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CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication (OAI9)

Europe/Zurich
Graduate Institute & Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

Graduate Institute & Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

Maison de la paix Chemin Eugène-Rigot 2 & Chemin des Mines 9 1202 Geneva 46.222172, 6.148243
Description

The CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication (OAI9) will be  held at Geneva in June 17th-19th 2015

 

logo_oai8_2

Participants
  • Abby Clobridge
  • Ahmed Mohammed
  • Alain Monteil
  • Alessandra Tosi
  • Alexander Wagner
  • Alexandra Büttner
  • Alexandre Bourban
  • Alexis Rivier
  • Alma Swan
  • Amaury Bouvet
  • Andras Holl
  • Andrea Hacker
  • Andreas Rauber
  • Andrew Mwesigwa
  • Andrew Preston
  • Anne Gentil-Beccot
  • Anne-Katharina Weilenmann
  • Annette Kiefer
  • Antoinette Lemaire
  • Astrid van Wesenbeeck
  • Audrey Bellier
  • Babel Sarah
  • Benoit Erken
  • Benoit Pauwels
  • Bianca Kramer
  • Birgitta Hellmark Lindgren
  • Bram Luyten
  • Bryan Vickery
  • Béatrice Marselli Fuerer
  • Cameron Neylon
  • Carl Demeyere
  • Carlos Silva
  • Catherine Chimes
  • Catriona MacCallum
  • Cecile Lebrand
  • Celine Courtial
  • Chandima Gunadasa
  • Christian Gutknecht
  • Claus Grossmann
  • Clementina Fraticelli
  • Damian Pattinson
  • Daniel Mietchen
  • David Prosser
  • David Abreu
  • David Ball
  • Dimitri Donzé
  • Dirk Verdicchio
  • Dmitry Semyachkin
  • Dominique Blaser
  • Donna Okubo
  • Eelco Ferwerda
  • Elena Giglia
  • Eliane Blumer
  • Elin H. Frøshaug
  • Ellen Cole
  • Ellen Nordre Sayed
  • Eloy Rodrigues
  • Emilio Lorenzo
  • Erin McKiernan
  • Filomena Severino
  • Fiona Wright
  • Floriane Muller
  • Frank Manista
  • Frank Scholze
  • Frauke Gisela Ralf
  • Gabriella Padovan
  • Gaëlle Delavy
  • Gemma Batson
  • Geoffrey Bilder
  • Gernot Deinzer
  • Gilles Falquet
  • Hadiya Razouk
  • Hans de Brouwer
  • Haragobinda Baidya
  • Herbert Van de Sompel
  • Howard Ratner
  • Ian Rowlands
  • Ignace Deroost
  • Indira Yerramareddy
  • Inge Van Nieuwerburgh
  • Iryna Kuchma
  • Jaimee biggins
  • James Wright
  • Jan Krause
  • Jan Magnusson
  • Jan Melichar
  • Janne-Tuomas Seppänen
  • Jean-Blaise Claivaz
  • Jean-Claude Albertin
  • Jean-Yves Le Meur
  • Jens H. Aasheim
  • Jens Vieler
  • Jens Vigen
  • Jeremy Brackpool
  • Jeroen Bosman
  • Jiri Kuncar
  • Jochen Bihn
  • Joel Ranck
  • Johanna Lilja
  • Johnny Mariéthoz
  • Jon Treadway
  • Jonas Gilbert
  • Jonas Holm
  • Jose Martin
  • Joseph McArthur
  • Josh Brown
  • Jyrki Ilva
  • Kathryn Smith
  • Kristian Salcedo
  • Lambert Heller
  • Lars Bjørnshauge
  • Lars Holm Nielsen
  • Lars Wenaas
  • Laure Mellifluo
  • Laurence GAUVIN
  • Leroy Mwanzia
  • Lionel Walter
  • Lise McLeod
  • Lotta Svantesson
  • Lucy Amez
  • Ludmila Marian
  • Madeleine du Toit
  • Manon Velasco
  • Marco Tullney
  • Margaret Louise Fotland
  • Margit Kenzian
  • Maria José Lloret ALcañiz
  • Maria Romana Garruccio
  • Marie Fuselier
  • Marina Muilwijk
  • Mark MacGillivray
  • Martin Klein
  • Martin Moyle
  • Martin Persson
  • Medha Devare
  • Megan Hunt
  • Melissa Hagemann
  • Meryl Momente
  • Michael Neuroth
  • Michael Victor
  • Michelle Fotsy
  • Miguel Moreira
  • Mikael K. Elbæk
  • Mikhail Sergeev
  • Monica Roos
  • Myriam Benichou
  • Najla Rettberg
  • Nancy Graham
  • Neil Jacobs
  • Neil Stewart
  • Nenad Milosevic
  • Nicolas Rod
  • Nicolas Sartori
  • Nicole Bögli
  • Nielsen Michael
  • Nina Karlstrøm
  • Nora Schmidt
  • Paloma Marín Arraiza
  • Paola Castellucci
  • Paola Gargiulo
  • Patricia Herterich
  • Patricia Sleeman
  • Paul Ayris
  • Paula Callan
  • Pedro Principe
  • Peter Ballantyne
  • Peter Murray-Rust
  • Pierre-Yves Burgi
  • Regula Schatzmann
  • Richard Jones
  • Robert Peters
  • Ronald Snijder
  • Rory McNicholl
  • Ros Pyne
  • Ruben Verborgh
  • Ruedi Lindegger
  • Rupert Gatti
  • Salomé Rohr
  • Samantha Dulip Withanage Don
  • Samantha Jones
  • Sarah Barkla
  • sarah coombs
  • Sergey Parinov
  • Silke Weisheit
  • Silvia Arango-Docio
  • Simone Rosenkranz
  • Sonia Manaï
  • Sonmez CELIK
  • Sophie Forcadell
  • Stephanie Meece
  • Stine Marie Barsjø
  • Sue Gardner
  • Sufiet Erlita
  • Susan Reilly
  • Sybille Geisenheyner
  • Sylvia Biro
  • Sándor Kopácsi
  • Sébastien Uyttenhoef
  • Thanos Giannakopoulos
  • Thom Blake
  • Thomas Krichel
  • Thomas Zschocke
  • Thorsten Uehlein
  • Tibor Simko
  • Tobias Kuhn
  • Tom Demeranville
  • Tony Ross-Hellauer
  • Torsten Reimer
  • Tullio Basaglia
  • Tyler Walters
  • Victoria Tsoukala
  • Vinciane de Bergeyck
  • Vlastimil Krejčíř
  • Wolfram Lutterer
  • Xenia van Edig
  • Yves Corpataux
  • Zoumana Bamba
    • 08:15 09:00
      Registration Desk opens at 8:15 Graduate Institute

      Graduate Institute

    • 09:00 11:30
      Tutorials Graduate Institute

      Graduate Institute

      • 09:00
        T1-Institution as publisher: getting started 2h 30m T1

        T1

        Graduate Institute

        This tutorial is part of a number of sessions on the Institution as Publisher. The goal of the tutorial is to help interested librarians become Open Access publishers. The tutorial will start with a landscape overview and will use case studies from UCL press, Manchester University Press and Stockholm University Press. In a few hours, all the essential elements of academic publishing will be addressed: the workflow in publishing from manuscript submission to publication; the business plan; the technical infrastructure; funding models to sustain Open Access publishing; attracting authors to publish with the press.
        Speakers: Mr. Eelco FERWERDA , Mrs. Jaimee BIGGINS , Mr. Ronald SNIJDER
      • 09:00
        T2-OA Café, all you always wanted to know about open access but were afraid to ask 2h 30m T2

        T2

        Graduate Institute

        Following the success of this session in the OAI7 and OAI8 Workshops, we are pleased to offer again the chance to learn more about Open Access topics that you would like to understand further. We will present a session where you can mingle with various experts, ask them questions in a café-style setting and discuss issues in a very informal atmosphere. There will be time during the session for you to explore 4 or 5 different topics in which you are particularly interested. We will engage experts from across the spectrum in order to cover technical-, cultural- and policy-related issues. Come along to the Open Access Café, meet people, talk about Open Access -- and drink coffee, of course!
        Speaker: Ms. Alma SWAN
        Pictures
      • 09:00
        T3-ORCID Implementations and Workflows 2h 30m T3

        T3

        Graduate Institute

        "ORCID is already natively supported in many systems, and there are numerous stand-alone integrations to learn from. ORCID also offers a range of resources and guidance for new integrators. Whether you're trying to integrate into a single software system using the public API, or integrating a range of business systems using the member API, with the right information and support, it should be straightforward. Getting the technical side right is only the start though, and you'll need to make sure that your user community is informed, on board and ready to start claiming, using and sharing their ORCID IDs. Join technical and policy leads from ORCID for this tutorial to understand how the two aspects of ORCID integration - technical and social - can be planned in lockstep from the outset, and how you can ensure that your researchers get the best out of integration. Whether you're seeking to engage colleagues with an existing setup, or at the beginning of planning your implementation, we can point you to information and tools to help you, and by taking you through the whole process we aim to provide you with useful, relevant information whatever stage you have reached. Find out what others have done and are doing, find out what's available to help and hear more about our plans for the immediate future."
        Speakers: Mr. Josh BROWN , Mr. Rob PETERS
        Pictures
      • 09:00
        T4-Open Monograph Press: Publishing Open Access Books 2h 30m T4

        T4

        Graduate Institute

        This tutorial will explore the publishing platform OMP from an editorial and managerial point of view. OMP allows for most – but not all – workflows in digital book production and this workshop will investigate the platform’s flexibility as well as its limitations. There will be three main topics for discussion. The first will concern possible editing workflows and quality control. Depending on the scope of the publishing pursuit, OMP can accommodate various levels of quality control in manuscript production, such as peer-review and copy-edit. The second focus will lie on the question of resources needed for open-access book-publishing and how OMP factors into the sustainability of such an undertaking. The third focus will lie on what happens once the books are published. This includes front-end matters of the press, archiving, and distribution including discoverability and meta-data management. Participants will need a laptop and access to the internet. We will work in OMP as users of a test press. Logon information will be distributed once registration has closed.
        Speaker: Dr. Andrea HACKER
        Pictures
      • 09:00
        T5-Memento: Uniform and Robust Access to Resource Versions 2h 30m T5

        T5

        Graduate Institute

        The Memento protocol tightly integrates the Web of the Present and that of the Past, making it possible to seamlessly navigate between both. The protocol defines an interoperable approach to access versions of a resource in web archives or content management systems, such as wikis, by leveraging the URI of that resource and the datetime of the required resource version. The tutorial will cover: - Various aspects of the Memento protocol that meanwhile has been published as RFC 7089 - How Memento closely aligns with a widely used web resource versioning mechanism - How Memento plays a role in addressing link rot and reference rot, in general, and specifically, in scholarly communication - Memento tools
        Speaker: Mr. Herbert VAN DE SOMPEL (Los Alamos National Laboratory)
        Pictures
      • 09:00
        T6-Managing a Digitization Project 2h 30m T6

        T6

        Graduate Institute

        The tutorial aims at providing an introduction and a practical insight into the management of international digitization projects as well as the virtual unification of dispersed collections. The session will focus on workflows, rights management as well as quality standards. Both theoretical guidelines and practical experiences from two digitization projects will be presented. Within the scope of the first project “German Sales 1901-1945” (http://www.arthistoricum.net/themen/portale/german-sales/), a collaborative effort of Heidelberg University Library, the Kunstbibliothek der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin as well as the Getty Research Institute, 10.000 auction catalogues published between 1901 and 1945 in Germany, Switzerland and Austria, are located, digitized and made accessible online, for the first time enabling a full-text search over all sales catalogues of this period. The second international digitization project „Bibliotheca Laureshamensis – digital“ (http://bibliotheca-laureshamensis-digital.de/en/index.html), the Virtual Monastic Library of Lorsch, focuses on virtually reuniting around 300 manuscripts held in institution as far apart as Los Angeles and Bucharest. Both the challenges and the potential of these digital cultural heritage projects will be highlighted and discussed.
        Speaker: Mrs. Alexandra BÜTTNER
        Pictures
    • 11:30 12:30
      Lunch & Registration 1h Graduate Institute

      Graduate Institute

    • 12:30 12:45
      Opening Ceremony Graduate Institute

      Graduate Institute

      Conveners: Mr. Jens VIGEN , Prof. Margareta Baddeley
      Pictures
    • 12:45 13:30
      Opening Keynote - Beyond open access 45m Graduate Institute

      Graduate Institute

      We've made significant strides toward open access to research, and open access may one day be routine for almost all publicly funded research. In this talk I ask: what comes after open access? In what ways can we use computers and the network to change the way in which knowledge is constructed? I will describe several prototype user interfaces with the potential to radically change how we represent and collectively manipulate knowledge. By looking at these prototypes we can get clues as to what the research medium of the future will look like.
      Speaker: Dr. Michael Nielsen
      Pictures
      Slides
    • 13:30 15:15
      Plenary 1: Technical Session Graduate Institute

      Graduate Institute

      Technical Session

      Convener: Mr. Herbert Van de Sompel
      Pictures
      • 13:30
        Tech Session: Sustainable, Query-Able Access to Linked Data 35m
        The availability of Linked Data is no longer a bottleneck, but the availability of query-able access to that data is the Semantic Web's Achilles heel. As such, building stable applications on top of live data remains an unrealistic endeavor. In this talk, we look at a new way to publishing query-able Linked Data with low cost. With Triple Pattern Fragments, servers offer a limited interface that allows clients to execute complex queries efficiently. In particular, we will focus on the impact of this interface for machine-processable data of scientific publications, and its effects on longterm sustainability and preservation of this data.
        Speaker: Mr. Ruben VERBORGH (Universiteit Gent)
        Pictures
        Slides
      • 14:05
        Tech Session: A Decentralized Network for Publishing Linked Data 35m
        Making available and archiving scientific results is for the most part still considered the task of classical publishing companies, despite the fact that classical forms of publishing centered around printed narrative articles no longer seem well-suited in the digital age. In particular, there exist currently no efficient, reliable, and agreed-upon methods for publishing scientific datasets, which have become increasingly important for science. In this talk, I outline how we can design scientific data publishing as a Web-based bottom-up process, without top-down control of central authorities. I present a protocol and a server network to decentrally store and archive data in the form of nanopublications, a format based on Semantic Web techniques to represent scientific data with formal semantics. Such nanopublications can be made verifiable and immutable by applying cryptographic methods with identifiers called Trusty URIs. I show how this approach allows researchers to produce, publish, retrieve, address, verify, and recombine datasets and their individual nanopublications in a reliable and trustworthy manner, and I discuss how the current small network can grow to handle the large amounts of structured data that modern science is producing and consuming.
        Speaker: Mr. Tobias KUHN (ETH Zurich)
        Pictures
        Slides
      • 14:40
        Tech Session: Reference Rot and Link Annotation 35m
        Scholarly communication has undergone a dramatic shift from a paper-based to a web-based endeavor. Referencing sources, however, remains a fundamental part of the scholarly discourse. In today's articles we increasingly find references to scholarly assets such as software, ontologies, project websites, presentations, blogs, videos, tweets, etc. These resources exist on the web at large and are therefore immediately accessible via their HTTP URI but they are also subject to one of the most detrimental characteristics of the web: reference rot. In this talk I will cover two main topics: First, I will showcase our recent study that investigated the extent to which more than 3.5 million scholarly science, technology, and medicine (STM) articles published between 1997 and 2012 are subject to reference rot. We extrapolated our results to the scale of the entire STM article landscape in the United States and I will present our eye-opening findings. The second focus of my talk with be our proposed approach to mitigate this problem: link decoration. The idea is to enhance links to web at large resources with additional information such as a reference to an archival snapshot of the resource at the time of referencing and the datetime of linking while retaining the original reference to the web resource. In case the referenced resource becomes subject to reference rot, an interested party can either refer to the archival snapshot or use the original reference and the linking datetime to obtain the desired content from web archives. I will demonstrate how tools such as the Memento Time Travel extension for Chrome make these link decorations easily accessible for everyone.
        Speaker: Mr. Martin Klein (UCLA)
        Pictures
        Slides
    • 15:15 15:45
      Coffee 30m Graduate Institute

      Graduate Institute

    • 15:45 17:30
      Plenary 2: Barriers and Impact Graduate Institute

      Graduate Institute

      Conveners: Dr. David Prosser (Research Libraries UK) , Ms. Melissa Hagemann (OSI)
      Pictures
      • 15:45
        Barriers and Impact Session: Open Access Button 30m
        The Open Access Button is fueled by young people who experience frequent collisions with barriers to accessing research, and want to do something about it. I’ll discuss our current progress telling the stories of people who’ve been affected by these barriers and how we plan to tell them in future. I will also talk about what more needs to be done to tackle these barriers, and the impact that doing this could release.
        Speaker: Mr. Joseph McArthur
        Pictures
        Slides
      • 16:15
        Barriers and Impact Session: Early career researchers and OA, why and where 30m
        Working as a researcher and educator in Latin America for the last three years, I have seen the access problem first hand. Open access to the scientific literature is urgently needed worldwide, and it will take the support of scientists at all career levels to make it happen. Early-career researchers are in a position to be game changers, ushering in a new era of open science. However, many are concerned about the repercussions of publishing in open access journals on the visibility and impact of their work and their prospects for obtaining employment, grants, and tenure. I will tackle these concerns with a discussion of publishing options, self-archiving, and other ways in which early-career researchers can be open and successful. I will also discuss how those at more advanced career levels can support early-career researchers in being open, in particular by reforming researcher evaluation systems.
        Speaker: Dr. Erin McKiernan
        Pictures
        Slides
      • 16:45
        Barriers and Impact Session: Integrating Open Access and Wikimedia 30m
        Open Access and Wikimedia have a lot in common in terms of their overall goals, the technical and legal approaches and the communities involved. Many interactions thus exist between the two, but they have rarely been systematic. In this talk, I will outline a range of approaches to making these interactions more systematic, e.g. by integrating OA elements into Wikimedia workflows or policies or vice versa. Link to the OAI9 talk : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Daniel_Mietchen/Talks/OAI9
        Speaker: Dr. Daniel Mietchen
        Pictures
    • 18:00 21:00
      Share your drink - Social event 3h Uni Mail (University of Geneva)

      Uni Mail (University of Geneva)

      Wednesday 17th the traditional "drink sharing'" will take place in form of "share an apero". The event will take place in the main hall of the Uni Mail building (University of Geneva). This aperitif is a unique chance to network with your workshop colleagues and to bring along some special drinks representing your region or your country. Following the aperitif participants are suggested to gather in groups and "land" in one of the many Geneva restaurants for dinner.
      Pictures
    • 08:15 09:00
      Registration Desk opens at 8:15 45m Campus Biotech

      Campus Biotech

    • 09:00 11:00
      Plenary 3: Open Science workflows, CHORUS and SHARE Campus Biotech

      Campus Biotech

      Convener: Dr. Neil Jacobs (JISC)
      • 09:00
        CHORUS and SHARE Session: CHORUS Advancing Public Access to Research 40m
        Public Access mandates are popping up across the globe. How can publishers and societies help authors comply with these mandates while reducing the administrative burden for them? The not-for-profit CHORUS membership organization enables free access to articles reporting on funded research; leverages existing infrastructure for cost-effective public-access solutions for publishers and is available at no extra cost to funders - preserving funds for research. CHORUS provides monitoring services complementary to funder plans and optimized search results through common search tools and a CHORUS application; and directs the public to official journal sites where they find research in context with additional tools and correction/retraction information. This session will explore how the not-for-profit CHORUS organization is helping researchers, funders, librarians, and university research offices address these issues.
        Speaker: Mr. Howard Ratner (CHORUS)
        Pictures
        Recordings
        Slides
      • 09:40
        CHORUS and SHARE Session: Opening up research infrastructures and workflows in higher education 40m
        Part of opening up science research is opening up information and data about its processes, products, and management. It is difficult today to track the release of new research objects (e.g. data, papers, records, notes, software), particularly from a specific research project. It is also difficult to ascertain the research outcomes being produced from a given sponsored research program or from a certain interdisciplinary area of research at a university. The Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) is a North American higher education community initiative aimed at optimizing the infrastructure, workflows, and policies involved in identifying, discovering, and re-using research output. Its goal is maximizing the impact of research in society through open data and information about research activity. SHARE is developing services and technologies to improve openness, beginning with SHARE Notify, its notification service of research release events. SHARE Notify and plans for future development will be discussed in this session.
        Speaker: Dr. Tyler Walters (Tyler Walters, Dean, University Libraries, Virginia Tech USA, and Director, SHARE)
        Pictures
        Recordings
        Slides
      • 10:20
        CHORUS and SHARE Session: The good, the open and the efficient: changing research workflows and the need to move from Open Access to Open Science 40m
        Science is in transition. If all goes well, the transition is towards more open, efficient and honest/reproducible practices. Libraries should move with this change by supporting open science instead of just open access. Building on their successful project "101 innovations in scholarly communication" Jeroen Bosman and Bianca Kramer present their interpretations of what is going on and can be expected in the six phases of the research cycle. They have tested their hypothetical workflows and show how real, day-to-day research workflows are changing from traditional to modern, innovative and experimental. These changes are reflected in tools and sites people use in various phases of that workflow. They might for example change from Web of Science  → SPSS → Word+Endnote → Nature → ResearcherID → Impact Factors to Sparrho → ROpenScience+IPythonNotebooks → WriteLateX+Docear → The Winnower → Kudos → Publons+PubPeer. The way new generations of researchers work affects how information will be discovered, re-used, created, shared, communicated and assessed. There are huge opportunities for libraries to contribute and work with the research community, but only if they are well prepared!
        Speakers: Mrs. Bianca Kramer , Mr. Jeroen Bosman
        Pictures
        Recordings
        Slides
    • 11:00 11:30
      Coffee and Posters 30m Campus Biotech

      Campus Biotech

    • 11:30 12:30
      Posters session Campus Biotech

      Campus Biotech

    • 12:30 13:45
      Lunch 1h 15m Campus Biotech

      Campus Biotech

    • 13:45 15:30
      Plenary 4: Quality assurance Campus Biotech

      Campus Biotech

      Convener: Mr. Frank Scholze (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology)
      • 13:45
        Quality Assurance Session: Managing peer review at a large scale 35m
        Since its launch seven years ago, PLOS ONE has broken all records of growth and scale, becoming the largest journal in the world within just five years. The journal now receives thousands of submissions each month, and publishes over 600 new research articles every week. Despite this scale, the journal has managed to maintain a high standard of quality and rigour, by using a combination of internal editorial staff and volunteer academic editors and reviewers. Because of this success, the PLOS ONE model is now widely emulated across the publishing world, with many new players adopting PLOS ONE’s editorial policies wholesale. In this talk I will discuss how the journal manages to maintain quality at scale, and describe some of the challenges it faces as its scope and reputation continue to expand.
        Speaker: Mr. Damian Pattinson (PLOS)
        Pictures
        Recordings
        Slides
      • 14:20
        Quality Assurance Session: Peerage of Science - community driven initiative to improve peer-review 35m
        In this talk I will discuss the two "foundation stones" of the Peerage of Science. 1) Peer judgement and scoring of the peer reviews. The academic community, and the publishing industry, need to have the courage to say out loud that the quality of peer review contributions varies considerably, and so act accordingly. Only then can we begin to give academic recognition for excellence in peer review, and thereby drive improved quality assurance in academic publishing. 2) Concurrent, or at least shared, use of peer reviews by journals. The traditional, onerous and slow "slide down the journal prestige ladder" submission practice is not only wasteful, but harmful to scientists, and to science itself. Submission cascade systems are a step forward, but we can move further and make a single set of reviews available from a trustworthy source for any and all journals that want to use them.
        Speaker: Dr. Janne-Tuomas Seppänen (University of Jyväskylä)
        Pictures
        Recordings
        Slides
      • 14:55
        Quality Assurance Session: Publons - credit for peer review 35m
        In this presentation I will introduce Publons.com and describe how researchers use the service to build and verify their peer review record. I will also outline the tools we provide to help editors to find and contact reviewers. This is all part of our mission to speed up science by improving the peer review process.
        Speaker: Mr. Andrew Preston
        Pictures
        Recordings
        Slides
    • 15:30 16:00
      Coffee 30m Campus Biotech

      Campus Biotech

    • 16:00 17:45
      Breakout Groups Campus Biotech

      Campus Biotech

      Convener: Mr. Cameron Neylon
      • 16:00
        BG1 - Vision for institutional publishing 1h 45m BG1 (Campus Biothech)

        BG1

        Campus Biothech

        This Breakout Group will look at the new role of the Institution as publisher. Open Access allows the academy to re-assert its role in the dissemination of research outputs. Across Europe, there are examples of libraries taking on such a role in the establishment of Open Access University Presses. This is a new role for libraries. As a result, they are no longer simply the curator and cataloguer of knowledge. In this new environment, they can become producers of knowledge. This Breakout Group will take UCL (University College London) Press as an example of this development. It will look at business planning, advocacy to academic researchers and teachers, construction of the necessary infrastructure, and look at the 3-year plan of the UCL Press. The Breakout Group will end with a group discussion on the advantages of libraries taking on this role as publisher, and examine how university libraries who wish to become publishers should get started.
        Speaker: Dr. Paul AYRIS
      • 16:00
        BG2 - OA Policy 1h 45m BG2 (Campus Biothech)

        BG2

        Campus Biothech

        The session on Open Access policy will cover the current picture with respect to policies worldwide. We will present the data from the PASTEUR4OA project which has analysed all existing policies and analysed the aspects of policy that prove most effective. The project has also redesigned and rebuilt ROARMAP, the policy registry, and we will explain what that database now holds and how to register a new policy. There will be plenty of opportunity to discuss how best to formulate a policy and how to support it within an institution to maximise the amount of OA material collected.
        Speaker: Mrs. Alma SWAN
      • 16:00
        BG3 - Monitoring progress towards Open Access - tools for institutions, funders and other decision makers 1h 45m BG3 (Global Institute)

        BG3

        Global Institute

        Mikael K. Elbæk : Open Access Barometer to Open Access Indicator: lessons learned from the journey from idea, to a prototype to become instrumental for the Danish Open Access strategy. Monitoring a phenomenon has two remarkable effects; first it enables us to understand its properties and interact with the object or phenomenon in an informed way. The second effect (an interesting fact about social phenomenon such as publishing), is that when something is being monitored it tends to stimulate that which is being monitored. It was these facts that were the primary motivation for the Open Access Barometer – a pilot project funded by DEFF in 2013-2014. Firstly we simply didn’t know how much of the research coming out of Denmark were Open Access. Secondly we wanted to stimulate the growth of Open Access. The Danish Open Access Barometer project published a mapping of Open Access to Danish research articles and produced a prototype of a web-based Open Access barometer that through data harvest from all Danish universities could monitor the current state of Open Access (gold, green) daily and produce a number of interesting statistics including an Open Access-potential based on SHERPA/RoMEO data. In conclusion the project made a number of recommendations to monitoring Open Access and it was the hope that policy makers working with Open Access implementation would take up the idea of measuring Open Access – but we did not expect it. However, in June 2014 the Danish Minister of Higher Education and Science announced the Danish strategy for Open Access – with two remarkable goals of 80% Open Access in 2017 to publications published in 2016 and topping this by 2022 where the goal is that all (100%) publications published in 2021 should be Open Access. In order to achieve these ambitious goals a high-profile steering committee was put together. One of the key focus areas are: “The implementation of Open Access is to be monitored on an ongoing basis to ensure that all parties make a maximum effort to develop and disseminate free accessibility to Danish research findings”. To specify and ultimately measure Open Access a working group was set-up – that in its mandate was to build on the outcomes and experiences of the former DEFF project The Danish Open Access Barometer. By January 2015 this group produced a specification, price estimate and production plan for this Open Access monitor. The name was changed to Open Access indicator and will measure Open Access to Danish research from January 2016. The presenter of this contribution was project manager of the Danish Open Access Barometer and member of the Open Access indicator working group set-up by the Ministry of Higher Education and Science. Based on the Mikael K. Elbæk’s experience from this work the presentation will take you through: • Definitions – what to measures, when to measure - an imperfect compromise o Definitions are incredible important as they will form the way institutions will respond and in the end how they will organize their work • Analysis and visualisation – what kinds of statistics was decided to make public o In the first version and what kinds of statistics was found nice-to-have and postponed to a second version that may be initially specified in 2016 • Pros and cons of moving from an informal Open Access Barometer to an formal Open Access indicator that will be instrumental in the implementation of a national Open Access strategy o What can be done to overcome the bureaucracy and the imperfect compromise – will making all data openly available be a solution. • Perspectives on how can we establish a common framework across nation that enables us to monitor Open Access, compare and aggregate data. o There have been bibliometric studies, based on proposed statistical significant data, which suggest that Open Access levels are much higher then what can be measured with more domain knowledge and rigorous effort. o A discussion of what can be done to have a better basis for comparing nations Open Access-levels?
        Speakers: Mr. David Ball , Mr. Lars BJØRNSHAUGE , Mr. Mikael K. Elbaek
      • 16:00
        BG5 - Research data management services: what needs to be developed in the future? 1h 45m BG5

        BG5

        Campus Biotech

        Discussion on the management of research data doesn't have to break out, it already has. However, every institution has different needs and usually applies its own strategy. In this context, this breakout session seeks to further break out on RDM services by addressing questions such as: What services are already in place? What feedback can be collected from their users? What are the needs for new services in the future? What will they look like? If you have RDM services in your institution or plan to develop some, just drop by to share your thoughts on the topic.
        Speaker: Mrs. Eliane Blumer (UNIGE)
      • 16:00
        BG6 - Managing APC Payments 1h 45m BG6

        BG6

        Campus Biotech

        This session will cover the range of activities involved in management of APC payments, from negotiations with publishers and development of offset arrangements, to administration, monitoring and access. To provide some context, the session will outline a local perspective from a research-intensive university, Imperial College London, and a national perspective from Jisc in the UK. It will highlight approaches taken to managing APCs, issues and challenges and the impact of pre-payment deals. It will also describe national initiatives to improve APC payment processes and explore opportunities for greater efficiencies. By highlighting a variety of approaches and examples of best practice, and providing some context, the session will explore how collaborative, international approaches might deliver benefits for all participants. An output of the workshop session, to which all participants will contribute, are recommendations around international priorities and collaboration, offset arrangements, to administration, monitoring and access.
        Speakers: Dr. Frank Manista , Dr. Torsten REIMER
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    • 18:30 22:30
      Musee Ariana - Social event 4h Musee Ariana

      Musee Ariana

      The Grand Hall of the Ariana, the Swiss Museum of ceramics and glass will open its doors especially for us, and its collections will be available for a visit. After a greeting speech given by Dr. Paul Ayris, Chair of the OAI9 Organizing Committee, Workshop participants will be invited to enjoy the official welcome buffet http://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g188057-d195990-Reviews-Musee_Ariana-Geneva.html http://institutions.ville-geneve.ch/fr/ariana
    • 08:15 09:00
      Registration Desk opens at 8:15 45m Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

      Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

    • 09:00 10:30
      Plenary 5: Institution as publisher Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

      Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

      Convener: Dr. Paul Ayris (University College London)
      • 09:00
        Institution as publisher Session: Putting the Academy at the heart of scholarly publishing 30m
        In the 17th century, scholarly communication was typified by small groups of scholars who could openly discuss their findings and criticise others. In the 20th century, as science became more specialised and the number of researchers and research outputs increased dramatically, scholarly communication became commodified and industrialised. And as the system continues to grow in the 21st century so do concerns that publishing as traditionally practiced is not working effectively. Studies can’t be reproduced, there are increasing accounts of fraud and incompetence, and those who should have access to information can’t obtain it. Institutions have the opportunity to help change the system and provide a way to re-engage the human part of the process, to make it more social. To do this requires a transformation in the scholarly communication industry to one that is focused on services rather than commodities, and on communities rather than individuals. Central to this system will be transparency - ‘intelligent openness’ - and the ability to track, identify and make connections between researchers, the research objects they communicate and the wider community. Transparency will enable the system of experts to evaluate the effectiveness of the whole ecosystem of services including pricing, expert review, different types of collaboration, and new methods of evaluation and assessment. Between the values of the 17th century and the technical capacities of the 21st we have an opportunity to build systems of networked knowledge that don’t just scale to include all the interested parties but truly involve them in the process, conduct and communication of research, bringing their expertise to the places where it can best be applied and creating a system that is accountable and itself open to independent scholarly scrutiny. The scientists of the 17th century talked about the centrality of openness and discussion to the conduct of research. Institutions have the opportunity to help deliver it.
        Speaker: Mrs. Catriona MacCallum (PLoS)
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      • 09:30
        Institution as publisher Session: Putting Scholarly Publishing at the Heart of the Academy 30m
        Traditionally the scholarly community has outsourced the responsibility for disseminating findings to third party publishers. As a consequence neither scholars nor scholarly institutions internalise the dissemination process itself as a fundamental strategic consideration in achieving their research objectives. Digital technology allows scholars and scholarly communities to reconsider this relationship and to integrate dissemination into their broader development strategies. For many scholarly and research institutions financial survival increasingly relies on engaging with, and having their work recognised and appreciated by, numerous different audiences The audiences may be broad and will differ from institution to institution - but typically include students, other research groups, public funding bodies, potential commercial research partners, alumni, professional organizations etc. These audiences may themselves be looking for very different types of information - from general introductions for non-specialists to specific and precise information about research techniques used or data generated. Providing access to 'research' is becoming a multi-faceted issue requiring coordination across many different agents – marketing, legal & PR departments, faculties, libraries, archiving services, data management systems, virtual teaching environments etc. Taking seriously the dissemination of 'results' has the potential to be a powerful strategic tool for both scholars and scholarly institutions - but what will this entail? Which dissemination services will be better outsourced to third party providers and which best provided internally? And who should be making the dissemination decisions? I address these issues, taking examples from Open Book Publishers’ experience of working with different research organisations.
        Speaker: Dr. Rupert Gatti (Open Book Publishers)
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      • 10:00
        Institution as publisher session: University-based open access publishing in Europe: challenges and opportunities in the Humanities 30m
        This talk briefly examines important issues in open access publishing in the Humanities in Europe and focuses on an overview of university-led publishing initiatives in the Humanities, that is, initiatives led by scholars, departments, libraries and newly-formed university presses. It examines current trends, major challenges faced, and opportunities for future work in view of rendering this work more impactful in the university environment.
        Speaker: Mrs. Victoria Tsoukala
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    • 10:30 11:00
      Coffee 30m Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

      Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

    • 11:00 12:45
      Plenary 6: Digital curation and preservation of large and complex scientific objects Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

      Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

      Convener: Mr. Gilles Falquet (UNIGE)
      • 11:00
        Digital curation and preservation of large and complex scientific objects: Data Life-Cycle Management - The Swiss Way 35m
        We target in the context of a national program (CUS-P2) the setting up of the the required services that will allow the efficient management of active research data, and ensure the publication, long-term reference and preservation of subsets of data selected by researchers. Through this project we intend to implement concrete high-impact use cases of exemplary research data life-cycle management solutions, along with guidelines and training, so that researchers and their supporting scientific IT and library teams can apply the results themselves in their daily data management activities.
        Speaker: Mr. Pierre-Yves Burgi (UNIGE)
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      • 11:35
        Digital curation and preservation of large and complex scientific objects: Preserving Complex Scientific Objects - Process Capture and Data Identification 35m
        In recent years data-driven science and in-silico experimentation have produced remarkable results and established e-Science as a completely new paradigm in many different disciplines. Yet, with the growing complexity of experiments it becomes increasingly difficult to reproduce the results published in scientific journals and papers, and to keep them available and accessible for future re-use. This talk will address some of the challenges regarding the capture and preservation of scientific processes. Specifically, we will focus on the need for and extent of context to capture as part of preserving a scientific process, presenting a context model capturing all process aspects down to the level of licenses, HW and SW dependencies structured as an ontology. Secondly, we will discuss means to identify the specific data (out of a potentially huge and dynamic data source) that went into a particular analysis based on the recommendations published by the Working Group on Dynamic Data Citation of the Research Data Alliance.
        Speaker: Mr. Andreas Rauber
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      • 12:10
        Digital curation and preservation of large and complex scientific objects: Research Data Curation - Crafting (Open) Data Services at CERN 35m
        The preservation and sharing of research data changes the scholarly communication environment and presents new challenges to both researchers and data librarians. This talk gives an overview of the ongoing data analysis preservation activities at CERN. We present the recently launched CERN Open Data Portal and the Data Analysis Preservation Framework, a tool for long-term preservation of data analyses which is currently under development. The services are being built in close collaboration with the LHC experiments, with the aim of being progressively integrated in scientists' daily research processes and workflows. We point out challenges faced during data modelling, high-level knowledge capture, long-term preservation of captured assets, as well as scenarios for their future reuse. Exchanging the lessons learned during service implementation in the domain of particle physics with similar activities in other scientific disciplines and research environments, we hope, will be mutually beneficial.
        Speakers: Mrs. Patricia HERTERICH , Mr. Tibor SIMKO
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    • 12:45 13:00
      Closing Remarks 15m Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

      Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

      In his Closing Remarks, Dr Paul Ayris (as Chair of the OAI9 Programme Committee) will highlight some top-level conclusions for the 3-days of the Workshop.
      Speaker: Dr. Paul Ayris
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    • 13:00 14:00
      Lunch and Departures 1h Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

      Campus Biotech (University of Geneva)

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