EURORIB 2010

Europe/Zurich
Village de Vacances de Lamoura

Village de Vacances de Lamoura

39310 Lamoura France
Yorick Blumenfeld (CERN-CERN-CERN)
Description

European Radioactive Ion Beam Conference. The second international EURORIB conference “EURORIB’10” will be held from June 6th to June 11th 2010 in Lamoura (France). Our nuclear physics community is eagerly awaiting the construction of the next generation of Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facilities in Europe: HIE-ISOLDE@CERN, NUSTAR@FAIR, SPES@LNL, SPIRAL2@GANIL and the future EURISOL. The collaborations built around these facilities are exploring new experimental and theoretical ideas that will advance our understanding of nuclear structure through studies of exotic nuclei. Following in the spirit of the conference held in Giens in 2008, EURORIB’10 will provide the opportunity for the different collaborations to come together and present these ideas, and explore the synergies between the research programmes based around the different accelerator projects. The main topics to be discussed at the conference are: 1) At and beyond the dripline 2) Shell structure far from stability 3) Fusion reactions and synthesis of heavy and superheavy nuclei 4) Dynamics and thermodynamics of exotic nuclear systems 5) Radioactive ion beams in nuclear astrophysics 6) New modes of radioactivity 7) Fundamental interactions 8) Applications in other fields 9) Future RIB facilities 10) Production and manipulation of RIB 11) Working group meetings on synergies in instrumentation and data acquisition.

Sponsored by:



 

Conference Photo
Excursion Group Photo
Poster
timetable
Participants
  • Adam Maj
  • Alain Gillibert
  • Alberto Andrighetto
  • Alberto Pullia
  • Alexander Herlert
  • Anabel Morales Lopez
  • Anatoli Afanasjev
  • Anatoly Barzakh
  • Andres Gadea
  • Antonio Di Nitto
  • Baptiste MOUGINOT
  • Bertram Blank
  • Björn Riese
  • Björn Jonson
  • Bradley Cheal
  • Branislav Streicher
  • Bruce Marsh
  • Chong Qi
  • Christoph Scheidenberger
  • Christophe Lau
  • Christophe Sotty
  • Christophe theisen
  • Christopher Geppert
  • Clementina Agodi
  • D. GUILLEMAUD MUELLER
  • Dai-Hyuk Yu
  • Daniele Montanari
  • Daniele Scarpa
  • David Morrissey
  • Deyan T. Yordanov
  • Dmitry Testov
  • Dolores CORTINA
  • Emanuel Pollacco
  • Eric Delagnes
  • Evelyne Cottereau
  • Fadi IBRAHIM
  • Faical Azaiez
  • Farheen Naqvi
  • Frederik Wauters
  • Fredrik Wenander
  • Frédéric Saillant
  • Giacomo Cuttone
  • Gianfranco Prete
  • Giovanna Benzoni
  • Giovanni Casini
  • Giovanni LA RANA
  • Giuseppe Cardella
  • Gordon Ball
  • Gry Tveten
  • Grzegorz Kaminski
  • Haik Simon
  • Hanna Franberg Delahaye
  • Hans Geissel
  • Hans Törnqvist
  • Heinrich J. Wörtche
  • Helmut WEICK
  • Hiroyoshi Sakurai
  • Hoonsoo Kang
  • Iain Moore
  • Ingo Augustin
  • Iris Dillmann
  • Ismael Martel Bravo
  • Itzhak Kelson
  • Jacek Dobaczewski
  • Jan Diriken
  • Janne Pakarinen
  • Jarno Van de Walle
  • Jenny Weterings
  • Joa Ljungvall
  • Juha Aysto
  • Jürgen Gerl
  • Kalvis Kravalis
  • Karsten Riisager
  • Ketel Turzo
  • Kieran Flanagan
  • Kim Kreim
  • Kristian Petrik
  • Laura Grassi
  • Laurent Nalpas
  • Lorenz Willmann
  • Lucia-Ana Popescu
  • M. Valentina Ricciardi
  • Magdalena Kowalska
  • Marc Rousseau
  • Marek Lewitowicz
  • Maria Colonna
  • Maria Kmiecik
  • Marica Sjodin
  • Mario Cubero
  • Mark Bissell
  • Mark Huyse
  • Martin Breitenfeldt
  • Maurizio Bini
  • Megumi Niikura
  • Michal Ciemala
  • Michel TRIPON
  • Miroslav Jeskovsky
  • Muhsin Harakeh
  • Nadezhda Tsoneva Larionova
  • Nasser Kalantar
  • Nathal Severijns
  • Navin Alahari
  • Nick Bree
  • Oleksii Kovalchuk
  • Olof Tengblad
  • Paul Greenlees
  • Paul Kienle
  • Pavel Molkanov
  • Peter Butler
  • Peter Egelhof
  • Peter Thirolf
  • Pierre Delahaye
  • R.Burcu Cakirli
  • RASYIEDA ABDULLAH
  • Rene Reifarth
  • Riccardo Raabe
  • Richard Casten
  • Richard Newman
  • Robert WOLF
  • Rosetta SILVESTRI
  • Saïd Essabaa
  • Sebastian Rothe
  • Serge FRANCHOO
  • Sergey Vaintraub
  • Seung-Woo Hong
  • Shebli Anvar
  • Silvia Lenzi
  • Stefano Carboni
  • Susanne Kreim
  • Sydney GALES
  • Sylvie Padlewski
  • Thomas Beyer
  • Thomas Cocolios
  • Thomas Nilsson
  • Thomas ROGER
  • Tsviki Hirsh
  • Ulli Köster
  • Valentin Fedosseev
  • Vazgen Sargsyan
  • Yacine Kadi
  • Yorick Blumenfeld
    • 6:00 PM 8:30 PM
      REGISTRATION
    • 6:45 PM 8:15 PM
      Dinner 1h 30m
    • 9:00 AM 9:10 AM
      Introduction 10m CERN

      CERN

      Welcome the participants
      Speaker: Yorick Blumenfeld (CERN)
    • 9:10 AM 10:40 AM
      Shell structure Far From Stability I Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 9:10 AM
        Extended energy density functionals and ground-state correlations in nuclei 30m
        In collaboration with the FIDIPRO team at the University of Jyväskylä: B.G. Carlsson, M. Kortelainen, N. Michel, A. Pastore, F. Raimondi, J. Toivanen, P. Toivanen, and P. Veselý Reliable predictions of nuclear properties in exotic nuclei, with controlled theoretical errors, are essential for modelling many stellar processes. In medium heavy and heavy nuclei, the only available approach, able to provide global information on ground-state properties, is based on the one-body degrees of freedom, which in modern formulation takes the form of the energy density functional (EDF) theory. Over the years, methods based on such ideas have proved to be extremely efficient, however, the present-day status thereof is far from being complete. Two elements of the approach are currently intensely studied, namely, construction of schemes that would allow for systematic improvements of the precision and determination of theoretical errors and variances. In Ref. [1], it was proposed to shift attention and focus of the EDF methods from ground-state bulk properties (e.g. total nuclear masses) to single-particle (s.p.) properties, and to look for a spectroscopic-quality EDFs that would correctly describe nuclear shell structure. Proper positions of s.p. levels are instrumental for good description of deformation, pairing, particle-core coupling, and rotational effects, and many other phenomena. Up to now, methods based on using EDFs, in any of its variants like local Skyrme, non-local Gogny, or relativistic-mean-field [2] approach, were mostly using adjustments to bulk nuclear properties. As a result, shell properties were described poorly. After so many years of investigations, a further increase in precision and predictability of all methods based on the EDFs may require extensions beyond forms currently in use [3,4]. Before this can be fully achieved, it was proposed to first take care of the s.p. properties, and come back to precise adjustment of bulk properties once these extensions are implemented. Within the standard 12-parameter form of the Skyrme functional [2], an improvement of spectroscopic properties cannot be obtained [3], and extensions of this form seem to be mandatory. One possible way could be the inclusion of density dependence into all the 12 coupling constant of the standard functional [5]. Another one, which was recently proposed in Ref. [4], aims at including gradient corrections up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO -- sixth order). I this talk I describe recent progress and new ideas emerging in the EDF approaches, including the attempts of microscopic derivations from first principles. [1] M. Zalewski, J. Dobaczewski, W. Satula, and T.R. Werner, Phys. Rev. C 77, 024316 (2008). [2] M. Bender, P.-H. Heenen, and P.-G. Reinhard, Rev. Mod. Phys. 75, 121 (2003). [3] M. Kortelainen, J. Dobaczewski, K. Mizuyama, and J. Toivanen, Phys. Rev. C 77, 064307 (2008). [4] B.G. Carlsson, J. Dobaczewski, and M. Kortelainen, Phys. Rev. C 78, 044326 (2008). [5] M. Kortelainen et al., to be published.
        Speaker: Dr Jacek Dobaczewski (Institute of Theoretical Physics - University of Warsaw)
        Slides
      • 9:40 AM
        Onset of collectivity in neutron-rich Fe isotopes 20m
        The lifetimes of the first excited 2+ states in 62Fe and 64Fe have been measured in an experiment at GANIL using the Recoil-Distance Doppler Shift technique. The iron nuclei where populated in multi-nucleon transfer reactions between a 238U beam at 6.5MeV/A and a 64Ni target. A degrader foil at micrometer distances from the target was used to slow the reaction products before entering the VAMOS spectrometer for identification. The Doppler shift of the gamma rays emitted before and after the degrader foil was measured with the EXOGAM germanium detector array. The lifetimes give evidence for a strong increase in collectivity from 62Fe to 64Fe. The results are compared to new large-scale shell model calculations and HFB-based configuration mixing calculations. The large B(E2) value in 64Fe can be related to the occupation of the neutron g9/2 and d5/2 orbitals. Many parallels are found between the neutron-rich Fe isotopes below 68Ni and the so-called 'island if inversion' around 32Mg.
        Speaker: Dr Joa Ljungvall (CSNSM Orsay)
      • 10:00 AM
        Isomer spectroscopy of 127Cd and 125Cd 20m
        The isomeric decays in 127Cd and 125Cd having two proton holes and three and five neutron holes respectively in the doubly magic 132Sn core have been studied. To date even mass heavy Cd isotopes have been investigated in detail [1,2]. The obtained sytematics exhibits evolution of single particle energies and addresses the onset of deformation when removing particles from the core nucleus. The experiment was performed at GSI, Darmstadt to investigate the structure of excited states in odd mass neutron rich Cd isotopes. Isomeric decays in the nuclei of interest were observed in the fragmentation reaction of a 136Xe beam at energy 750MeV/u on a 9Be target of 4g/cm2 thickness. The Cd ions were selected using the standard Bρ-ΔE-Bρ method in the FRagment Separator (FRS). Event by event identification of the particles in terms of their mass A and charge Z was provided by the standard FRS detectors. Isomers populated in the reaction were implanted in a plastic catcher surrounded by 15 Ge cluster detectors from RISING array [3] to detect the γ decays. In 127Cd , excited states with pure neutron ν (h11/2 -2 d3/2 -1) character analogous to 129Sn have been observed, whereas in 125Cd apart from the previously observed (19/2)+ isomer reported in Ref. [4], a new isomeric state has been detected . The level schemes of these nuclei have been established based on the obtained intensity balance and life time information. The new experimental information provides vital input for the shell model description of the evolution of neutron hole energies in neutron-rich nuclei in the N=82, Z=50 region. Comparison of the experimental results with shell model calculations will be discussed. [1] A. Jungclaus, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 132501 (2007). [2] L. Cáceres, et al., Phys. Rev. C 79, 011301(R) (2009). [3] S. Pietri, et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 261, 1079 (2007). [4] M. Hellström, et al., GSI 2003-1, p.5 (2003).
        Speaker: F. Naqvi (Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Köln, Germany /Gesselschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt, Germany)
      • 10:20 AM
        Pygmy Resonances in Exotic Nuclei 20m
        The progress of the new generation of experimental facilities on radioactive ion beams opens the opportunity to investigate unknown regions of exotic nuclei, far from the valley of beta-stability. One of the most interesting findings, was the observation of enhanced, resonance-like, low-energy, dipole strength, as a common feature of stable and unstable nuclei with neutron excess. This clustering of strong dipole transitions was named Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR). It was suggested that the PDR is due to an oscillation of a small portion of neutron-rich nuclear matter relative to the rest of the nucleus. Here, we present systematic investigations based on self-consistent HFB and QPM theory on dipole and other multipole excitations in several isotonic and isotopic chains of nuclei, particularly exploring their connection to the thickness of the neutron or proton skin, respectively [1-3]. From the analysis of the structure of low-energy electric dipole and quadrupole states and the corresponding neutron and proton transition densities a Pygmy Dipole [1,3] and a Pygmy Quadrupole Resonances (PQR) [2] are identified as a distinct and unique excitation, different from giant resonances and low-energy collective quadrupole states, respectively. The total PDR and PQR strengths are found to be related to the neutron skin thickness. In addition, it has been suggested that the pygmy resonances are independent of the type of nucleon excess (neutron or proton) [1,2]. Furthermore, recent calculations of low-energy E1 and spin-flip M1 excitations in N=82 nuclei are presented in comparison with experimental data [3]. These investigations allow to decompose the dipole strength below the GDR to elastic E1 component, related to skin oscillations and PDR, and background component composed of elastic and inelastic E1 and M1 transitions, respectively. The obtained information reveals new aspects in the isospin dynamics of the nucleus. References: [1] N. Tsoneva, H. Lenske, Phys. Rev. C 77, 024321 (2008), and refs. therein. [2] N. Tsoneva, H. Lenske, Phys. Lett. B submitted, arXiv:0910.3487 [nucl-th]. [3] A. P. Tonchev, S. L. Hammond, J. H. Kelley, E. Kwan, H. Lenske, G. Rusev, W. Tornow, and N. Tsoneva, Phys. Rev. Lett., accepted, and refs. therein.
        Speaker: Dr Nadia Tsoneva (Universität Giessen, 35390 Giessen, Germany)
    • 10:40 AM 11:10 AM
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 11:10 AM 1:00 PM
      Shell Structure Far From Stability II Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 11:10 AM
        Shell structure far from stability 30m
        Far from the valley of beta stability, the nuclear shell structure undergoes important and substantial modifications. In medium-light nuclei, interesting changes have been observed such as the appearance of new magic numbers, and the development of new regions of deformation around nucleon numbers that are magic near stability. The observed changes help to shed light on specific terms of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction and to improve our knowledge of the nuclear structure evolution towards the drip lines. In particular, it has been shown that the monopole part of the tensor force of the proton-neutron interaction gives the main contribution to the shell evolution. The possibility of having a good theoretical description of these phenomena is essential to allow a deep insight into the nuclear effective interaction, to interpret the structure of nuclei far prom stability, to predict the position of the drip-lines and to understand the nucleosynthesis pathways. In the last few years, particular effort has been put on studying light and medium-mass neutron-rich nuclei where these effects manifest more dramatically. Detailed nuclear structure information is becoming available both with stable and radioactive beams nowadays and deeper insight on nuclei approaching the drip line is foreseen with the future radioactive beams facilities. The status of the present scenario and future perspectives will be discussed.
        Speaker: Prof. Silvia Lenzi (Universty of Padova and INFN)
        Slides
      • 11:40 AM
        Single particle states in 67Ni 20m
        The interest in the structure of nuclei around 68Ni has been triggered long ago by the observation of the high excitation energy of the first 2+ in this nucleus [1]. Combining this observation with the fact that a minimum is reached in the systematic of B(E2;2+ -> 0+)-values at N=40 in the neutron rich nickel chain has lead to interpretations in terms of a harmonic oscillator subshell closure resulting in extensive theoretical studies [2]. The excitation spectrum of odd mass nuclei in the direct neighborhood of closed shells is usually governed by single particle excitations. One-neutron transfer reactions are a useful tool to fix spins and parities of excited states and determine spectroscopic factors which can be compared to shell model predictions. Recent large scale shell model calculations have shown the sensitivity of certain nuclear parameters in this region to the size of the N=40 and N=50 shell gaps [3]. By measuring effective single-particle energies these shell gaps can be fixed in order to further update the existing nuclear models. In this case the excitation spectrum of 67Ni was studied by performing the 66Ni(d,p)67Ni reaction in inverse kinematics with an energy of 3 MeV/u at the REX-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility in CERN using the MINIBALL setup in combination with the T-REX particle detection array [3]. The extracted angular distributions of the protons can be compared to DWBA calculations in order to determine spin and parity of the excited states as well as spectroscopic factors. Population of levels with excitation energy up to 6 MeV have been observed, probably above N=50. Preliminary results of the analysis will be presented. [1] R. Broda et al. Phys.Lett.B 113, 279 (1982) [2] O. Sorlin et al. Phys.Rev.Lett. 88, 092501 (2002) [3] K. Langanke et al. Phys.Rev.C 67, 044314 (2003) [4] V. Bildstein et al. Prog.Part.Nucl.Phys 59, 386 (2007)
        Speaker: Mr Jan Diriken (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)
        Slides
      • 12:00 PM
        Spectroscopy of neutron-rich lead nuclei 20m
        The neutron-rich lead region is of exceptional interest to trace the evolution of single-particle levels and the residual proton-neutron interaction beyond the doubly magic 208Pb. While 208Pb is well understood in terms of the shell model, experimental data on the heavier isotopes are very scarce[1,2]. Another crucial aspect that calls for further experimental information is the evaluation of beta-decay half lives for neutron-rich nuclei with A>215. These half lives are particularly needed for r-process calculations as an essential test to validate the nuclear and beta-decay models away from stability[3]. In this talk results from a recent RISING experiment aiming at studying neutron-rich lead isotopes with A>210 will be reported. The experiment employed the active stopper configuration of the RISING array in order to study both isomeric gamma decay of long-lived states and the beta decay of heavy lead and bismuth isotopes. The nuclei of interest were populated by relativistic fragmentation of 238U at 1GeV/u on a Be target. The ions of interest where transported in the GSI FRS separator [4] and implanted in an active catcher consisting of 9 Silicon DSSSD. The gamma decay after implantation was measured by the 15 Cluster HPGe detectors of the RISING array [5,6]. New isomers have been identified in the populated Pb, Bi and Tl isotopes, and their lifetime and isomeric ratios are being evaluated. Comparison with shell model calculations will be presented. [1]M. Pfutzner et al., Phys. Lett. B 444 (1998) 32-37. [2]Zs. Podolyak, Acta Physica Polonica B36 (2005) 1269. [3]I.N. Borzov. Phys. Rev. C67 (2004) 025802. [4]H. Geissel et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. B70 (1992) 286. [5]S. Pietri et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. B 261 (2007)1079. [6]R. Kumar et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. A 598 (2009) 754.
        Speaker: giovanna benzoni (INFN sezione di Milano)
      • 12:20 PM
        Exploring life-time of low-lying states in neutron rich nuclei towards 78Ni with the plunger technique at GANIL 20m
        One of the most critical ingredients in determining the disappearance or appearance of magicity in nuclei far from stability is the evolution of single-particle energies with increasing neutron or proton numbers when moving away from the valley of stability. The three known cases of disappearance of shell effects at N=8, 20 and 28 in neutron rich nuclei are understood as due to the effect of the tensor part of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The tensor force is held responsible for the strong attraction between a proton and a neutron in spin-flip partner orbits. A recent generalization of such mechanism foresees a similar behaviour also for orbitals with non-identical orbital angular momenta. It is expected that orbitals with anti-parallel angular momenta attract each other and orbitals with parallel angular momenta repulse each other. The change in shell structures based on this mechanism has recently been discussed for different mass regions of the nuclear chart. In this context neutron-rich nuclei close to shell gaps are particularly interesting since they allow to search for anomalies when compared with shell-model predictions. It is predicted, for example, that the Z=28 gap for protons in the pf-shell becomes smaller when moving from 68Ni to 78Ni as a consequence of the attraction between the proton f5/2 and neutron g9/2 orbits and the repulsion between the proton f7/2 and the neutron g9/2 states. The same argument would also predict a weakening of the N=50 shell gap when depleting the proton f5/2 state upon approaching the 78Ni nucleus, due to the diminished attraction between the neutron g9/2 and the proton f5/2 orbits and the reduced repulsion between the neutron g7/2 and the proton f5/2 states. Recently an experiment aiming at the study of the evolution of the structure of neutron rich Cu and Zn isotopes has been performed. This experiment uses the plunger technique in order to measure life time of gamma transition involved in the decay of excited states in these exotic nuclei. The studied nuclei have been populated using reactions induced by a cocktail beam composed of 73,74Zn RIB’s of 34MeV/u in a CD2 target. The cocktail beam is produced by the in-flight technique using the first half of the LISE separator. The second half is used for the selection and identification of the final products after interaction in the secondary CD2 target. The EXOGAM array and the differential Plunger technique provide information on the in-beam gamma spectroscopy and life time of the excited states in the picoseconds to tens of picoseconds The first results obtained on the life time of excited states in 72,73,74Zn will be reported together with the comparison to results from Coulomb excitation experiment at REX-ISOLDE. A picture of the low-energy structure in these isotopes towards the middle of the g9/2 orbital will be given via: i) identification of the levels populated with inelastic scattering reaction and ii) determination, in a model-independent way, of the transition probabilities of those levels towards the ground state.
        Speaker: Batipste MOUGINOT (Institut de Physique Nucléaire d'Orsay)
        Slides
      • 12:40 PM
        Laser spectroscopy of gallium isotopes using ISCOOL 20m
        Laser spectroscopy performed at ISOLDE, CERN has been revolutionised by the installation of an ion beam cooler, ISCOOL. This device, a gas-filled linear RFQ, serves not only to improve the beam quality but also delivers a bunched ion beam. Recent measurements on isotopes of gallium (Z=31) are presented which illustrate the improvement. The phenomenon of monopole migration is the primary physics motivation in these studies - specifically the movement of proton states as the g9/2 neutron orbit is filled. The nuclear spin, magnetic moment, quadrupole moment and mean-square charge radius are complementary probes and all are obtainable from optical spectroscopy. Anomalous ground state spins have been measured for A=73 and A=81, and these, together with the moments, are compared with theoretical calculations.
        Speaker: Bradley Cheal (The University of Manchester, UK)
        Slides
    • 1:00 PM 2:30 PM
      Lunch 1h 30m
    • 2:30 PM 2:50 PM
      Shell Structure Far From Stability II Cont'd
      • 2:30 PM
        The EXL experiment at FAIR 20m
        The upcoming FAIR facility in Darmstadt, Germany, will produce intense high energy beams of exotic nuclei, which will be used to explore the properties of new regions of the chart of nuclides of key importance for both nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. Since the nucleus under study is the one which is produced in the process of in-flight fragmentation, one has to deal with inverse kinematics in which the hadronic probe, generally a light nucleus, is the target being bombarded by the heavy nucleus. The inverse kinematics will impose particular conditions on the design of detection systems. In the EXL project, heavy ion beams are first cooled in the New Experimental Storage Ring (NESR) and then used to induce reactions on windowless thin hydrogen, deuterium and Helium gas targets in the ring. High luminosities can be achieved because the beam circulates a couple of million times in the ring. The EXL system will be ideal for high resolution reaction studies at low momentum transfers, for example the study of nuclear sizes using protons, giant resonance properties using inelastic light-ion scattering – such studies provide unique insights into the asymmetry energy in the nuclear equation of state and the properties of neutron stars. The design of the detector system considered is universal in the sense that it should allow the use of a large variety of nuclear reactions, addressing numerous physics questions. The detector system provides the capability of fully exclusive kinematical measurements, with target recoil detectors, fast ejectile forward detectors and an in-ring heavy-ion spectrometer. Technologically, the requirement that the detectors should be placed in the ultra-high vacuum of the ring is most demanding and requires non-standard solutions of the detector design. The physics case and detector design considerations for EXL along with tests experiments performed at KVI and GSI, paving the way to the full EXL detection system, will be presented.
        Speaker: Prof. Nasser Kalantar-Nayestanaki (University of Groningen)
        Slides
    • 2:50 PM 4:10 PM
      Fundamental Interactions
      • 2:50 PM
        “Fundamental Interaction Studies with Radioactive Nuclei” 30m
        In the past few years significant progress was made in the study of weak interaction properties at low energies. Particle traps and GEANT based simulations have played a crucial role in this. Improved theoretical calculations and new measurements have verified the unitarity condition of the quark mixing matrix with high precision, leading to stringent limits on different types of physics beyond the standard model. Further, a series of new results from different types of correlation measurements in the beta decay of radioactive nuclei have recently become available. These provide new constraints on exotic, viz. scalar and tensor, charged weak currents. An overview of the status and prospects for the future of this field will be given.
        Speaker: Prof. Nathal Severijns (Kath. Univ. Leuven)
        Slides
      • 3:20 PM
        Time-Modulation of Two-Body Weak Decays with Massive Neutrinos 30m
        Excellence Cluster “Universe” Technische Universität München Abstract: In recent experiments at the GSI, Darmstadt, time-modulated orbital Electron Capture (EC) decays of H-like 140Pr58+, 142Pm60+, and 122I52+ ions with one electron in the K-shell, coasting in the ESR storage ring with velocity ß = 0.71, were observed. The EC-branches show exponential decay curves time-modulated with period T= 7.06(8) s and amplitude a = 0.18(3) for 140Pr decays, T = 7.10(22) s and a = 0.23(4) for 142Pm decays, and T = 6.04(6) s and a = 0.19(3) for 122I (preliminary) decays in the laboratory frame. The simultaneously measured ß+ branch of 142Pm shows no modulation with a < 0.03. We discuss here as origin of the modulation neutrino quantum beats produced by the superposition of massive neutrino mass-Eigen states emitted in the entangled two body weak decay. From the modulation frequency a value for the difference of the quadratic mass values Δm² =m²2-m²1= 2.22(3) x10-4 eV² is deduced, which is 2.75 times larger than the value derived by the KamLAND antineutrino oscillation experiment. Vacuum polarisation effects of lepton-W-boson loops in the Coulomb-field of heavy nuclei are proposed to explain the difference of Δm² for neutrinos and antineutrinos. The origin of the small modulation amplitudes is discussed as the result of a partial restoration of the interference terms which are expected to cancel for the usual assumed unitarity of the neutrino flavour mixing matrix.
        Speaker: Dr Paul Kienle (Technische Universität München)
        Slides
      • 3:50 PM
        Limits on tensor-type weak currents obtained with beta-asymmetry measurements in nuclear decays. 20m
        Precision beta decay experiments are a powerful tool to probe the structure of the weak interaction at low energies 1). For example, the beta-asymmetry parameter A for pure Gamov-Teller nuclear decays is sensitive to a possible tensor component in the weak interaction if determined at the 1 % precision level. Here we will present two measurements of this parameter. Our results are competitive with the best results available in literature and contain information on tensor type charged weak currents. The low temperature nuclear orientation technique is used to create a polarized ensemble of radioactive nuclei by cooling them down to a few millikelvin in a strong magnetic field that is created either by hyperfine interactions or by an external magnet. The beta-particles are observed by semiconductor detectors operating at a temperature of about 10 K and facing directly to the sample. In previous measurements the accuracy of such an experiment was usually limited to several percent by the scattering of beta particles and the deflection of their trajectories by the magnetic field. We have developed a method based on GEANT4 Monte-Carlo simulations to gain control over these effects. The code was extensively tested by comparing simulations to experimental data taken under various well-controlled experimental conditions 2). First results were obtained with the isotopes 114In and 60Co with a precision at the 1,5 % level; which is better then the current literature values 3). An extensive study of the recoil corrections on the Standard Model prediction value was done to interpret our results in terms of exotic currents. The method is further being improved to push the precision and new data is under analysis. Our goal is to reach the 1% level or better, which would improve the sensitivity to tensor type weak currents by a factor of 2 to 3 compared to previous experiments in beta decay. 1) N. Severijns, M. Beck, and O. Naviliat-Cuncic, Rev.Mod. Phys. 78, 991 (2006). 2) F. Wauters et al,. Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 609, 156 (2009). 3) F. Wauters et al,. Phys. Rev. C 80, 062501 (2009).
        Speaker: Mr Frederik Wauters (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)
        Slides
    • 4:10 PM 4:40 PM
      Coffee 30m
    • 4:40 PM 7:00 PM
      Working Group - Synergies in Instrumentation Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 4:40 PM
        Overview on large gamma arrays and complementary instrumentation 25m
        Gamma spectroscopy is a fundamental tool for the investigation of nuclear structure. Since the end of the EUROBALL deployment, very specialized large arrays as well as compact arrays optimized for the first generation of radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities, have been extensively used by the Nuclear Physics community. Examples of former arrays are JUROGAM [1] and JUROGAM II coupled to RITU at JYFL, CLARA [2] coupled to PRISMA at INFN-LNL and RISING [3] installed at the focal plane of the Fragment Separator at GSI, while examples of the latter are EXOGAM [4], installed at GANIL and MINIBALL [5] at REX-ISOLDE. Presently, Nuclear Physics is entering a new era with the construction of second generation RIB facilities as the in-flight FAIR-NUSTAR and the ISOL SPIRAL2 and SPES. The response of the gamma spectroscopy community to this challenge is being the construction of the Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) [6] with superior sensibility and counting rate capabilities. In addition a number of the last generation compact gamma-arrays is being upgraded, improving again sensibility and rate capabilities, to cope with the necessities of a community with high demand of instrumental availability. Moreover, R&D is ongoing for a high-resolution spectroscopy array for decay spectroscopy after implantation in relativistic in-flight facilities. Since long time it is well known that complementary instrumentation is of paramount importance to improve the sensibility of the large gamma-arrays as well as for particular type of experiments as lifetime measurements, or for the selection of the reaction channels. An overview of complementary
        Speaker: Dr Andres Gadea (IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, Spain)
      • 5:05 PM
        Experiments with Exotic Nuclei applying a new Generation on In-Flight Separators and Spectrometers 25m
        The research potential with exotic nuclei is determined by fast, sensitive and highly efficient separation and high-resolution detection methods. Therefore, new separators and spectrome-ters are integrated parts in each rare-isotope facility worldwide. In this contribution novel developments of separators and spectrometers are briefly reviewed and compared. High-resolution experiments are often the key to extend the knowledge of nuclear physics. Present and future spectrometers for stored rare isotopes offer unique research opportunities at low and high kinetic energies.
        Speaker: Prof. Hans Geissel (GSI Darmstadt Germany /Justus-Liebig Universität, Giessen)
      • 5:30 PM
        MUSETT and the spectroscopy of heavy elements at GANIL 10m
        Ch. THEISEN for the MUSETT collaboration In the last few years, an impressive amount of new information has been obtained in the region of the heaviest elements. Detailed information has been obtained on the collective properties and single-particle structure using both prompt and decay spectroscopy techniques. However, very little data are available for nuclei located on the less neutron-deficient side of this region of the nuclear chart. Indeed, these isotopes can only be populated in very-asymmetric hot fusion-evaporations reactions using light-ion beams and actinide targets with the consequence that the recoiling nuclei have a very large angular distribution and a very low kinetic energy. The transmission of separators or spectrometers is usually poor for such reactions. With its very large acceptance providing a high transmission, VAMOS is well adapted to these studies; recoils are detected in the new MUSETT silicon detector array (“Mur de Silicium pour l’Etude des Transfermiens par Tagging”), which has been developed for the detection of the very heavy and very slow fusion-evaporation residues and for alpha-decay tagging. MUSETT is made of 4 segmented double-sided silicon detectors (128 strips on each side) assembled in a wall having a total size of 40x10 cm2 covering the VAMOS focal plane. Given the very large number of strips a new highly integrated ASIC based electronics and data acquisition system have been developed. Recoil-decay tagging will be used to unambiguously identify evaporation residues in the dominant backgrounds of unwanted reaction channels, while EXOGAM will provide a large efficiency for the detection of prompt gamma-ray cascades. In this contribution, we will first give an overview of our experimental program on transfermium and transactinides elements studies. We will then describe the new MUSETT silicon wall and show the results of the first commissioning experiment. A new gas-filled operation mode has been recently implemented at VAMOS, which extends the capability of the spectrometer in symmetric and inverse kinematics fusion-evaporation reactions. Examples of nuclear structure and reaction dynamics studies using this new mode and MUSETT will be given. In a near future the Super Separator Spectrometer S3 and the ultra-high intensities of the LINAG linear accelerator will provide fantastic opportunities for decay-spectroscopy studies. We will show how the S3 focal plane detection will benefit from the MUSETT developments and give examples of first-day experiments foreseen with S3 in 2013.
        Speaker: Dr christophe theisen (CEA Saclay)
        Slides
      • 5:40 PM
        The CHyMENE project for a windowless solid hydrogen thin target 10m
        Nuclear reactions on hydrogen CH2 or CD2 targets in inverse kinematics are extensively used with radioactive beams. This is the case, for example, for transfer reactions or resonant elastic scattering. Cryogenic targets may be used to improve the luminosity and remove the contribution of C atoms. However, for low incident beam energies, the thickness of the cryogenic target is a crucial parameter to achieve the detection of the reaction products. The aim of the CHyMENE project is first to produce a thin target in the 50-100µm range by a continuous extrusion technique. A film of solid hydrogen flows in a given plane (perpendicular to the beam axis in our case) and will be evacuated after irradiation. No additional Mylar-type window will be used.
        Speaker: A. Gillibert (DSM/IRFU/SPhN)
      • 5:50 PM
        MINOS: a new active target for in-beam gamma spectroscopy 10m
        In-flight gamma spectroscopy of rare isotopes is known to be one of the most efficient tools to investigate shell effects in exotic nuclei. In this presentation, we present MINOS, a project for a new active target dedicated to hydrogen-induced reactions and in-beam gamma spectroscopy at relativistic energies. When coupled to AGATA, the improvement in sensitivity is to reach a factor of several hundreds compared to today's capabilities. In the future, it will take advantage of the most exotic neutron-rich beams produced at the FAIR facility, coupled to the new-generation gamma array AGATA spectrometer.
        Speaker: Mr Alexandre Obertelli (CEA Saclay)
      • 6:00 PM
        Active target ACTAR for the low-energy short-lived radioactive SPIRAL2 beams 10m
        The active targets (AT) are promising tools for the study of low-energy short-lived radioactive beams available in the next decade at SPIRAL2, HIE-ISOLDE, NSCL and RIKEN. They are based on a gaseous ionization detector for the measurement of the incoming radioactive ions and their particle decay stopping in the volume. Alternatively, the nuclei of the gas can interact as a target with the beam to study induced direct reaction in inverse kinematics. The active targets provide high efficiency, low detection threshold and ion tracking capabilities allowing angular distribution and energy measurements. The validity of the method has been demonstrated with the first generation of detection set-ups developed at Bordeaux [1] and Ganil [2-3]. The ACTAR (Active TARget) collaboration aims to build a new active target, working as a time-projection chamber (TPC), able to record the 3D-tracks of ionizing particles passing through the gas volume and to work with medium-mass high-intensity radioactive beams. The ACTAR joint research initiative has promoted an R&D program gathering 9 European laboratories led by Ganil to define the characteristics of ACTAR [4], namely a highly segmented cathode (25 pads/cm2) representing more than 10’000 electronic channels, having a large dynamic range (both in energy and time), self-triggering and high-data rate capabilities. A specific R&D program called GET (General Electronics for TPC) has been started by IRFU/Saclay, CENBG/Bordeaux, GANIL/Caen and NSCL/MSU to build in a 4-year plan a generic front-end electronics for AT-TPC. The French ANR and US agencies have already funded the project. It will be a modular scale-free system able to read various AT-TPC within the ACTAR specifications. [1] J. Giovinazzo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 (2007) 102501 [2] C. Demonchy et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 583 (2007) 341. [3] I. Tanihata et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 100 (2008) 192502. [4] H. Alvarez Pol, ActarSim, http://fpsalmon.usc.es/r3b/ActarSimACTAR.shtml This work has been partly financed by the FP6 European contract.
        Speaker: Dr Laurent Nalpas (CEA Saclay)
      • 6:10 PM
        Prototyping of DSSD detectors for the EXL project 10m
        The EXL1) experiment as part of the future FAIR facility will provide the means for studying numerous physics phenomena in unstable exotic nuclei. Reactions will be performed in inverse kinematics using new storage-ring techniques and an universal detector system providing high resolution and large solid angle coverage for kinematically complete measurements. The present work focuses on prototyping and testing double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs) produced in PTI St. Petersburg (Russia) as a part of the EXL's Silicon Particle Array (ESPA). The spectroscopic properties and tracking performance of DSSDs with 16x16 and 64x64(16) strips were studied using 241Am alpha source, with special emphasis on the interstrip characteristics using particle implantation from either the junction or the ohmic side. These detectors were also used in telescope-like configurations in two test experiments with proton beams of 50 and 100 MeV performed at KVI Groningen and GSI Darmstadt, respectively, aimed at the total energy reconstruction. Another experiment with these detectors was performed at TU München aimed at separating protons and alpha particles using pulse shape discrimination. Special ceramic PCBs along with support flanges were constructed and tested at GSI Darmstadt to examine the possibility of using the first layer of EXL's DSSDs as an active vacuum barrier separating storage ring ultra-high vacuum from moderate vacuum housing all the subsequent detectors and the necessary cabling and electronics. The talk will cover spectroscopic performance of DSSDs as well as the results of the aforementioned experiments. The second part will address the mechanical solutions for the ESPA in conjunction with the vacuum prototype using DSSDs as a vacuum barrier. 1) http://www.rug.nl/kvi/Research/hnp/Research/EXL/index
        Speaker: Dr Branislav Streicher (GSI Darmstadt)
        Slides
      • 6:20 PM
        Discussion 40m
    • 7:00 PM 8:15 PM
      Welcome Cocktail and Dinner 1h 15m
    • 9:00 AM 11:00 AM
      Production and Manipulation of RIB Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 9:00 AM
        Production and Manipulation of Radioactive Ion Beams 30m
        The preparation and subsequent manipulation of radioactive ion beams is a hot topic of interest for all facilities involved in the study of isotopes far from stability. With ever increasing primary beam intensities, the ability to handle unwanted secondary contaminants is of particular interest. The means to produce the secondary radioactive ion beams in a selective manner relies on novel technologies, often developed at smaller facilities. Complicated experiments often set stringent requirements on the temporal or spatial properties of the beams. Indeed, in the last two years since the previous EURORIB conference (2008), many of the new techniques introduced at that time have now matured and others are presently in the planning stage to be used at future Large Scale Facilities. In this presentation I will present some of the recent advances and highlights in this important field including: ionization in a chemically selective manner, suppression of abundant contaminants in order to efficiently isolate the rare isotopes, novel techniques to provide high-precision mass separation on short timescales, preparation of low energy ion beams from an initial high energy primary or secondary beam, optical manipulation of ion beams for state-selective preparation and so forth.
        Speaker: Dr Iain D. Moore (Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.)
        Slides
      • 9:30 AM
        Production and manipulation of relativistic exotic nuclei 30m
        Projectile fragmentation or fission in flight is a rich source of exotic nuclei. The production cross sections of the selected nuclides are crucial for a successful experiment, but also the production rates of all other nuclei is of importance as they define the level of separation that must be reached. With beam intensities exceeding $10^{10}$ primary beam ions a high reduction factor must be achieved. The so called $B\rho-\Delta E-B\rho$ method has become the standard method for separation in fragment separators. World wide many dedicated devices have been built or existing beamlines have been modified to work in this technique. For new separators as BigRIPS or the planned Super-FRS a many stage separation scheme with more than only one degrader will be employed. This scheme can even be extended by an additional stage for bunching the energy-distribution for implantation into a gas catcher. A formalism to calculate analytically the separation characteristics of these devices will be presented as well as numerical techniques of simulation. The description involves the combination of the ion-optical properties as well as the energy-loss of heavy ions in matter. The achievable resolution as well as limitations from ion-optical imperfections and the energy-loss and angular straggling in the degraders will be discussed. The exact characteristics of separation depend on the velocity at which the separator is operated and strong differences even in the energy domain of 100-1000 MeV/u are the result. Ions of different charge states can confuse the particle identification and require special care for separation. Another interesting possibility comes with the coupling to storage rings where after beam cooling much higher resolving powers can be achieved.
        Speaker: Dr Helmut Weick (GSI)
      • 10:00 AM
        A novel method for isomeric beam production 20m
        We report a new innovation in laser spectroscopy: Collinear Resonant Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS), which aims to study the rarest isotopes produced at ISOLDE. CRIS relies on the new RFQ ion cooler and trap (ISCOOL) to remove the duty cycle losses that previously prevented effective realization of this technique. This method will produce ultra-clean isomeric beams, which can be studied independently of the ground state, with yields below 1 atom per second. Therefore CRIS could be applied at future RIB facilities for beam cleaning and isomer selection. This would open up the possibility of preparing pure isomeric beams for reacceleration and decay spectroscopy. This talk will discuss the status of the CRIS project at ISOLDE and the application of this technique at current and future RIB facilities.
        Speaker: Dr Kieran Flanagan (The University of Manchester)
        Slides
      • 10:20 AM
        The ISOLDE RILIS laser upgrade program 20m
        For many ISOLDE users, the isobaric purity of the ion beam is a critical factor. The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is the only ion source capable of achieving high ionization efficiency combined with chemical selectivity for many different elements. By using up to three broadly tunable dye lasers with optional second or third harmonic generation, ionization schemes for 27 elements have been successfully applied for ion beam production. Until 2008, the RILIS relied on copper vapor lasers (CVLs) to pump tunable dye lasers and to ionize highly excited atoms. The maintenance and operation of the CVLs manufactured almost 20 years ago required substantial efforts. A new CERN, KTH (Stockholm) collaboration funded by a grant from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation was established with the goal of improving the RILIS performance through a series of upgrade steps.  The first of these, the replacement of the CVLs with a commercial Nd:YAG laser, began in 2008 and by 2009 the new laser was fully integrated into the RILIS setup and the CVLs were no longer required.  An improvement in RILIS performance in terms of ionization efficiency, as well as overall stability and reliability has been achieved.  The second phase of the RILIS upgrade is underway and involves the replacement of the dye lasers.  The three new dye lasers are adapted to take advantage of the availability of a 355 nm output of the Nd:YAG pump laser, extending the fundamental tuning range into the blue part of the spectrum to bridge the gap in the spectral coverage offered by the dye laser fundamental and second harmonic beams of the 532 nm pumped system.  One laser has a motorized intra-cavity etalon which reduces its linewidth to 1 GHz. This is necessary for precision tuning to hyperfine components of an electron energy level to perform an isomer separation with RILIS, or for high resolution scanning during in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy studies. The third RILIS upgrade task is the installation of a complementary, all solid state RILIS system of Nd:YAG pumped Titanium Sapphire lasers, alongside the existing setup.  The construction of this system, which is being carried out in collaboration with the University of Mainz, began in 2009 and its progressive installation during 2010/2011 is planned.
        Speaker: Bruce Marsh (CERN)
      • 10:40 AM
        Secondary neutrons as the main source of the neutron rich fission residues production after the bombardment of a thick U target by 1 GeV protons: experimental evidences for Cs isotopes 20m
        To predict isotope yields in the future ISOL installations it is of crucial importance to understand properly the mechanism of isotope production in thick target. The present work seems to be a step toward this understanding. Experimental yields of the mass separated Cs isotopes produced by 1 GeV proton beam in thick U targets (with the thicknesses 6.5, 91 and 146 g/cm2) have been analyzed in the framework of diffusion-effusion model. The applicability of the model has been shown by the analysis of the Fr isotopes yields. Comparison of the neutron rich and neutron deficient Cs isotopes production efficiencies allows to divide contributions from the direct reaction (p+238U) and secondary reaction ((secondary n)+238U) in the neutron rich Cs isotopes production. For 146Cs, for example, the secondary neutron contribution is greater than the direct reaction contribution from 10 to 40 times depending on the thickness and geometry of a target material. Simple calculation of the “neutron contribution” with the known secondary neutron multiplicity and the isotope production cross-sections in the reaction (n14MeV+238U) describes these data fairly well.
        Speaker: Anatolij Barzakh (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute)
        Slides
    • 11:00 AM 11:30 AM
      Coffee 30m
    • 11:30 AM 12:40 PM
      Radioactive Ion Beams in Nuclear Astrophysics Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 11:30 AM
        Radioactive ion beams in nuclear astrophysics 30m
        The nucleosynthesis of elements beyond iron is dominated by neutron captures in the s and r processes. However, 32 so-called p-nuclei are thought to be produced in the p process, where proton-rich nuclei are made by sequences of photodisintegrations and (p,g) reactions and following decays on existing r- and s-seed nuclei. Charged-particle induced cross section measurements in the astrophysically interesting energy range are already very challenging on stable nuclei. Only a minute part of the nuclei involved in p-process networks, however, is stable. The most promising approach to determine the desired reaction rates is to produce the isotopes in Radioactive Ion Beam facilities and to investigate the reactions in inverse kinematics. A pioneering experiment was recently performed at the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI. Fully stripped ions of 96Ru were injected into the storage ring and slowed down to a few MeV/nucleon. The reaction products were detected with different particle detectors. Similarly photon-induced cross sections on radioactive nuclei can be measured in inverse kinematics applying the Coulomb-dissociation method. This can be done at the LAND/R3B setup at GSI. Recent examples applying this method to radioactive beams will be presented. This project is supported by the HGF Young Investigators Project VH-NG-327.
        Speaker: Dr Rene REIFARTH (GSI Darmstadt Germany)
        Slides
      • 12:00 PM
        Perspectives for nuclear astrophysics using ultra-dense ion beams and highly brilliant gamma beams 20m
        Along with the availability of high power, short pulse lasers arises the perspective of generating ultra-dense, laser-accelerated ion beams, which is one of the most active fields of research in virtually all major high-power laser laboratories world-wide. We plan to apply the new Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) mechanism for ion acceleration, which was recently observed [1,2,3]. We are exploring the possibility to establish a new nuclear reaction mechanism, fission-fusion, where in a first step bunches of solid state density of e.g. ^232Th with about 10 MeV/u will be produced (thus exceeding the density of ion bunches from classical accelerators by about 15 orders of magnitude), which then pass through a second Th foil where they desintegrate into light and heavy fission fragments. A strongly reduced atomic stopping power is expected in the interaction of the very dense ion bunches via collective effects, which is important to obtain intense fission fragment beams. The high density of the projectile and target ions furthermore leads to a reasonable subsequent fusion yield between neutron-rich light fission fragments. This may grant access to the production of extremely neutron-rich nuclei in the region of the astrophysical r-process near the waiting point N=126. Moreover, highly brilliant gamma-beams with MeV energies can be produced via Compton-backscattering of laser photons (ca. 1 eV) off brilliant electron bunches from conventional accelerators (storage ring or energy recovery linac). High-resolution spectroscopy (Delta E_gamma/E_gamma ~ 10^-4) using nuclear the resonance fluorescence technique can be applied to shed new light on short-lived neutron-deficient nuclei relevant for the astrophysical p- or rp nucleosynthesis processes. Ultra-dense laser ion acceleration as well as a brilliant gamma source based on the above concept is presently under study for the nuclear physics pillar of the European ELI (Extreme Light Infrastructure) large scale research facility to be built within the next 5 years in Bucharest [4]. [1] A. Henig et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 245003 (2009). [2] T. Tajima, D. Habs, X. Yan; Laser Acceleration of Ions for Radiation Therapy, RAST 2, 221 (2009). [3] S. Steinke et al., 'Efficient ion acceleration by collective laser-driven electron dynamics with ultra-thin foils', submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. (2009), arXiv:0909.2334v1 [physics.plasm-ph] [4] http://www.extreme-light-infrastructure.eu/
        Speaker: Dr Peter Thirolf (Fakultät für Physik-Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. München)
        Slides
      • 12:20 PM
        beta-decay half lives of nuclei approaching the r-process path near the 126-neutron shell closure 20m
        The decay properties of neutron-rich nuclei around N=126 are very important not only because they will provide valuable information about nuclear models far from stability, but also because these nuclei approach the astrophysical rapid-neutron capture [1] path near the waiting-point A~195. Particularly, the beta-decay half lives provide a noteworthy understanding of the r-process time-scales, and hence of the atomic abundances in the Universe. The use of projectile fragmentation at relativistic energies has opened up the possibility to produce these nuclei via the “cold-fragmentation” reaction channels [2]. Isomer spectroscopy using passive stoppers with a germanium array [3] and time correlations for beta-decays with an active stopper [4,5] have provide the first structural information on some of them. In a previous experiment the half-lives of 198-199-200Ir, 199-200Os and 194-195Re were measured from time-position correlations between implanted ions and subsequent beta-decays using double side silicon strip detectors (DSSSD) [4]. In this work we benefit from the last developments using beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy to measure the beta-decay half lives of other nuclei at the current limits of experimental synthesis. The present experiment was performed at GSI where the Fragment Separator (FRS) was used to identify and select heavy neutron-rich nuclei produced in the reaction 208Pb+Be at 1 AGeV. The nuclei were then slowed down and implanted in three DSSSD detectors acting as active stopper [6], recording the position and time of implantations and decays. Additionally, the RISING gamma-ray array [7] enclosed the active stopper in order to register the characteristic transitions from daughter nuclei. The event-by-event position and time correlations between implantations and gamma-labelled radioactive electrons allowed for the measurement of the beta-decay half lives of 204Au, 204-203Pt and 200-202Ir with improved background conditions. The new measurements allow to validate the numerical technique previously proposed for the analysis of beta-decay half lives under complex background conditions [4], and confirm the conclusions on the beta-decay of nuclei in this region of the Segrè chart. Indeed, the comparison of all our measurements with theoretical predictions [8,9] indicates the importance of FF transitions in the beta-process picture of this region. Moreover, the fact that beta-decay models used in standard r-process calculations do not consider FF transitions suggests that the r-process matter flow across N=126 is faster than expected. [1] E.M. Burbidge et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 29 (1957) 547 [2] J. Benlliure et al., Nucl. Phys. A 660 (1999) 87 [3] P.H.Regan et al. Nucl. Phys. A 787 (2007) 491c [4] T. Kurtukian, J. Benlliure and K.H.Schmidt, Nucl. Instr. and Methods A 589 (2008) 472 [5] N.Alkhomashi et al., Phys. Rev. C 80 (2009) 064308 [6] R. Kumar et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. A 598 (2009) 754 [7] S. Pietri et al., Nucl. Inst. Meth. B 261(2007) 1079 [8] P. Möller et al., Phys. Rev. C 67 (2003) 055802 [9] I.N. Borzov, Phys. Rev. C 67 (2003) 025802
        Speaker: Ms Anabel Morales López (USC)
        Slides
    • 12:40 PM 2:30 PM
      Lunch 1h 50m
    • 2:30 PM 3:40 PM
      At and Beyond the Dripline Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 2:30 PM
        "Recent results from experiments at and beyond the dripline" 30m
        Modern high-intensity accelerators provide access to new regions of the nuclear chart. This allows one to study the properties of extremely weakly bound or even unbound nuclei which spontaneously emit protons or neutrons. These nuclei have a huge imbalance in the proton/neutron ratio, adding a new degree of freedom - the isospin - and opening a large field of new experimental possibilities. It has been observed that, in these systems, nuclear forces manifest themselves in different ways. This is interpreted presently as an isospin dependence, and is questioning our understanding of the behaviour of nuclear matter going from proton- rich to neutron-rich matter. The light part of the nuclide chart offers a unique scenario where particle-bound and unbound nuclei mixed in the same isotopic chain, offering the possibility to follow how the structure develops as a function of increasing neutron number. In general, the isospin variations present in exotic nuclei are predicted to modify the nuclear mean-field picture together with the long and short-range correlation and are thus a key issue for the understanding of the evolution of the shell structure with isospin. We will review in this talk a personal selection of recent experimental results obtained in different laboratories during the last years. The enormous quality and amount of data, are a clear sign of the dynamism and interest awaken by the investigation of nuclear species close to the dripline.
        Speaker: Dr Dolore Cortina Gil (USC)
        Slides
      • 3:00 PM
        Beta decay directly to continuum 20m
        The beta-delayed deuteron decay of the halo nucleus 6He is thought of as proceeding directly to continuum states, and it appears that the corresponding decay of 11Li behaves in the same manner [1]. The present contribution discusses evidence that beta decays directly into continuum states may happen more generally. Experimental indications come from extended R-matrix fits to beta-delayed alpha decays of 12N [2] and 8B [3] measured at JYFL and KVI. In both cases acceptable fits with a moderate number of resonances only occur for unrealistic parameter values of the resonances. I shall - after presenting the experimental data - argue that transitions directly into the continuum should be considered as an alternative decay route, explain how this conceptually ties in with the R-matrix fits and illustrate this via simplified model calculations. [1] R. Raabe et al, Phys.Rev.Lett. 101 (2008) 212501. [2] S. Hyldegaard et al, Phys. Rev. C81 (2010) 024303. [3] O. Kirsebom, S. Hyldegaard et al, in preparation.
        Speaker: Dr Karsten Riisager (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University)
        Slides
      • 3:20 PM
        FIRST RESULTS OF REACTIONS INDUCED WITH EXOTIC BEAMS IN THE REGION OF 11Be WITH CHIMERA ARRAY 20m
        Nowadays our understanding of atomic nuclei is strongly oriented to the study of exotic nuclei. The availability of energetic beams of short-lived nuclei, referred to as radioactive ion beams (RIBs), has opened the way to the study of the structure and dynamics of new nuclear species, and to investigate nuclear matter under extreme conditions. In Catania, at Laboratory Nazionali del Sud is available a facility that produces radioactive beams at Fermi energies through in flight separation technique of projectile fragmentation products. With these beams and the CHIMERA multidetector, we have performed two experiments by using 13C and 18O as primary beams at 55 MeV/A impinging on 9Be target and measuring reactions induced by various exotic beams as 10,11,12Be, 12,13,14B and 16,17C. We report preliminary results obtained on the reactions 11Be(p,d)10Be and 10Be(d,p)11Be: the two reactions allow to study 11Be nuclear halo structure.
        Speaker: L. Grassi (INFN sez CT- Università degli Studi di Catania)
        Slides
    • 3:40 PM 4:10 PM
      Coffee 30m
    • 4:10 PM 5:20 PM
      New Modes of Radioactivity Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 4:10 PM
        Two proton radioactivity: status and perspectives 30m
        Two-proton radioactivity is the latest nuclear decay mode discovered. It consists of the emission of a pair of protons from a nuclear ground state. According to the definition by V. Goldanskii who was the first to discuss this new type of radioactivity extensively, one-proton radioactivity is not allowed to be an open decay channel for two-proton radioactivity (2p) candidates. In pioneering experiments at GANIL and GSI, this new radioactivity was discovered in 2002 and meanwhile 45Fe and 54Zn are established 2p emitters, with a possible third nucleus, 48Ni, for which one event was most likely observed. These results allowed a detailed comparison with the theoretical models available and showed that, at the level of precision of the experimental data and of the predictive power of the models, nice agreement was obtained. The latest step in the investigation of 2p radioactivity was the use of time-projection chambers to study the decay dynamics via measurements of the individual proton energies and the relative proton-proton emission angle. A first experiment at GANIL and a high-statistics experiment performed at MSU on 45Fe allowed to gain first insides into the decay characteristics by comparison with a three-body model. Meanwhile, 54Zn has also been studied with a TPC at GANIL. The present talk will review the experimental results on ground-state two-proton radioactivity and compare these results with theoretical predictions. Future studies and the possible discovery of new 2p emitters will be discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Bertram Blank (CEN Bordeaux-Gradignan)
        Slides
      • 4:40 PM
        Study of exotic beta-decays of light nuclei with an implantation technique 20m
        Thanks to its well-established theory, beta-decay is a useful tool to study the peculiar features present in light exotic nuclei, such as halos and cluster structures. In such systems, beta decay is characterised by large Q-values and low breakup thresholds in the daughter nuclei, so that feeding to continuum states and delayed emission of nucleons and light ions become possible. To study these exotic decays we used a technique where the radioactive nuclei are implanted in a finely segmented detector, and the decay channels are identified through the time and position correlation between the implanted nuclei and subsequent parent and daughter decays. This method ensures a high efficiency and an accurate normalisation of the branching ratios. We will illustrate the results obtained for the study of various systems: The deuteron-emission decay channel of the nuclei 6He and 11Li, and the implications concerning their halo structure; The decays of 12B and 12N to alpha-unbound channels in 12C; The measurements of the decay of 8B and 11Be.
        Speaker: Riccardo Raabe (Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, K.U. Leuven)
        Slides
      • 5:00 PM
        Observation of gamma-delayed three-alpha breakup in 12C: a complete kinematics approach to study multi-particle final state reactions 20m
        Hans Bethe was the first to establish the concept of nucleon synthesis in stars [1] proposing the CNO cycle and the PP chain, but was unsuccessful in solving the 12C formation mechanism. Not until the introduction of the Hoyle state [2] in 1953 one was getting close to a solution. However, 50 years later the 12C break-up is still not fully solved and the quest for learning more about the reaction rates in stars by studying the triple-alpha process is continuing. In this work we have studied the break-up of 12C following the reactions 10B(3He,pααα) and 11B(3He,dααα). The study was performed at the 5MV tandem accelerator at the Centro de Micro Analysis de Materials (CMAM) [3] at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. The break-up give us information on excited states in 12C from the famous Hoyle state up to an energy of almost 18 MeV. Using a highly segmented experimental set-up the simultaneous detection of the three alpha particles in coincidence with a proton or a deuteron, respectively, made possible a full kinematic reconstruction of the break-up. On the basis of the energies of the three alpha particles and their angular correlations it has been possible to separate the branching of the break-up through the ground state and the first excited 2+ state in 8Be, as well as to determine the spin and parity of states for cases where the assignment have been doubtful. Some of these levels will also de-excite via electromagnetic emission. The comparison between the energy of the proton (or deuteron) that populate a state of 12C and the sum of the energies of the 3alpha emitted from the same state makes possible to determine the presence of electromagnetic disintegration (γ) to lower states within 12C followed by the 3α break-up. This technique permits to identify γ-emissions between states where the gamma radiation emitted does not correspond to a peak [4]. In this contribution we will discuss the experimental set-up followed by a detailed description of the analysis method to reach the results obtained. [1] H.A. Bethe, Energy production in stars, Phys. Rev. 55(1939)434 [2] F. Hoyle et al., Phys. Rev. 92(1953)1095 [3] http://www.cmam.uam.es/
        Speaker: Dr Olof Tengblad (Consejo Sup. de Investigac. Cientif (CSIC))
        Slides
    • 5:20 PM 7:20 PM
      Working Group - Synergies in Data Acquisition Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 5:20 PM
        Front-end electronics and Controls as seen from the NUSTAR/FAIR perspective 20m
        The experimental program at FAIR requires a smooth transition from existing experiments as well as integrating a variety of old and new detector systems from different collaborations world-wide. We follow a flexible scheme where minimal functionalities of an associated electronics, readout and control are defined in order to make these complex systems work together. In my talk I will present these functionalities and associated implementations and prototypes, as well as the neccessary back-end installations to be implemented at the FAIR facility. The issue of being able to monitor and judge on the quality of the data produced by an inhomogenous setup with large channel counts is discussed, especially in view of the necessary setup times. I will also outline in this context, how future instrumentation can be made compatible in the sense that they can be used flawlessly in different labs.
        Speaker: Haik Simon
      • 5:40 PM
        INCAS 30m
        I will present the organizational structure and the research program of INCAS3, a starting research institute focusing on the development of advanced sensor technology. INCAS3 is co-financed by the Northern-Netherlands Provinces, the European Union, European Fund for Regional Development and the Dutch Ministry of Economic affaires. The mission of INCAS3 is to translate business and societal needs into research projects and to advance scientific and technological knowledge in the field of sensors and sensor systems, in collaboration with industry and the scientific community, leading to technological breakthroughs. I will provide an overview of development lines relating to nuclear technologies: antineutrino detection, medical applications, environmental monitoring/geophysical exploration techniques and cognitive sensor (systems). I will further indicate the involvement of industrial partners and our approach to stimulate and to organize these collaborations.
        Speaker: Mr H.J. WOERTCHE (INCAS)
        Slides
      • 6:30 PM
        Front end electronics and Data acquisition of Fazia detector. 20m
        The development of the Fazia FEE design will be presented, concerning the main problems that have been attacked. In order to minimize noise and signal distortion the solution of the digitizer back-to-back the preamplifier inside the vacuum chamber has been adopted. With the digitizing ADCs (6 for each telescope composed of two Silicon detectors of 300 and 500 micron followed by a CsI) each FEE board will host FPGAs to perform online trapezoidal shaping and to handle the communication through optical fibers with a system of regional cards outside the scattering chamber. The online fast shaped signals are aimed at generating fast logic signals to produce a global trigger validation. The high-speed bidirectional optical fibers (>= 3 Gbit/s) will transmit both data for the acquisition and logic information to a common general device. It will include a programmable trigger unit which, following the experiment demands, will generate and send back to all telescope of the apparatus a fast trigger validation. The data to be acquired, when separated, are sent through an ethernet network to a PC farm for storage and online analysis.
        Speaker: Maurizio BINI (INFN Firenze)
        Slides
      • 6:50 PM
        Discussion 30m
    • 7:20 PM 8:15 PM
      Dinner 55m
    • 9:00 AM 10:30 AM
      Facility Talks I Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 9:00 AM
        GANIL-SPIRAL2: a new era at the dawn of a new decade 30m
        GANIL-SPIRAL2: a new era at the dawn of a new decade Abstract: GANIL presently offers unique opportunities in nuclear physics and many other fields that arise from not only the provision of low-energy stable beams, fragmentation beams and re-accelerated radioactive species, but also from the availability of a wide range of state-of-the-art spectrometers and instrumentation. With the construction of SPIRAL2 over the next few years, GANIL is in a good position to retain its world-leading capability even though it faces strong competition from new and upgraded ISOL and fragmentation facilities. As selected by the ESFRI committee, the next generation of ISOL facility in Europe is represented by the SPIRAL2 project to be built at GANIL (Caen, France). SPIRAL 2 is based on a high power, CW, superconducting LINAC, delivering 5 mA of deuteron beams at 40MeV (200KW) directed on a C converter+ Uranium target and producing therefore more 1013 fissions/s. The expected radioactive beams intensities in the mass range from A=60 to A=140, will surpass by two order of magnitude any existing facilities in the world. These unstable atoms will be available at energies between few KeV/n to 15 MeV/n. The same driver will accelerate high intensity (100*A to 1 mA), heavier ions (Ar up to Xe) at maximum energy of 14 MeV/n. In applied areas SPIRAL2 is considered as a powerful variable energy neutron source. The Neutrons For Science collaboration (NFS) is proposing a physics program on fission induced by fast neutrons as well as fusion studies on materials. Under the 7FP program of European Union called*Preparatory phase*, the SPIRAL2 project has been granted a budget of about 4M€ to build up an international consortium around this new venture. The status of the construction of SPIRAL2 accelerator and associated physics instruments in collaboration with EU and International partners will be presented In addition, in order to ensure that the existing GANIL-SPIRAL1 facility makes best use of available resources, a study of the prospects for the laboratory has been undertaken , which will address its likely needs for the scientific programme up to 2015.
        Speaker: Dr Sydney GALES (GANIL)
      • 9:30 AM
        HIE-ISOLDE: Status Report of the Project and Highlights 30m
        The research with radioactive beams has strengthen the link between technical developments and physics output. The study of radioactive beams allows us to follow the evolution of nuclear structure over extended regions in the nuclear chart. ISOLDE has nowadays a vast variety of species produced, more than 1000 nuclei from almost 70 elements, the largest number by far of the existing ISOL-facilities. A key feature of the REX-ISOLDE complex is that essentially all isotopes produced can be charge bred and accelerated further up to 3 MeV/u. The present energy range limits the experimental program to Coulomb excitation of light and intermediate mass nuclei and to transfer reaction for the lightest species. The ISOLDE facility has been expanded several times in order to continue being a reference facility. Improvement of beam quality, increase in intensity and availability of new radioactive beams will boost decay experiments as well as the study of ground state properties as, for instance, Penning trap mass measurements that continuously refine our understanding of the nuclear mass surface. An energy upgrade will make all produce nuclei available for reactions up to and above the Coulomb barrier opening new avenues from the physics point of view. The enlarged dynamic range, first to 5.5 MeV/u and in a later stage to 10 MeV/u, will allow the optimization in each case with respect to cross section and reaction channel opening. A major upgrade of the present facility, High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE), is now approved to fully exploit the latest developments and significantly increase the ISOLDE scope. The HIE-ISOLDE project proposes a staged upgrade in three main categories: beam intensity, beam energy and beam quality. In this talk the present status of the project, and the future plans will be presented.
        Speaker: Yacine Kadi (CERN)
        Slides
      • 10:00 AM
        SPES Project 30m
        The SPES Project at INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) is now entering its construction phase. SPES is a facility based on a two exit-port cyclotron as proton driver and the PIAVE-ALPI superconductive linac accelerator, to supply an ISOL facility for Rare Ion Beam (RIB) production and reacceleration. The second proton beam is devoted to neutron production and applied physics research. RIB’s will be produced by proton induced fission on a UCx multi foil direct target with the goal to produce neutron-rich radioactive nuclei by the Uranium fission at a rate of 1013 fission/s. This is obtained developing a target able to operate with a proton beam of 8kW power (40MeV,200A). The unstable nuclei on experimental target are expected at a rate of 105-109 pps and energies up to 13 MeV/n in the mass region A=130. Special effort is also devoted to produce a high quality beam, well selected by a High Resolution Mass Spectrometer The talk will present recent developments and the actual status of the project.
        Speaker: Prof. Gianfranco Prete (INL.INFN)
        Slides
    • 10:30 AM 11:00 AM
      Coffee 30m
    • 11:00 AM 12:00 PM
      Facility Talks II Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 11:00 AM
        THE TRIUMF-ISAC RADIOACTIVE ION BEAM (RIB) FACILITY: RECENT HIGHLIGHTS AND FUTURE PLANS 30m
        The availability of a wide variety of intense beams of exotic nuclei from the next generation of radioactive ion beam facilities such as the Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF provides an unprecedented opportunity to address key questions of current interest in nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure physics, fundamental symmetries and molecular and material science. The short-lived isotopes are produced at ISAC by the ISOL (on-line isotope separation) method using a beam of up to 100uA of 500 MeV protons from the TRIUMF H- cyclotron to bombard thick production targets. The targets can be coupled to a wide variety of ion sources including: surface, laser (TRILIS) and plasma (FEBIAD) sources, to produce the worlds most intense RIB beams for certain isotopes such as 11Li. Low-energy ( <60 keV ) RIBs have been available at ISAC since 1999, and over the past decade a large number of state of the art experimental facilities have been developed. Recent research highlights include: high precision mass measurements of halo nuclei using the TITAN ion trap, measurements of the ground state quadrupole moments of 8,9,11Li using βNQR, implications for neutrinoless double electron capture via β-decay studies of 112Ag and 112In using the 8pi gamma-ray spectrometer, and microscopic investigations by βNMR of proximity effects in metal- superconductor bilayers. Fundamental symmetry studies including the search for a permanent EDM in odd A radon isotopes and PNC in francium isotopes using RIBs from a UC2 production target are under development. An RFQ and variable energy DTL provide reaccelerated radioactive beams in the energy range from 0.15-1.8 A MeV for nuclear reaction studies of importance in explosive nucleosynthesis environments such as Novae and X-ray bursts. Most recently the DRAGON recoil separator was used to study the 23Mg(p,γ)24Al reaction, of critical importance in the transition between the Ne-Na and Mg-Al cycles. Since January 2007 the new Superconducting LINAC installed at ISAC-II has made nuclear reaction studies possible with radioactive beams at energies up to 5 A MeV for A < 30. The initial studies using exotic beams of halo nuclei included: a measurement of the two-halo neutron transfer reaction 1H(11Li, 9Li) 3H at 3 A MeV carried out using the active target detector MAYA brought to TRIUMF from GANIL, a study of halo effects in the scattering of 11Li on 208Pb at energies near the Coulomb barrier, and a study of the halo structure of 12Be studied via the 11Be(d,p) reaction. In 2009, the TUDA particle detector array was move to ISAC-II for astrophysically motivated studies of the 18F(p,α)15O and 21Na(p,α)18Ne reactions. The gamma-ray spectroscopy program at ISAC-II is centered on TIGRESS, a next generation array of high-efficiency segmented HPGe detectors with digital signal processing that is specifically designed to meet the challenges of experiments with high-energy radioactive ion beams. A number of auxiliary detectors are also under development for use with TIGRESS including: a DSSSD barrel for detecting charged particles SHARC, an array of neutron detectors DESCANT, and a recoil mass spectrometer EMMA. During the past year, the experimental studies included: the Coulomb excitation of 10Be and the first experiment with SHARC, a measurement of the 25Na(d,p)26Na reaction as part of a program to follow the evolution of shell structure of neutron-rich sd-shell nuclei. The potential for nuclear structure studies at ISAC-II will be greatly enhanced during the coming year with the installation of high-beta cavities and a charge state booster to provide radioactive beams up to 7 A MeV for A < 150. Recent highlights from the research programs at ISAC I and ISAC II will be presented together with an overview of future plans which include the construction of a 50 MeV, 500 kW superconducting e-linac to provide intense beams of neutron-rich nuclei via the photo-fission of actinide targets.
        Speaker: Gordon Ball (TRIUMF)
        Slides
      • 11:30 AM
        EURISOL – European ISOL facility for high-intensity exotic beams 30m
        Recently completed Design Study for EURISOL [1] – a European isotope-separation-on-line (ISOL) facility – aims at the construction of an accelerator-based ISOL system for producing exotic radioactive ion beams (RIBs) with intensities several orders of magnitude greater than those available today. EURISOL is intended to be complementary to FAIR – the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, currently planned in Germany. With high-power beams of protons producing highest intensities for a range of radioactive and exotic isotopes, EURISOL will provide a unique facility for European scientists. In this talk the main features of the planned facility and its potential impact on nuclear science and its applications will be reviewed. 1. http://www.eurisol.org/site02/index.php
        Speaker: Prof. Juha Aysto (University of Jyvaskyla)
        Slides
    • 12:00 PM 1:30 PM
      Lunch 1h 30m
    • 1:30 PM 5:30 PM
      Excursion
    • 5:30 PM 7:00 PM
      Poster session
    • 7:00 PM 8:00 PM
      ENSAR Presentation 1h
      Speaker: Mushin HARAKEH (GSI)
    • 8:00 PM 9:00 PM
      Dinner 1h

      Dinner served 20:00 - 20:15

    • 9:00 AM 11:00 AM
      Facility Talks III Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 9:00 AM
        The FAIR project 30m
        This presentation outlines the current status of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). It is expected that the actual construction of the facility will commence in 2011 as the project has raised more than one billion euro in funding. Outstanding research opportunities offered by the Modularized Start Version for all scientific FAIR communities from early on will allow to bridge the time until the completion of FAIR with a world-leading research program. FAIR will provide intense secondary beams of unstable Isotopes across the entire nuclide chart. Beam intensities exceed those available at existing rare-Isotope-beam facilities by several orders of magnitude and beam energies are variable up to more than 1GeV/u. A superconducting in-flight separator (Super-FRS) serves external stations and coupled storage cooler rings and in a later stage also an electron-ion collider. The novel instruments and experimental opportunities have attracted a large community of nuclear physicists addressing a broad research spectrum covering nuclear structure physics, nuclear astrophysics and studies of fundamental interactions and symmetries. Altogether 9 experimental programs are currently planned at the three branches of the Super-FRS. These programs are organized in the NuSTAR collaboration (Nuclear Structure, Astrophysics, and Reactions) with more than 700 participating scientists. The presentation will put special emphasis on this scientific branch of FAIR.
        Speaker: Mr Ingo AUGUSTIN (GSI)
      • 9:30 AM
        NSCL/FRIB - Michigan State University 30m
        Plans for FRIB at MSU C. Konrad Gelbke NSCL/FRIB Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321, USA Michigan State University has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to design and establish the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), a cutting-edge research facility to advance understanding of rare nuclear isotopes and the evolution of the cosmos. In this talk I will provide a high-level summary of the envisioned science program, the facility layout, the FRIB project status, and the planned user interfaces.
        Speaker: Prof. David Morrissey (NSCL)
      • 10:00 AM
        Present Status and Perspectives of RIKEN RIBF 30m
        I show present status and perspectives of RIBF “RI Beam Factory (RIBF)” through demonstrating recent results obtained and discussing physics programs to be promoted. RIBF is the world-class radioactive-isotope beam (RIB) facility, which is based on a new high-power heavy-ion accelerator complex [1] and a new in-flight fragment separator BigRIPS [2]. In 2007, RIBF started to deliver radioactive isotope beams. High performances and potentialities of this facility have been demonstrated by discovery of two new isotopes [3]. The accelerator system has been upgraded since 2007. Additional beam monitors have been installed to strengthen a beam diagnostic and to improve a transmission-efficiency. In 2008 maximum intensities achieved for 48Ca and 238U beams at 345A MeV were 175pnA and 0.3pnA, respectively. Based on the powerful 48Ca beam in 2008, the first spectroscopy experiments at BigRIPS/ZDS were performed for the island-of-inversion region as a DayOne experiment campaign in December, 2008. In 2009, light ion beams such as (polarized) deuteron and nitrogen were successfully accelerated up to 250A MeV. At a DayTwo campaign at the end of last year, an intensity of 238U beam was achieved to be 0.8 pnA due to a newly installed 28 GHz SC-ECR ion source. Concerning experimental devices, ZeroDegree Spectrometer (ZDS) [4] and SHARAQ spectrometer [5] have been served for scientific programs since 2008 and 2009, respectively. Other devices [6], SAMURAI spectrometer and SCRIT system [7], will be ready for experiments in 2011. An rf ion-guide gas-catcher system SLOWRI [8], Rare-RI Ring dedicated for mass measurement [9], IRC-to-RIPS BT line for multi-use capability [6] are to be funded in near future. References [1] Y. Yano, Nucl. Instr. Meth. B 261, 1009 (2007).. [2] T. Kubo, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B204 (2003) 97. [3] T. Onishi et al., J. Phys. Soc. Japan 77 (2008) 083201. [4] H. Sakurai, Nucl. Phys. A 805 (2008) 526c-532c. [5] T. Uesaka et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods B266 (2008) 4218-4222. [6] Technical information on experimental devices are found in <http://rarfaxp.riken.go.jp/RIBF-TAC05/> [7] M. Wakasugi, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 (2008) 164801. [8] M. Wada et al., Hyperfine Interactions 173 (2006) 153-163 [9] Y. Yamaguchi et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods B266 (2008) 4575-4578
        Speaker: Prof. Hiro Sakurai (RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-based Science)
        Slides
      • 10:30 AM
        A plan to construct a rare isotope accelerator facility in Korea 30m
        The Korean government announced in January 2009 a preliminary plan to construct a heavy ion accelerator facility for producing radioactive ion beams in the framework of a mega project called the International Science & Business Belt. Since then, a planning work for the construction of a heavy ion accelerator is underway supported by the government. The construction of this facility will be a cornerstone for basic science research in Korea. This facility which is tentatively referred to as KoRIA (Korea Rare Isotope Accelerator) is to be used for multipurpose research, including nuclear science, atomic, material & energy sciences, and bio-medical sciences. To produce the radioactive ion beams, both ISOL and In-flight fragmentation methods are being considered. Post-acceleration of the radioactive ion beams may be done up to unprecedentedly high energies. The conceptual design study is expected to start soon, and the present status of the planning will be presented.
        Speaker: Prof. Seung-Woo Hong (Sungkyunkwan University)
        Slides
    • 11:00 AM 11:30 AM
      Coffee 30m
    • 11:30 AM 12:50 PM
      Future RIB Facilities Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 11:30 AM
        The new intermediate energy in flight facility ACCULINNA-2 20m
        The new project of the in-flight fragment separator ACCULINNA-2 [1] at U-400M cyclotron in Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reaction, JINR is proposed as the third generation of the Dubna Radioactive Ions Beams (DRIBs-1) complex [2]. It is expected to be a more universal and powerful instrument in comparison with existing separator ACCULINNA [3]. The beam intensity should be increased by factor 10-15, the beam quality greatly improved and the range of the accessible secondary radioactive beams broadened up to Z~20. The new separator will provide RIBs in the broad range of energies 5÷50 AMeV – the lowest energy range which is attainable for in-flight separators. Extensive research program which could be carried out at this facility and its operating principle are described. The new ACCULINNA–2 separator is planed to be constructed during the years 2010-2016.
        Speaker: G. Kaminski (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia and Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Krakow, Poland)
        Slides
      • 11:50 AM
        The ALTO facility for the production of rare nuclei 20m
        The ALTO facility (Accélérateur Linéaire et Tandem d'Orsay) at Institut de Physique Nucléaire d'Orsay is ready for operation. The aim of this facility is to provide neutron rich isotope beams for both nuclear physics study (away from the valley of stability) and developments dedicated to next generation facilities such as SPIRAL2. The neutron rich isotopes are produced by photofission of 238U induced by the 50 MeV electrons from the linear accelerator. The isotopes coming out of the fission target effuse towards an ion source to form a beam that is analyzed through the on line separator PARRNe. Additional experimental beam lines are currently under construction. First experimental results will be presented.
        Speaker: Dr Christophe LAU (IPN Orsay)
        Slides
      • 12:10 PM
        SPIRAL 1 upgrade: status and perspectives for physics 20m
        Since 2001, SPIRAL at GANIL has been delivering radioactive ion beams of unique intensity and purity for physics experiments. Using projectile fragmentation on a graphite target and ionization in an ECR ion source via a cold transfer passage, mostly isotopes of gases lighter than Xe and fragments of volatile molecules such as O and F were post-accelerated. During the past year, a project was formed to upgrade the present facility with a 1+ to n+ charge breeding system, thus permitting the use of more versatile 1+ sources for extending the range of elements available for post-acceleration. Numerous physics projects based on the potential new capabilities of SPIRAL 1 were recently formulated in the form of letter of intents, attesting of the scientific relevance of such upgrade. This contribution will present the status of the upgrade, its positioning with respect to the SPIRAL 2 production capabilities and physics objectives.
        Speaker: Dr Pierre Delahaye (GANIL)
        Slides
      • 12:30 PM
        THE MYRRHA ADS PROGRAMME IN BELGIUM 20m
        Since 1995, SCK•CEN has been studying the coupling of a proton accelerator, a windowless liquid Lead-Bismuth spallation target and a Lead-Bismuth cooled, sub-critical fast core. The study was first performed in collaboration with Ion Beam Applications (IBA, Louvain-la-Neuve) in the frame of the ADONIS project (1995-1997). ADONIS was a small irradiation facility, based on the ADS concept, having a dedicated objective to produce radioisotopes for medical purposes and more particularly 99Mo as a fission product from highly enriched 235U fissile targets. The ad-hoc scientific advisory committee recommended extending the purpose of the ADONIS machine to become a Material Testing Reactor (MTR) for material and fuel research, to study the feasibility of transmutation of the minor actinides and to demonstrate at a reasonable power scale the principle of the ADS. The project, since 1998 named MYRRHA, has then evolved to a larger installation. MYRRHA today is conceived as a flexible fast spectrum irradiation facility, able to work as an Accelerator Driven System (subcritical mode) and in critical mode. In this way, MYRRHA will allow fuel developments for innovative reactor systems, material developments for GEN IV systems, material developments for fusion reactors, radioisotope production for medical and industrial applications and industrial applications, such as Si-doping. MYRRHA will also demonstrate the ADS full concept by coupling the three components (accelerator, spallation target and subcritical reactor) at a reasonable power level to allow operation feedback, scalable to an industrial demonstrator and allow the study of efficient transmutation of high-level nuclear waste. MYRRHA consists of a proton accelerator with a proton energy of 600 MeV and a design intensity of 4 mA, coupled to a liquid Lead-Bismuth Eutectic spallation neutron source. Apart from the experimental and irradiation possibilities in the subcritical reactor, the MYRRHA proton accelerator on its own can be used as a supply of proton beams for a number of experiments. In order to explore new research opportunities offered by the accelerator, a pre-study was initiated within the framework of the “Belgian Research Initiative on eXotic nuclei” (BriX) network of the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme of the Belgian State. This study is investigating unique possibilities for fundamental research using high-intensity proton beams with a fraction of the full beam during ADS operation (up to 200 µA). An interesting approach for fundamental research using the 600-MeV proton accelerator is the installation of an Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL@MYRRHA) facility with a ruggedized target-ion source system, which is able to provide intense low-energy Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) for experiments requiring very long beam times (up to several months). This will open unique opportunities for RIB research in various scientific fields, which is complementary with the activities at other existing and future facilities. In a second phase, when the MYRRHA reactor will run as a stand-alone critical reactor, the full proton-beam intensity might be used for ISOL@MYRRHA or other applications. MYRRHA is foreseen to be in full operation by 2024 and it will be operated in the first years as an ADS.
        Speaker: Dr Lucia Popescu (Centre d'Etude de l'Energie Nucl. (SCK-CEN))
        Slides
    • 12:50 PM 2:30 PM
      Lunch 1h 40m
    • 2:30 PM 4:30 PM
      Fusion Reactions and Synthesis of Heavy and Superheavy Nuclei Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 2:30 PM
        To fuse or not to fuse: That is the question 30m
        Fusion reactions provide an avenue for extending the periodic table creating nuclei, powering the stars and in the near future, solution of the energy problem. The fusion of complex (composite) nuclei is governed by a delicate balance between the attractive nuclear and repulsive Coulomb interactions. Detailed experiments made in the last three decades have shown that the fusion process cannot be understood as a simple barrier penetration by a structureless object with a potential depending only on the distance between the centers of the colliding systems. The associated tunneling probability was shown to be extremely sensitive to the plasticity of the intrinsic structure that can evolve during the process and to the interplay of the many open and virtual channels, whose amplitudes may be tuned by varying the beam energy and/or choosing different projectile-target combinations. Thus the theoretical tool to conceptually understand the modification of barrier(s) towards fusion due the coupling of direct reactions to the elastic channel is a coupled channel approach. To obtain a complete understanding of fusion process necessitates also the investigation of the associated direct channels. Short-lived Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) with weak binding, unusual neutron/proton asymmetry and extended spatial distributions (halos) provide a new vista to probe such a multidimensional tunneling. The experimental conditions for measuring the fusion cross sections using low intensity RIB combined with the need to identify a complete amalgamation of project and target (complete fusion) made these measurements challenging. The role of exotic structures on the tunneling process and its interconnectivity with other open channels especially coupling to unbound states (breakup) and transfer channels have been pursued mainly using beams of 6,8He, 9Li, 11Be. Such studies have focused mainly on light ion beams as they show a large variety of exotic structures as compared to heavier nuclei. The coupling to states in the continuum in such nuclei is also being used to study open quantum systems and the effect of dechorence to describe nuclear reactions. Studies of the tunneling of composite objects are also of fundamental interest in molecular processes and transport in nanodevices In this talk after a brief historical overview of the major stepping stones of fusion with stable beams, we will review the recent status of the field and our present understanding of fusion with radioactive ion beams and discuss perspectives in this field.
        Speaker: Dr Navin ALAHARI (Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM - CNRS/IN2P3, Caen, France)
      • 3:00 PM
        Present and future studies of Superheavy Nuclei 30m
        The production and spectroscopic study of the heaviest elements has always been a central theme of nuclear physics. In recent years, a wealth of new data has been produced, both in terms of new elements (up to Z=118 [1]) and in detailed spectroscopic studies of nuclei with masses above 240 [2]. Such studies provide data concerning nuclear parameters such as masses, decay modes, half-lives, moments of inertia, single-particle properties, etc., in systems with the highest possible number of protons. The main focus of current experiments is the search for the next closed proton- and neutron- shells beyond the doubly magic 208Pb. This search can be made directly, by producing nuclei in the region of interest (Z>112 and N>176), or indirectly through the study of lighter deformed nuclei where the orbitals of interest at sphericity are active at the Fermi surface. The advent of next-generation radioactive beam facilities will begin to provide reasonably intense beams of exotic nuclei. Whilst the intensities are not expected to be at the level used in current stable beam facilities, the beams still offer a opportunity to extend studies of superheavy nuclei. Neutron-rich beams will provide a method to populate isotopes not accessible by any other means. The use of more symmetric reactions will allow nuclei in the region of 254No to be populated at higher spin and excitation energy than currently possible. New opportunities to study reaction dynamics with exotic neutron-rich beams will also provide interesting data. The use of deep inelastic collisions with neutron-rich beams may also be of interest. Examples of recent highlights in heavy element studies with stable beams, along with the opportunities provided by future facilities to extend these studies will be presented. [1] Yu.Ts. Oganessian et al., Phys. Rev. C 74, 044602 (2006). [2] R.-D. Herzberg and P.T. Greenlees, Prog. Part. Nucl. Phys. 61, 674 (2008).
        Speaker: Dr Paul GREENLEES (University of Jyväskylä)
        Slides
      • 3:30 PM
        Sub-barrier fusion of 6He + 208Pb 20m
        During the last years there have been an increasing interest in understanding the process of sub-barrier fusion induced by halo nuclei. The fusion probability is largely affected by two main features, the extended density distribution and the weak binding energy of these exotic systems. In addition to this, one and two neutron transfer can also play an important role in the dynamics of the fusion process. Sub-barrier fusion of 6He was studied in [1, 2, 3] but no clear signature of fusion enhancement was found. This picture is consistent with the observation of large yields of alpha particles [4] which could be attributed only to neutron transfer (incomplete fusion) and projectile breakup. However in a recent measurement [5], a large enhancement of the fusion channel was observed in the scattering of 6He+206Pb at deep sub-barrier energies. The authors explained their finding using a sequential neutron transfer mechanism [6] that increases the fusion probability and is able to reproduces the data. To clarify the situation we have performed a new measurement of the fusion cross-sections for the system 6He + 206Pb, in the range of energies 14-18 MeV (Lab) using the target activation technique. The experiment was performed at the RIB facility of the Cyclotron Research Center (UCL) at Louvain-la Neuve (Belgium). The irradiated targets were analyzed in the Detector Laboratory at the University of Huelva (Spain). The details of the experimental method and the new fusion data will be presented and discussed. References [1] N. Keeley, R. Raabe, N. Alamanos and J.L. Sida, Prog.Part.Nucl.Phys. 63,(2009) 396. [2] J.F.Liang and C.Signorini, Int.J.Mod.Phys. E14,(2005) 1121. [3] R. Raabe et al., Nature (London) 431, (2004) 823. [4] J.J. Kolata, Eur. Phys. J. A 13, (2002) 117. [5] Yu.E. Penionzhkevich, V.I. Zagrebaev, S.M. Lukyanov and R. Kolpakchieva, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, (2006) 162701. [6] V.I. Zagrebaev, Phys. Rev. C 67, (2003) 061601.
        Speaker: Dr Ismael Martel Bravo (University of Huelva, Spain)
      • 3:50 PM
        Heavy and superheavy nuclei in covariant density functional theory 20m
        The questions of the existence limits and the properties of shell-stabilized superheavy nuclei have been a driving force behind experimental and theoretical efforts to investigate such nuclei. Unfortunately, theoretical predictions for superheavy nuclei differ considerably. In such a situation, heavy nuclei of actinide region play a role of testing ground for many theoretical approaches. Systematic study of these nuclei allows to put the error bars on theoretical description of the properties of superheavy nuclei. The present status of our understanding of heavy and superheavy nuclei within covariant density functional theory will be presented. I will concentrate on several aspects which define the shell structure and the stability of superheavy nuclei, such as (i) single-particle degrees of freedom, (ii) role of pairing, and (iii) the fission barriers. Single-particle degrees of freedom define the shell structure. Thus, the differences in model description of the single-particle energies are important when extrapolating to superheavy nuclei. Following our initial analysis of the single-particle spectra in a few actinide nuclei [1], the systematic analysis of the accuracy of the description of the energies of deformed quasiparticle states has been carried out in relativistic Hartree-Bogolibov (RHB) approach in rare-earth and actinide regions [2] with the goal to better understand the accuracy of the extrapolation of single-particle energies to superheavy nuclei. Impact of particle-vibration coupling on the single-particle structure of superheavy nuclei [3] will also be discussed. Special attention will be paid to self-consistency effects [4]. The fission barriers play an important role in the physics of heavy and superheavy nuclei; they are intimately connected with the existence and stability of superheavy nuclei. The role of treatment of pairing on the fission barriers has been investigated and new results were obtained [5]. The RHB and RMF+BCS calculations show that calculated fission barrier heights substantially depend on employed pairing force and treatment of pairing window even in the case when the pairing strengths are adjusted to the same value of the pairing gap at the ground state. The consequences of a different treatment of pairing for the stability of superheavy nuclei will be discussed. In addition, we performed systematic study of the impact of triaxiality on the fission barrier height [6]; in many cases it substantially decreases the fission barrier. This work has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under the grant DE-FG02-07ER41459 [1] A.V.Afanasjev, T.L.Khoo, S.Frauendorf, G.A.Lalazissis, and I.Ahmad, Phys. Rev. C67, 024309 (2003). [2] S.A. Shawaqfeh and A.V.Afanasjev, in preparation [3] E. Litvinova and A.V. Afanasjev, in preparation [4] A.V. Afanasjev and S.Frauendorf, Phys. Rev. C 71, 024308 (2005). [5] S. Karatzikos, A.V. Afanasjev, G.A. Lalazissis, and P.Ring, submitted to Physics Letters B and arXiv: 0909.1233[nucl-th] [6] H. Abusara and A.V.Afanasjev, in preparation
        Speaker: Prof. Anatoli Afanasjev (Mississippi State University, USA)
      • 4:10 PM
        Temperature evolution of the GDR width and Jacobi shape transitions in hot rotating 88Mo nuclei 20m
        The study of the properties of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) at high temperature and angular momentum is one of the central topics in nuclear structure as it provides insight into the behavior of nuclei under extreme conditions. The wealth of experimental data on this subject covers in most cases an interval of temperatures up to 2.5 MeV and is mainly based on the study of the GDR gamma-decay from fusion-evaporation reactions. These data have been shown to provide an important testing ground for the theoretical models. In particular, the change of the GDR width with angular momentum and temperature reflects the role played by quantal and thermal fluctuations in the damping of the giant vibrations. Certain nuclei are expected to exhibit very exotic behavior – the Jacobi shape transition. This phenomenon is predicted as an abrupt change from an oblate shape at the so called critical value of spin to triaxial and to more elongated shapes, and finally undergoes scission. First results from the experiment performed in LNL Legnaro aiming at investigating the spin and temperature evolution of the 88Mo nucleus as well as the GDR width at high temperature will be presented. The 48Ti beam at 300, 450 and 600 MeV bombarded 40Ca target producing 88Mo compound nucleus at temperatures 3, 3.8 and 4.5 MeV respectively. The coupled GARFIELD and HECTOR detector arrays were used, which allowed to measure high-energy gamma rays, charged particles, evaporation residua and fission fragments.
        Speaker: Mr Michał Ciemała (Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN Krakow)
        Slides
    • 4:30 PM 5:00 PM
      Coffee 30m
    • 5:00 PM 6:10 PM
      Dynamics and Thermodynamics Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 5:00 PM
        Even-odd effects in multifragmentation products 30m
        We discuss about the origin of the even-odd staggering observed in the yields of multifragmentation products. The observed fine structure agrees well with the fluctuations of the lowest particle threshold as a function of neutron and proton number. The structure is not consistent with the fluctuations of the binding energies. We take this experimental observation as an indication that primary fragments produced in multifragmentation are mostly found in excited states from which a sequential decay originates. The production of the finally observed cold intermediate-mass fragments directly in their ground state seems to be weak. Our study confirms the important role of the deexcitation process in almost all nuclear reactions. We focus our attention particularly on multifragmentation reactions, where sequential decay strongly influences the yields of light fragments, which are often used to extract information on the nature of hot nuclear matter.
        Speaker: Dr Maria Valentina Ricciardi (GSI)
      • 5:30 PM
        Testing the behavior of neutron-rich systems away from normal density 20m
        Heavy Ion Collisions (HIC) represent a unique tool to probe the in-medium nuclear interaction in regions away from saturation. We present a selection of new reaction observables in dissipative collisions (10-50 MeV/u) particularly sensitive to the low-density part of the symmetry term of the nuclear Equation of State (Iso-EoS). In particular, we will discuss the Isospin Equilibration Dynamics. At low energies this manifests via the recently observed Dynamical Dipole Radiation, due to a collective neutron-proton oscillation with the symmetry term acting as a restoring force. At higher beam energies Iso-EoS effects will manifest through isospin diffusion between projectile and target and Imbalance Ratio Measurements, in particular in correlation with the total kinetic energy loss. At higher beam energies (above 100 Mev/u) suitable observables, such as the isotopic content of particle and meson emission and collective flows, allow one to test the Iso-EoS at high density.
        Speaker: Dr Maria Colonna (INFN-LNS)
        Slides
      • 5:50 PM
        DYNAMICAL DIPOLE MODE IN FUSION HEAVY-ION REACTIONS 20m
        An experimental overview [1-6] on an interesting feature of dipole excitation in heavy-ion collisions, the dynamical dipole mode, predicted to occur between interacting ions with a large charge asymmetry will be presented. In a campaign of experiments where the same compound nucleus in the 132Ce region was probed through different charge asymmetry entrance channels, a larger gamma-ray emission from the more charge asymmetric channel was evidenced, in the Giant Dipole Resonance energy range. The beam energy dependence of this extra gamma yield was extracted by comparing the results obtained at different beam energies [2-5]. The first angular distribution data taken at Elab= 16 MeV/nucleon support its prompt dynamical nature [2,3]. Our data [2-5] are compared with theoretical calculations performed within a BNV transport model and based on a collective bremsstrahlung analysis of the entrance channel reaction dynamics [7] and with recent data [6] obtained for compound nuclei in the same mass region but formed through smaller entrance channel charge asymmetry. Using the prompt dipole radiation as a probe and employing radioactive beams, new possibilities for the investigation of the symmetry energy at sub-saturation density are foreseen and will be discussed [5]. As a fast cooling mechanism on the fusion path, the prompt dipole radiation could be of interest for the synthesis of superheavy elements through hot fusion reactions. The entrance channel charge asymmetry could provide a way to cool down the hot fusion paths, so ending up with a larger survival probability. To shed light in this direction and to study if pre-equilibrium effects survive in heavier systems, we extended our study to the 192Pb compound nucleus, formed at an excitation energy of 232 MeV, by using the 40Ca + 152Sm and 48Ca +144Sm reactions at Elab= 440 MeV and 485 MeV, respectively. Preliminary results of this measurement, done with the aim to search for the dynamical dipole mode in both fusion-evaporation and fusion-fission events for the first time in this mass region, will be presented. References [1] S. Flibotte et al., Phys. Rev. C77 (1996)1448 [2] D. Pierroutsakou et al, Eur. Phys. J. A17. (2003) 71 [3] D. Pierroutsakou et al., Phys. Rev. C71 (2005) 054605 [4] B. Martin et al., Phys. Lett. B664 (2008) 47 [5] D. Pierroutsakou et al., Phys. Rev. C 80 (2009) 024612 [6] A. Corsi et al., Phys. Lett. B 679 (2008) 197 [7]V. Baran et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 87(2001)182501 [8] V. Baran et al., Phys. Rev. C79 (2009) 021603(R).
        Speaker: Dr Rosetta Silvestri (Universita degli Studi diNapoli "Federico II" -Universita & INFN, Napoli)
        Slides
    • 6:10 PM 6:55 PM
      Poster Prize Talks Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 6:10 PM
        Radioactive ISOL beam production for SPIRAL 2 15m
        The future facility SPIRAL 2 at GANIL aims at producing radioactive isotopes using not only neutron induced fission from high density UCx target, but from other nuclear reactions such as deep inelastic transfer, fusion evaporation, etc [1]. The different intensity estimates for some of the beam that should be available at the start of SPIRAL 2 and their extrapolation to nominal operation conditions will be presented during the meeting together with the method adopted for calculating the in-target yield estimates, for evaluating diffusion and effusion losses, ionization, charge breeding and post-acceleration efficiencies. [1] White Book of SPIRAL 2
        Speaker: Ms Hanna Franberg-Delayahe (GANIL)
      • 6:25 PM
        Introduction to Laser Spectroscopy at the TRIGA-SPEC Facility 15m
        On-line laser spectroscopy allows us to study the nuclear ground-state properties of short-lived exotic isotopes by measuring their hyperfine structure and isotope shifts. The properties that can be extracted from this are the nuclear spin, the magnetic moment, the spectroscopic nuclear quadrupole moment, and the change in the mean-square nuclear charge radii between isotopes. Experimental data can be determined with high precision and the nuclear parameters can be extracted in a nuclear-model free way. Collinear laser spectroscopy has played an important role in obtaining hyperfine structures and isotope shifts of short-lived isotopes and is still a versatile tool for the exploration of long isotopic chains reaching far from the valley of nuclear stability. At the TRIGA research reactor at the University of Mainz a collinear laser spectroscopy experiment is currently being installed, which will allow us to study short-lived fission products created by neutron induced fission of, e.g., 249Cf near the reactor core. A gas-jet transport system will be employed to guide the nuclei from the production site close to the nuclear reactor core to an ECR ion source, where ion beams of a large variety of elements including refractory elements will then be produced and after mass separation be guided to the TRIGA-Laser experiment. We will present the technical outline of the experiment, show the results of first beam line performance tests with a surface ion source and report on first specification measurements by laser spectroscopy on a fast beam of stable Rb atoms.
        Speaker: Dr Christopher Geppert (Universität Mainz)
        Slides
      • 6:40 PM
        β-decay and Coulomb excitation of neutron-rich Mn and Fe isotopes at ISOLDE 15m
        The first hint for onset of deformation south of 68Ni came from a beta decay experiment on 64,66Mn at ISOLDE back in 1999 [1]. This experiment was possible thanks to the availability of the selective Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source. In the ten years since then, much structural information has been obtained on radioactive neutron rich isotopes in this region. In this contribution a short summary will be given of recent discoveries south of 68Ni. Now, 10 years later, a beta decay experiment was performed at ISOLDE on 60-68Mn with the LISOL tape station. Some of the high quality spectra will be shown and first results will be presented. A comparison will be made with recently obtained spectra from in-flight facilities. It will be shown that online a factor ten increase in yield could be achieved by further optimizing the laser ionization scheme of the neutron rich Mn isotopes with A>=65. The A=62 and 63 Mn beams were also post-accelerated at REX-ISOLDE and Coulomb excitation has been induced on 62,63Mn and 62Fe at the MINIBALL setup. The latter was possible by making use of the in-trap decay of the short lived 62Mn isotope. The combined results from Coulomb excitation and beta decay of the pure and intense 62Mn beam will be shown. [1] M. Hannawald et al., PRL 82, 1391 (1999)
        Speaker: Jarno Van de Walle (KVI, RUG, the Netherlands)
    • 8:00 PM 9:30 PM
      Conference Dinner 1h 30m
    • 9:30 PM 11:00 PM
      Jazz Band
    • 9:00 AM 10:20 AM
      Applications in other fields Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 9:00 AM
        Applications of radioactive beams 30m
        Advances in nuclear spectroscopy and nuclear reaction studies far from stability are more and more driven by the availability of intense and pure radioactive beams. However, also other disciplines profit of such beams, e.g. nuclear astrophysics, nuclear solid state physics, materials sciences and medical applications. The particular requirements to the radioactive beam properties will be discussed via some practical examples and future perspectives will be given.
        Speaker: Ulli Köster (Institut Laue Langevin)
        Slides
      • 9:30 AM
        Applications of RIBs in other fields 30m
        Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) is becoming the most promising and challenging topic for nuclear physics in the next decade. The facilities under development are tipically based on high intensity, high power particle accelerators. These are giving the opportunity to exploit the possibility to apply the production techniques even in other fields as the production of radioisotopes for advanced imaging and therapy in oncology and new radiopharmaceuticals. Moreover the study and cross section measurements for beta emitters production can be carried out. They can be of particular interest for the development of PET Online applications in hadrontherapy. It is feasible to get neutron sources in the framework of future RIBs facilities. They can offer the opportunity to develop dedicated application in medicine (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy), cultural heritage, material science and electronics. Moreover the availability of high power, high energy proton beams can open the possibility to study their application in the field of nuclear power production and waste transmutation. These possibilities will be presented and discussed together with some examples now under development.
        Speaker: Dr Giacomo Cuttone (INFN-LNS Catania)
      • 10:00 AM
        Use of RIB facilities for producing isotopes for cancer treatment by DαRT 20m
        Alpha particles are well known for their effectiveness against cancer cells. A few alpha particles passing through the cell DNA are sufficient to destroy it or to stop its multiplication. However, the short range (less than 0.1 mm) of naturally available alpha particles has so far prohibited their use as a practical therapeutic agent. Diffusing Alpha-emitters Radiation Therapy (DαRT) is a new modality for utilizing alpha particles for treating solid tumors which overcomes this limitation. Instead of inserting into a tumor a source emitting alpha particles, one inserts a source which releases short-lived alpha emitters. These disperse in the tumor by diffusion and by convection, emitting their alpha particles at a therapeutically significant distance (a few mm) from the source. Specifically, the parent isotope on the DαRT source is 224Ra (3.7 days half-life), which releases a sizable fraction of its progeny by its own alpha-decay induced recoil. 224Ra itself is being collected electrostatically onto the source after recoiling from a surface 228Th (1.9 years half-life) generator. An optimal method of producing such generators is through the collection of 228Fr, which results in a practical, longer lived 228Th generator fed by the intermediate isotope 228Ra (5.7 years half-life).
        Speaker: Prof. Itzhak Kelson (School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel)
        Slides
    • 10:20 AM 10:50 AM
      Coffee 30m
    • 10:50 AM 12:00 PM
      Shell Structure Far From Stability III Conference Hall

      Conference Hall

      • 10:50 AM
        Masses and Structure in Exotic Nuclei 30m
        The measurement of nuclear masses takes on enhanced importance in exotic nuclei far from stability where spectroscopic data will often be sparse. Masses and binding energies are integral quantities reflecting all nucleonic interactions. However, various differences and double differences of binding energies can isolate particular physics or specific interactions. There has been enormous progress in mass measurements in recent years, in particular with Penning traps and storage rings. This has spawned significant advances in understanding the relationship between masses and structure and, thereby, using measured masses to study structural evolution in nuclei, underlying shell structure, the development of collectivity, quantum phase transitions, and the microscopic interactions that drive this evolution. This talk will focus on a few of these recent developments, in particular using two nucleon separation energies and proton-neutron interaction strengths deduced from nuclear masses. Work supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-91ER-40609.
        Speaker: Richard Casten (Yale University)
        Slides
      • 11:20 AM
        Testing fundamental symmetries with Ra isotopes 20m
        Radium isotopes are of interest because they have advantageous properties searching for new physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. At KVI we are developing experiments to measure Atomic Parity Violation (APV) and Time Reversal Violation (TRV) using Ra ions and atoms, respectively. The APV measurements aim to improve on the accuracy of weak charge measurements. The sensitivity scales faster than the atomic number of the atom and therefore Ra ions may improve on the current best accuracy obtained with Cs. Limits on TRV can be obtained by searching for a permanent Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) also here Ra is orders of magnitude more sensitive than the current best limit on the EDM using Hg atoms. Current focus is on measuring atomic properties of Ra ions and atoms. We describe the production and trapping of Ra atoms and ions and the first measurements, such as isotope shifts and hyperfine interactions of excited states, which address the accuracy of theoretical calculations. The latter will be essential for the interpretation of the fundamental experiments.
        Speaker: Lorenz Willmann (University of Groningen/ NL)
      • 11:40 AM
        In-gas-cell laser spectroscopy of neutron-deficient 57-59Cu isotopes at LISOL 20m
        With a single proton outside the Z=28 shell closure and spanning the nuclear chart across several magic or quasi-magic neutron shells (N=20,28,40,50), the copper isotopes are ideal to study the evolution of magicity. Of particular interest is the isotope 57Cu with a single proton outside the controversial doubly-magic, N=Z=28, nucleus 56Ni. The earlier measurement of the magnetic moment of 57Cu by beta-NMR pointed towards a large breaking of the 56Ni core but attempts to confirm this measurement with the in-source laser spectroscopy technique at a hot-target ISOL facility has been unsuccessful. In a recent campaign, in-gas-cell laser ionization spectroscopy coupled to mass separation and nuclear decay identification has been performed for the first time at the LISOL facility (Belgium). The magnetic dipole moments of 58-59Cu was confirmed but that of 57Cu shows a large discrepancy from the published value. The new proposed value is in good agreement with empirical and theoretical predictions, supporting the magic nature of the 56Ni core in the ground state of 57Cu. The g-factor of the odd-odd 58Cu isotope is compared to empirical g-factors and points similarly to a configuration consistent with a magic 56Ni core. The success of this measurement opens also new possibilities for future gas-catcher facilities such as S3 at GANIL.
        Speaker: Dr Cocolios Thomas Elias (Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica)
        Slides
    • 12:00 PM 1:30 PM
      Lunch 1h 30m