26th RD50 Workshop (Santander)

Europe/Zurich
Santander

Santander

Ivan Vila Alvarez (Universidad de Cantabria (ES)), Marcos Fernandez Garcia (Universidad de Cantabria (ES)), Michael Moll (CERN)
Description
26th RD50 Workshop on Radiation hard semiconductor devices for very high luminosity colliders.
Participants
  • Abdenour Lounis
  • Abraham Antonio Gallas Torreira
  • Agnieszka Oblakowska-Mucha
  • Alexander Dierlamm
  • Alexander Lawerenz
  • ALVARO DIEZ GONZALEZ-PARDO
  • Alvaro Dosil Suarez
  • Anna Macchiolo
  • Cedric Prieels
  • Celso Figueiredo
  • Christian Scharf
  • Clara Nellist
  • Donato Creanza
  • Dr. Fco. Rogelio Palomo Pinto
  • Eckhart Fretwurst
  • Eija Tuominen
  • Eliseo Perez Trigo
  • Esa Veikko Tuovinen
  • Esteban Curras
  • Evangelos-Leonidas Gkougkousis
  • Francesca Cenna
  • Francisco Javier Gonzalez Sanchez
  • Gallrapp Christian
  • Gervasio Gomez Gramuglio
  • Gianluigi Casse
  • Giulio Pellegrini
  • Gregor Kramberger
  • Hartmut Sadrozinski
  • Igor Mandic
  • Ivan Lopez Paz
  • Iván Vila
  • Joern Lange
  • Julián García Pardiñas
  • Juozas Vaitkus
  • Marcela Mikestikova
  • Marco Ferrero
  • Marcos Fernandez Garcia
  • Maria Vieites Diaz
  • Marko Mikuz
  • Marko Zavrtanik
  • Michael Moll
  • Miguel Ullan Comes
  • Natascha Savic
  • Nicolo Cartiglia
  • Pintilie Ioana
  • Raúl Montero
  • Riccardo Mori
  • Richard Jaramillo Echeverria
  • roberta arcidiacono
  • Salvador Hidalgo
  • Susana Gomez-Salces
  • Susanne Kuehn
  • Sven Wonsak
  • Timo Hannu Tapani Peltola
  • Tomasz Szumlak
  • Ulrich Parzefall
  • Vitaliy Fadeyev
    • Defect and Material Characterization
      Convener: Ioana Pintilie (NIMP Bucharest-Magurele, Romania)
      • 9:00 AM
        Registration Santander

        Santander

      • 1
        Welcome speech by UIMP vice-dean Pedro Salinas

        Pedro Salinas

        Santander

        Speaker: Mr Rodrigo Martínez-Val Peñalosa (UIMP - Vicerrector de Innovación y desarrollo de proyectos)
      • 2
        Technical information
        Speakers: Ivan Vila Alvarez (Universidad de Cantabria (ES)), Marcos Fernandez Garcia (Universidad de Cantabria (ES))
      • 3
        Analysis of electron mobility dependence on electron and neutron irradiation in silicon
        Irradiation by electrons causes rather small decrease of electron mobility, only at high fluence the tendency to appear of microinhomogeneities appear. The electron mobility decreases up to twice in the neutron irradiated up to fluence 1e16 cm-2. An origin of electron mobility change investigated by analyze of its temperature dependence. A possible fit to experimental data was found if the scattering on phonons, point defects, clusters and dipoles were includded in the consideration. A desity functional method was used to analyze the electron charge distribution insice the cluster, and an existence of the dipole properties was observed.
        Speaker: Juozas Vaitkus (Vilnius University)
        Slides
      • 4
        Defect generation and damage functions in electron irradiated silicon-dependence on particle energy
        The study of high resistivity n-type silicon diodes irradiated with electrons of energies ranging from 1.5 MeV to 27 MeV have enabled us to scan the generation, time evolution and generation rates of point defects and small defect clusters having a direct impact on the device performance over a large irradiation fluence range. It is shown that this offers the unique opportunity to follow the different formation of point and cluster defects as correlated with Non Ionizing Energy Loss NIEL calculated either with binary code (BCA) or molecular dynamics (MD) approaches. The generation of point defects is well described by the “classical NIEL” (BCA), the formation of small defect clusters is better described by the “Effective NIEL” (MD).
        Speaker: Ioana Pintilie (NIMP Bucharest-Magurele, Romania)
      • 11:00 AM
        Coffee break Santander

        Santander

      • 5
        Modelling Radiation Induced Vacancy-Interstitial Clusters
        High energy particle irradiation created cluster defect model is based on the particle bombardment process scenario. The incident particle strikes the crystal lattice at the point of interaction and initiate the movement of lattice ions along with itself. The moving group of ions leave the vacancy region behind itself and further destroy the lattice structure causing other ions to leave their stable crystalline positions. By the end of destruction process the three defect regions are formed: region of vacancies, disordered region of randomly distorted lattice ions and the region of interstitials. These three subregions form the vacancy-interstitial defect cluster. After the irradiation the relaxation of defect region may take place with interstitials returning back to the vacancy positions thus partially restoring crystalline lattice structure within a defect cluster. The electronic states within such a cluster and its environment are calculated using density functional method. Compared to earlier simulation results obtained by E. Holmström et al (2010) and our group (E. Zasinas et al, 2014, 24th Cern RD50 workshop) the newly proposed cluster defect model has a much richier deep level structure. The earlier studied cluster model was considered as a region of randomly displaced ions giving rise to acceptor type of deep level states originating from the broken interatomic valency bonds. The model presented in this work exhibit both acceptor states and donor states. It is suggested that the broken valency bonds in vacancy subregion give rise to the deep level acceptor states and the valency electrons of the extra atoms in the interstitial atoms subregion give rise to the deep level donor states. Thus sush an assymetric deffect cluster may act both as acceptor and donor type of deffect in electronic devices. E. Holmström et al, Phys. Rev. B 82, 104111 (2010).
        Speaker: Juozas Vaitkus (Vilnius University)
        Slides
      • 6
        Studies of initial acceptor removal in p-type silicon
        The studies of initial acceptor removal in high resistivity p-type silicon detectors are scarce, mainly due to minor impact on operation of standard p-type detectors at high fluences expected at HL-LHC. On the other hand initial acceptor removal is of prime importance for radiation hardness of new detector technologies such as Low Gain Amplification Detectors and HV-CMOS sensors, where the doping levels are up to several orders of magnitude higher than in standard p-type sensors. In this work the impact of acceptor removal in different detector structures will be reviewed after neutron and charged hadrons irradiations. The initial acceptor removal rate was found to depend on the concetration and it is faster for charged hadrons than neutrons. The removal constants for different material resistivities ranging from ~1 Ohm cm to >10 kOhm cm will be presented. Possible reasons for such behavior will be investigated with means to mitigate or enhance the effect.
        Speaker: Gregor Kramberger (Jozef Stefan Institute (SI))
        Slides
      • 7
        Discussion on defect characterization
        Speaker: Ioana Pintilie (NIMP Bucharest-Magurele, Romania)
        Slides
    • 1:00 PM
      Lunch break
    • 3D detectors
      Convener: Giulio Pellegrini (Universidad de Valencia (ES))
      • 8
        Recent progress on 3D pixel detectors
        3D pixel detectors have advanced rapidly recently, leading to their first successful installation in the ATLAS IBL and the decision to install them in the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) experiment, which is foreseen as early as this year’s winter shutdown. 3D detectors are also a promising candidate for the innermost layer of trackers in the HL-LHC experiments. This presentation will summarise the recent developments with a focus on studies concerning radiation hardness and slim-edge properties, which includes laboratory and testbeam characterisations before and after irradiation.
        Speaker: Joern Lange (IFAE Barcelona)
        Slides
      • 9
        Status of 3D detector activities at CNM
        I will present the last fabrication run ongoing at CNM-IMB on 3D detectors activityes ofr the LHC upgrade.
        Speaker: Giulio Pellegrini (Universidad de Valencia (ES))
      • 10
        Recent testbeam results of 50 µm pitch 3D sensors at high incidence angle for HL-LHC
        Highly segmented (50x50 µm²) silicon sensors imply a challenge on the forward regions of the tracker (high-ŋ). Although under such conditions the total charge deposited is large, due to the high segmentation, the charge deposited per pixel is ~3.3ke along the 50 µm pitch pixel (1-2 times the typical threshold in an FE-I4 chip). This low charge collection could lead to high pixel inefficiencies and cluster splitting, reducing and biasing the spatial resolution of the tracker. Structures with 50x50 µm² pixels are not yet available for testbeam studies, so standard FE-I4 compatible 3D sensors with pixel pitch 50x250 µm² were studied under high incidence angle (80º) with respect to the short pixel direction in order to investigate the behaviour of small-sized pixels in the forward region of the tracker. Per pixel efficiency (as opposed to the standard hit efficiency per cluster) and charge collection along large clusters of IBL-like CNM and FBK 3D designs are studied before and after irradiation.
        Speaker: Ivan Lopez Paz (IFAE Barcelona)
        Slides
      • 11
        Proposal for a new RD50 project "Strip sensors made of N-rich FZ silicon"
        Within this project we want to produce mini strip sensors on FZ and N-rich FZ wafers to compare CCE at high fluences.
        Speaker: Alexander Dierlamm (KIT - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (DE))
        Slides
      • 12
        Discussion on 3D detectors and RD50 proposal
      • 5:30 PM
        Coffee break
    • Collaboration Board: Meeting
      Conveners: Gianluigi Casse (University of Liverpool (GB)), Gregor Kramberger (Jozef Stefan Institute (SI)), Michael Moll (CERN)
    • LGAD
      Convener: Salvador Hidalgo Villena (Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona (ES))
      • 13
        Status of CNM RD50 Projects
        I will report the status of the RD50 projects for LGAD and 3D detectors.
        Speaker: Giulio Pellegrini (Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica (IMB-CNM-CSIC) (ES))
        Slides
      • 14
        New iLGAD detector development at CNM
        We will present the first technological developments at CNM to fabricate a new p-on-p position-sensitive-detector with low signal amplification useful as well for timing applications. This device is based on a double-sided LGAD with pad-like multiplication structure in the back-side and ohmic read out in the front side. It is has been named “inverted” LGAD (iLGAD).
        Speaker: Dr Salvador Hidalgo (Centro Nacional de Microelectronica (IMB-CNM-CSIC))
        Slides
      • 15
        TCT measurements on neutron and proton irradiated LGAD diodes
        Red and IR LASER TCT measurements have been performed on LGAD samples fabricated in the Run7062. The study focuses on charge collection and gain properties before and after irradiation with neutron and protons up to fluences of 1E16$n_{eq}cm^{-2}$. A second focus is the analysis of inhomogeneous behavior observed during TCT surface scans with front and back side exposure. In unirradiated LGAD diodes this effect seems to appear only at low bias voltages while a shift to higher bias voltages can be observed after irradiation.
        Speaker: Christian Gallrapp (CERN)
        Slides
      • 16
        Study of irradiated NinN production and LGAD dopping profiles
        Trough SiMS measurements, the evolution of the doping profile is been studied for irradiated NinN samples at fluences of 10e15neq/cm2, while the transient current technique is used on diodes of the same implantation profile n order to evaluate the electrical characteristics evolution as a function of the received dose. Comparison and conclusions are established with the non-irradiated case both for the profile evolution and the intrinsic characteristics of the samples. A SiMS vs process simulation approach is used to model and control the new LGAD production in an attempt to understand post irradiation behavior and electrical characteristic.
        Speaker: Vagelis Gkougkousis (Laboratoire de l'Accelerateur Lineaire (FR))
        Slides
      • 17
        Progress on the Two-Photon-Absortion TCT technique
        After the first proof-of-concept of the TCT technique based on the Two-Photon-Absortion process using a 1300nm femtosecond laser on non-irradiated silicon diodes. we aim to complete the feasibility study of the TPA-TCT technique on irradiated sensors. As it is well known, irradiation creates localized deep energy levels (DL) inside the semiconductor’s forbidden gap between the conduction and valence bands. The radiation-induced DLs will enhance the photon absorption cross-section of the single photon absorption process (SPA) and two-step photon absorption process (TSPA). This project aims to quantify this increase of the SPA and TSPA cross-section in irradiated sensors with respect to the TPA cross-section.
        Speaker: Ivan Vila Alvarez (Universidad de Cantabria (ES))
        Slides
      • 18
        Time resolution of thin LGADs
        Thin Low-Gain Avalanche detectors are expected to have very good time resolution. We analyze data from a CERN beam test and show the requirements for truly ultra-fast silicon detectors (UFSD).
        Speaker: Hartmut Sadrozinski (SCIPP, UC santa Cruz)
      • 19
        Alibava Systems
        Hands on demonstration from Alibava
      • 11:00 AM
        Coffee break
      • 20
        A Compact/Educational-TCT presentation
        A presentation of small portable TCT will ge given. The system can be used as a tool for material studies or for educational purposes.
        Speaker: Marko Zavrtanik (Jozef Stefan Institute (SI))
      • 21
        Timing performance of the last CNM LGAD production
        In this talk I will present the most recent timing measurements performed in the last CNM LGAD production using the laser system in Torino.
        Speaker: Nicolo Cartiglia (Universita e INFN Torino (IT))
        Slides
      • 22
        Discussion on LGAD, timing
        Speaker: Giulio Pellegrini (Universidad de Valencia (ES))
    • Technological improvements
      Convener: Ivan Vila Alvarez (Universidad de Cantabria (ES))
      • 23
        TiN ALD layers for future pixel detector applications
        Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is well-established and reliable method for depositing thin film layers. Earlier we have demonstrated the use of ALD alumina (Al2O3) layers in the passivation of p-type silicon sensors. With alumina passivation we can leave out p-stop and p-spray structures and, thus, simplify the sensor manufacturing process. In the sensors used in the future upgrades of LHC experiments, the pixel size will be considerably smaller than in the current sensors. As a consequence, the small pixel size makes the realization of punch-through biasing structures very difficult. We have studied the use of ALD thin films as resistor material for the future pixel sensor applications. We will present the first results of Titanium nitride (TiN) thin films grown by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). This work has been done in collaboration with University of Helsinki, Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Micronova Centre for Micro and Nanofabrication.
        Speaker: Esa Tuovinen (Helsinki Institute of Physics (FI))
        Slides
      • 24
        Embedded pitch adapters as a proposal for high-yield interconnection for strip sensors
        A status will be given on the proposal of the use of a second metal layer for the integration of pitch adaptors in the fabrication of large-área strip sensors for high energy physics experiments.
        Speaker: Miguel Ullan Comes (CNM-Barcelona (ES))
        Slides
      • 25
        Ongoing R&D Activities at CiS Forschungsinstitut fuer Mikrosensorik: Bump Bonding
        Smaller dimensions for CMS and ATLAS pixel sensors require smaller dimensions for the under bump metallisation (UBM) and for the solder bumps which are connecting the radiation sensors to the FE-I chips. Whereas 40 to 50 µm large solder bumps are state of the art, future bumps have to be smaller than 30 µm. Another future task is to increase the number of solder bumps per area. CiS is working at overcoming these challenges by applying maskless, less expensive technologies as (single) solder ball placement and light induced plating.
        Speaker: Dr Alexander Lawerenz (CiS Forschungsinstitut fuer Mikrosensorik)
        Slides
    • 1:25 PM
      Lunch break
    • Test beams and lab tests
      Convener: Gregor Kramberger (Jozef Stefan Institute (SI))
      • 26
        Sensor Development for the LHCb VELO Upgrade
        The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the experi- ment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm with access to the complete event information. This will enable the detector to run at luminosities of 2 1033cm-2s-1 and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy avour sector with unprecedented precision. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz, designed to withstand the irradiation ex- pected at an integrated luminosity of 50 fb􀀀1 and beyond. The upgraded VELO will form an integral part of the software trigger, and must provide fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction while maintaining the exceptional resolution of the current detector. The detector will be composed of silicon pixel sensors with 55 55 m2 pitch, read out by the VeloPix ASIC which is being developed based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. An additional challenge is the non uniform nature of the radiation damage, which results in a need for excellent high voltage control on the sensor guard ring design. The performance of the sensor-ASIC bump bonded assemblies has been investigated in a test- beam in which the two arms are equipped with Timepix3 sensors, and the device to be tested can be mounted, rotated, and cooled in the central region. This allows tests of the speed and time tagging performance of the ASIC, together with the performance of the sensor after irradiation. Photos and gures from the testbeam setup are shown in gure 1. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulat- ing in microchannels within 400 m thick silicon substrates. Microchannel cooling brings many advantages: very ecient heat transfer with almost no temperature gradients across the module, no CTE mismatch with silicon components, and low material contribution. This is a breakthrough technology being developed for LHCb. Results from the irradiation and testing campaign will be shown, including the calibra- tion of the Timepix, the operation of irradiated assemblies and charge collection, and the high voltage behaviou before and after irradiation. Results will be showsn from testbeam and lab environments.
        Speaker: Alvaro Dosil Suarez (Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (ES))
        Slides
      • 27
        Tests of 50 µm thick silicon micro-strip sensors after extreme fluences up to 3x10$^{16}$ neq cm$^{-2}$
        The development of silicon detectors tolerant to extreme fluences for future high energy and high luminosity hadron colliders (like the upgrade of the present Large Hadron Collider to high luminosity at CERN) is demanded not only for instrumenting the innermost layers (where pixel sensors will be deployed) but also for particle flow calorimetry. The anticipated fluence levels range from 2x10$^{16}$ neq in the inner pixel layers to possibly 1x10$^{17}$ neq cm$^{-2}$ in the forward calorimeter region. The challenge is daunting, because of the large increase of the reverse current and the severe decrease of the signal recorder by the irradiated devices. The use of thin silicon detectors in charge multiplication regime could take the tolerance of silicon detectors further towards satisfying this requirement. We show here the experimental result obtained with silicon micro-strip sensors with a thickness of 50 µm irradiated to various fluences up to 3x10$^{16}$ neq cm$^{-2}$. After irradiation the signal is studied with fast electrons from a radioactive source, to mimic the signal of minimum ionising particles. Additional IV measurements show the current of highly irradiated silicon sensors.
        Speaker: Sven Wonsak (University of Liverpool (GB))
        Slides
      • 28
        Investigation of hit efficiency of n-in-p pixels with different designs
        We present results of n-in-p pixel sensor prototypes of 100 to 270 μm thickness with different designs, focusing on alternative implementations of punch-through structures. A comparative study has been performed on pixel modules by means of radioactive sources and beam test measurements at the CERN-SPS and DESY. The results of these measurements will be discussed for devices irradiated up to a fluence of 3e15 neq cm-2. In addition, the charge collection properties at different depths inside the silicon bulk have been studied before and after irradiation with the grazing angle technique. The results will be compared to predictions of TCAD simulations. Charge collection and power dissipation properties have been investigated as a function of different operational temperatures.
        Speaker: Natascha Savic (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (D)
        Slides
      • 29
        Test beam and clean room studies of ATLAS PPS modules with alternative bias rail geometries
        It is known that for the current design of planar pixel sensors, there is a drop of efficiency at the punch-through structure of the biasing system at the edge of pixels. Various geometries, as part of the ATLAS Inner Tracker (ITK) upgrade, are being investigated to reduce this inefficiency. Planar pixel sensors with multiple alternative bias rail geometries have been tested at the SPS beam test facility at CERN in late 2014 with the FE-I4 beam telescope, with results focusing on the efficiency within the pixel. Measurements of the pixel detectors in a clean room before and after irradiation were performed to study the noise for the varied designs. Future plans for further investigations are also discussed.
        Speaker: Clara Nellist (LAL-Orsay (FR))
        Slides
      • 30
        Update on Surface Studies of n-on-p Silicon Strip Sensors after irradiation to HL-LHC fluences: Prague status
        Surface properties of ATLAS12 n-on-p silicon sensors developed for the upgrade of the strip tracker of the ATLAS experiment were evaluated before and after irradiation. Different types of end-cap and barrel mini sensors were irradiated by gamma and protons at different irradiation sites. Influence of different sensor geometries, wafer resistivities and types of PTP structures on sensor stability and inter-strip properties was studied up to fluence 1E16 neq/cm2.
        Speaker: Marcela Mikestikova (Acad. of Sciences of the Czech Rep. (CZ))
        Slides
      • 31
        Update on radiation hardness of Silicon Diodes for the future CMS High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL).
        The CMS collaboration is planning to upgrade the forward calorimeters as these will not be sufficiently performant with the expected HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) conditions. After CMS committee decision, the High Granularity Calorimeter (HGC) is the technology chosen for this upgrade. It is realized as a sampling calorimeter with layers of silicon detectors that feature very high longitudinal and lateral granularities, and a coarser segmentation backing hadronic calorimeter based on scintillators as active material. The sensors are realized as pad detectors of size in the order of 1 cm2 with an active thickness between 100µm and 300µm depending on the position respectively the expected radiation levels. After the first results on neutron irradiation of 300µm, 200µm and 100µm n-on-p and p-on-n devices that have been irradiated to fluences up to 1.5E16 n/cm2 at Ljubljana Nuclear Reactor; We present, the latest results in terms of radiation hardness of these pad detectors.
        Speaker: Esteban Curras Rivera (Universidad de Cantabria (ES))
        Slides
      • 5:30 PM
        Coffee break
      • 32
        Long term performance of silicon strip detectors under high bias voltage: charge collection and laser measurements
        Recently it has been shown that silicon strip detectors, especially irradiated and showing charge multiplication, have decreasing performance when tested for several days under high voltage conditions. This behaviour has been in some cases explained in some cases by a surface effect[1], coming from the dose released in the silicon oxide by the source used for the measurements. Other studies[2] showed that the phenomenon didn't come from the source but from the high voltage stress. In this work we present new performance results by means of charge collection and laser measurements on ATLAS detectors irradiated up to 2e15n_eq/cm^2. They proof that the high voltage (higher than 1kV) is definitely a stressing factor and that part of the initial performance can be recovered by a resting time without bias or by thermal treatments. [1] Klanner, TIPP, talk, 06.2014. [2] Mori et al., NIM A proceeding, 03.2015.
        Speaker: Riccardo Mori (Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg (DE))
        Slides
      • 33
        Discussion
        Speaker: Gregor Kramberger (Jozef Stefan Institute (SI))
    • Conference dinner
    • HVCMOS
      Convener: Gianluigi Casse (University of Liverpool (GB))
      • 34
        HV-CMOS device fabrication
        There are several on-going device submissions in HV-CMOS technology from groups working on ATLAS pixel and strip systems. The main objective of these submissions is device evaluation as a possible alternative to the sensor modules in pixels and strips. Along with functional evaluation of these monolithic devices, the basic questions regarding sensor radiation hardness need to be addressed for the relevant fluences. Some RD50 member groups already started working on this topic. The new submissions give the option of devices fabricated on intermediate resistivity wafers. We will present the test structure options and test possibilities that are available.
        Speaker: Gianluigi Casse (University of Liverpool (GB))
        Slides
      • 35
        E-TCT and charge collection studies with irradiated HV-CMOS detectors
        The charge collection mechanism in HVCMOS detectors produced by AMS was studied with Edge-TCT and by measuring signals from minimum ionizing particles before and after neutron irradiation with up to 5e15 n/cm2. The sensors were produced for investigation of HVCMOS technology for pixel and strip detectors for the experiments at HL-LHC. In reverse biased HVCMOS sensors studied in this work depleted layer is formed in relatively low resistivity p-type silicon. It was found that the change of depletion thickness with neutron fluence can be explained by initial acceptor removal process. Because of this effect charge collected after a MIP passage with irradiated sensor can significantly exceed the charge collected before irradiation in certain fluence range.
        Speaker: Igor Mandic (Jozef Stefan Institute (SI))
        Slides
      • 36
        Radiation hardness of neutron irradiated HVCMOSv3
        Radiation hardness of HVCMOSv3 to neutron irradiation was studied by using edge-TCT. The fluence range covered was 0, 1e15, 7e15 and 2e16 neq/cm-2. A test diode providing analog signal was readout using a fast current amplifier. The detector was mounted on a very simple PCB which allowed for a clean signal readout. Results on charge collection and depletion width are presented. Due to the very low resistivity of the substrate (10 Ohm.cm) the active region thickness is smaller than the beam width. A first attempt to calculate the true active thickness was essayed.
        Speaker: Marcos Fernandez Garcia (Universidad de Cantabria (ES))
        Slides
      • 37
        A preliminary look at HV-CMOS eTCT data after p-irradiation
        First look at the results of proton irradiated detectors will be presented
        Speakers: Daniel Muenstermann (Universite de Geneve (CH)), Marcos Fernandez Garcia (Universidad de Cantabria (ES))
        Slides
    • Simulations: TCAD
      Convener: Timo Hannu Tapani Peltola (Helsinki Institute of Physics (FI))
      • 11:00 AM
        Coffee break
      • 38
        Status of 3D Detectors TCAD Simulations
        We will present our results with TCAD Simulations of three different 3D Devices (ROC4Sense, Fermilab, PSI46). We have I-V, C-V and MIP simulations before and after irradiation up to 2e15 n_eq/cm2. Also include will be a glimpse of our present effort for LGAD device simulations on MIP hit.
        Speaker: Francisco Rogelio Palomo Pinto (Universidad de Sevilla (ES))
        Slides
      • 39
        Signal formation in segmented Si planar detectors: TCAD simulated effect of SiO2 passivation layer
        Measurements have shown a reversal of the pulse polarity in the detector response to short-range charge injection [V. Eremin et al., NIM A 500 (2003) & E. Verbitskaya et al., IEEE TNS 52 (2005) NO. 5]. Since the measured negative signal is about 30–60% of the peak positive signal, the effect strongly reduces the CCE even in non-irradiated detectors. For further investigation of the phenomenon the measurements have been reproduced by TCAD simulations. Similar to the measurement, the simulation study was applied for the p-on-n strip detectors with each strip having a window in the metallization covering the p+ implant allowing the generation of electron-hole pairs under the strip implant. Red laser scans across the strips and the interstrip gap with varying laser diameters and Si-SiO2 interface charge densities were carried out. The scans were repeated with an IR laser and for the n-on-p strip detectors. The simulation results offer a further insight to the role of the oxide charge density in the signal formation. Also results of the dependence on the charge injection depth and sensor polarity will be presented.
        Speaker: Timo Hannu Tapani Peltola (Helsinki Institute of Physics (FI))
        Slides
      • 40
        Discussion on HVCMOS and discussion on Simulations
        Speakers: Gianluigi Casse (University of Liverpool (GB)), Timo Hannu Tapani Peltola (Helsinki Institute of Physics (FI))
    • 12:50 PM
      Lunch break
    • Sentaurus TCAD tutorial

      Tutorial session on TCAD simulation given by some experts in the field. Everybody is welcome to participate in this event

      Conveners: Francisco Rogelio Palomo Pinto (Universidad de Sevilla (ES)), Pablo Fernandez Martinez (Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (ES))
      • 41
        Tutorial: part 1
        Speaker: Francisco Rogelio Palomo Pinto (Universidad de Sevilla (ES))
        Code
        Slides
      • 42
        Tutorial: part 2
        Speaker: Pablo Fernandez Martinez (Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (ES))