13th Vienna Conference on Instrumentation - VCI2013

Europe/Vienna
Vienna University of Technology

Vienna University of Technology

Gußhausstraße 25-29, 1040 Wien (Vienna), Austria
Josef Hrubec (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT)), Manfred Jeitler (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT)), Manfred Krammer (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT)), Marko Dragicevic (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT)), Markus Friedl (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT)), Meinhard Regler (Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik (HEPHY) - Oesterreichische Akad.), Thomas Bergauer (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT)), Winfried Mitaroff (AUSTRIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES // INSTITUTE OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS)
Support
    • 08:00 10:00
      Registration 2h
    • 10:00 10:10
      Welcome 10m EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Speaker: Prof. Johannes Fröhlich (TU Wien)
      Slides
    • 10:10 10:20
      Opening 10m EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gußhausstraße 25-29, 1040 Wien (Vienna), Austria
      Speaker: Prof. Christian Fabjan (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
    • 10:20 10:30
      Greetings 10m EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Speaker: Dr Daniel Weselka (Ministry for Science and Research)
    • 10:30 12:10
      Plenary 1
      Convener: Manfred Krammer (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 10:30
        Particle detector applications in medicine 45m
        Particle detectors find increasing applications in medicine. The broad spectrum of particles used in medicine requires a variety of instruments, which are mostly based on concepts originally developed within HEP, Nuclear Physics or Astro-physics. The optimization of these instruments for clinical use will be shown on examples in dosimetry, beam diagnostics and in the wide field of imaging.
        Speaker: Hartmut Sadrozinski (SCIPP, UC santa Cruz)
        Slides
      • 11:20
        Detectors for astroparticle physics and dark matter searches 45m
        Astroparticle physics is an exciting new field of research at the interface between particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. After briefly addressing some of the fundamental questions it is trying to answer, I will review the newest experimental developments in this varied field, with emphasis on present and future detector technologies for dark matter searches.
        Speaker: Laura Baudis (University of Zurich)
        Slides
    • 12:10 12:20
      Information from the Organizers 10m
      Speaker: Manfred Krammer (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      Slides
    • 12:20 14:00
      Lunch Break 1h 40m
    • 14:00 15:45
      Plenary 2 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Meinhard Regler (Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik (HEPHY) - Oesterreichische Akad.)
      • 14:00
        Conception of the MedAustron Accelerator Complex and Present Status 20m
        MedAustron is a synchrotron based light-ion beam therapy centre for cancer treatment as well as for clinical and non-clinical research, currently in the construction phase. The accelerator design is based on the CERN-PIMMS study and its technical implementation by the Italian CNAO Foundation. Whilst the choice of basic machine parameters was driven by medical requirements, the accelerator complex design was also optimized to offer flexibility for research operation. The potential of the synchrotron is being exploited to increase the maximum proton energy far beyond the medical needs to up to 800 MeV, for experimental physics applications, mainly in the areas of proton scattering and detector research. The accelerator layout allows for the installation of up to four ion source – spectrometer units, to provide various ion types. To decouple research and medical operation, a dedicated irradiation room for non-clinical research was included . This presentation provides a status overview over the whole project detailing the achieved progress of the building construction and technical infrastructure installation in Wiener Neustadt, Austria, as well as of the accelerator development, performed at CERN.
        Speaker: Dr Thomas Schreiner (MedAustron)
        Slides
      • 14:25
        Neutron detectors 45m
        We present new neutron detector concepts for ultra-cold, cold and fast neutrons. The developments are driven by the experimental needs: the next generation of neutron lifetime experiments require high rate capacities of 100 x 10^6 s^{-1}, gravity tests at short distances need a detector with a spatial resolution of a micron at low background, time of flight experiments require a time resolution of 10µs , and experiments at neutron centers need large area detectors of 1 m2 to 10 m2. Due to a helium shortage the focus is on boron as a neutron converter for large area detectors.
        Speaker: Mr Hartmut Abele (ATI)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        A Time Projection Chamber for High-Rate Experiments: Towards an Upgrade of the ALICE TPC 20m
        A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is a powerful detector for 3-dimensional tracking and particle identification for ultra-high multiplicity events. It is the central tracking device of many experiments, e.g. the ALICE experiment at CERN. The necessity of a switching electrostatic gate, which prevents ions produced in the amplification region of MWPCs from entering the drift volume, however, restricts its application to trigger rates of the order of 1 kHz. Charge amplification by Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) foils instead of proportional wires oers an intrinsic suppression of the ion backflow, although not to the same level as a gating grid. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the distortions due to residual space charge from back-drifting ions can be limited to a few cm, and thus can be corrected using standard calibration techniques. A prototype GEM-TPC has been built which is the detector with the largest active volume of this kind up to now. It has been commissioned with cosmics and particle beams at the FOPI experiment at GSI, and was employed for a physics measurement with pion beams. For future operation of the ALICE TPC at the CERN LHC beyond 2019, where Pb-Pb collision rates of 50 kHz are expected, it is planned to replace the existing MWPCs by GEM detectors, operated in a continuous, triggerless readout mode, thus allowing an increase in event rate by a factor of 100. As a first step of the R&D program, a prototype of an Inner Readout Chamber was equipped with large-size GEM foils and exposed to beams of protons, pions and electrons from the CERN PS. In this presentation, new results will be shown concerning ion backflow, spatial and momentum resolution of a GEM-TPC in a running experiment, detector calibration, dE=dx resolution, and high-rate performance with both detector prototypes. The perspectives of a GEM-TPC for ALICE with continuous readout will be discussed and the expected performance will be presented.
        Speaker: Bernhard Ketzer (Technische Universitaet Muenchen (DE))
        Slides
    • 15:45 16:15
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:15 17:55
      Plenary 2
      Convener: Winfried Mitaroff (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 16:15
        Recent developments in silicon detectors 45m
        I will present a very brief history of silicon detectors in physics experiments culminating in the spectacular systems now delivering great physics in the CERN/LHC. An overview of the status of the present R&D towards future applications will follow.
        Speaker: Gianluigi Casse (University of Liverpool (GB))
      • 17:05
        DC-DC Powering for the CMS Pixel Upgrade 20m
        The CMS experiment plans to replace the silicon pixel detector by a new one with improved rate capability and an additional detection layer at the end of 2016. In order to cope with the increased number of detector modules the new pixel detector will be powered via DC-DC converters close to the sensitive detector volume. This talk will review the DC-DC powering scheme and report on the ongoing R&D program to develop converters for the pixel upgrade. Design choices will be dicussed and results from the electrical and thermal characterisation of converter prototypes will be shown. An emphasis will be put on system tests with up to 24 converters. The performance of pixel modules powered by DC-DC converters is compared to conventional powering. The integration of the DC-DC powering scheme into the pixel detector will be described and system design issues will be reviewed.
        Speaker: Prof. Lutz Feld (Rheinisch-Westfaelische Tech. Hoch. (DE))
        Slides
      • 17:30
        LePix – a high resistivity, fully depleted monolithic pixel detector 20m
        The LePix project explores monolithic pixel sensors fabricated in a 90nm CMOS technology for which more lightly doped substrates are available. This maintains the advantages usually offered by Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), like a low input capacitance, having a single piece detector and using a standard CMOS production line, but offers charge collection by drift from a depleted region several tens of microns deep into the substrate, and therefore an excellent signal to noise ratio and a radiation tolerance superior to conventional un-depleted MAPS. Such sensors are expected to offer significant cost savings and reduction of power consumption for the same performance, leading to the use of much less material in the detector (less cooling and less copper), addressing one of the main limitations of present day particle tracking systems. A review on the technology and the most important experimental results achieved so far will be presented. The focus will be on the latest evolution of the project, which uses detectors thinned down to 50 um to obtain back illuminated sensors operated in full depletion mode. By back-processing the chip and collecting the charge from the full substrate it is hence possible to efficiently detect soft X-rays up to 10 keV. Test beam results from synchrotron light tests as well as potential application of this monolithic device will be discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Piero Giubilato (Università e INFN Padova)
    • 18:30 19:15
      Art and History of Vienna
      • 18:30
        Art and History of Vienna 45m EI7

        EI7

        Vienna University of Technology

        The city of Vienna was essentially founded by the ancient Romans. In the late middle ages, it became the capital of the Habsburg Empire, and consequently grew in size and importance. Even though there are some Roman excavations, most of the architectural heritage originates from the monarchy. In particular, the turn of the 19th to 20th centuries was undoubtedly a peak in many aspects of arts and culture, and even the population of Vienna was then higher than today. Nonetheless, the monarchy terminated almost hundred years ago and gave way to modernism. All periods of fine arts are represented in Vienna, by architecture as well as in museums. In addition, performing arts and classical music are offered in various places. This presentation will provide an overview of the history of Vienna, the periods of art and where to spot them, with a particular focus on the locations where social events will take place during this conference.
        Speaker: Dr Satoko Friedl
        Slides
    • 19:30 21:30
      Welcome Cocktail 2h
    • 09:00 10:40
      Plenary 3
      Convener: Manfred Jeitler (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 09:00
        Did the LHC detectors meet expectations? 45m
        By showing comparisons between the achieved performance and the expected one from the various sub-detectors of the large LHC Experiments at conditions that exceed the original design, it will be shown that the first answer is yes, BUT. The BUT will be dedicated to various problems encountered with industrial orders and design mistakes, and what lessons one should learn from these issues.
        Speaker: George Mikenberg (Weizmann Institute of Science (IL))
        Slides
      • 09:50
        Status and future of the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC" 20m
        The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC and its status after three years of operation will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The record breaking instantaneous luminosities of 7.7 x 10^33 cm-2 s-1 recently surpassed at the Large Hadron Collider generate a rapidly increasing particle fluence in the ATLAS Pixel Detector. As the radiation dose accumulates, the first effects of radiation damage are now observable in the silicon sensors. A regular monitoring program has been conducted and reveals an increase in the silicon leakage current, which is found to be correlated with the rising radiation dose recorded by independent sensors within the inner detector volume. In the longer-term crystal defect formation in the silicon bulk is expected to alter the effective doping concentration, producing type-inversion and ultimately an increase of the voltage required to fully deplete the sensor. The fourth pixel layer at the radius of 3.5 cm will be added during the long shutdown 2013-2014 together with the replacement of pixel services. Letter of Intent is in preparation for the completely new pixel detector after 2023, capable to take data with extremely high instantaneous luminosities of 5 x 10^34 cm-2 s-1 at High Luminosity LHC.
        Speaker: Alexandre Rozanov (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (FR))
        Slides
      • 10:15
        THE LHCB DETECTOR UPGRADE 20m
        The LHCb collaboration presented a Letter of Intent (LOI) to the LHCC in March 2011 for a major upgrading of the detector during Long Shutdown 2 (2018) and intends to collect a data sample of 50/fb in the LHC and High-Luminosity-LHC eras. The aim is to operate the experiment at an instantaneous luminosity 2.5 times above the present operational luminosity, which has already been pushed to twice the design value. Reading out the detector at 40MHz allows to increase the trigger efficiencies especially for the hadronic decay modes. The physics case and the strategy for the upgrade have been endorsed by the LHCC. This paper presents briefly the physics motivations for the LHCb upgrade and the proposed changes to the detector and trigger.
        Speaker: Heinrich Schindler (CERN)
        Slides
    • 10:40 11:20
      Coffee Break 40m
    • 11:20 12:35
      Podium discussion on the Electromagnetic Calorimeters of ATLAS and CMS
      Convener: Manfred Jeitler (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 11:20
        ATLAS 1h 15m
        Speaker: Martin Aleksa (CERN)
        Slides
      • 11:20
        CMS 1h 15m
        Speaker: Marcella Diemoz (Universita e INFN, Roma I (IT))
        Slides
    • 12:35 14:00
      Lunch Break 1h 25m
    • 14:00 15:40
      Astroparticle Detectors
      Convener: Hiroyasu TAJIMA (SLAC)
      • 14:00
        The Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) on-board Solar Orbiter 20m
        Solar Orbiter is a sun-observing mission of the European Space Agency, addressing the interaction between the sun and the heliosphere (launch is scheduled for 2017). The satellite will carry ten instruments, and will approach the sun to 0.28 astronomical units, allowing unprecedented high-resolution measurements. The X-ray imaging spectrometer on-board Solar Orbiter is called STIX (Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays). This report will give a brief overview of its scientific goal and cover in more detail the instrument design and challenges. STIX will determine the intensity, spectrum, timing, and location of thermal and accelerated electrons near the Sun through their Bremsstrahlung X-ray emission. STIX uses indirect Fourier imaging. The sun is observed through pairs of fine grids, separated by 55 cm. The grids of one pair are slightly different in pitch and rotation angle and cast a Moire pattern on the detectors underneath. Count rates of X-rays passing the grids as function of energy are determined with CdTe semiconductor sensors. Each sensor is pixelized to sample the Moire pattern and to cover of an extended dynamic range in count rates. The sensors are bonded to front-end amplifier units and thermally coupled to a space-craft cold finger to operate below -20 deg Celsius in the +50 deg Celsius environment. The instrument data processing unit allows autonomous operation over extended periods of time (up to 80 days) and provides the space-craft interfaces.
        Speaker: Oliver Grimm (ETH Zurich)
        Slides
      • 14:25
        Homogeneous and isotropic calorimetry for space experiments 20m
        Calorimetry plays an essential role in experiments for observing very high energy gamma and cosmic rays in space. Geometrical dimensions and mass of the calorimeter are the main limiting factors. The available mass depends on the design of the detector and the total available mass of the payload. It is therefore important to optimize the geometrical acceptance of the calorimeter for rare events, its granularity for the identification of the arriving particle and its depth for the energy measurement. We studied the design of a calorimeter that could simultaneously optimize these characteristics assuming a limit mass of about 1.6 t. The best choice resulted to be a homogeneous calorimeter made by cesium iodide (CsI), as the best compromise between the radiation and interaction lengths of the material. The most convenient geometry is cubic and isotropic to detect particles arriving from any direction in space, thus maximizing the acceptance; granularity is obtained by filling the cubic volume with small cubic CsI crystal. The total depth in any direction is very high both in radiation and interaction lengths, and allows for electromagnetic particle identification better than 10-5 and optimal energy measurement. Side of the crystal and needed space between them for managing their mechanical support and external electrical connections have been studied. A prototype has been realized and preliminary tests on high energy electron and proton beams are reported.
        Speaker: Dr Nicola Mori (INFN Florence)
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Euso Balloon: a pathfinder mission for the JEM-EUSO experiment 20m
        The JEM-EUSO instrument is a wide-angle refractive telescope in near-UV wavelength region being proposed for attachment to the Japanese Experiment Module onboard ISS. The main scientific goal of the mission is the study of Ultra High Energy cosmic Rays. The instrument consists of high transmittance optical Fresnel lenses with a diameter of 2.5 m, a focal surface covered by 4932 MAPMTs of 64 pixels, front-end readout, trigger and system electronics. In this paper will be presented the EUSO-BALLOON experiment, the JEM EUSO pathfinder mission, in which a telescope of smaller dimension respect to the one designed for the ISS, will be mounted in an unpressurized gondola of a stratospheric balloon which will float at 42 km above the sea level. We will describe in detail the Electronic System which performs instrument control and data management in such a critical environment. The main objective of this pathfinder mission, planned for the 2014, is to perform a full scale end-to-end test of all the key technologies and instrumentation of JEM-EUSO detectors and to prove the global detection chain. EUSO-BALLOON will measure the atmospheric and terrestrial UV background components, in different observational modes, fundamental for the development of the simulations. Through a series of stratospheric balloon flights performed by CNES, EUSO-Balloon also has the potential to detect Extensive Air Showers from above, paving the way for any future large scale, space-based UHECR observatory.
        Speaker: Dr Giuseppe Osteria (INFN Napoli)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        The Tunka multi – component EAS detector for high energy cosmic ray studies. 20m
        In autumn of 2012 a EAS Cherenkov light array Tunka-133 with $\sim$3\,km$^2$ geometrical area in the Tunka Valley (50 km from Lake Baikal) for a detailed study of the cosmic ray energy spectrum and the mass composition with energy above 10$^{16}$ eV was combined with new Tunka-Rex (Tunka radio extension) array of about 20 antennas measures the radio emission of cosmic-ray air showers. The last is triggered by the Cherenkov detectors of the Tunka-133 array. The radio-Cherenkov-hybrid measurements thus offer a unique opportunity for a cross-calibration of both detection methods. The main goal of Tunka-Rex is to determine the precision of the radio reconstruction for the energy and the atmospheric depth of the shower maximum, and thus to experimentally test theoretical predictions that the radio precision can be similar to the precision of air-Cherenkov and fluorescence measurements. At the same time, Tunka-Rex can demonstrate that radio measurements can be performed on a large area for a relatively cheap price, since the antennas will be connected to the already existing Tunka DAQ. The results on the all particles energy spectrum and the mean depth of the EAS maximu vs. primary energy derived from the data of three winter seasons (2009–2012) are presented. Plans for future upgrades – deployment of remote clusters, a scintillator detector network and a prototype of the HiSCORE gamma-telescope – are discussed.
        Speaker: Nikolay Budnev (Irkutsk State University)
        Slides
    • 14:00 15:40
      Gaseous Detectors
      Convener: Werner Riegler (CERN)
      • 14:00
        Production and Test of the Cylindrical-GEM detectors for the KLOE-2 Inner Tracker 20m
        The upgrade of the KLOE detector at the DAFNE Phi-factory foresees the insertion of a new Inner Tracker device around the interaction region, composed by four tracking layers with diameters from 260 mm to 410 mm and an active length of 700 mm. Each layer is realized as a cylindrical triple-GEM detector, a solution that allows to keep the total material budget under 2% of X0, of utmost importance to limit the multiple scattering of low-momentum tracks at KLOE-2, and to minimize dead spaces. The peculiar readout pattern with XV strips provides a spatial resolution of about 200 um on both views. A dedicated readout system has been developed within the KLOE-2 collaboration. It is composed by a digital readout front-end card based on the GASTONE ASIC and a General Interface Board with a configurable FPGA architecture and Gigabit Ethernet. The three innermost layers have been built and extensively tested with a beta source and cosmic-rays, and the construction of the fourth layer has started. The insertion inside the KLOE apparatus is foreseen in spring 2013. The construction procedure and the results of the validation tests will be reported.
        Speaker: Danilo Domenici (Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare (IT))
        Slides
      • 14:25
        Development of a new generation of micropattern gaseous detectors for high energy physics, astrophysics and medical applications 20m
        During the last two years, our team has developed a cost effective technology of manufacturing various types of micropattern gaseous detectors designed for applications in many fields. The designs of these detectors feature a matrix of thin metallic readout strip located under segmented resistive electrodes. This electrode configuration makes such detectors very robust, allows them to be operated at exceptionally high gas gains, and enables withstanding long-term continuous sparking (if it appears) and achieving a very good 2D position resolution. We will describe the results obtained from systematic studies of these detectors and their optimization for high rate applications. Three examples of successful applications, in which our team is deeply involved, will be presented: CsI-RICH detector prototypes for ALICE upgrade, a prototype of novel double-phase LAr detector with a CsI photocathode immersed inside the LAr and a medical/security applications including to a TOF-PET device. The results so far obtained are very encouraging and show that these new micropattern detectors may have a great future.
        Speaker: Prof. Vladimir Peskov (CERN)
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Ageing studies of resistive Micromegas detectors for HL-LHC 20m
        Resistive-anode Micromegas detectors are in development since several years, in an effort to solve the problem of sparks when working in high flux and high radiations environment like in the HL-LHC (ten times the luminosity of the LHC). They have been chosen as one of the technologies that will be part of the ATLAS New Small Wheel project (forward muon system). An ageing study is mandatory to assess their capabilities to handle the HL-LHC environment on a long-term period. A prototype has been exposed to several types of irradiations (X-rays, cold neutrons, 60Co gammas) up to an equivalent HL-LHC time of more than five years without showing any degradation of the performances in terms of gain and energy resolution. Beam test studies are foreseen in October 2012 to assess the tracking performances (efficiency, spatial resolution, …). Results of ageing studies and beam test performances are reported in this paper.
        Speaker: Javier Galan Lacarra (CEA/IRFU,Centre d'etude de Saclay Gif-sur-Yvette (FR))
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Study of a Large Prototype TPC using integrated electronics and resistive Micromegas detectors 20m
        Significant R&D on detectors for the future International Linear Collider (ILC) has been carried out by the community in the last decade. The International Large Detector (ILD) is one detector concept at the ILC where calorimetry and tracking systems are combined. The tracking system consists of a vertex detector and a large volume Time Projection Chamber (TPC). Within the framework of the LCTPC collaboration, a Large Prototype (LP) TPC has been built. Its endplate can accommodate up to seven identical modules of Micro Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) representative of the final design. With 3 mm wide by 7 mm high pads, a point resolution of 60 microns per pad-row has been reached by a single-module of resistive anode Micromegas with fully integrated electronics. In July 2012, data were taken with 6 modules of such technology allowing the study of cracks, distorsions and module misalignment. After introducing the LP, first analysis results of multi-module configuration will be presented.
        Speaker: Dr David ATTIE (CEA/DSM/DAPNIA/SPP)
        Transparents
    • 14:00 15:40
      Semiconductor Detectors 1 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Gianluigi Casse (University of Liverpool (GB))
      • 14:00
        Development of thin n-in-p pixel sensors with active edges and recent results of the ATLAS Planar Pixel R&D project 20m
        A summary of the recent results of the ATLAS Planar Pixel R&D project will be given, with a focus on thin n-in-p detectors, with an active thickness from 75 μm to 200 μm, from productions of the MPI Semiconductor Laboratory, VTT and FBK-CMM. The MPI-HLL thin n-in-p pixels were interconnected using the ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips, with standard solder bump-bonding and in case of the 75 μm detectors with Solid-Liquid-InterDiffusion (SLID), an interconnection technique developed by the Fraunhofer Institute EMFT in Munich. The results of the characterization before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 1016 neq cm-2 will be shown, using radioactive sources and beam tests. The VTT and FBK-CM pixel sensors make use of active trenches to reduce the inactive area at the edges of the devices. The reconstructed hit efficiency, obtained with VTT modules in beam tests will be discussed. An overview of the device simulations of pre- and post-irradiated FBK-CMM samples, together with the first electrical characterization of the produced devices will be given. Within the PPS Collaboration, alternative approaches to achieve active edges are also investigated, as the Scribe- Cleave-Passivate Approach, developed by the SCIPP group in collaboration with the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). As a post processing step, this allows to achieve slim edges also for already produced sensors with a traditional design. Finally the performance of n-in-n pixel sensors up to a fluence of 2x1016 neq cm-2 will be shown, using sensors from productions at CiS employing designs by the TU Dortmund group.
        Speaker: Anna Macchiolo (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (D)
        Slides
      • 14:25
        Test Results of 3D Silicon Pixel Sensors for Future ATLAS Upgrades 20m
        3D Silicon pixel detectors, selected to make-up 25% of the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) and 100% of the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) tracking system, were studied in an intense laboratory and beam test qualification program in 2011 and 2012. The IBL is a new pixel layer which will be installed between the current ATLAS pixel detector and a new, thinner beam pipe of radius 3.2 cm during the phase 0 long shut-down in 2013-14. Beam tests of sensors before and after irradiation were performed using 4 GeV positrons at DESY, Germany and 180 GeV pions from the SPS at CERN, Switzerland. Sensors were bump-bonded to ATLAS FE-I3 front-end readout cards and also to the new FE-I4 cards, which have a smaller pixel size of 50 μm x 250 μm and faster readout compared to FE-I3. Tracks were reconstructed using data from the EUDET and ACONITE beam telescopes delivering a resolution of 3 μm. At a variety of angles, thresholds and bias voltages, studies into radiation hardness, charge collection efficiency, charge sharing and edge efficiency were performed to both qualify the 3D Silicon sensors to IBL requirements and to analyse improved manufacturing techniques for future ATLAS upgrades.
        Speaker: Clara Nellist (University of Manchester (GB))
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Testbeam and laboratory test results of irradiated 3D CMS pixel detectors 20m
        The CMS pixel detector is the innermost tracking device at the LHC, reconstructing the interaction vertices and charged particle trajectories. The current planar sensors located in the innermost layer of the pixel detector will be exposed to very high fluences which will degrade their performances. As a possible replacement of planar pixel sensors for the High Luminosity-LHC or HL-LHC, 3D silicon technology is under consideration due to their expected good performances in harsh radiation environments. The Deep-Reactive-Ion-Etching (DRIE) plays the key role in fabricating innovative 3D silicon detectors in which readout and ohmic electrodes are processed through the silicon substrate in place of being implanted on silicon surface. The 3D CMS pixel devices, which were processed at FBK, CNM, and SINTEF. They were bump bonded to the CMS pixel readout chip, characterized in the laboratory, and testbeams carried out at FNAL. We report the laboratory and testbeam measurement results for the irradiated 3D CMS pixel devices.
        Speaker: Enver Alagoz (Purdue University (US))
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Technology and characterization results in new 3D double sided pixel detectors for future colliders 20m
        Future colliders, like High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) or future generation of colliders will deliver higher radiation doses to the detectors, specifically those closer to the beam line. The instantaneous luminosity as well as the particle fluxes at the detectors, will be increased considerably. Inner tracker detectors will be the most affected part, increasing substantially its occupancy and radiation damage. In order to conserve the sensors performance under this new conditions, the pixel sensor technologies have to be improved. The new requirements demand the use of new silicon technologies instead of actual pixel planar sensors. Planar sensors have not shown enough radiation hardness for the innermost layers where the radiation doses can reach values around 1*10^16 neq/cm2. 3D sensors technologies are one of the candidates in the closest layers to the beam pipe. They show higher radiation hardness, and the double sided design provide some additional technical advantages. Several wafers have been produced at the IMB-CNM (Barcelona, Spain), implementing two different pitches between p-electrodes. First characterizations have been developed at IMB-CNM and PSI (Villigen, Switzerland). Results after electrical characterization and radioactive source test (90 Sr), before and after irradiation will be presented.
        Speaker: Ms Francisca Javiela Muñoz Sánchez (IFCA (CSIC-UC), Santander,Spain)
        Slides
    • 15:40 16:30
      Poster Session A

      Posters displayed on a board with an even number

    • 16:30 18:10
      Astroparticle Detectors EI9

      EI9

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Ronaldo Bellazzini (INFN Pisa)
      • 16:30
        Large area water Cherenkov array for air shower detection at high altitude 20m
        Large Area Water Cherenkov Array (LAWCA), a newly planned water Cherenkov detector, is to be built in Yangbajing, Tibet, China by the end of 2014, for detecting air showers at high altitude of 4300 m a.s.l. The LAWCA detector, amounting to an area of 23,000 m2 and built adjacent to the ARGO-YBJ detector, mainly aims to all sky survey for transient sources. A cross calibration between LAWCA and ARGO-YBJ can make us to better understand the systematic errors. In this presentation, the design, the performance and the schedule of LAWCA experiment is to be introduced.
        Speaker: Dr Zhiguo Yao (IHEP, Beijing)
        Slides
      • 16:55
        Status of Super-Kamiokande gadolinium project 20m
        In the universe, there exist supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) which have been released from all past supernova explosions. Super Kamiokande (SK) has conducted search for these SRN events via inverse beta decay interaction in the detector, and it is about to reach the SRN signals with sensitivity of about a factor of 2. But, it is still difficult to observe them since the search is limited by background. The addition of gadolinium (Gd) compound in the SK was proposed. Gd has the largest thermal neutron capture cross-section among all stable nuclei and gives total 8 MeV gamma cascade in the capture process. By coincidental tagging of positron and gamma-rays from Gd neutron capture, we can identify the SRN inverse beta decays signal.This technique can lead us to the first observation of a SRN signal in SK. We will demonstrate the principle of a Gd-doped water Cherenkov detector (transparency of the Gd-doped water, Gd-doped water circulation method), neutron capture efficiency, etc) with test dedicate facility called EGADS. EGADS consists of 200 ton water Cherenkov detector, a Gd mixing pre-treatment device, Gd-doped water circulation system, and water transparency measurement device. We have checked Gd-doped water circulation with EGADS purification system since 2012. The PMTs and DAQ are ready and these performances have been studied. The evaluation of the overall performance of EGADS will start in 2013 after the PMT installation. The current status of the EGADS will be shown.
        Speaker: takaaki mori
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Development of Hybrid Photo-Detector for the Hyper-Kamiokande Project 20m
        A hybrid photo-detector (HPD) is being developed for the Hyper-Kamiokande experiment, a next-generation underground water Cherenkov detector designed to study a wide range of topics in physics and astronomy. To establish the feasibility of HPDs for Hyper-Kamiokande, we plan to study their long-term stability and determine their neutrino detection performance. The HPD is a hybridization of a photomultiplier tube and an avalanche diode (AD), in which photoelectrons are amplified in 2 steps: bombardment from the photocatode to the AD surface under high voltage (~8kV) and from the internal AD avalanche. For this reason , the HPD is expected to achieve higher single photon sensitivity and better timing resolution at a lower mass production cost than the conventional PMTs used in the baseline design of Hyper-Kamiokande. Implementation of HPDs in Hyper-Kamiokande could therefore improve its physics sensitivity. As part of our R&D we will evaluate the performance of a water Cherenkov detector using small size, 8-inch HPDs in 200-ton water tank before developing a 20-inch HPD for Hyper-Kamiokande. As a preparation for validation studies in 200-ton tank. The basic performance of sn 8-inch HPD was measured such as single photon sensitivity, timing resolution, uniformity of response, thermal and magnetic dependence and so on. Also we operated it in small water tank to guarantee safe and stable operation. These results and status will be presented.
        Speaker: Seiko Hirota (Kyoto University)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:10
      Gaseous Detectors EI8

      EI8

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Werner Riegler (CERN)
      • 16:30
        Measurements of the Gain, Time Resolution, and Spatial Resolution of a 20x20cm MCP-based Picosecond Photo-Detector 20m
        Microchannel plates (MCPs) allow for micron-level spatial imaging and picosecond-level time resolution, making them a good solution for the next generation of photo-detectors aiming for precision time-of-flight measurements. The Large-Area Picosecond Photo-Detector Collaboration (LAPPD) is currently developing a 20x20cm, thin, planar, glass-body detector with the MCPs serving as the gain stage. In such a detector photo-electrons ejected from a photo-cathode produce a cascade of secondary electrons in the pores of a pair of MCP's which are consequently collected at the anode circuit. The modular design allows covering large areas while keeping the number of electronics channels low. We report on the recent progress in the development of the detector components. We have built a complete detector system approximating the final detector design. We have measured gain up to 2$\times$10$^{7}$, time-of-flight resolution of $\sim$60~ps, differential time resolution of $\sim$6~ps, and spatial resolution of $\sim$0.6~mm.
        Speaker: Dr Andrey Elagin (University of Chicago)
        Slides
      • 16:55
        ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw Tube Gaseous Detectors at High Rates 20m
        The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three tracking subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector The ATLAS detector is located at LHC/CERN. We report on how these gaseous detectors (“straw tubes”) are performing during the ATLAS 2011 and 2012 runs where the TRT experiences higher rates than previously encountered. The TRT contains ~300000 thin-walled proportional-mode drift tubes providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with ~130 µm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, the TRT provides electron identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons. During the ATLAS 2012 proton-proton data runs, the TRT is operating successfully while being subjected to the highest rates of incident particles ever experienced by a large scale gaseous tracking system. As of the submission date of this abstract, the TRT has collected data in an environment with instantaneous proton-proton luminosity of ~0.8 x 10^34 s-1cm-2. While shadowing effects caused by up to 40 simultaneous proton-proton collisions per bunch crossing are noticeable, the TRT performs significantly better than design. It also contributes to the combined tracking system pT resolution and to electron identification. During LHC heavy ion running in 2011, the TRT contributed to measuring track pT even in events where overall occupancy exceeded 50%.
        Speaker: Adrian Vogel (Universitaet Bonn (DE))
        Proceedings (CDS Record)
        Slides
        Slides (CDS Record)
      • 17:20
        TRD detector development for CBM experiment 20m
        A TRD prototype based on a single multiwire proportional chamber coupled with a small drift region was developed for the most inner part of the CBM-TRD subdetector. It preserves the same gas thickness for transition radiation absorption as the small size double-sided prototype for which an extrapolated pion efficiency of ~1% for a six layers configuration was obtained and fulfills the requirement of high geometrical efficiency of the CBM-TRD stations. With the aim to access the position information in both coordinates of the readout electrode pad-plane (across and along the pads) with a single TRD layer, the original rectangular pads of the read-out electrode were split diagonally, each triangular pad being readout separately. A new Fast Analog Signal Processor (FASP) for pad signal processing has been developed. The detectors were tested with a mixed electron/pion beam of 1-10 GeV/c momenta at CERN PS. A pion efficiency of 1.18% for a six layer configuration based on such an architecture was obtained. The performance in two dimensional position resolution is reported. Based on these results, the geometry of the most inner zone of the first CBM-TRD station was designed.
        Speaker: Dr Mariana Petris (Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest, Romania)
        Slides
      • 17:45
        GridPix Characterisation and Development 20m
        The innovative GridPix detector is a micro TPC, read out with a Timepix pixelchip. Each individual element of the 256x256 pixel-matrix is connected to a preamplifier, discriminator and TDC (100MHz) for time of arrival measurements. By using wafer post processing techniques an aluminium grid is placed on top of the chip. When operated, the electric field in between the grid and the chip is sufficient to create single electron induced avalanches which are measured by the pixels. The digital counter is used to record the relative time enabling reconstruction of high precision 3D track segments. A SiRN protection layer protects the chip from discharges. Gossips are GridPix detectors proposed as inner tracker detectors in ATLAS. Because of the LHC frequency a drift gap of 1 mm is required. Low diffusion and sufficient ionisations are essential for accurate 3D tracking. Currently, time walk is the dominant error in the drift direction. In a detailed study, recent test beam data gave insight into the contribution of both diffusion and time walk to the positional and angular resolutions of a Gossip detector. In addition long term tests show that the protection layer successfully quenches discharges preventing harm to the chip. Recently, GridPix detectors were successfully made on full wafer scale, to meet the demand for more reliable and cheaper devices in large quantities. Wafer scale production opens a large variety of new possibilities and novel applications for GridPix.
        Speaker: Willem Koppert (NIKHEF (NL))
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:10
      Semiconductor Detectors 1 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Gianluigi Casse (University of Liverpool (GB))
      • 16:30
        DEPFET pixels as a vertex detector for the Belle II experiment 20m
        The successful heavy flavour factory KEKB, operating between 1999 and 2010 at KEK, Tsukuba, Japan, is currently being upgraded and is foreseen to start commissioning in the fall of 2014. The new e+e- collider (SuperKEKB) will provide an instantaneous luminosity of 8x10^35 cm^2/s, 40 times higher than the current world record set by KEKB. In order to handle the increased event rate and the higher background and to provide high data quality, the Belle detector is upgraded to Belle II. The increased particle rate requires a new vertex pixel detector with high granularity. This silicon detector will be based on the DEPFET technology and will consist of two layers of active pixel sensors. By integrating a field effect transistor into every pixel on top of a fully depleted bulk, the DEPFET technology combines detection as well as in-pixel amplification. This technology allows excellent signal to noise performance, complemented by a very low material budget by thinning down the sensors to 75 microns. The sensors will be operated with the dedicated chain of steering and readout ASICs. In this presentation the key parameters of the sensor design will be presented, together with the individual ASICS. Furthermore, supplemental systems like cooling, powering, mechanics, etc. will be described. Results of the prototypes tested in various particle beams will be shown as well as the expected performance at SuperKEKB.
        Speaker: Jochen Schieck (Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (DE))
        Slides
      • 16:55
        Beam test results of triggerless pixel prototypes for the PANDA MVD 20m
        The PANDA experiment will make use of cooled antiproton beams at the future FAIR facility. The physics goals dictate basic requirements to the Micro Vertex Detector of the experiment such as the capability to resolve secondary vertices of short-lived particles, limited material budget, additional information to the global PID by energy loss meaurement. Continuous readout and radiation tolerance are additional requests to the MVD, composed of thinned epitaxial silicon pixel and double sided silicon microstrips arranged in an asymmetric layout of four barrels around the interaction point and six forward disks. Thinned epitaxial silicon pixel assemblies (100umx100um each pixel) read out by ToPix_3 ASICs, developed in the 130 nm CMOS technology, have been tested at CERN-T9. The circuit is triggerless and then the channels are able to detect signals and transmit the information with a precise time stamp, including the energy loss measurement using the Time over Threshold technique. A single assembly was studied at several rotation angles using a strip tracking telescope, and a dedicated pixel tracking station, composed of four pixel planes, allowed to study the assembly performance in terms of residuals and efficiency, developing dedicated algorithms based on time windows to select hits belonging to the same event. 100 um and 150 um epitaxial silicon sensors were studied and an assembly pre-irradiated with neutrons was tested too. The results will be presented.
        Speaker: Daniela Calvo (INFN-Torino (IT))
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Fabrication, Characterisation and Test of a 3D Diamond Detector for Ionising Radiation 20m
        We report on the fabrication and test of the first prototype of a 3D diamond detector for applications in particle physics. Polycrystalline and single-crystal CVD diamond samples have been processed with a femto-second laser to create arrays of graphitic columns with a diameter of a few microns. This 3D geometry of read-out electrodes enhances the radiation hardness due to the reduced carrier drift path compared to conventional planar detector geometries. Such an approach had been successfully tested for silicon detectors where a significant improvement in radiation hardness has been obtained. By processing 3D electrodes, we studied the gain brought to the performances of CVD diamond detectors. The prototypes used conductive graphitic micro-channels, as fabricated within the diamond bulk using an femtosecond IR laser (800 nm). Electronic properties of the device were evaluated, including current-voltage, transient-current, and charge collection efficiency characteristics using a Sr-90 Source. Complete prototype single-crystal and polycrystalline 3D diamond detectors with multi-channel charge integrating read-out have been tested with minimum ionising radiation in particle beams (proton/pion beam at CERN). Finally IBIC measurements were used under heavy ions to probe the benefit of the approach and evaluate the gain in terms of radiation hardness. The obtained results prove the viability of 3D diamond detectors for particle physics for the first time.
        Speaker: Mr Benoit CAYLAR (CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory (FR))
        Slides
    • 19:30 22:30
      Soirée Musicale 3h Great Hall (Austrian Academy of Sciences)

      Great Hall

      Austrian Academy of Sciences

      Classical Concert

    • 09:00 10:40
      Cherenkov Detectors
      Convener: Peter Krizan (Jozef Stefan Institute (SI))
      • 09:00
        First Particle Identification with a Disc DIRC Detector 20m
        The PANDA experiment at the FAIR laboratory, currently under construction at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, requires excellent Particle Identification for its study of proton-antiproton reactions in the few GeV energy range. In the confined space of the PANDA Target Spectrometer, two RICH-type Cherenkov detectors mainly aim at pion-kaon separation: a Barrel-DIRC detector patterned after the BaBar-DIRC covering the central angles, and a Disc-DIRC detector for the forward theta angle range from 5 to 22 degrees. Such a Disc-DIRC design has not yet been used in production experiments. A demonstrator prototype, one quarter segment scaled to 80 percent of the PANDA geometry, constructed at Giessen university and equipped with 480 sensor pixels, has measured particles of several GeV/c in a cocktail secondary beam delivered by the T9 test beamline at CERN in October 2012. First analysis of the recorded hit patterns will be presented, compared to simulations and discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Klaus Föhl (Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen)
        Slides
      • 09:25
        Performance study of a position sensitive SiPM detector for Cherenkov applications 20m
        Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are multi-pixel APDs operated in Geiger mode. This photon detection technology is characterized by a high photon detection efficiency, low costs and an insensitivity to magnetic fields. These attributes make them suitable for detectors in many research fields, such as particle physics, nuclear physics or medical imaging. A prototype of a position sensitive Cherenkov detector was built, consisting of an array of 8 x 8 SiPMs with a light concentrator on top. The SiPMs have an active area of 3 x 3 mm2 with a pixel size of 100 x 100 µm2. With an entrance surface of 7 x 7 mm2 and an exit surface of 3 x 3 mm2, the light guide increases the detection area of the module, while providing sufficient position resolution for example for the barrel DIRC detector of the PANDA experiment at FAIR in Darmstadt The detector was tested under laboratory conditions by scanning the array in two dimensions, using a pulsed light-beam and two step motors. The light source is an LED with a wavelength range of 465-475 nm. The beam diameter was about the size of a SiPM pixel and the step size to move the beam was 100 µm. To define the collection efficiency of the light concentrator, measurements were done with and without light concentrator respectively and in dependence of the incident beam angle. The results will be compared with previous simulations and will be presented during the conference.
        Speaker: Mariana Narcisa Rihl (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
        Slides
      • 09:50
        The ATLAS Forward Detectors LUCID, ALFA and AFP – Past, Present and Future 20m
        LUCID is a gas Cerenkov detector deployed near to the beam‐pipe at 17 m either side of the ATLAS Intersection point. The LUCID detector ‐ when calibrated via a Van der Meer scan – is now measuring absolute luminosity on a bunch‐by‐bunch basis. It is now measuring integrated luminosity up to high luminosity with a precision of around 3%. The technical challenges that had to faced to make this measurement as well as upgrade plans for LUCID will be presented. In addition to LUCID, we will discuss that ALFA detector (Absolute Luminosity for ATLAS) and its status as well as the progress on the ATLAS Forward Protons project (AFP) that plans to deploy detectors to tag and measure, with 3‐D silicon detectors, both protons in exclusive central diffractive processes.
        Speaker: Davide Caforio (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Design and performance study of the TOP counter 20m
        A novel RICH detector called TOP counter has been developed for particle identification in Belle II. It measures a time of propagation (TOP) of Cherenkov photons traveling in the quartz radiator with a precision of 50 psec and reconstructs the Cherenkov ring image in the photon detection position-time plane. The key features of the TOP counter will be presented: a 2.5 m long quartz radiator composed of two quartz bars glued together, each of which is polished with roughness < 0.5 nm in RMS and flatness < 6.3 um to keep the Cherenkov ring image after hundreds of reflections on its surface; the focusing mirror at the end of the quartz to minimize the chromatic dispersion; at the other end 32 micro-channel-plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMTs), which are capable of detecting single photons with a timing resolution better than 50 psec. In addition, photon incident angle and polarization dependences of the MCP-PMT quantum efficiency will also be discussed because they are specifically important for the TOP counter which detects linearly polarized Cherenkov photons at various angles. A full-size prototype of the TOP counter was successfully built and it was tested with the 1-2 GeV electron beam at the Laser Electron Photon beamline at SPring-8 (LEPS). The obtained performance of the TOP counter prototype (for instance, the resolution of the reconstructed particle velocity) was as expected. Finally, the status and plan of the TOP counter construction will be presented.
        Speaker: Kodai Matsuoka (N)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:40
      Scintillating Detectors
      Convener: Vladimir Kekelidze (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (RU))
      • 09:00
        A Prototype Scintillating-Fibre Tracker for the Cosmic-ray Muon Tomography of Legacy Nuclear Waste Containers 20m
        Cosmic-ray muons are highly penetrative charged particles observed at sea level at a rate of 1 per square cm per min. They interact with matter primarily through Coulomb scattering. These properties are exploited in muon tomography to image objects inside industrial nuclear waste containers. A prototype scintillating-fibre detector has been developed at the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the UK National Nuclear Laboratory. This consists of two tracking modules above and two below the container to be assayed. Each module consists of two orthogonal planes of 2mm-pitch fibres yielding one spacepoint. Per plane, 128 fibres are read out by a Hamamatsu H8500 64-channel MAPMT with two fibres multiplexed onto each pixel. A dedicated mapping scheme has been developed to avoid spacepoint ambiguities and retain the high spatial resolution provided by the fibres. The configuration allows the reconstruction of the incoming and scattered muon trajectories, thus enabling the container content, with respect to atomic number Z, to be determined. A likelihood-based image reconstruction algorithm was developed and tested using a dedicated GEANT4 simulation of the prototype system and detailed modeling of muonic properties. Images reconstructed from this simulation are presented in comparison with preliminary results from data taken on a test setup. The experimental results verify the simulation and show clear discrimination between the low, medium and high-Z materials imaged.
        Speaker: David Mahon (University of Glasgow)
        Slides
      • 09:25
        Handy Compton camera using 3D position-sensitive scintillators coupled with large-area monolithicMPPC arrays 20m
        One year after Japan’s nuclear disaster, the invisible threat of radiation lingers around homes and businesses near the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant. Various gamma cameras are being developed and are now undergoing careful field tests. Although some are compact, the detector weight still exceeds 10 kg due to the thick mechanical collimator. Other models use electronic collimation but have relatively poor sensitivity especially for 137Cs and 134Cs gamma rays. We are developing a novel Compton camera weighing only ~1 kg and just ~10 cm cubic in size. Despite its compactness however, the camera realizes wide 180 deg vision with its sensitivity ~50 times superior to other cameras being tested in Fukushima. We expect that a hotspot producing a 5 micro-Sv/h dose at a distance of 3 meters can be imaged every 10 sec. The prototype camera consists of two identical 1 cm cubic 3D position-sensitive scintillation detectors (Ce:GAGG), developed through key in-house technology. By measuring the pulse-height ratio of MPPC-arrays coupled at both ends of a scintillation crystal block, the depth of interaction is obtained as well as the usual 2D positions. The average energy resolution of 10 % was obtained with the angular resolution better than 10 deg (FWHM) for 662 keV gamma rays. These results suggest that this gamma camera design is versatile and offers promise in various applications; not only as a survey device but also for nuclear medicine and high energy astrophysics.
        Speaker: Jun Kataoka (Waseda University)
        Slides
      • 09:50
        Recent developments on heavy inorganic scintillators with photonic crystal enhanced light extraction. 20m
        One of the problems in heavy scintillating materials is related to their high index of refraction. As a consequence, a large part of the scintillation light produced in the bulk material is trapped inside the crystal due to total internal reflection. Recent developments in the area of nanophotonics were showing now that those limitations can be overcome by introducing a photonic crystal slab at the outcoupling surface of the scintillator. In previous work we could show a theoretical light yield improvement of various scintillator materials when applying such a structure at the outcoupling side of the crystal. During the last two years we were working on further improving the structure towards maximal light extraction but also for better timing. In addition we refined our simulation tools to provide better information on the angular and timing distribution of emitted photons from the PhC structure. In the practical part of this work we show the results of the first PhC enhanced scintillator samples. Through the deposition of an auxiliary layer of silicon nitride and the adaptation of the standard electron beam lithography parameters we could successfully produce several PhC slabs on top of 1.2 x 2.x 5mm3 lutetium oxyorthosilicate scintillators. In the characterization process, the PhC samples showed a 30-60% light yield improvement when compared to an unstructured reference scintillator.
        Speaker: Arno Richard Knapitsch (CERN)
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Performance of Novel Oxide Scintillator Ce:(La,Gd)_2Si_2O_7 with a high energy resolution 20m
        Recently, we have developed a novel oxide scintillator (La,Gd)_2Si_2O_7 (La-GPS) crystal doped with 1-mol\% Ce grown by floating zone method. This crystal had excellent scintillation properties measured with a photomultiplier (PMT, Hamamatsu R7600U): a high light output of approximately 36,000 photons/MeV, good energy resolution (FWHM) of 5.0\% at 662 keV and fast decay time of 46 ns. Moreover, this material had no hygroscopic nature and intrinsic background. The maximum emission wavelength was approximately 390 nm. In addition, the Ce:La-GPS crystal had a good energy resolution (FWHM) of 7.7 \pm 0.1\% at 662 keV, even though we used a multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC, Hamamatsu S10362-33-050C) at 26.0 \pm 0.1^{\circ}C. La-GPS can be the most appropriate choice in low-counting-rate applications such as a Compton camera and radiation monitor. In this presentation, we report the performance of La-GPS scintillator.
        Speaker: Mr Akira Suzuki (Institute for Materials Research)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:40
      Semiconductor Detectors 2
      Convener: Ivan Vila Alvarez (Universidad de Cantabria (ES))
      • 09:00
        The LHCb Silicon Tracker 20m
        The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and search for New Physics using the enormous flux of beauty and charm hadrons produced at the LHC. The LHCb detector is a single-arm spectrometer with excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities. The Silicon Tracker is part of the tracking system and measures very precisely the particle trajectories coming from the interaction point in the region of high occupancies around the beam axis. The LHCb Silicon Tracker covers a total sensitive area of about 12 m2 using silicon micro-strip detectors with long readout strips. It consists of one four-layer tracking station before the LHCb dipole magnet and three stations after. The detector has performed extremely well since the start of the LHC operation despite the fact that the experiment is collecting data at instantaneous luminosities well above the design value. This paper reports on the operation and performance of the Silicon Tracker during the Physics data taking at the LHC during the last two years. The calibration procedures put in place will be discussed in addition to the intrinsic detector efficiency and resolution of the detector. Finally, measurements of the observed radiation damage will be shown and compared to that expected from simulation.
        Speaker: Mark Tobin (Universitaet Zuerich (CH))
        Slides
      • 09:25
        The Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector 20m
        The KEK-B machine and the Belle experiment in Tsukuba (Japan) are now undergoing an upgrade, leading to an ultimate luminosity of 8x10^35 cm-2 s-1 in order to measure rare decays in the B system with high statistics. The previous vertex detector cannot cope with a 40-fold increase of luminosity and thus needs to be replaced. Belle II will be equipped with a two-layer Pixel Detector, surrounding the beam pipe, and four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors (SVD=Silicon Vertex Detector) at higher radii than its predecessor. The SVD will have a total sensitive area of 1.14m2 and 223,744 channels - twice as many as the old detector. All silicon sensors will be made from 6" wafers in order to maximize their size and thus reduce the relative contribution of support structure. The forward part has slanted sensors of trapezoidal shape to improve the measurement precision and minimize the amount of material as seen by particles from the vertex. Fast-shaping front-end amplifiers will be used in conjunction with an online hit time reconstruction algorithm in order to reduce the occupancy to the level of a few percent at most. A novel "Origami" chip-on-sensor scheme is used to minimize both the distance between strips and amplifier (thus reducing the electronic noise) as well as the overall material budget. We will report on the status of the Belle II SVD and its components, including sensors, front-end detector ladders, mechanics, cooling and the readout electronics.
        Speaker: Dr Markus Friedl (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
        Slides
      • 09:50
        A Low Mass On-chip Readout Scheme for Double-sided Silicon Strip Detectors 20m
        B-factories like the KEK-B in Tsukuba, Japan, operate at relatively low energies and thus require detectors with very low material budget in order to minimize multiple scattering. On the other hand, front-end chips with short shaping time like the APV25 have to be placed as close to the sensor strips as possible to reduce the capacitive load, which mainly determines the noise figure. In order to achieve both - minimal material budget and low noise - we developed a readout scheme for double-sided silicon detectors, where the APV25 chips are placed on a flexible circuit, which is glued onto the top side of the sensor. The bottom-side strips are connected by two flexible circuits, which are bent around the edge of the sensor. This so-called “Origami” design will be utilized to build the Silicon Vertex Detector of the Belle II experiment, which will consist of 4 layers made from ladders with up to five double-sided silicon strip sensors in a row. Each ladder will be supported by two ribs made of a carbon fiber and Airex foam core sandwich. The heat dissipated by the front-end chips will be removed by a highly efficient two-phase CO2 system. Thanks to the Origami concept, all APV chips are aligned in a row and thus can be cooled by a single thin cooling pipe per ladder. We will present the concept and the assembly procedure of the Origami chip-on-sensor modules, and show results of beam tests which were performed at CERN on prototype modules.
        Speaker: Christian Irmler (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Resolution studies on the ohmic side of silicon microstrip sensors 20m
        High precision collider experiments at lepton accelerators and b-factories need highly accurate position resolution while preserving a low material budget for precise particle tracking. Thin double-sided silicon detectors (DSSDs) fulll both requirements, if a careful sensor design is applied to preserve a high charge collection effciency. In this continuation of a previous study we investigate the p-stop and the p-spray blocking methods for strip isolation on the n-side (ohmic side) of DSSDs with n-type bulk. We compare three different p-stop patterns: the common p-stop pattern, the atoll p-stop pattern and a combination of these patterns, whereas for every pattern four different geometric layouts are considered. Moreover we investigate the effect of the strip isolation on sensors with one intermediate strip. Sensors featuring these p-stop patterns and the p-spray blocking method were tested in a 120 GeV/c hadron beam at the SPS at CERN, gamma-irradiated to 100 kGy at SCK-CEN (Mol, Belgium), and immediately afterwards tested again in the same setup as before. In this new study we used a renwed p-stop design, had all sensor types irradiated, and for the first time use point resolution values obtained by particle tracking for judging the sensor performance. The results of these tests are used to optimize the design of DSSDs for the Belle II experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan).
        Speaker: Manfred Valentan (HEPHY Vienna)
        Slides
    • 10:40 11:30
      Poster Session B

      Posters displayed on a board with an odd number

    • 11:30 12:45
      Cherenkov Detectors EI8

      EI8

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Peter Krizan (Jozef Stefan Institute (SI))
      • 11:30
        STATUS OF THE NA62 RICH 20m
        NA62 is the last generation kaon experiment at CERN. Its main goal is to collect about 100 K+→π+νν events with 10% background. This implies to collect 10^13 K+ decays with a backgound rejection factor of at least 10^12. The challenging aspect of the experiment is the suppression of K decays with branching ratio up to 10 orders of magnitude higher than the signal and similar experimental signature, such as K+→μ+ν. To this purpose good PID (Particle IDentification) and kinematic rejection are required. Precise timing is needed to correctly associate the π+ with the parent K+ in an high rate environment. A RICH detector is proposed as PID element, to identify μ contaminating the π sample in the 15-35 GeV/c momentum range with inefficieny lower than 1% and to measure the π arrival time with precision better than 100 ps. It will also be a key element for the 1-track trigger. A vacuum-proof cylindrical vessel with 4 m diameter, about 17.5 m long, will be filled with Ne gas at atmospheric pressure. The Cherenkov light will be reflected by a mosaic of 20 hexagonal mirrors with 17 m focal length and collected by about 2000 PMT. The construction of the detector is almost completed and the installation will start in 2013. New and final results of the last prototype test at CERN, the updated description of the detector and the current status of the construction, the readout electronics and the trigger system based on the RICH will be presented.
        Speaker: Patrizia Cenci (INFN Perugia (IT))
        Slides
      • 11:55
        R&D for the high momentum particle identification upgrade detector for ALICE at LHC 20m
        The Very High Momentum Particle Identification (VHMPID) detector has been proposed as upgrade for the ALICE experiment at LHC to extend charged hadron track-by-track identification in the momentum range 5-25 GeV/c. It is a RICH counter with focusing geometry using pressurized perfluorobutane (C4F8O) as Cherenkov radiator. Three options are currently being investigated for the photon detector: a MWPC with CsI photocathode, a triple Thick GEM counter with top element coated with CsI and a commercial micro-channel plate with bialkali photocathode (Photonis Planacon XP85012). We will discuss the results of beam tests performed on RICH prototypes using both liquid C6F14 radiator (in proximity focusing geometry for reference measurements) and for the first time pressurized C4F8O gaseous radiator. In particular we will present studies of a CsI based gaseous photon detector equipped with a MWPC having adjustable anode-cathode gap, aiming at the optimization of the chamber layout and performance in the detection of single photoelectrons.
        Speaker: Antonello Di Mauro (CERN)
        Slides
      • 12:20
        Beam test of FARICH prototype with dSiPM 20m
        FARICH is a modern RICH detector based on variable refractive index 'focusing' aerogel. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) can be successfully employed in large RICH detectors due to their potentially low costs, compactness and immunity to magnetic field. Recently Philips has developed a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM) by integrating readout electronics on the same chip as the array of avalanche diodes using conventional CMOS process technology. dSiPM is a very promising candidate for modern high-energy physics detectors because it cardinally solves the problem of front-end electronics integration for high channel density and the solution is easily scalable. Moreover, dSiPM enables a significant reduction of dark count rates by switching off noisy SPADs. In June 2012 we tested a FARICH detector prototype based on dSiPM from Philips at the CERN PS T10 beam channel. The prototype consists of a 20x20 cm photon detector using 2304 dSiPM pixels of 4x4 mm size each. In order to reduce dark count rates the detector was cooled to -40C in addition to disabling individual SPADs. Two aerogel samples produced in Novosibirsk were studied. One is a four-layer 'focusing' aerogel and the other is a homogeneous aerogel. We have observed rings with 0.8 mm ring radius resolution and 14 photoelectrons for 6 GeV/c pions in the 'focusing' aerogel. Particle separation capability of FARICH along with several other results will be presented and compared to MC simulations.
        Speaker: Mr Sergey Kononov (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics)
        Slides
    • 11:30 12:45
      Scintillating Detectors EI9

      EI9

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Vladimir Kekelidze (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (RU))
      • 11:30
        Development of liquid scintillator containing zirconium complex for neutrinoless double beta decay experiment 20m
        An organic liquid scintillator containing zirconium complex was studied for neutrinosless double beta decay. We have synthesized tetrakis(8-quinolinolate) zirconium as a complex and found their good solubility (2 w.t.%) in Benzonitrile, which has good light yield of primary scintillation for gamma-rays. The photo-luminescence was measured, and the maximum peak was found around 548nm. We made liquid scintillator cocktail using both PPO and POPOP, and measured energy spectrum from induced gamma rays. However, the light yield was very small. In order to shorten emission wave length, we introduced Dimethoxy-Tiazine as substituent group, and succeeded to obtain larger quantum yield and light yield than those of original complex. We are developing another zirconium complex. Zirconium beta-diketon complex has a huge solubility (over 10w.t.%) for anisole, however, it does not have a luminescence, and the absorbance of ligand overlaps with the luminescence from anisole. Therefore, the light yield should be weaker as proportional to the concentration of complex. In order to avoid this problem, we are planning to synthesize beta-keto ester complex with -OC3H7 or -OC2H5 substituent groups. These complexes have much shorter wavelength of the absorbance than the emission of anisole. We are also synthesizing Zr-ODZ complex, which should have both large quantum yield and good emission wave length. Here we report these new ideas of liquid scintillator containing zirconium complex.
        Speaker: Prof. Yoshiyuki Fukuda (Faculyu of Education, Miyagi University of Education)
        Slides
      • 11:55
        The dual light-emitting crystals detector for WIMPs direct searches 20m
        The dual light-emitting crystals can reflect the different ranges of nuclear recoils and electron recoils by the ratio of the two different scintillation components. CsI(Na) crystals at temperatures of ~-100 ℃ have the best performance in several candidate crystals. An experiment called CINDMS is proposed for WIMPs direct searches based on the CsI(Na) crystals detector by IHEP. The 1T-scale experimental threshold is expected to be in the world advanced level through the background estimates. The initial stage of a 100 kg scale experiment called CINDMS100 is under construction at Daya Bay neutrino experiment underground laboratory for the accumulation of technology. CINDMS1T or more large-scale experiment may be located deep underground laboratory of Jinping Mountain in Sichuan, China. This location provides vastly improved shielding from cosmogenic events which will reduce interference of known backgrounds particles.
        Speaker: Dr Xilei Sun (IHEP)
        Slides
      • 12:20
        Scintillating bolometers: a promising tool for rare decays search 20m
        The first idea of using a scintillating bolometer was suggested for solar neutrino experiments in 1989. After many years of developments, now we are able to exploit this experimental technique, based on the calorimetric approach with cryogenic particle detectors, to investigate rare events such as Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and interaction of Dark Matter candidates. The possibility to have high resolution detectors in which a very large part of the natural background can be discriminated with respect to the weak expected signal, results very appealing. The goal can be achieved by means of scintillating bolometers, which allow to distinguish the different type of interactions in the detector. The simultaneous read-out of the heat and scintillation signals made with two independent bolometers enable this precious feature, leading to possible background free experiment. In the frame of the LUCIFER project, we report on how exploiting this technique to investigate Double Beta Decay for different isotope candidates. Moreover we demonstrate how scintillating bolometers are suitable for investigating other rare events such as alpha decays of long living isotopes of Lead and Bismuth.
        Speaker: Dr Luca Pattavina (I.N.F.N. Milano-Bicocca)
        Slides
    • 11:30 12:45
      Semiconductor Detectors 2 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Ivan Vila Alvarez (Universidad de Cantabria (ES))
      • 11:30
        The upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System 20m
        ALICE is a general purpose experiment dedicated to the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC. After more than 3 years of successful operation, an upgrade of the apparatus during the second long shutdown of LHC (LS2) in 2017/18 is under study. One of the major goal of the proposed upgrade is to extend the physics reach for rare probes at low transverse momentum. The current Inner Tracking System (ITS), made of 6 layers of three technologies of silicon detectors, plays a key role in the determination of the primary and secondary vertices, complements the tracking performed by the Time Projection Chamber and the particle identification at low momentum by means of the specific energy loss dE/dx in silicon. The new ITS will consist of 7 layers of silicon detectors with significantly increased single point resolution and reduced material budget, allowing an improvement of a factor 3 of the impact parameter resolution. Moreover the data rate capability of the new ITS will be able to record the full expected LHC lead-lead interaction rate of 50 kHz, almost two orders of magnitude above the present readout rate. In this contribution the technical requirements and the ongoing developments of the different detector technologies under study will be presented, together with the first results from prototypes and the integration concepts.
        Speaker: Dr Serhiy Senyukov (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (FR))
        Slides
      • 11:55
        Development of a Level 1 Track Trigger for the CMS Experiment towards a High-Luminosity LHC scenario 20m
        Over the next decade, several upgrades in the LHC and its injector chain will eventually increase the luminosity by up to a factor of 10 compared to the original design figure of 1034 cm-2s-1. In order to cope with the large number of interactions per bunch crossing, a novel tracking system for the CMS experiment will be designed and built. The new tracker will also provide information to the Level-1 trigger decision, in order to improve the ability of selecting interesting physics channels in a higher density environment. The CMS collaboration is developing a novel module concept (“pT module”), where signals from two closely-spaced sensors are correlated in the front-end electronics, to select pairs of hits compatible with particle pT above a certain threshold. Selected pairs of hits, called “track stubs”, represent between 5% and 10% of the overall data rate: such reduction factor enables the data processing at Level-1. Two main types of pT modules are being developed, one based on strip sensors, and the other coupling a strip sensor with a pixelated sensor, which provides also precise information in the z coordinate. The main features of the pT module options under development are reviewed, as well as the benchmark results from simulation studies.
        Speaker: Nicola Pozzobon (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 12:20
        A new vendor for high volume production of silicon particle detectors 20m
        Most modern particle physics experiments use silicon based sensors for their tracking systems. These sensors are able to detect particles generated in high energy collisions with high spatial resolution and therefore allow the precise reconstruction of particle tracks. So far only a few vendors were capable of producing silicon strip sensors with the quality needed in particle physics experiments. Together with the European-based semiconductor manufacturer Infineon Technologies AG (Infineon) the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (HEPHY) developed planar silicon strip sensors in p-on-n technology. This talk presents the development, production, electrical characterization, beam tests and gamma-irradiation of the first sensors produced by Infineon. This cooperation offers the possibility to establish Infineon as a high quality vendor for particle physics detectors capable of a high volume production required by future particle physics experiments.
        Speaker: Marko Dragicevic (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:40
      Calorimeters
      Convener: Marcella Diemoz (Universita e INFN, Roma I (IT))
      • 09:00
        PERFORMANCE OF THE LHCb DETECTOR DURING THE LHC PROTON RUNS 2010- 2012 20m
        The status and performance of the LHCb detector during the physics LHC physics run is described. The LHCb detector has a number of notable features including: 12 micron resolution in the transverse plane on 30-35 track primary vertices, pion and kaon separation from 1 to 100 GeV, and 1 MHz full readout of all sub-systems. The detector is being operating at twice its design Luminosity and the sub-system performance will be discussed. Hardware and software based trigger levels are utilised to efficiently select leptonic and hadronic decays of beauty and charm hadrons. During 2012 a so called ‘deferred’ triggering scheme has been used and will be presented. The alignment, tracking and particle identification performance will be discussed, together with effects of detector ageing.
        Speaker: Francesco Dettori (NIKHEF (NL))
        Slides
      • 09:25
        The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter: performance and role in the discovery of the Higgs boson 20m
        The signature of the two-photon decay of a low-mass Higgs boson is a narrow resonance, smeared by the photon energy resolution, over a large continuum background. The excellent energy resolution and photon identification capabilities of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) at the LHC enhance the experimental sensitivity to this decay mode. The ECAL is a hermetic, fine grained and homogeneous calorimeter containing 75848 lead-tungstate (PbWO4) crystals, located inside the CMS superconducting solenoidal magnet. The scintillation light is detected by avalanche photodiodes (APDs) in the barrel section and by vacuum phototriodes (VPTs) in the two endcap sections. A silicon/lead pre-shower detector is installed in front of the endcaps. The ECAL performance is presented in detail and its role in the hunt for the Higgs boson, through the two-photon decay mode, is discussed.
        Speaker: Julie Malcles (CEA - Centre d'Etudes de Saclay (FR))
        Slides
      • 09:50
        New results from the RD52 (DREAM) project 20m
        Simultaneous detection of the Cherenkov light and scintillation light produced in hadron showers makes it possible to measure the electromagnetic shower fraction event by event and thus eliminate the detrimental effects of fluctuations in this fraction on the performance of hadron calorimeters. In the RD52 (DREAM) project, the possibilities of this dual-readout calorimetry are investigated and optimized. In this talk, the latest results of this project will be presented. These results concern the performance of a matrix of molybdenum doped lead tungstate crystals built for this purpose, new data on the application of the polarization of Cherenkov light in this context, particle ID based on the time structure of the signals, and the first test results of prototype modules for the new full-scale DREAM fiber calorimeter.
        Speaker: Prof. Richard WIGMANS (Texas Tech University)
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Construction and testing of a large scale prototype of a silicon tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter for a future lepton collider 20m
        The CALICE collaboration is preparing large scale prototypes for highly granular calorimeters for detectors to be operated at a future linear electron positron collider. After several beam campaigns at DESY, CERN and FNAL, the CALICE collaboration has demonstrated the principle of highly granular electromagnetic calorimeters with a first prototype called physics prototype. The next prototype, called technological prototype, addresses the engineering challenges which come along with the realisation of highly granular calorimeters. This prototype will comprise 30 layers where each layer is composed of four 9 cm x 9 cm silicon wafer. The front end electronics is integrated into the detector layers. The size of each pixel is 5 mm x 5 mm. This prototype enters its construction phase. We present results of the first layers of the technological prototype obtained during beam test campaigns in spring and summer 2012. According to these results the signal over noise ratio of the detector exceeds the R&D goal of 10:1. The front end electronics will be power pulsed synchronous to the time structure of the beam at the linear collider. This most important feature will be tested during the winter 2012/13. The test will comprise beam tests with high energy particles and functional tests in a magnetic field. The talk will report on these results as well. Finally the next R&D steps and the way towards the construction of a full detector will be outlined.
        Speaker: Jeremy Rouene (Universite de Paris-Sud 11 (FR))
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:40
      Semiconductor Detectors 3
      Convener: Jochen Schieck (Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (DE))
      • 09:00
        Silicon Sensors for HL-LHC Tracking Detectors – RD50 Status Report 20m
        It is foreseen to significantly increase the luminosity of the LHC by upgrading towards the HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in order to harvest the maximum physics potential. Especially the PhaseII-Upgrade foreseen for 2021 will mean unprecedented radiation levels. All-silicon central trackers are being studied in ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, with extremely radiation hard silicon sensors to be employed on the innermost layers. Within the RD50 Collaboration, a massive R&D programme is underway across experimental boundaries to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. One research topic is to study sensors made from p-type silicon bulk, which have a superior radiation hardness as they collect electrons instead of holes. A further area of activity is the development of advanced sensor types like 3D silicon detectors designed for the extreme radiation levels expected for the inner layers. We will present results of several detector technologies and silicon materials at radiation levels corresponding to HL-LHC fluences. Observations of charge multiplication effects at very high bias voltages in a number of detectors will be reported. In this context, we will show first measurements from a set of dedicated detectors designed in order to better understand the charge multiplication mechanism, Based on our results, we will give recommendations for the silicon detectors to be used for LHC detector upgrades.
        Speaker: Igor Mandic (Jozef Stefan Institute (SI))
        Slides
      • 09:25
        Study of High-dose X-ray Radiation Damage of Silicon Sensors 20m
        The high intensity and high repetition rate of XFEL, the European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser presently under construction in Hamburg, results in X-ray doses of up to 1 GGy in pixel sensors for 3 years of operation. Within the AGIPD Collaboration the Hamburg group has systematically studied X-ray damage using test structures and segmented sensors fabricated on high-ohmic n-type silicon. MOS Capacitors and Gate Controlled Diodes from 4 vendors with different crystal orientations and different technological parameters, as well as strip sensors have been irradiated in the dose range between 10 kGy and 1 GGy. Current-Voltage, Capacitance/Conductance-Voltage and Thermal Dielectric Relaxation Current measurements were used to extract oxide-charge densities, interface-trap densities and surface-current densities as function of dose and annealing conditions. The results have been implemented into TCAD simulations, and the radiation performance of strip sensors and guard ring structures simulated and compared to the experimental results. Finally, with the help of detailed TCAD simulations, the layout and technological parameters of the AGIPD pixel sensor has been optimized. It is found that the optimization for sensor exposed to high X-ray doses is significantly different than of non-irradiated sensors and that the specifications of the AGIPD sensor can be met.
        Speaker: Prof. Robert Klanner (Hamburg University)
        Slides
      • 09:50
        Planar silicon sensors for the CMS Tracker upgrade 20m
        The CMS tracker collaboration has initiated a large material investigation and irradia- tion campaign to identify the silicon material and design that fulfills all requirements for detectors for the high luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). A variety of silicon p − in − n and n − in − p test-sensors made from Float Zone (FZ), Magnetic Czochralski (MCz) and epitaxially grown (Epi) materials were manufactured by one single industrial producer (Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.). Thus guaranteeing similar conditions for the production and design of the test-structures, properties of different silicon materials and design choices have been systematically studied and compared. The samples have been irradiated with 1 MeV neutrons and protons corresponding to max- imal fluences as expected for the positions of detector layers in the future tracker. Three different proton energies have been used (23 MeV, 800 MeV and 23 GeV) in order to eval- uate the energy dependance of the defect generation in oxygen rich material. All materials have been characterized before and after irradiations, and throughout an an- nealing treatment. The measurements performed on the structures include electrical sensor characterization, measurement of the collected charge injected with beta sources and laser light and bulk defect characterization. In this talk, results from the ongoing campaign are presented.
        Speaker: Alexandra Junkes (Brown University)
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Investigating Radiation induced Bulk Defects and its Influence on Doping Profiles 20m
        In most High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments tracking and vertexing is realized by silicon detectors. Sensors, which are foreseen to be used at future collider experiments like the HL-LHC are exposed to a very challenging radiation environment. Due to radiation induced lattice defects the effective doping concentration of such sensors crucially changes and additional energy levels inside the band gap are created. Frequency dependent Capacitance Voltage (CV) methods are used to investigate deep-levels defects. The radiation influence on shallow-level defects in the bulk as well as in doping profiles is investigated with a Spreading Resistance Probe (SRP) technique. Therefore the doping profiles of neutron irradiated n-bulk samples were measured with SRP and a decreasing implantation depth with increasing fluences is determined. Additional CV measurements on electrical structures of the same samples were done. The results contain effects not considered in literature and are of special interest concerning the problems of type inversion and double junction.
        Speaker: Wolfgang Treberer-Treberspurg (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
        Slides
    • 10:40 11:30
      Poster Session A

      Posters displayed on a board with an even number

    • 11:30 12:45
      Calorimeters EI8

      EI8

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Marcella Diemoz (Universita e INFN, Roma I (IT))
      • 11:30
        Polarization as a Tool in High Energy Calorimetry 20m
        The signals from a high-Z scintillating crystal (BSO) are studied to characterize Cherenkov light polarization and to measure the longitudinal polarization profile of Cherenkov light in electromagnetic showers. The scintillation and Cherenkov lights can be separated by making use of the fact that the latter is polarized in the context of dual-readout calorimetry. In addition, this unique characteristic of Cherenkov light opens up a new set of possibilities that range from high-energy calorimetry to atmospheric air showers where significant improvements seem possible.
        Speaker: Nural Akchurin (Texas Tech University (US))
        Slides
      • 11:55
        A totally Active Scintillator Calorimeter for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment 20m
        The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a totally active scintillator detector to be installed in the muon beam of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) - the main R&D project for the future neutrino factory. It is aimed at measuring properties of low energy beam composed of muons, electrons and pions performing the identification particle by particle. The EMR is made of 48 intersecting layers. Each layer consists of 59 triangular scintillator bars. It is shown that the granularity of the detector makes it possible to identify tracks and measure particle ranges and shower shapes. The read-out is based on FPGA custom made electronics and commercially available modules. Currently it is being built at the University of Geneva and it is planned to install it in MICE in the first quarter of 2013.
        Speaker: Ruslan Asfandiyarov (Universite de Geneve (CH))
        Slides
      • 12:20
        A LYSO calorimeter for the SuperB factory 20m
        The SuperB project is an asymmetric e+e− accelerator of 10^36cm−2s−1 design luminosity, capable of collecting a data sample of 75 ab−1 in five years running. The SuperB electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) provides energy and direction measurement of photons and electrons, and is used for identification of electrons versus other charged particles. In particular we present its design, geometry study and related simulations, as well as R&D on LYSO crystals and developments on readout electronics. A matrix of 25 crystals has been tested at the Beam Test Facility of Frascati (BTF) in May 2011 at energies between 100 MeV and 500 MeV. Results from this test are presented.
        Speaker: Alessandro Rossi (INFN Perugia)
        Slides
    • 11:30 12:45
      Semiconductor Detectors 3 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Jochen Schieck (Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (DE))
      • 11:30
        Performance and Radiation Damage Effects in the LHCb Vertex Locator 20m
        LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study New Physics in the decays of heavy hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Heavy hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the VELO, the retractable silicon-strip vertex detector surrounding the LHCb interaction point at only 7 mm from the beam during normal LHC operation. Both VELO halves comprise 21 silicon micro-strip modules each. A module is made of two n-on-n 300 µm thick half-disc sensors with R- and phi-measuring geometry, mounted on a carbon fibre support paddle. The minimum pitch is approximately 40 µm. The detector is also equipped with the only n-on-p module operating at the LHC. The performance of the VELO in its three years of successful operation during the LHC physics runs will be presented. Highlights will include alignment, cluster finding efficiency, single hit resolution, and impact parameter and vertex resolutions. The VELO module sensors receive a large and non-uniform radiation dose having inner and outer radii of only 7 and 42 mm, respectively. In this extreme and highly non-uniform radiation environment type-inversion of the inner part of the n-on-n sensors has already been measured. Radiation damage is monitored and studied in three ways: (1) dependence of sensor currents on voltage and temperature; (2) noise versus voltage behaviour; and (3) cluster finding efficiency. Results will be presented in all three areas with updates based on recent results from the 2012 LHC running.
        Speaker: Dr Stefano De Capua (University of Manchester (GB))
        Slides
      • 11:55
        Analysis of test beam data by global optimization methods 20m
        Successful track reconstruction in a silicon tracking device depends on the quality of the alignment, on the knowledge of the sensor resolution, and on the knowledge of the amount of material traversed by the particles. We describe algorithms for the concurrent estimation of alignment parameters, sensor resolutions and material thickness in the context of a test-beam setup. They are based on a global optimization approach and are designed to work both with and without prior information from a reference telescope. We present results from two beam tests with sensors designed for the Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector. We also discuss whether and how the global optimization approach can be transferred from a simple test-beam setup to a full-scale tracker.
        Speaker: Rudolf Fruhwirth (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
        Slides
      • 12:20
        Track finding in silicon trackers with a small number of layers 20m
        We present software based on novel techniques, developed for track finding in silicon trackers with a small number of layers. The core algorithm is a cellular automaton, followed by a Kalman filter and Hopfield neural network. We present results from two test cases. The first one is the Forward Tracking Detector (FTD) of the International Large Detector (ILD) at a future linear collider, which covers the forward and the backward region between the beam tube and the TPC. It consists of 7 disk-shaped silicon detectors on either side - two with pixel sensors and five with double-sided silicon strip sensors. We give some details on the implementation in the ILD software framework, and present results on simulated events without and with background. These show that our method performs better than the previously used one in terms of efficiency, ghost rate and processing speed. The second test case is the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) of the Belle II experiment at the B factory at KEK, which is a new device between the vertex detector and the central drift chamber. It consists of only four cylindrical layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors. The focus of this study is on the reconstruction of very low momentum tracks that miss the surrounding drift chamber. We present results from simulated data, including ghost hits and hits from the machine background.
        Speaker: Jakob Lettenbichler (Institute of High Energy Physics, Vienna)
        Slides
    • 12:45 14:00
      Lunch Break 1h 15m
    • 14:00 15:40
      Electronics
      Convener: Dr Markus Friedl (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 14:00
        A Tracker for the Mu3e Experiment based on High-Voltage Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors 20m
        The Mu3e experiment searches for the lepton flavour violating decay μ+→e+e-e+, aiming for a branching fraction sensitivity of 10-16. This requires an excellent momentum resolution for low energy electrons, high rate capability and a large acceptance. In order to minimize multiple scattering, the amount of material has to be as small as possible. These challenges can be met with a tracker built from high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors (HV-MAPS), which can be thinned to 50 μm and which incorporate the complete read-out electronics on the sensor chip. To further minimise material, the sensors are supported by a mechanical structure built from 25 μm thick Kapton foil and cooled with gaseous helium. The talk discusses the progress towards building this tracker in the areas of sensor development, mechanics and cooling.
        Speaker: Niklaus Berger (Uni Heidelberg)
        Slides
      • 14:25
        Optimisation of CMOS pixel sensors for high performance vertexing and tracking 20m
        CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) with a column parallel read-out architecture and developed in a 0.35 um technology have already met the requirements of several high energy projects (EUDET, STAR-HFT, ILC) where spatial resolution and material budget govern the specifications. The full potential of CPS is however not yet reached, and can answer the demand of future vertex detectors (ALICE, SuperB, eIC) for faster integration time and stronger radiation tolerance, on condition to exploit a CMOS process with the appropriate characteristics. In this context, we report on the in-beam test of a CPS prototype fabricated in a 0.18 um technology processed over a low doping epitaxial layer. Results indicate excellent charge collection properties greatly alleviating the irradiation effect up to the range of 1014 n_eq/cm2 and 1 MRad. This observation holds as well for rectangular-shape pixels, which offer the added value of a reduced integration time in the proposed read-out architecture. Based on these achievements, we indicate the development path toward sensors featuring integration time much below 50 microsecond or large wedge-shape surface for forward tracking, always using the initial column-parallel read-out approach. Our conclusion underlines that the virtue of this architecture lies in its low power dissipation, a few 100 mW/cm2. Indeed it guarantees to keep the benefit of the genuine very low material budget of monolithic sensors, of prime importance for tracking systems.
        Speaker: Jerome Baudot (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (FR))
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Monolithic pixel detectors with 0.2 um FD-SOI pixel process technology 20m
        Truly monolithic pixel detectors were fabricated with 0.2 um SOI pixel process technology by collaborating with LAPIS Semiconductor Co., Ltd. for particle tracking experiment, X-ray imaging and medical application. CMOS circuits were fabricated on a thin SOI layer and connected to diodes formed on the silicon handle wafer through the buried oxide layer. We can choose the handle wafer and therefore high-resistivity silicons are also available. When Float Zone (FZ-) SOI wafers in which the thickness is about 500 um are used as the handle wafer, it can be fully-depleted with back-bias voltages of about 100 V. Double SOI (D-SOI) wafers fabricated from Czochralski(CZ)-SOI wafers were newly obtained and successfully processed in 2012. The top SOI layers are used as electric circuits and the middle SOI layers used as a shield layer against the back-gating effect, the cross-talk between sensors and CMOS circuits, and the total ionizing dose (TID) effect. KEK organizes Multi Project Wafer (MPW) runs in every year, in which many designs provided by Universities and institutions over the world are put together. In 2012, we developed several types of pixel detectors and some transistor test chips. Characteristics of the transistors and sensors fabricated with D-SOI were compared with that with single SOI. In presentation, the up-to-date test results will be shown.
        Speaker: Dr Toshinobu Miyoshi (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (JP))
        Slides
      • 15:15
        3-Dimensional ASIC Development at Fermilab 20m
        For several years, Fermilab has been heavily involved in the development of novel 3-dimensional analog and digital ASIC circuits. These devices consist of thinned wafer layers with circuits bonded to each other to act as monolithic forms. Communication between the layers and across the stacks is achieved with micron-size through-silicon-vias. Enabling a new dimension in integrated circuits allows for new forms of virtually edgeless detectors, in-situ signal processing, and flexibility of attachment to sensors. We are exploring various applications for these type of circuits, including high energy particle track-triggering, highly granular trackers and time correlating X-ray imagers for photon science. Another application of the 3D technology is a hardware track finding engine using stacked associative memory structures for LHC upgrades. I will summarize Fermilab's work in this area, including test results on fabricated chips and plans for the future.
        Speaker: erik ramberg (Fermilab)
        Slides
    • 14:00 15:40
      Medical Applications
      Convener: Grigori Feofilov (St. Petersburg State University (RU))
      • 14:00
        Development and Performance Evaluation of a Simultaneous PET-MR Detector based on the ClearPEM Technology 20m
        We present a feasibility study of the ClearPEM technology for simultaneous PET-MR imaging. The basic ClearPEM detector module is composed of 12 LYSO:Ce crystal matrices, each with 4x8 individual crystals (2x2x20mm3) optically coupled on both ends to S8550 hamamatsu APD arrays that are read out by two front-end boards. Each board integrates two low-noise ASICs of 192 channels each for APD readout, pulse amplification and shaping. The board also performs sequential analog-to-digital conversion and data serialization and transmission to the off-detector DAQ system. Mutual electromagnetic interference effects between both systems were evaluated on a 7T MR scanner by characterizing the response behavior and the tolerance of the ClearPEM detectors and front-end electronics to the pulsed RF power and the switched magnetic field gradients; and by analyzing the MR system performance degradation from noise pickup into the RF receiver chain, and from magnetic susceptibility artifacts caused by PET front-end materials. In the present work we will also present the first detection performance results of the ClearPEM module working simultaneously with a MRI acquisition; and our prototype developments on a new approach of a ClearPEM based detector for simultaneous small-animal PET-MR imaging at ultra-high magnetic fields (9.4 and 14.1T).
        Speaker: Dr Jorge A. Neves (LIP - Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particle Physics, Lisbon, Portugal)
        Slides
      • 14:25
        Combining Endoscopic Ultrasound with Time-Of-Flight PET: the EndoTOFPET-US Project 20m
        Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in males. Pancreas cancer, on the other hand, is among the deadliest cancers. Both require advanced imaging techniques for their diagnosis and staging. The endoTOFPET-US collaboration develops a multimodal imaging technique for endoscopic exams. It combines the benefits of high resolution metabolic imaging with Time-Of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and anatomical imaging with ultrasound (US). EndoTOFPET-US consists in an PET head extension for a commercial US endoscope and a PET plate outside the body in coincidence with the head. This paper presents the functionality and development of this novel instrument. The high level of miniaturization and integration creates challenges in fields such as scintillating crystals, ultra-fast photo-detection, highly integrated electronics, system integration and image reconstruction. Amongst the developments, we highlight the use of fast scintillators coupled to optical elements that concentrate the light on the active area of the photodetector as well as fast and compact digital SiPMs with single SPAD readout to obtain the best coincidence time resolution (CTR). In view of the targeted resolution of ~1 mm in the reconstructed image, we present a prototype detector system with a CTR of better than 240ps FWHM. We discuss the challenges in simulating such a system and introduce reconstruction algorithms based on graphics processing units (GPU).
        Speaker: Benjamin Armand Frisch (CERN)
        Slides
      • 14:50
        A PET TOF endorectal probe, compatible with MRI, for diagnosis and follow up of prostate and other pelvic region cancers 20m
        Prostate Carcinoma, is a heterogeneous disease, asymptomatic to rapidly systemic malignancy. Standard techniques cannot detect early disease. An endorectal PET-TOF MRI probe would solve the problem. The internal probe has to be used in coincidence with external dedicated detectors and/or a standard PET. The performance of the probe dominates, with improvement in spatial resolution and efficiency. The electronics has to measure with a precision of 300 ps or less. The photodetectors have to be Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM), for timing properties, compactness and MRI compatibility. Dual imaging agents PET allow for a trimodality imaging platform, helping in detecting limph nodes and tumor margins. Results from simulation show spatial resolution of ~1.5 mm for source distances up to 80 mm; the efficiency is significantly improved with respect to the external PET. A discrete electronics system, based on ASIC has been designed and built. Minidetectors have been built and tested. We obtained, for the first time, timing resolution of 300 ps and at the same time Depth Of Interaction (DOI) resolution of 1 mm or less. The proposed detector can be used for several dieases.. It is an advanced and innovative multimodality imaging molecular system of the pelvic region that will merge anatomical and metabolic details from (simultaneous) TOF-PET/MRI imagers for diagnosis and follow up of several cancers: Adenocarcinoma Endocervical, and Lynch Syndrome in women and Prostate cancer in men
        Speaker: Dr Franco Garibaldi (INFN Roma1)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        COMPET: High Resolution High Sensitivity MRI Compatible Pre-Clinical PET Scanner 20m
        COMPET is a pre-clinical MRI compatible PET scanner which decouples sensitivity and resolution by the use of a novel detector design. The detector is built using square 8 × 8 cm layers consisting of 30 LYSO crystals interleaved with 24 Wavelength shifting fibers (WLS). By stacking several layers into a module, the point-of-interaction (POI) can be measured in 3D. Four layers forms a PET ring where the sensitivity can be increased by stacking several layers. The layers can be stacked such that no inter-crystal or inter-module gap is formed. COMPET has used four assembled layers for module and scanner characterization. The modules are connected to the COMPET data-acquisition chain and the images are reconstructed with a novel geometry independent COMPET image reconstruction algorithm. Time and Energy resolution has been resolved and found to be 1.2 ns and 14% respectively. Tests for MRI interference and count rate performance has been carried out. The reconstruction algorithm has been verified with data acquired from COMPET full ring PET scanner.
        Speaker: Kim-Eigard Hines (University of Oslo)
        Slides
    • 15:40 16:30
      Poster Session B

      Posters displayed on a board with an odd number

    • 16:30 18:10
      Electronics EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Hartmut Sadrozinski (SCIPP, UC santa Cruz)
      • 16:30
        The first fully functional 3D CMOS chip with Deep N-well active pixel sensors for the ILC vertex detector 20m
        This work presents the characterization of Deep N-Well (DNW) active pixel sensors fabricated in a vertically integrated technology. The DNW approach takes advantage of the triple well structure to lay out a sensor with relatively large charge collecting area (as compared to standard three transistor MAPS), while the readout is performed by a classical signal processing chain for capacitive detectors. This new 3D design relies upon stacking two homogeneous tiers fabricated in a 130nm CMOS process where the top tier is thinned down to about 12um to expose the through silicon vias (TSV), therefore making connection to the buried circuit possible. This technology has been used to design a fine pitch 3D CMOS sensor with sparsification capabilities, in view of vertexing applications to the International Linear Collider (ILC) experiments. Results from the characterization activity on the SDR1 chip and on different kind of test structures, including single pixels, 3x3, 8x8 and 16x16 matrices will be presented at the conference.
        Speaker: Dr Gianluca Traversi (University of Bergamo)
        Slides
      • 16:55
        The TDCpix readout ASIC: a 75 ps resolution timing front-end for the NA62 Gigatracker hybrid pixel detector 20m
        The TDCpix is a novel pixel readout ASIC for the NA62 Gigatracker detector. NA62 is a new experiment being installed at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. Its Gigatracker detector shall provide on-beam tracking and time stamping of individual particles with a time resolution of 150 ps rms. It will consist of three tracking stations, each with one hybrid pixel sensor. The peak flow of particles crossing the detector modules reaches 1.27 MHz/mm^2 for a total rate of about 0.75 GHz. Ten TDCpix chips will be bump-bonded to every silicon pixel sensor. Each chip shall perform time stamping of 100 M particle hits per second with a timing accuracy better than 200 ps rms and a detection efficiency above 99%. The TDCpix chip has been designed in a 130 nm CMOS technology. It will feature 45 × 40 square pixels of 300×300 µm^2 and a complex End of Column peripheral region including an array of TDCs based on DLLs, four high speed serializers, a low-jitter PLL, readout and control circuits. This contribution will describe the complete design of the final TDCpix ASIC. It will discuss design choices, the challenges faced and some of the lessons learned. Furthermore, experimental results from the testing of circuit prototypes will be presented. These demonstrate the achievement of key performance figures such as a time resolution of the processing chain of 75 ps rms and the capability of time stamping charged particles with an overall resolution below 200 ps rms.
        Speaker: Alex Kluge (CERN)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        First Results from Medipix in Space 20m
        A talk was given at the last VCI demonstrating the capabilities of the pixel detector technology developed by the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration and outlining the plans to develop dosimeters and radiation area monitors for use in characterizing space radiation. In the interim, a number of devices have been sent to the International Space Station and are being used to obtain operating these devices in that environment. This has been coupled with an extensive ground-based accelerator evaluation of the response of these detectors to incident charged particles including heavy ions in order to evaluate both the effects of the ionization of such large quantities of electron-hole pairs in initially fully depleted Si sensors, as well as the impact on the front end electronics within each pixel in such situations. The result of these investigations and a preliminary report on the initial experience in space will be presented along with an overview of the future plans for deployments in space and the desirable characteristics for the next generation of these detectors from the Medipix3 Collaboration.
        Speaker: Prof. Lawrence Pinsky (University of Houston (US))
    • 16:30 18:10
      Medical Applications EI8

      EI8

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Grigori Feofilov (St. Petersburg State University (RU))
      • 16:30
        Study of a Cherenkov TOF PET module 20m
        A time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET) prototype apparatus, based on the principles of Cherenkov photon detection, was tested in experiments with a simple phantom. The time resolution obtained with such a system was 116 ps FWHM, with the single detector efficiency of 4.3%. Such excellent time resolution enabled a very fast image reconstruction algorithm to achieve results comparable to that of much more computing-intensive algorithms.
        Speaker: Peter Krizan (University of Ljubljana)
        Slides
      • 16:55
        DEVELOPMENT OF A PET DETECTOR MODULE WITH DEPTH OF INTERACTION CAPABILITY 20m
        The 4DM-PET experiment aims to develop an innovative detector module for PET applications. The device is composed of a continuous LYSO scintillator crystal coupled to two SiPM matrices on its top and bottom surfaces. The peculiarity in using a continuous crystal is the ability to reconstruct the Depth of Interaction of the 511 keV photons generated by the annihilation of the positrons emitted by the radiotracer. A first small prototype module has been built. It is composed of a LYSO crystal, 20x20x10 mm3 coupled on larger surfaces with arrays of SiPMs (4x4 pixel, 4x4 mm2 each) . The lateral faces of the crystal slab are black painted to avoid reflection of light. The Detector is read by custom designed Front-End ASICs. We have scanned the detector in the three coordinates with pencil beams produced by collimated radioactive sources in order to investigate the spatial resolution capabilities of the module. The results achieved in terms of Depth of Interaction reconstruction and Point Spread Function at different positions on the detector surface are presented.
        Speaker: Matteo Morrocchi (University of Pisa / Infn Pisa)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Recent results on the development of a proton Computed Tomography system 20m
        Proton Computed Tomography (pCT) is an imaging technique based on the use of proton beams with kinetic energies above 200 MeV to directly measure stopping power (SP) distributions inside the tissue volume. PRIMA (PRoton IMAging) is an italian collaboration working on the development of a pCT scanner based on a tracker and a calorimeter to measure single protons trajectory and residual energy. The tracker is composed by 4 x-y planes of silicon microstrip detectors to measure entry and exit positions and angles. Residual energy is measured by a segmented calorimeter composed by YAG:Ce scinitillating crystals which also provides the trigger signal for the read-out chain. A first prototype of pCT scanner, with an active area of about 5x5 cm2 and a data rate capability of 10 kHz, has been constructed and characterized with 60 MeV protons at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud – Catania (Italy) and with 180 MeV protons at Svedberg Laboratory – Uppsala (Sweden). A new pre-clinical prototype with an extended active area up to ~ 5x20 cm2, real time data acquisition and a data rate up to 1 MHz is under development. Test beam results of the present prototype and a description of the new prototype under development will be presented. Moreover, first results concerning tomographic image reconstruction will be presented and discussed.
        Speaker: Carlo Civinini (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
        Video
      • 17:45
        A new X-Ray imaging system based on Chromatic Photon Counting technology 20m
        An innovative X-ray imaging sensor with intrinsic digital characteristics is presented. It is based on Chromatic Photon Counting technology. The detector is able to count individually the incident X-ray photons and to separate them according to their energy (two'color' images per exposure). The energy selection occurs in real time and at radiographic imaging speed (GHz global counting rate). Photon counting, color mode and a very high spatial resolution (more than 10 l.p./mm at MTF50) allow to obtain an optimal ratio between image quality and absorbed dose. The individual building block of the imaging system is a two-side buttable pixellated CdTe crystal coupled to a very large area CMOS ASIC. Up to 8 tiles have been assembled together to obtain a very large sensitive area imaging system (25×2.5 cm²). A dedicated machine to perform X-ray slot-scanning imaging has been designed, built and tested. Results from in depth testing of several configuration of sensors are discussed. ' Color' X-ray images from 3x2.5 to 25x25 cm2 area will be shown. A new 'plug and play' unit will be presented. To be fully operational, this unit requires only an external 12 V, lap-top type, power supply. The X-Ray imaging system is the technological platform of PIXIRAD Imaging Counters s.r.l., a recently constituted INFN spin-off company.
        Speaker: Dr Ronaldo Bellazzini (INFN-Pisa and PIXIRAD IMAGING COUNTERS srl)
        Slides
    • 19:30 22:30
      Conference Dinner 3h Palais Ferstel

      Palais Ferstel

      Strauchgasse 4, 1010 Wien
    • 09:50 10:40
      Plenary 4
      Convener: Marko Dragicevic (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 09:50
        Imaging Hadron Calorimetry for Future Lepton Colliders 20m
        To fully exploit the physics potential of a future Lepton Collider will require unprecedented jet energy and (di)-mass resolution. To achieve this goal, detectors optimized for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) are being conceived. The application of PFAs requires calorimeters with very fine segementation of the readout, so-called imaging calorimeters. This talk will review the main developments in imaging hadron calorimetry geared towards implementation in a future Lepton Collider detector. The talk covers recent results from the large prototypes of the CALICE collaboration, such as the Scintillator Analog Hadron Calorimeter (AHCAL) and the Digital Hadron Calorimeters (DHCAL and SDHCAL). In addition, precision measurements of the development of hadronic showers as function of time will be presented.
        Speaker: Dr Jose Repond (Argonne National Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Antihydrogen Detection in the ALPHA -Experiment 20m
        The principal aim of the ALPHA experiment at is to trap cold atomic antihydrogen and study it’s properties, and, ultimately, perform precision comparison between hydrogen and antihydrogen atomic spectra. Recently, several important milestones have been achieved, including long confinement of antihydrogen atoms and the first spectroscopic measurements done on the antihydrogen atoms. The main experimental tool for the antihydrogen detection in the experiment is the ALPHA silicon vertex detector. The detector consists of three concentric barrels of 144 double sided silicon sensors and provides information on the time evolution of antiproton plasmas and individual annihilation events. Characteristics of the detector will be given along with the current status of the experiment.
        Speaker: Petteri Pusa (University of Liverpool (GB))
        Slides
    • 10:40 11:20
      Coffee Break 40m
    • 11:20 12:35
      Plenary 4 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Marko Dragicevic (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 11:20
        The aerogel RICH for the Belle II spectrometer 20m
        For the Belle II spectrometer we are developing the proximity focusing RICH with aerogel as an radiator. It will be positioned in the small space between the drift chamber and the electromagnetic calorimeter inside a strong magnetic field of 1.5 T in the forward direction of the spectrometer and will enable the efficent separation of kaons from pions in the wide range of particle momenta from 0.5 up to 4 GeV/c. The chosen photo sensor - Hybrid Avalanche Photo Diode should be able to detect single photons with high efficiency and in addition it has to be resistant to high radiation doses of 10^12 neutrons/cm2 and 100 Gy of gammas in 10 years of operation. In the contribution the design of the detector will be presented. We will show the beam test results of the detector prototype, the results of the tests in the magnetic field and the results of the irradiation tests of photo sensor samples.
        Speaker: Dr Rok Pestotnik (Jozef Stefan Institute)
        Slides
      • 11:45
        A Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector for CLAS12 20m
        The energy increase of Jefferson Laboratory's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to 12GeV promises to greatly extend the physics reach of its experiments. This will include an upgrade of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to CLAS12, offering unique possibilities to study internal nucleon dynamics. For this, excellent hadron identification over the full kinematical range is essential. In the base equipment this is achieved in CLAS12 by Cherenkov and time-of-flight counters. However improved hadron identification at momenta from 3 to 8GeV/c can be obtained by the installation of a Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector into the forward region of CLAS12. There are several design constraints imposed upon the detector, in order that it complies with geometry and performance requirements. A novel hybrid imaging design incorporating mirrors, aerogel radiators and Hamamatsu H8500 multianode photomultiplier tubes has therefore been proposed. Depending upon the incident particle track angle, Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly by a proximity imaging setup or detected after a series of reflections and multiple passes through the aerogel. This paper presents an overview of the detector design and current status, including recent small- and large-scale prototype results from cosmics and mixed hadron beam tests respectively.
        Speaker: Ms Rachel Montgomery (University of Glasgow)
        Slides
      • 12:10
        LUX: A dual phase Xe TPC for direct dark matter detection 20m
        Direct detection of WIMP dark matter (DM) requires highly sensitive, ultra-low background detectors, which maximize the target mass. The two-phase Time Projection Chamber (TPC) technique, employed by the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector, takes advantage of the anti-correlated scintillation and ionization properties of liquid Xe to achieve a projected sensitivity of DM-nucleon cross section $< 2\times10^-46 \mathrm{cm}^2$ (for 60 GeV WIMPs). In order to realize this, it employs a large water shield, careful radio-screening of materials, and extensive Xe purification, thereby lowering background. Results from surface operation of the LUX detector and preliminary results from underground commissioning will be presented. Critical figures of merit, such as electron drift lifetime, light collection efficiency, and discrimination power, will be discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Richard Ott (UC Davis)
        Slides
    • 12:35 14:00
      Lunch Break 1h 25m
    • 14:00 15:15
      Plenary 5
      Convener: Joachim Mnich (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
      • 14:00
        Detection methods at reactor neutrino experiments 45m
        In 2011 and 2012, the smallest neutrino mixing angle $\theta_{13}$ was determined to be unexpected large by reactor neutrino experiments Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO, and accelerator experiments T2K and MINOS. The most precise measurement is $\sin^2 2\theta_{13}=0.089 \pm 0.010 (stat.) \pm 0.005 (syst.)$, provided by Daya Bay. The measurement of $\theta_{13}$ opened the gateway to the mass hierarchy and CP phase measurements. It also marked the beginning of precision measurements in neutrino studies. With near-far relative measurement and improvements in detector design, the relative precision of neutrino detectors reached 0.2%. In this talk, detection methods for reactor neutrinos are reviewed. The highlighted techniques include gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator, three-layer detector, functionally identical detectors, reflective panel, background shielding, energy calibration, etc.
        Speaker: Jun Cao (IHEP)
        abstract
        Slides
      • 14:50
        A Packet-based Precise Timing and Synchronous DAQ Network for LHAASO Project 20m
        Aiming to high sensitivity and wide spectrum of cosmic ray detection, the one-square km complex detector array (KM2A) of Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) project consists of 5631 electron detectors, 1221 muon detectors, spreading over 1.2 square km. To precisely reconstruct the air shower events with high angular resolution, all detector electronics and digitizers should work in synchronous acquisition mode with global timing error less than 500ps (rms). This large scale and high precision timing requirement exceeds the capability or feasibility of traditional method such as GPS and echo-delay calibration. Recently an emerging method named White Rabbit (WR) was proposed and demostrated as a cost-effective solution that combines Giga-byte Ethernet and sub-nanosecond precision timing link via the same fiber media. Furthermore, the White Rabbit network also enables direct digitization and trigger-less data acquisition mode for each detector, which will greatly reduce the complexity and improve the performance of the DAQ system. In this paper we will demostrate the design and development status of a WR tming and DAQ network for KM2A in LHAASO project.
        Speaker: Qiang Du (Tsinghua University)
        Slides
    • 15:15 15:55
      Coffee Break 40m
    • 15:55 16:45
      Plenary 5 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Joachim Mnich (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
      • 15:55
        Particle tracking at 4K: The Fast Annihilation Cryogenic Tracking (FACT) detector for the AEgIS antimatter gravity experiment 20m
        The AEgIS experiment is an international collaboration with the goal of performing the first direct measurement of the earth’s gravitational acceleration on antimatter. Critical to the success of AEgIS is the production of cold antihydrogen (Hbar) atoms. The FACT detector will be used to measure the production and temperature of Hbar atoms and for establishing the formation of a beam. The operating requirements for this detector are very challenging: it must be able to identify each of the thousand or so annihilations in the 1ms period of pulsed Hbar production, operate at 4K inside a 1T solenoidal field and not produce more than 10W of heat. The FACT detector consists of two concentric cylindrical layers of 400 scintillator fibers with a 1mm diameter and a 0.6 mm pitch. The scintillating fibers are coupled to clear fibers which transport the scintillation light to 800 silicon photomultipliers. Each silicon photomultiplier signal is connected to a linear amplifier and a fast discriminator, the outputs of the which are sampled continuously by FPGAs. In the course of the developments for the FACT detector we have established the performance of scintillating fibers at 4K by means of a cosmic-ray tracker operating in a 4K cryostat. The FACT detector will be installed in the AEgIS apparatus in October 2012 and will be used to study Hbar formation. This talk will present the design of the FACT detector and provide first results of the detector operation in the AEgIS apparatus.
        Speakers: Carlo Canali (Universitaet Zuerich (CH)), Dr James Storey (Universitaet Zuerich (CH))
        Slides
      • 16:20
        Imaging of phantoms and small animals with the AX-PET demonstrator 20m
        We have developed a fully operational PET demonstrator set-up which allows true 3D reconstruction of the 511 keV photons and therefore leads to practically parallax free images. The AX-PET concept is based on thin 100 mm long scintillation crystals (LYSO), axially oriented and arranged in layers around the field of view. Layers of wavelength shifting plastic strips mounted in between the crystal layers give the axial coordinate. Both crystals and WLS strips are individually read out by G-APD (SiPM) photodetectors. The fully scalable concept overcomes the dilemma of sensitivity versus spatial resolution which is inherent to classical PET designs. A demonstrator set-up based on two axial modules was exhaustively characterized using point-like sources, phantoms filled with radiotracer and finally rats and a mouse. The results entirely meet the performance expectations (< 2 mm FWHM in all 3 coordinates over the complete field of view) and also demonstrated the ability to include Compton interactions (inter-crystal scatter) in the reconstruction without noticeable performance loss. Our recent studies focus on a TOF extension of the AX-PET concept making use of the novel digital SiPM detectors by Philips. After reproducing comparable energy and spatial resolution on a small digital AX-PET set-up, we could already demonstrate a coincidence time resolution well below 300 ps FWHM.
        Speaker: Christian Joram (CERN)
        Slides
    • 16:45 17:05
      Award Ceremony 20m EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gußhausstraße 25-29, 1040 Wien (Vienna), Austria
    • 17:05 17:55
      Summary Talk 50m EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Speaker: Ariella Cattai (CERN)
      Slides