EuPRAXIA - 3rd Collaboration Week and Symposium

Europe/London
University of Liverpool

University of Liverpool

Liverpool L69 7BX UK
Arnd Ernst Specka, Carsten Peter Welsch (Cockcroft Institute / University of Liverpool), Ralph Wolfgang Assmann (DESY)
Description

The 3rd EuPRAXIA Collaboration "Week" will take place on July 4th - 6th, 2018 in Liverpool, UK.

During the collaboration week, all participants will have the chance to meet and update each other on work progress. After a common half day on Wednesday morning, Wednesday afternoon and Thursday morning are reserved for individual work package (WP) meetings. There will be meetings across different WPs with common topics or interfaces. The final session will bring together again the whole collaboration, to discuss the outcomes from WP meetings, outstanding topics, problems and plans for the rest of the year.

As a highlight of the week our EuPRAXIA Symposium “Quantum Leap Towards the Next Generation of Accelerators” will take place on the third day of the Collaboration Week at the Liverpool Arena and Convention Centre. It is an integral part of the meeting and a unique opportunity to showcase our project to other research communities, policy makers, industry and a wider public. We will also use this event to promote our work with the EC and REA. There will be talks throughout the day, interactive demonstrations targeting high school and university students, as well as a dedicated industry exhibition. There will be ample opportunity for all participants to engage in wider discussions and discuss further collaborative research opportunities.

The event will be followed by a formal reception and dinner for the participants of the collaboration week 

 

The symposium is sponsored by:

  

Information
Poster
    • 10:00 10:30
      Registration (school children) 30m Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK
    • 10:30 10:45
      Symposium: Welcome - morning session Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK
      • 10:30
        Symposium: Welcome - morning session 10m
        Speaker: Prof. Carsten Peter Welsch (Cockcroft Institute / University of Liverpool)
    • 10:45 11:15
      Dream Beams 30m Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK

      Particle accelerators have been using pretty much the same technology since they were invented back in the 1930’s. The recent development of ultra-high intensity lasers and laser-driven plasma acceleration could change this trend forever. Dr Ceri Brenner, from the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, will share her experiences working with the world’s most powerful lasers in her talk Dream Beams at the Symposium Quantum Leap towards the Next Generation of Accelerators.

      Speaker: Dr Ceri Brenner (STFC)
    • 11:15 11:45
      A glimpse into the science and technology of attosecond light sources 30m Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK

      The femtosecond barrier was broken in 2001 when the first isolated, attosecond-duration (1as=10-18s) light pulses were generated by firing extremely intense laser pulses with carefully controlled waveforms into neon gas atoms. The origin of attosecond photon emission is the laser-driven acceleration of ionised electrons; an atomic-scale accelerator. The duration of those first attosecond pulses was 650as. The current world record stands at 53as. To put this into some kind of perspective, this is the time required for light to travel a distance equal to the size of the smallest virus.
      Attosecond light pulses provide scientists with the shortest controllable probes currently available. Such pulses, used as exquisitely sharp temporal “scalpels”, are allowing previously immeasurably fast dynamics in matter to be tracked and, potentially, even controlled at a fundamental level.
      Though a relatively new field, a growing number of groups around the world have established attosecond measurement capabilities in their laboratories, and are employing these powerful new tools to conduct ground-breaking experiments in atoms, molecules and condensed phase matter. Attosecond measurements have been made of photo-ionisation dynamics, multi-electron relaxation processes, and ultrafast nuclear rearrangements in molecules. The attosecond time-delays in photoemission from surfaces has been measured for the first time – effectively “timing the photoelectric effect” – and recently, attosecond control of the electrical and optical properties of dielectrics at optical frequencies has been demonstrated, with implications for PHz signal processing.
      Using the attosecond facilities in the Laser Consortium in the Physics Department as an exemplar, this talk will provide an accessible introduction to the science and technology behind the generation, characterisation and application of attosecond light pulses.

      Speaker: Prof. John Tisch (Imperial College London)
    • 11:45 12:15
      Probing the secret of life with accelerator driven light sources 30m Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK

      Life operates in a world governed by the second law of thermodynamics, which is sentence of decay disorder and death and we know that that is the fate of all living things. The interesting question is how do living things establish themselves and manage to put off their thermodynamic fate for so long? Life evolved at room temperature and the energy available in a room temperature environment, kT, is 6 terahertz (THz) where k is Boltzman's constant and 1 THz is an electromagnetic wave with a frequency of 10 12 Hertz and a wavelength of 300 microns. We thus expect that the biological organisation of living things will exploit THz radiation and clearly a way to investigate this would be to irradiate simple things, such as bacteria, with THz radiation and see what happens. Unfortunately there is a "THz gap" in the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation where we cannot make a powerful source of radiation. Laboratory sources can only generate about 100 microwatts of power, which isn't enough to do useful experiments. Fortunately electron accelerators are now becoming available that can generate tens of kilowatts of power in this frequency range and it is now becoming possible to study living things with this radiation. This lecture will give an account of some of the interesting results that are coming out of this research.

      Speaker: Prof. Peter Weightman (University of Liverpool)
    • 12:15 12:30
      Symposium: Closing remark - morning session Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK
      • 12:15
        Symposium: Closing remark - morning session 10m
        Speaker: Dr Ralph Wolfgang Assmann (DESY)
    • 12:30 14:30
      Lunch / industry exhibition / hands-on-experiments / school competition 2h Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK
    • 14:30 14:45
      Symposium: Welcome - afternoon session Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK
      • 14:30
        Symposium: Welcome - afternoon session 15m
        Speaker: Dr Arnd Ernst Specka
    • 14:45 15:15
      Industry opportunities in accelerator facilities 30m Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK

      Particle accelerators not only provide powerful research tools for the exploration of matter, or understanding the properties of materials at the atomic level, but they are also used to manage our health, ensure our security, advance our manufacturing capability, enable safer energy production and improve our environmental efficiency. Practical utilisation of particle accelerators is advancing and more applications are being pursued, with a remit to make such platforms more compact, simpler, combining functionality and adopting novel and more advanced accelerator technologies. My overview will highlight how particle accelerators in industry are currently utilised, giving examples of how such developments have been realised at accelerator facilities across Europe and also provide some indication for how future industrial applications are projected to evolve.

      Speaker: Dr Peter Mcintosh
    • 15:15 15:45
      Laser Technology in 2025 30m Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK

      The continued advancement of short pulse lasers with high average power is crucial for the development of important applications. There are several technologies being used in the next generation of lasers systems from more flash lamp technology to solid state diode pumped technology. Diode pumping has been identified at the CLF as the future route for increasing the repetition rate, and hence average power, of high power lasers. We describe the current performance achieved and what advances are expected in this field in the next decade that would enable a wide range of applications of high power lasers.

      Speaker: Dr Cristina Hernández Gómez (STFC)
    • 15:45 16:15
      Coffee break and discussion / industry exhibition 30m Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK
    • 16:15 16:45
      System integration in large scale research infrastructures 30m Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK
      Speaker: Dr Georg Korn (ELI-Beamlines)
    • 16:45 17:15
      Enabling new capabilities with laser plasma technology 30m Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK
      Speaker: Dr Paul Dumont (SourceLAB)
    • 17:15 17:30
      Symposium: Closing remark - afternoon session Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK
      • 17:15
        Symposium: Closing remark - afternoon session 15m
        Speaker: Prof. Carsten Peter Welsch (Cockcroft Institute / University of Liverpool)
    • 19:30 20:30
      Reception 1h Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK
    • 20:30 23:30
      Dinner 3h Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

      Kings Dock, Liverpool Waterfront L3 4FP UK
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