of using a deep-submicron HV CMOS process to produce a drop-in replacement for traditional radiation hard silicon sensors. Unlike fully integrated monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS), such active sensors still require a traditional (pixel or strip) readout chip to receive and organize the data from the active sensor and handle high level functionality such as trigger management. In contrast to standard radiation-hard silicon pixel sensors, however, active sensors contain simple circuits to amplify and either discriminate or condition the basic pulses created by charged particles which yields many advantages such as improved resolution, reduced cost, capacitive coupling and very thin devices leading to an improved material budget. After outlining the design of the HV2FEI4 test ASIC, characterization results and first experience obtained with pixel and strip readout will be shown before discussing future prospects of active sensors.
        Speaker: Simon Feigl
        Slides
      • 15:20
        A thin and fully depleted monolithic pixel sensor in SOI technology 20m
        The Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technology is one of the leading technologies for the realization of monolithic pixel sensors on high resistivity wafers. A commercial, deep-submicron SOI process by LAPIS, coupled with high-resistivity silicon substrates, is made available through KEK. In this process, a full CMOS circuitry is integrated in a 40 nm thick layer on top of each pixel. Thanks to the realization of vias through the 200 nm thick Buried Oxide (BOX), pixel implants can be created and the 260 µm thick substrate can be reverse-biased and depleted to improve charge collection. In the framework of an international collaboration between INFN and University of Padova, LBNL and UC Santa Cruz, we have realized monolithic and depleted pixel sensors in SOI technology, both for charged particle detection and for imaging applications. In this contribution we will review the latest chip produced, the so called SOImager3, a matrix of 256×256 pixels of 13.75 µm of pitch. This chip has been thinned down to 70 µm, back-processed and successfully tested with soft X-ray photons in back-illumination at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of LBNL and with 300GeV pion- at the CERN SPS. These results show that a thin, fully-depleted SOI pixel provides charged particle detection capability with large signal-to-noise ratio and detection efficiency and achieves a single point resolution of the order of 1 µm.
        Speaker: Serena Mattiazzo (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 15:40
        Optimization of timing performance of large-area FBK SiPMs in the scintillation light readout 20m
        In this work we describe the work that we have carried out at FBK, aimed at the optimization of the timing performance of large-area SiPMs coupled to LYSO crystals, in the detection of 511 keV gamma photons. We focus on the role of the detector noise, namely its Dark Count Rate (DCR), and on possible baseline compensation techniques for the reduction of its effects on the Coincidence Resolving Time (CRT) of the detector. Once the effects of the DCR are strongly attenuated, it is possible to observe an additional limit to the timing performance due to the optical crosstalk (OC) of the device, which is increased by the presence of the scintillator. We report on the experimental evidence of the phenomenon and we discuss possible solutions.
        Speaker: Dr. Alberto Gola (Fondazione Bruno Kessler)
        Slides
      • 16:00
        Integrated Circuit Design for Time-of-Flight PET with Silicon Photomultiplier 20m
        The high gain and fast rise time of compact Silicon Photomultiplier matrices paved the way for the development of instrumentation with very stringent timing requirements, such as Time-of-Flight PET. Fast, low-noise and low-power integrated front-end electronics is a key factor to achieve the envisaged time resolution. We discuss methods and circuit topologies that target this performance, implemented in customized ASICs for SiPM readout.
        Speaker: Dr. Manuel Dionisio Rolo (LIP and INFN Torino)
        Slides
    • 16:20 16:40
      Coffee Break 20m Lobby

      Lobby

      FBK, Trento

    • 16:40 18:10
      Non HEP Projects "Stringa" Conference Hall

      "Stringa" Conference Hall

      FBK, Trento

      Via Sommarive, 18 38123 Povo - Trento ITALY
      Convener: Claudio Piemonte (FBK)
      • 16:40
        HYDE Project: the combination of 3D detectors with polysiloxane based scintillators. 20m
        The aim of HYDE (HYbrid DEtectors for neutrons) project, financed by INFN V commission, is the realization of detectors for neutrons made by 3D systems coupled to polysiloxane based scintillators suitable to convert the energy of fast and slow neutrons both in scintillation light and in reaction products detectable by the patterned silicon detector. Polysiloxane scintillators are cheap, stable and resistant systems reaching up to 70% of scintillation yield with respect to the best plastic scintillators. In particular, it has been demonstrated that polysiloxane scintillators retain their scintillation yield after 50 kGy of absorbed dose. By dispersing different dye molecules and boron rich compounds, the detection of both fast and thermal neutrons can be achieved. Recently, red emitting scintillators have been produced by combining three different dyes for promoting the wavelength shift in the red part of the spectrum, in order to match the responsivity curve of 3D photodetectors. Further research has been carried on for studying the possibility of obtaining the pulse shape discrimination between gamma rays and neutrons. Finally the first coupling tests between polysiloxane scintillators and 3D systems will be presented, evidencing a good matching of the organic resin into the silicon wells and the first results about the detection by silicon 3D detectors of recoil protons produced by 2 MeV neutrons in the polysiloxane will be presented.
        Speaker: Prof. Alberto Quaranta (Department of Industrial Engineering)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        X-ray detectors development at the Swiss Light Source 20m
        An overview of the microstrip and pixel detectors developed at the SLS is presented together with example applications. Parallel to the successful development of large area single photon counting systems for synchrotron radiation experiments (MYTHEN, EIGER), charge integrating detectors with extended dynamic range and single photon resolution are being developed to satisfy the strict requirements of X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (GOTTHARD, AGIPD, JUNGFRAU). These detectors present interesting performances also for synchrotron applications, e.g. the analog low noise information provided by GOTTHARD allowed to exploit the charge sharing between 20um pitch strips to achieve almost micron spatial resolution by means of interstrip interpolation. Open issues concerning the sensors design will also be addressed, including the absorption efficiency for low and high energy X-rays and the radiation hardness.
        Speaker: Anna Bergamaschi (PSI)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Wide Area Radiation Surveillance with Semiconductor Detectors 20m
        The Real Time Wide Area Radiation Surveillance System (REWARD) is a novel mobile system for radiation detection and monitoring based on the integration of new miniaturized solid-state radiation sensors: a CdZnTe detector for gamma radiation and a neutron detector based on novel silicon technologies. The sensing unit also includes a wireless communication interface to send the data remotely to a monitoring base station as well as a GPS unit. This presentation will introduce the REWARD project, funded within the 7th Framework Progamme of the EU. Particular emphasis will be placed on the semiconductor sensors at the core of the system.
        Speaker: Ulrich Parzefall (Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg (DE))
        Slides
      • 17:40
        Discussion 30m
    • 19:30 22:30
      Conference Dinner 3h Ristorante ORSO GRIGIO

      Ristorante ORSO GRIGIO

    • 09:20 11:00
      Microfabrication "Stringa" Conference Hall

      "Stringa" Conference Hall

      FBK, Trento

      Via Sommarive, 18 38123 Povo - Trento ITALY
      Convener: Hartmut Sadrozinski (SCIPP)
      • 09:20
        Studies on enhanced silicon detector cooling and integration through microfabrication techniques at CERN 20m
        Ultra-thin liquid micro-fluidic silicon devices have been recently selected for the active thermal management of the GigaTracker detector in the NA62 experiment at CERN. Following this first successful application, further studies have been launched on two-phase flow devices for the upgrades of the ALICE Inner Tracker System (room temperature and low pressure) and LHCb Vertex Locator (low temperature and high pressure) detectors. Recent developments at CERN on this subject will be discussed, including thermal performance, material budget impact, structural reliability and hydraulic connector issues. In the frame of a collaboration agreement with CSEM (Centre Suisse d'Electronique et Microelectronique), studies are also on-going towards the fabrication of a demonstrator gathering micro-channels for cooling and fine-pitch TSV for interconnectivity in the same device. The status of this R&D aiming to an active silicon interposer will be presented.
        Speakers: Giulia Romagnoli (Universita e INFN (IT)) , Paolo Petagna (CERN)
        Slides
      • 09:40
        Silicon Buried Channels for Pixel Detector Cooling 20m
        This talk reports the development of an integrated microchannels cooling into silicon devices. The microchannels are formed in silicon using isotropic SF6 plasma etching in a DRIE (deep reactive ion etcher), after the DRIE process the channels are sealed by depositing a PECVD silicon oxide. We have realized on a silicon wafer microchannels with different geometries and hydraulic diameters. We describe the main fabrication steps of microchannels with focus on the channel definition and we report some selected results on the thermal characterization of several prototypes.
        Speaker: Sabina Ronchin (FBK)
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Microfluidic scintillation detectors for hadron therapy and high energy physics 20m
        Within the microScint project in the CERN Physics Department a new generation of microfabricated particle detectors based on liquid scintillators is being developed. These novel devices consist of dense arrays of microfluidic channels acting as optical waveguides and feature high spatial resolution and increased radiation resistance, while minimizing the material budget. Experimental measurements on prototype detectors yielded light output efficiencies comparable to state of the art scintillating fiber trackers. Several technological solutions for the fabrication of the microchannels, such as SU-8 photolithography and silicon DRIE, are being investigated within the cleanroom facilities at the EPFL Center for Micronanotechnology (CMi) with the Microsystems Laboratory 4 (LMIS4). Potential applications include single particle tracking in high energy physics experiments and beam monitoring for hadron therapy applications. A collaboration with INFN Rome has just started to develop a common approach to the potential applications considered. A common system is foreseen, with custom parts dedicated to beam monitoring applications, based on silicon photodiodes, while silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are being considered for single particle tracking.
        Speaker: Pietro Maoddi (CERN)
        Slides
      • 10:20
        3D-S: A fast, high resolution, low-mass, detector with embedded cooling and internal charge multiplication capability 20m
        3D silicon sensors have completed the key milestones set by the 3DATLAS R&D collaboration and are now industrially fabricated. A new challenge is now being faced for the HL-LHC which will require a totally new approach in sensor fabrication. 3DS is an innovative fast, low mass modular system where all components, including cooling and active edges, are fabricated and are vertically integrated using microfabrication techniques. The talk will present some of the highlights of the current 3D sensors production and discuss the developement status of 3DS.
        Speaker: Dr. Cinzia Da Via (University of Manchester (GB))
        Slides
      • 10:40
        A new 3D PIN diode structure for neutron detection 20m
        A new hybrid structure of a 3D silicon sensor coupled to a scintillator for the detection of fast and thermal neutrons is presented. The device is based on a PIN diode with DRIE-etched cavities filled with polysiloxane acting as a scintillator, while the signal is transferred to the other side by means of TSV. The structure increases the active interaction volume for neutron, with respect to a planar device, giving higher detection efficiencies. We present the fabrication process and some selected results from the electrical characterization of devices and test structures.
        Speaker: Sabina Ronchin (FBK)
        Slides
    • 11:00 11:20
      Coffee Break 20m Lobby

      Lobby

      FBK, Trento

    • 11:20 13:00
      Active/Slim Edges "Stringa" Conference Hall

      "Stringa" Conference Hall

      FBK, Trento

      Via Sommarive, 18 38123 Povo - Trento ITALY
      Convener: Gian-Franco Dalla Betta (University of Trento and INFN)
      • 11:20
        Thin Edgeless Silicon Pixel Sensors on Epitaxial Wafers 20m
        The demand for minimizing the material budget of tracking detectors, especially those closer to the interaction region, has been addressed by fabricating pixel sensors on 100 µm thin epitaxial material. After processing, the thick, heavily doped substrate can be thinned down, leaving only a very thin layer, necessary for properly terminating the depletion region. In order to reduce the insensitive (dead) area at the sensor periphery, the ‘active edge’ technique has been exploited, surrounding the devices by deep, heavily doped DRIE-etched trenches. An overview of the key technological steps and of the first electrical characterization of the fabricated devices will be given.
        Speaker: I. Rashevskaya (INFN Trieste)
        Slides
      • 11:40
        Novel edgeless n-on-p planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS tracker upgrade 20m
        In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the Inner Detector with an all-silicon system. The n-on-p silicon technology is a promising candidate to achieve a large area instrumented with pixel sensors, since it is radiation hardness and cost effectiveness. The talk reports on the development of novel n-on-p edgeless planar pixel sensors produced by FBK-CMM, making use of the active trench concept for the reduction of the dead area at the periphery of the device. Electrical characterization of the sensors will be presented, after outlining the project and commenting the sensors simulation studies.
        Speaker: Gabriele Giacomini (Fondazione Bruno Kessler)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Progress onslim edges with Scribe-Cleave-Passivate 20m
        We will report on recent results on slim edges using the Scribe-Cleave-Passivate SCP method
        Speaker: Hartmut Sadrozinski (SCIPP, UC santa Cruz)
        Slides
      • 12:20
        Discussion 30m
      • 12:50
        Conference Closing 10m
    • 13:00 14:30
      Lunch Break 1h 30m Canteen

      Canteen

      FBK, Trento

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