VCI2016 - The 14th Vienna Conference on Instrumentation

Europe/Vienna
Vienna University of Technology

Vienna University of Technology

Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
    • 8:00 AM 10:00 AM
      Registration & Coffee
    • 10:00 AM 10:05 AM
      Welcome 5m EI7

      EI7

      Speaker: Prof. Joachim Burgdörfer
    • 10:05 AM 10:10 AM
      Opening 5m EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Speaker: Manfred Krammer (CERN)
    • 10:10 AM 10:20 AM
      Information from the Organizers 10m EI7

      EI7

      Speaker: Thomas Bergauer (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
    • 10:20 AM 12:00 PM
      Plenary 1
      Convener: Manfred Krammer (CERN)
      • 10:20 AM
        New Opportunities for the Time Projection Chamber in its Fourth Decade 45m
        Now in its fourth decade, the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) idea continues to find new and novel applications in nuclear and particle physics, rare longevity in the arsenal of experimental techniques. I examine some of the recent implementations as exemplars of the scientific aspirations, with focus on a bizarre idea to exploit single molecule fluorescent imaging as a means to identify the birth of the barium daughter in double-beta decays of 136Xe. Efficient ‘tagging’ of the barium daughter would eliminate essentially all backgrounds due to radioactivity, opening a path to the realization of a true ton-scale ‘Discovery Class’ experiment based on a modular high-pressure xenon gas TPC concept.
        Speaker: David Robert Nygren (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (US))
      • 11:10 AM
        Dark Matter Detectors 45m
        Speaker: Stefan Schoenert
    • 12:00 PM 2:00 PM
      Lunch Break 2h
    • 2:00 PM 3:40 PM
      Plenary 2
      Convener: Jochen Schieck (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 2:00 PM
        Recent Developments in Silicon Detectors 45m
        The talk will give a (selective) overview of developments in recent years on silicon detectors, in particular those developments which are challenged by new demands on particle tracking and vertexing from coming-up new experiments and upgrades.
        Speaker: Norbert Wermes (Universitaet Bonn (DE))
      • 2:50 PM
        The ultralight DEPFET Pixel Detector of the Belle II Experiment 20m
        An upgrade of the existing Japanese flavor factory (KEKB in Tsukuba, Japan) is under construction, and foreseen for commissioning by the end of 2017. This new e+e- machine (SuperKEKB) will deliver an instantaneous luminosity 40 times higher than the world record set by KEKB. In order to be able to fully exploit the increased number of events and provide high precision measurements of the decay vertex of the B meson systems in such a harsh environment, the Belle detector will be upgraded (Belle II) and a new silicon vertex detector, based on the DEPFET technology, will be designed and constructed. The new pixel detector, close to the interaction point, will consist on two layers of DEPFET active pixel sensors. This technology combines the detection together with the in-pixel amplification by the integration, on every pixel, of a field effect transistor into a fully depleted silicon bulk. In Belle II, DEPFET sensors thinned down to 75 $\mu$m with low power consumption and low intrinsic noise will be used. The first large thin multichip production modules have been produced and the characterization results will be presented in this contribution.
        Speaker: Florian Jochen Lutticke (Universitaet Bonn (DE))
      • 3:15 PM
        The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment for Run-2 at the Large Hadron collider. 20m
        Run-2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 at a radius of 3.3 cm between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe. The new detector, built to cope with high radiation and expected occupancy, is the first large scale application of 3D detectors and CMOS 130nm technology. In addition the Pixel detector was refurbished with a new service quarter panel to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run-1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. The commissioning and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector, in particular the IBL, will be presented, using collision data.
        Speaker: Didier Ferrere (Universite de Geneve (CH))
    • 3:40 PM 4:15 PM
      Coffee Break 35m
    • 4:15 PM 5:55 PM
      Plenary 2 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Prof. Lutz Feld (RWTH Aachen University)
      • 4:15 PM
        How can Moore’s Law help making better detectors? 45m
        A prophetic and risky prediction made more than half a century ago in the then obscure field of “integrated electronics” has changed profoundly every manufacturing, computing and communication technology that we can imagine. Also in experimental physics, microelectronics has changed not only the speed at which we can read and manipulate data from detectors, but has also allowed designers to sense smaller signals, measure shorter time intervals, improve spatial resolution of detectors, and all this at much lower power consumption than ever before. Commercial applications of this technology continue to push the performance of innumerable devices that are built based on it. The latest innovations offered by this technology are likely to have an impact on the design of future detectors and experiments that will be as dramatic as those of the last 20 years. This presentation will give a glimpse on what these coming technologies might be and hint at how they could be adapted beneficially to instrumentation for particle and nuclear detectors.
        Speaker: Alessandro Marchioro (CERN)
      • 5:05 PM
        Development of Ultra Fast Silicon Detector for 4D tracking 20m

        Development of Ultra Fast Silicon Detector for 4D tracking
        In this contribution I will review the progress towards the development of a new type of silicon detectors suited for picosecond tracking, the so called Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors, designed to obtained concurrent precisions of ~ 10 picoseconds and ~ 30 microns with a 50 micron thick sensor.
        UFSD are based on the concept of Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors, which are silicon detectors with an internal multiplication mechanism so that they exhibit a signal which is a factor of ~ 10 larger than standard silicon detectors. This increased signal makes LGAD ideal for many applications, ranging from experiments requiring very low material budgets, to very high radiation environment, to applications that need very precise timing.
        The basic design of UFSD consists of a thin silicon sensor with moderate internal gain and pixelated electrodes coupled to full custom VLSI chips. An ultra-fast thin silicon sensor represents a new frontier in silicon sensor design and the development of a thin sensor combined with charge multiplication presents a major challenge.
        UFSD detectors are now considered in the proposal of the CT-PPS for the forward CMS tracker and for the upgrade of the ATLAS forward calorimeter.
        I will report on first sensor measurements, the plan for future productions and the initial progress towards the development of the read-out electronics.

        Speaker: Dr Nicolo Cartiglia (INFN Torino (IT))
      • 5:30 PM
        Level-1 track trigger for CMS in HL-LHC 20m
        The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is expected to deliver luminosities of 5 × 10^34 cm-2s-1, with an average number of overlapping proton-proton collisions per bunch crossing of up to 200. However, a higher number of particle interactions per bunch crossing presents huge challenge to the experiments, as their trigger systems are not designed to accommodate the anticipated rates. For luminosity levels expected after the HL-LHC upgrade of the accelerator, the solution to the problem is to use silicon tracker data at a very early stage of triggering. A key component of the CMS upgrade for HL-LHC is a track trigger system which would identify tracks with transverse momentum above 2 GeV/c already at the first-level trigger. However, due to high bunch-crossing rates, as well as the size and high occupancy of the detectors, there is an enormous challenge in implementing a track trigger. Three different proposals for implementing Level-1 tracking at CMS are presented. The proposed architectures are discussed along with the status of current hardware prototypes and anticipated performance from simulation. Plans for the future development are also outlined.
        Speaker: Sergo Jindariani (Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (US))
    • 6:00 PM 7:00 PM
      Art and History of Vienna EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      • 6:00 PM
        Art and History of Vienna 45m
        The city of Vienna was essentially founded by the ancient Romans. In the late middle ages, it became the capital of the Habsburg Empire, and consequently grew in size and importance. Even though there are some Roman excavations, most of the architectural heritage originates from the monarchy. In particular, the turn of the 19th to 20th centuries was undoubtedly a peak in many aspects of arts and culture, and even the population of Vienna was then higher than today. Nonetheless, the monarchy terminated almost hundred years ago and gave way to modernism. All periods of fine arts are represented in Vienna, by architecture as well as in museums. In addition, performing arts and classical music are offered in various places. This presentation will provide an overview of the history of Vienna, the periods of art and where to spot them, with a particular focus on the locations where social events will take place during this conference.
        Speaker: Markus Friedl (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
    • 7:00 PM 9:00 PM
      Welcome Reception

      Vienna University of Vienna

    • 9:00 AM 10:40 AM
      Plenary 3
      Convener: Ariella Cattai (CERN)
      • 9:00 AM
        Recent Progress in Photodetectors 45m
        The paper will review recent progress in photodetectors: vacuum based detectors (PMTs, MCP PMTs), solid state detectors (SiPMs, APDs) and hybrid detectors (HPD, HAPDs). It will discuss advances in photon detection efficiency, timing properties, as well as improvements in radiation hardness, resistance against ageing and suppression of internal noise. As a motivation for these improvements it will also discuss several applications that drive this progress in the fields of experimental particle physics (in particular RICH and DIRC type counters, and calorimeters) and in detectors for medical imaging (TOF PET).
        Speaker: Samo Korpar (Jozef Stefan Institute (SI))
      • 9:50 AM
        SciFi - A large Scintillating Fibre Tracker for LHCb 20m
        The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. Concept, design and operational parameters are driven by the challenging LHC environment including significant ionising and neutron radiation levels. Over a total active surface of 360 m$^2$ the SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres (Ø 0.25 mm) read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The project is now at the transition from R&D to series production. We will present the evolution of the design and the latest lab and test beam results.
        Speaker: Thomas Kirn (Rheinisch-Westfaelische Tech. Hoch. (DE))
      • 10:15 AM
        SoLid: An innovative antineutrino detector for searching oscillations at the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor 20m
        The SoLid experiment intends to search for active-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillation at the very short baseline of the SCK•CEN BR2 research reactor (Mol, Belgium). A novel detector approach to measure reactor anti-neutrinos was developed based on an innovative sandwich of composite Polyvynil-Toluene and 6LiF:ZnS scintillators. The system is highly segmented and read out by a network of wavelength shifting fibers and MPPCs. High experimental sensitivity can be achieved compared to other standard technologies thanks to the combination of high granularity, high neutron-gamma discrimination using 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillator and precise localisation of the Inverse Beta Decay products. This technology can be considered as a second generation antineutrino detector. This compact system requires limited passive shielding and relies on spatial topology to determine the different classes of backgrounds. We will describe the principle of detection and the detector design. Particular focus on the neutron discrimination will be made, as well as on the capability to use cosmic muons for channel equalization and energy calibration. The performance of the first full scale SoLid module 1 (SM1), based on the data taken at BR2 in February 2015,will be presented. We will conclude with the next phase, that will start in 2016, and the perspectives of the experiment.
        Speaker: Yamiel Abreu (Universiteit Antwerpen)
    • 10:40 AM 11:20 AM
      Coffee Break 40m
    • 11:20 AM 12:35 PM
      Plenary 3 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Ariella Cattai (CERN)
      • 11:20 AM
        From gated to continuous readout: an upgrade of the ALICE TPC 20m
        A large Time Projection Chamber is the main device for tracking and charged particle identification in the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC. After the second long shutdown in 2019/20, the LHC will deliver Pb beams colliding at an interaction rate of about 50 kHz, which is about a factor of 100 above the present read-out rate of the TPC. This will result in a significant improvement on the sensitivity of rare probes that are considered key observables to characterise the QCD matter created in such collisions. In order to make full use of this luminosity, a major upgrade of the TPC is required. The presently employed gating of the TPC wire chambers must be abandoned and continuously operated readout detectors using GEMs will be implemented. To fulfill the challenging requirements of the upcoming upgrade, a novel configuration of GEM detectors has been developed. It allows to maintain excellent particle identification and efficient ion trapping by stacking four GEM foils operated under specific field configuration. Results of an extensive R&D program concerning ion backflow suppression, d$E$/d$x$ resolution and stability against discharges will be presented. The status of the upgrade of the online calibration and data reduction system, as well as the development of a new readout electronics will be reported. We will also discuss the detector production phase, which is just starting.
        Speaker: Piotr Gasik (Technische Universitaet Muenchen (DE))
      • 11:45 AM
        Strategies for reducing the environmental impact of gaseous detector operation at the CERN LHC experiments 20m
        A wide range of gas mixtures is used for the operation of different gaseous detectors at LHC. Nowadays some of these gases, as C2H2F4, CF4 and SF6, are indicated as greenhouse gases (GHG) and dominate the overall GHG emission at LHC. The release of GHG is an important subject for the design of future particle detectors as well as for the operation of the current experiments. The different strategies adopted at CERN for reducing the GHG emissions from gaseous detectors at LHC are presented. The standard approach is the recirculation of the gas mixture by the use of complex gas systems made of several functional modules. Besides their complexity, the stability of the system as well as the accumulation of impurities, need to be attentively evaluated for the good operation and safety of the detectors. A second approach is based on the recuperation of the used gas mixture and the separation of its gas components for re-use. As state-of-the-art example, the CF4 recuperation plant based on warm separation developed for the CMS Cathode Strip Chamber system will be reviewed. As a long-term perspective, the use of less invasive gases is also being investigated. An overview of environmental friendly gas possibilities will be discussed.
        Speaker: Beatrice Mandelli (CERN)
      • 12:10 PM
        Liquid xenon calorimeter for MEG II experiment with VUV-sensitive MPPCs 20m
        The MEG II experiment is the upgrade of the MEG experiment to search for the charged lepton flavor violating decay of muon, $\mu^+ \rightarrow e^+ \gamma$. The MEG II experiment is expected to reach a branching ratio sensitivity of $4\times10^{-14}$, which is one order of magnitude better than the sensitivity of the current MEG experiment. The performance of the liquid xenon (LXe) gamma-ray detector will be greatly improved with a highly granular scintillation readout realized by replacing 216 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) on the gamma-ray entrance face with 4092 Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPC). For this purpose, we have developed a new type of MPPC which is sensitive to the LXe scintillation light in VUV range, in collaboration with Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. We have measured the detailed properties of MPPC in LXe, and an excellent performance has been confirmed including high photon detection efficiency (>15%) for LXe scintillation light. The production of 4200 MPPCs was completed and a mass test was carried out at room temperature to measure the performance of all the MPPCs. Excellent performance of the LXe detector has been confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations based on the measured properties of the MPPC. For example, energy resolution for 53MeV gamma-ray from the signal event is expected to reach 1%. The details of the performance of the VUV-sensitive MPPC will be reported, as well as the expected performance of the LXe detector by Monte Carlo simulations.
        Speaker: Shinji Ogawa (University of Tokyo (JP))
    • 12:35 PM 2:00 PM
      Lunch Break 1h 25m
    • 2:00 PM 3:40 PM
      Cherenkov
      Convener: Samo Korpar (Jozef Stefan Institute (SI))
      • 2:00 PM
        The kaon identification system in the NA62 experiment at CERN SPS 20m
        The Cherenkov detector identifying kaons in the beam line of the NA62 experiment will be presented. The main goal of the NA62 experiment at the CERN SPS accelerator is to measure the branching ratio of the ultra-rare $K^+ \rightarrow \pi^+ \nu \bar{\nu}$ decay with $10\%$ accuracy. NA62 uses a 750MHz high-energy un-separated charged hadron beam, with kaons corresponding to $\sim 6 \%$ of the beam, and a kaon decay-in-flight technique. An upgraded version of a gas-filled differential Cherenkov detector (CEDAR-KTAG) is used to perform the fast identification of kaons, before their decays. New photon detectors, readout, mechanics, cooling and safety systems have been realised to stand the kaon rate (50MHz average) and to meet the performances required for NA62. The CEDAR-KTAG must provide a kaon identification with an efficiency of at least $95\%$ and precise time information with a resolution below 100ps. The fully equipped CEDAR-KTAG detector, its readout and front-end chain have been successfully commissioned during a pilot run at CERN in 2014. With the data taking started from June 2015, while the NA62 experiment is finalising the detector and read-out commissioning, the CEDAR-KTAG time resolution and efficiency have been measured to be within the required detector performances. The capability to distinguish between kaons and pions has been validated and the development of software trigger algorithms for online kaon identification has been completed.
        Speaker: Nicolas Lurkin (University of Birmingham (GB))
      • 2:25 PM
        Test-beam and laboratory characterisation of the TORCH prototype detector 20m
        The TORCH time-of-flight (TOF) detector is being developed to provide particle identification between 2-10 GeV/c momentum for a flight distance of 10 m. It has been proposed for the upgrade of the LHCb experiment to complement the particle identification capabilities of the RICH detectors. TORCH is designed for large-area coverage, up to 30$\rm m^2$, and has a DIRC-like construction with 10 mm thick synthetic amorphous fused-silica plates as a radiator. Cherenkov photons propagate by total internal reflection to the plate periphery and there are focused onto an array of position-sensitive micro-channel plate detectors, customised in industry. The goal is to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle by combining arrival times from multiple photons. The photon detectors will provide a spatial resolution of 0.4 mm by 6.6 mm in the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, by incorporating a novel charge-sharing technique to improve the spatial resolution to be better than the pitch of the readout anodes. Prototype photon detectors and readout electronics have been tested and calibrated in the laboratory. These tests, together with the construction of a prototype TORCH detector and its first test beam measurements, will be presented.
        Speaker: Ana Ros Garcia (University of Bristol (GB))
      • 2:50 PM
        Photon counting with a FDIRC Cherenkov prototype readout by SiPM arrays 20m
        A prototype of a Focused Internal Reflection Cherenkov, equipped with 16 arrays of NUV-SiPM, was tested at CERN SPS in March 2015 with beams of relativistic ions at 13 and 30 GeV/n obtained from fragmentation of an Ar primary beam. The detector, designed to identify cosmic nuclei, features a Fused Silica radiator bar optically connected to a cylindrical mirror, of the same material, and an imaging focal plane of dimensions ~4 cm x 3 cm, covered with a total of 1024 SIPM photosensors. Thanks to the outstanding performance of the SiPM arrays, the detector could be operated in photon counting mode as a fully digital device. The Cherenkov pattern was recorded together with the total number of detected photoelectrons increasing as Z2 as a function of the atomic number Z of the beam particle. In this paper, we report on the characterization and test of the SiPM arrays and the performance of the Cherenkov prototype in the charge identification of the beam particles.
        Speaker: Prof. Pier Simone Marrocchesi (University of Siena (IT) and INFN Pisa)
      • 3:15 PM
        CLASSIC: Cherenkov Light detection with SiC 20m
        We present the CLASSIC R&D for the development of a Silicon Carbide (SiC) based avalanche photodiode for the detection of Cherenkov light. SiC is a wide-bandgap semiconductor material, which, thanks to the 3.3 eV bandgap, is insensitive to visible light. A SiC based light detection device has a peak sensitivity in the deep UV, around 280 nm, making it ideal for Cherenkov light. Moreover, the visible blindness allows the use of such a device for the disentanglement of Cherenkov and scintillation light in all those materials that scintillate above 400 nm. Within CLASSIC, we aim at developing a device with single photon sensitivity, having in mind two main applications. One is the use of the SiC APD in a new generation ToF PET scanners concept, using the Cherenov light emitted by the electrons following 511 keV gamma ray absorption as a timestamp. Cherenkov is intrinsically faster than scintillation and could provide an unprecedentedly precise timestamp. The second application concerns the use of SiC APD in dual readour crystal based hadronic calorimeter, where the Cherenkov component is used to measure the electromagnetic fraction on an event by event basis. We will report on our progress towards the realization of the SiC APD devices, the strategies that are being pursued toward the realization of these devices and the preliminary results on prototypes in terms of spectral response, quantum efficiency, noise figures and multiplication.
        Speaker: Piergiulio Lenzi (Universita e INFN, Firenze (IT))
    • 2:00 PM 3:40 PM
      Miscellaneous 1
      Convener: Marcella Diemoz (Universita e INFN, Roma I (IT))
      • 2:00 PM
        30-ps Time Resolution with Segmented Scintillation Counter for MEG II 20m
        We have developed a timing detector with a ~ 30 ps time resolution for the measurement of ~ 50 MeV/c positron in the MEG II experiment using fast scintillator and SiPM. The adoption of SiPM allows flexible layout of the detector with high segmentation as well as a high precision time measurement due to the intrinsic properties. The detector is composed of 512 fast-plastic-scintillator counters. Six SiPMs from AdvanSiD, connected in series, are attached to each end of the scintillator to gain the photo-sensor coverage. The target resolution is achieved by measuring each particle’s time with multiple (on average 9) counters. A systematic R&D for maximizing the single counter time resolution and a series of beam tests to demonstrate the time-resolution improvement with multi-counter measurements were performed, and 30 ps resolution was achieved with 8-counter measurement. Now the detector R&D was completed and the construction is under-way. We have built 1/4 of the full detector so far, and a pilot run is foreseen this December using ~$10^8$/s muon beam, whose results will also be reported.
        Speaker: Dr Yusuke Uchiyama (The University of Tokyo)
      • 2:25 PM
        New Fast Interaction Trigger for ALICE 20m
        The LHC heavy-ions luminosity and collision rate from ~2020 onwards will considerably exceed the design parameters of the present ALICE forward trigger detectors and the introduction of a new Muon Forward Tracker will significantly reduce the space available for the upgraded detectors. To comply with these conditions a new Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) will be build. FIT will be the main forward trigger, luminometer, and T0 detector. It will also determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane of heavy ion collisions. FIT will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov radiators with MCP-PMT sensors and of a scintillator ring increasing the acceptance, improving the performance, adding sensitivity to detect beam-gas events and providing some degree of redundancy. The arrays will be placed on the opposite sides of the interaction point (IP). Because of the presence of the hadron absorber, the placement of the FIT arrays will be asymmetric: ~800 mm from IP on the absorber side and ~3200 mm from IP on the opposite side. Scheduled for installation ~2019, FIT is in the midst of an intense R&D and prototyping period. The timing, amplitude and efficiency characteristics are determined with relativistic particles and with fast lasers. The ongoing Monte Carlo studies verify the physics performance and refine the geometry of the FIT arrays. The presentation will give a short description of FIT, summary of the performance, and the outcome of the simulations.
        Speaker: Wladyslaw Henryk Trzaska (University of Jyvaskyla (FI))
      • 2:50 PM
        Graphical processors for HEP trigger systems 20m
        General-purpose computing on GPUs is emerging as a new paradigm in several fields of science, although so far applications have been tailored as accelerator in offline computation. With the steady reduction of GPU latencies, and the increase in link and memory throughputs, the use for real-time applications in high-energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems is becoming ripe. We will discuss the use of online parallel computing on GPU for synchronous low level trigger, focusing on tests performed on CERN NA62 experiment trigger system. All the components of the latency have to be analyzed. The networking results the most critical one. Our envisioned solution to this issue is NaNet, an FPGA-based PCIe Network Interface Card (NIC) to enable GPUDirect connection. The use of GPU in higher trigger system is also considered. In particular we discuss how specific trigger algorithms can be parallelized and thus benefit from the implementation on the GPU architecture, in terms of the increased execution speed. Such improvements are particularly relevant for the foreseen LHC luminosity upgrade where highly selective algorithms will be crucial to maintain a sustainable trigger rates with very high pileup. We will give details on how these devices can be integrated in a typical LHC trigger system. As a study case, we will consider the Atlas experimental environment and propose a GPU implementation for a typical muon selection in a high-level trigger system.
        Speaker: Luca Pontisso (Universita di Pisa & INFN (IT))
      • 3:15 PM
        Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector and its performance 20m
        The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the LHC, designed to perform high precision studies of B and D hadrons. In Run II of the LHC, a new scheme for the software trigger at LHCb allows splitting the triggering of events in two stages, giving room to perform the alignment and calibration in real time. In the novel detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II, data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The larger timing budget, available in the trigger, allows to perform the same track reconstruction online and offline. This enables LHCb to achieve the best reconstruction performance already in the trigger, and allows physics analyses to be performed directly on the data produced by the trigger reconstruction. The novel real-time processing strategy at LHCb is discussed from both the technical and operational point of view. The overall performance of the LHCb detector on the data of Run II is presented as well.
        Speaker: Silvia Borghi (University of Manchester (GB))
    • 2:00 PM 3:40 PM
      Semiconductor Detectors: Radiation Hardness EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Prof. Lutz Feld (RWTH Aachen University)
      • 2:00 PM
        Radiation Hard Silicon Particle Detectors for HL-LHC – RD50 Status Report 20m
        It is foreseen to significantly increase the luminosity of the LHC by upgrading towards the HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC). The Phase-II-Upgrade scheduled for 2023 will mean unprecedented radiation levels, way beyond the limits of the silicon trackers currently employed. All-silicon central trackers are being studied in ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, with extremely radiation hard silicon sensors to be employed on the innermost layers. Within the RD50 Collaboration, a massive R&D program is underway across experimental boundaries to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. We will present results of several detector technologies and silicon materials at radiation levels corresponding to HL-LHC fluences. Based on these results, we will give recommendations for the silicon detectors to be used at the different radii of tracking systems in the LHC detector upgrades. In order to complement the measurements, we also perform detailed simulation studies of the sensors, e.g. device structure optimization or predictions of the electric field distributions and trapping in the silicon sensors.
        Speaker: Stefano Terzo (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (D)
      • 2:25 PM
        Radiation hardness study of Silicon Detectors for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) 20m
        The CMS collaboration is planning to upgrade the forward calorimeters as these will not be sufficiently performant with the expected HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) conditions. The High Granularity Calorimeter (HGC) is the technology choice of the CMS collaboration for this upgrade. It is realized as a sampling calorimeter with layers of silicon detectors that feature very high longitudinal and lateral granularities, and a coarser segmentation backing hadronic calorimeter based on scintillators as active material. The sensors are realized as pad detectors of size in the order of 1 cm2 with an active thickness between 100µm and 300µm depending on the position respectively the expected radiation levels. For an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb − 1 and in the region η ∼ 3, the electromagnetic calorimetry near shower max will sustain integrated doses of 1.5 MGy (150 Mrads) and neutron fluences of 10 16 n/cm 2 . Integrated doses at the location of the front layers of the existing HE are expected to reach 300 kGy (30 Mrads). After the first results on neutron irradiation of 300µm, 200µm and 100µm n-on-p and p-on-n devices that have been irradiated to fluences up to 1.5E16 n/cm2 at JSI Triga reactor in Ljubljana, Slovenia. We present the latest results in terms of radiation hardness of these pad detectors as obtained with CV, IV, TCT and beta-CCE measurements.
        Speaker: Esteban Curras Rivera (Universidad de Cantabria (ES))
      • 2:50 PM
        Surface effects in segmented silicon sensors 20m
        The voltage stability, the charge-collection properties and the dark current of segmented silicon sensors are influenced by the charge and potential distributions on the sensor surface, the charge distribution in the oxide and passivation layers, and by Si-SiO$_2$ interface states. To better understand these complex phenomena, measure¬ments on test structures and sensors, as well as TCAD simulations including surface and interface effects are being performed at the Hamburg Detector Lab. The main results of these studies are presented and some tentative conclusions, which are relevant for the sensor design, are drawn.
        Speaker: Dr Joern Schwandt (University of Hamburg)
      • 3:15 PM
        LHCb VELO: Radiation Damage Effects and Operations in LHC Run 2 20m
        The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer covering the pseudorapidity range $2<\eta <5$, designed for the study of particles containing $b$ or $c$ quarks. The detector includes a high-precision tracking system consisting of a silicon-strip vertex detector (VELO) surrounding the $pp$ interaction region, a large-area silicon-strip detector located upstream of a dipole magnet and three stations of silicon-strip detectors and straw drift tubes placed downstream of the magnet. Calorimeters, RICH and Muon detectors for particle identification complement the detector. The VELO comprises 42 modules made of two n$^+$-on-n 300 $\mu$m thick half-disc silicon sensors with R-measuring and Phi-measuring micro-strips, featuring a double metal layer for signal routing. One upstream module is manufactured with n$^+$-on-p technology, allowing a direct comparison of the two technologies. The VELO is installed as two movable halves containing 21 modules each to ensure its safety during beam injection. The extreme proximity (~8 mm) of the VELO sensors to the LHC beam renders the VELO an ideal laboratory to study the effects of radiation damage on silicon detectors. Therefore, and to ensure efficient operation until the end of LHC Run 2, the radiation damage is studied closely with several methods complementing one another: IV scans, IT scans and CCE scans. The latest results as well as operational challenges for the VELO in LHC Run 2 will be presented.
        Speaker: Kazu Carvalho Akiba (Univ. Federal do Rio de Janeiro (BR))
    • 3:40 PM 4:30 PM
      Poster Session A

      Posters displayed on a board with an even number

    • 4:30 PM 6:10 PM
      Miscellaneous 2
      Convener: Marcella Diemoz (Universita e INFN, Roma I (IT))
      • 4:30 PM
        A detector for in-beam measurement of the ground state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen 20m
        The matter - anti matter asymmetry observed in the universe today still lacks a quantitative explanation. One possibility that could contribute to the observed state could be a violation of the combined Charge-, Partiy- and Timesymmetries (CPT). A possible contribution to this asymmetry could come from a violation of the CPT symmetry. A test of CPT symmetry using anti-atoms is being carried out by the ASACUSA-CUSP collaboration at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator using a low temperature beam of antihydrogen - the most simple atomic system built only of anti particles. While hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, antihydrogen is produced in very small quantities in a laboratory framework. A detector for in-beam measurements of the ground state hyperfine structure of antihydrogen has to be able to detect very low signal rates within high background. To fulfil this challenging task a two layer barrel hodoscope detector was developed. It is built of plastic scintillators with double sided readout via Silicon Photo Multipliers (SiPMs). The SiPM readout is done using novel, compact and cost efficient electronics that incorporate power supply, amplifier and discriminator on a single board. This contribution will evaluate the performance of the new detector during the ASACUSA beamtime 2014 and 2015. We will also put a spotlight on the new, self developed, readout electronics and discuss possible further applications.
        Speaker: Clemens Sauerzopf (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 4:55 PM
        The MoEDAL detector - a totally different LHC detector 20m
        MoEDAL- the newest LHC experiment – that began operating in June 2015 – is designed to search for highly ionizing avatars of new physics and extend the discovery horizon of the LHC in a complementary way. In this talk I will describe MoEDAL’s innovative and unconventional detector methodologies tuned to the prospect of discovery physics. The largely passive MoEDAL detector, deployed at Point 8 on the LHC ring, has a dual nature. First, it acts like a giant camera, comprised of very large array of nuclear track detectors - analyzed offline by novel ultra fast scanning microscopes - sensitive only to new physics. Second, a one tonne trapping detectors is uniquely able to directly detect magnetic charge and to capture the particle messengers of physics beyond the Standard Model for further study. MoEDAL's radiation environment is monitored by a state-of-the-art real-time TimePix pixel detector array. Finally I will describe a proposed new MoEDAL sub-detector designed to extend MoEDAL's reach from highly charge to millicharged particles (MMIPs).
        Speaker: James Pinfold (University of Alberta (CA))
      • 5:20 PM
        Imaging the LHC beams with silicon and scintillating fibre vertex detectors 20m
        The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is used to reconstruct beam-gas interaction vertices which allows one to obtain precise profiles of the LHC beams. In LHCb, this information is combined with the profile of the reconstructed beam-beam collisions and with the LHC beam currents to perform precise measurements of the luminosity. This beam-gas imaging (BGI) method also allows one to study the transverse beam shapes, beam positions and angles in real time. Therefore, a demonstrator beam-gas vertex detector (BGV) based on scintillating fibre modules has been built and installed in LHC Ring 2 (at point 4). We present first results of the commissioning of this device and compare with recent results obtained in the LHCb experiment.
        Speaker: Mariana Rihl (Vienna University of Technology (AT))
      • 5:45 PM
        Stability monitoring of historical buildings with a cosmic ray tracking system 20m
        Cosmic ray radiation, thanks to its high penetration capability and relative abundance, has been successfully used both in scientific studies and civil applications. We investigated, for the first time, the possibility of using cosmic ray radiation for the static monitoring of historical buildings, where severe conservation constraints apply and the time evolution of the deformation phenomena under study could be of the order of months or years. In this talk, we present the results of a feasibility study performed by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, using the  wooden vaulted roof of the “Palazzo della Loggia” in the town of Brescia (Italy) as a relevant case study. The results, based on a scintillating fiber detector, showed that horizontal displacements of the order of 1 mm could be detected with a week of measurement. Finally, as a proof of principle, we also developed a small-size detector prototype consisting of layers of scintillating fibers coupled to silicon photomultipliers. The first experimental results and their comparison to MC simulations are also presented.
        Speaker: Davide Pagano (Universita di Brescia (IT))
    • 4:30 PM 6:10 PM
      Semiconductor Detectors: Detector Systems EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Markus Friedl (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 4:30 PM
        The LHCb VELO Upgrade 20m
        The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, scheduled for LHC Run-3, will transform the experiment to a triggerless system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm. enabling the detector to run at luminosities of $2 \times 10^{33} \rm{/cm^2/s}$. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The upgraded VELO will provide fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction to the software trigger. The silicon pixel sensors have with $ 55 \times 55~{\rm \mu m^2}$ pitch, and are read out by the VeloPix ASIC, from the Timepix/Medipix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The foil will be manufactured through milling and possibly thinned further by chemical etching. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative $\rm{CO_2}$ coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 um thick silicon substrates. The current status of the VELO upgrade will be described and latest results from operation of irradiated sensor assemblies will be presented.
        Speaker: Karol Hennessy (University of Liverpool (GB))
      • 4:55 PM
        A new timing detector for the CT-PPS detector of CMS 20m
        The CT-PPS detector will be installed in Roman pots positioned on both sides of CMS, ~ 200 meter downstream the interaction point. This detector will measure forward leading protons, allowing detailed studies of diffractive hadron physics and Central Exclusive Production. The main components of the CT-PPS detectors are a silicon tracking system and a timing system, QUARTIC, which measures the Cerenkov radiation emitted by the proton in quartz bars. In this contribution we present a possible alternative to the QUARTIC timing system, based on Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD). UFSD are a novel concept of silicon detectors based on the Low-Gain Avalanche Detector design, which are able to obtain time resolution of the order of ~ 20 ps. The use of UFSD has many attractive features as its material budget is small, the pixel geometries can be tailored to the precise physics distribution of protons, and timing and tracking planes can be house in the same Roman Pots. UFSD prototypes for the CT-PPS have been designed and manufactured by CNM (Barcellona) and FBK (Trento): we will show the first characterizations and new results of these productions and we will also presents first designs of the read-out electronics.
        Speaker: Roberta Arcidiacono (Universita Del Piemonte Orientale (IT))
      • 5:20 PM
        The Belle II SVD assembly and mechanics 20m
        The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan will operate at an instantaneous luminosity approximately 50 times greater than its predecessor (Belle). The central feature of the experiment is a vertex detector comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detectors (PXD) and four layers of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors (SVD). One of the key measurements for Belle-II is CP violation asymmetry in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons, which hinges on a precise charged-track vertex determination and low-momentum track measurement. Towards this goal, a proper assembly of the SVD components with precise alignment ought to be performed and the geometrical tolerances should be checked to fall within the design limits. We present an overview of the assembly procedure that is being followed, which includes the precision gluing of the SVD module components, wire-bonding of the various electrical components, and precision 3D coordinate measurements of the jigs used in assembly as well as of the final SVD modules.
        Speaker: Stefano Bettarini (University of Pisa and INFN)
      • 5:45 PM
        The Silicon Tracking System of the CBM experiment at FAIR 20m
        The central detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR is a Silicon Tracking System (STS) consisting of 8 tracking stations based on double-sided silicon microstrip sensors. It will deliver high-rate streamed data that is analyzed on a computing farm. The functional building block is a detector module consisting of a sensor, microcables and a front-end electronics board. The double-sided microstrip sensors have a strip pitch of 58 $\mu$m , are AC-coupled and oriented under 7.5$^\circ$. Double metallization is employed to interconnect corner strips. Ultra-thin cables with up to 60 cm length and pitch matching that of the sensor strips transfer the analog signals to the readout electronics at the periphery of the stations. The readout ASIC is the STS-XYTER with self-triggering architecture that will deliver time and amplitude information. The detector will be operating within a thermal enclosure of 2 m$^3$ at below $-5^\circ$C so that its silicon sensors remain operational up to a particle fluence of 10$^{14}$ 1-MeV n$_{eq}$/cm$^2$. The electronics inside, about 16 thousand ASICs with more than 2 million readout channels, will dissipate about 40 kW power. Bi-phase CO$_2$ evaporative cooling approach has been chosen. In this contribution, the development status of components, system integration and the project time line for their production will be discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Anton Lymanets (GSI, Darmstadt)
    • 4:30 PM 6:10 PM
      SiPM
      Convener: Hiroyasu TAJIMA (SLAC)
      • 4:30 PM
        A novel Silicon Photomultiplier with bulk integrated quench resistors - utilization in optical detection and tracking applications for particle physics 20m
        Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are a promising candidate for replacing conventional photomultiplier tubes in many applications, thanks to ongoing developments and advances in their technology. A drawback of conventional SiPMs is their limited fill factor caused by the need for a high ohmic polysilicon quench resistor and its metal lines on the surface of the devices, which in turn limits the maximum photon detection efficiency. At the Semiconductor Laboratory of the Max-Planck Society (HLL) a novel detector concept was developed integrating the quench resistor directly into the silicon bulk of the device resulting in a free entrance window. The feasibility of the concept was already confirmed by simulations and extensive studies of first prototype productions. Recently SiPMs were also considered as an attractive alternative for tracking applications in vertex detectors. The requirements for a fast response, simple design and high fill factor can all be met by SiPMs. In addition the increased trigger probability for an avalanche by MIPs allows device operations at lower overbias voltages, resulting in decreased noise. The concept can be evolved further towards an imaging photo-detector. A new design for an application of these SiPM devices as vertex detectors with active quenching developed by HLL and DESY as well as first simulation results will be presented. Also, first measurements of the trigger efficiency as a function of the applied overbias voltage will be shown.
        Speaker: Mr Stefan Petrovics (Semiconductor Laboratory of the Max-Planck Society)
      • 4:55 PM
        Performance of the latest prototypes of NUV-HD Silicon Photomultipliers 20m
        In this work, we will present the latest Silicon photomultiplier technology (SiPM), developed in Fondazione Bruno Kessler, designed to detect UV and blue light and named NUV-HD. With respect to the original NUV technology, shown at last VCI, the High-Density (HD) one has the same electrical field profile but a novel layout with a lower dead border area and the introduction of trenches between cells. This new layout allows having a lower cell pitch, ranging from 15 to 40 µm, reducing the gain of the cell and the correlated noise probabilities, increasing the dynamic range and the fill factor, from 55% to 80% in bigger cells. Considering the PDE, the new technology shows a peak centered in 400-420 nm as its predecessor, but reaches an impressive value of about 60% for the 40 µm cell. This technology reaches the highest PDE value compared to state-of-the-art commercial SiPMs. We will show a complete characterization focusing on the most relevant parameters of a SiPM (PDE, DCR, Correlated Noise probabilities, etc.) and comparing these values to the non-HD technology.
        Speaker: Gaetano Zappalà (University of Trento)
      • 5:20 PM
        Improving the Time Resolution in Cherenkov TOF PET with SiPMs 20m
        Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) were examined as photodetectors in Cherenkov time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET). The time-of-flight resolution and the detection efficiency of several devices by different manufacturers were measured in TOF PET setup. Effects which degrade the time resolution and the methods to correct them were studied in more detail with a picosecond laser setup.
        Speaker: Rok Dolenec (Institut "Jožef Stefan")
      • 5:45 PM
        Study of the breakdown voltage of SiPMs 20m
        The breakdown behaviour of prototype SiPMs (Silicon Photomultiplier) with pixel sizes of 15×15, 25×25 and 50×50 μm^2 manufactured by KETEK has been investigated. The I-V (current-voltage) characteristics and the PA (pulse-area) spectra have been measured as a function of bias voltage in dark conditions, as well as with the SiPM illuminated with an LED with a wavelength of 470 nm. The measurements were made in the temperature range between –20 °C and +20 °C. From the PA spectra the gain, G(V), and from a linear fit to G(V), the gain-breakdown voltage, V_bd^G, have been obtained. From fits to the I-V curves with and without LED illumination below and above breakdown, the current-breakdown voltage, V_bd^I, has been determined. It is found that there is a significant difference between V_bd^G and V_bd^I. The difference V_bd^I-V_bd^G is positive and increases with decreasing pixel size. We explain this difference by the difference between the turn-on and the turn-off voltage of the Geiger discharge. A possible model of the V_bd^I-V_bd^G difference is presented.
        Speaker: Prof. Robert Klanner (University of Hamburg)
    • 7:30 PM 10:00 PM
      Classical Concert Great Hall (Austrian Academy of Sciences)

      Great Hall

      Austrian Academy of Sciences

      Dr. Ignaz-Seipel Platz 2 1010 Wien
    • 9:00 AM 10:40 AM
      Calorimeter EI8

      EI8

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Convener: Marcella Diemoz (Universita e INFN, Roma I (IT))
      • 9:00 AM
        FoCal - a high-granularity electromagnetic calorimeter for forward direct photon measurements at LHC 20m
        The measurement of direct photon production at forward rapidity (y~3-5) at the LHC provides access to the structure of protons and nuclei at very small values of fraction momentum (x~10^-5). FoCal, an extremely-high-granularity Forward Calorimeter covering 3.5 < η < 5.3 is proposed as a detector upgrade to the ALICE experiment. To facilitate the design of the upgrade and to perform generic R&D necessary for such a novel calorimeter, a compact high-granularity electromagnetic calorimeter prototype has been built. The corresponding R&D studies will be the focus of this presentation. The prototype is a Si/W sampling calorimeter. It was instrumented with 24 layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors, a total of 39M pixels. We will report on performance studies of the prototype with test beams at DESY and CERN in a broad energy range. The results of the measurements demonstrate a very small Molière radius (~11 mm) and good linearity of the response. Unique results on the detailed lateral shower shape, which are crucial for the two-shower separation capabilities, will be presented. We will compare the measurements to GEANT-based MC simulations, which additionally include a modeling of charge diffusion. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of this high-granularity technology for use in the proposed detector upgrade. They also show the extremely high potential of this technology for future calorimeter development.
        Speaker: Chunhui Zhang (Nikhef National institute for subatomic physics (NL))
      • 9:25 AM
        The upgrade of the BelleII froward calorimeter 20m
        The new facility SuperKEKB will be an upgrade of the existing KEKB electron-positron asymmetric collider, with a target luminosity of 8 x 10^35 cm^-2 s^-1, about 40 times greater than that of KEKB. The accelerator upgrade is based on the novel low-emittance "nanobeams" scheme. The detector will also be upgraded to cope with the higher luminosity, pile-up and occupancy. We report here on the design and development of the new pure CsI calorimeter for the forward region. An intensive R&D has been carried on to study the performance of pure CsI crystals with APD’s (Avalanche Photodiodes) readout. Results about the signal to noise ratio of this detector for different front end electronics configurations will be presented. A matrix of 16 crystals has been put on electron beam at the BTF facility in Frascati and at the MAMI facility in Mainz. Results in terms of energy and timing resolution of this prototype of the detector will also be discussed.
        Speaker: Claudia Cecchi (Universita e INFN, Perugia (IT))
      • 9:50 AM
        Shower characteristics of particles with momenta up to 150 GeV in the CALICE scintillator-tungsten HCAL 20m
        In the R&D effort towards detectors at future high-energy colliders, CALICE is studying novel options for more compact hadron calorimeters. Using tungsten as dense absorber material appears to be an attractive alternative to iron. In this talk, a study of showers initiated by electrons, pions, kaons, and protons with beam momenta up to 150 GeV in the CALICE scintillator-tungsten HCAL is presented. Details of the data reconstruction and simulation as well as of the studies of systematic uncertainties are discussed. The resulting measurements of the calorimeter response to each particle type, as well as the energy resolution and detailed studies of the longitudinal and radial shower development, are presented. These results, of unprecedented detail, serve to validate and tune Geant4 simulation models for tungsten-based calorimetry. The data are therefore compared with several Geant4 simulation models.
        Speaker: Eva Sicking (CERN)
      • 10:15 AM
        Performance in electron beams of a tungsten-CeF3 prototype for radiation-resistant high-energy physics calorimetry 20m
        The High-Luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (HL-LHC) poses stringent requirements on calorimeter performance in terms of resolution, pileup resilience and radiation hardness. A tungsten-${CeF_{3}}$ sampling calorimeter is a possible option for the upgrade of current LHC detectors and for future HEP experiments. A prototype of the calorimeter has been built and exposed to high energy electrons at the CERN SPS H4 beam line. The performance of the prototype, read out with different types of wavelenght-shifting fibers, conventional clad plastic fibers and photo-luminescent radiation hard cerium-doped quartz fibers, will be shown in terms of energy resolution, uniformity and timing performance. A detailed simulation has been also developed in order to compare with data and to extrapolate to different configurations. Additional studies on the calorimeter and the R&D projects ongoing on the various components of the experimental setup will be also discussed.
        Speaker: Riccardo Paramatti (INFN - Rome I)
    • 9:00 AM 10:40 AM
      Gas Detectors: GEMs EI9

      EI9

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Convener: Christoph Schwanda (Austrian Academy of Sciences)
      • 9:00 AM
        Ion space-charge effects in multi-GEM detectors: challenges and possible solutions for future applications 20m
        Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical, electrical and optical properties. It can be regarded as the thinnest and narrowest conductive mesh with a reported strong asymmetry in transmission of low energetic electrons and ions. Ideally this would make graphene a membrane transparent to electrons and opaque to ions, therefore solving the problem of ion back-flow in Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGD). Graphene layers with an area of the order of a square centimetre were transferred onto metal support structures with holes of diameters from 30 to 70 micrometres and pitches of the order of twice the diameter of the holes, so that the graphene was freely suspended in the holes. The graphene samples were installed into the conversion volume of a triple Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM), allowing a study of the transparency of the graphene to electrons and ions in gas as a function of the electric fields applied. We describe the transfer techniques of the graphene layers from the substrate to the experimental setup as well as the procedures to measure the charge transfer properties. Results will be presented with special attention to the challenges arising from defects in the graphene layers. We furthermore describe solutions to study the intrinsic transmission properties of this material and discuss applications where these techniques can be used to improve the state of the art of gaseous detectors.
        Speaker: Patrik Thuiner (Vienna University of Technology (AT))
      • 9:25 AM
        The KLOE-2 Inner Tracker: detector commissioning and operation 20m
        The KLOE-2 experiment started its data taking campaign in November 2014 with an upgraded tracking system including an Inner Tracker built with the cylindrical GEM technology, to operate together with the Drift Chamber improving the apparatus tracking performance. The Inner Tracker is composed of four cylindrical triple-GEM, each provided with an X-V strips-pads stereo readout and equipped with the GASTONE ASIC developed inside the KLOE-2 collaboration. Although GEM detectors are already used in high energy phyiscs experiment, this device is considered a fronteer detector due to its cylindrical geometry: KLOE-2 is the first experiment to use this novel solution. The results of the detector commissioning, detection efficiency evaluation, calibration studies and alignment, both with dedicated cosmic-ray muon and Bhabha scattering events, will be reported as well as detector operation with collisions.
        Speaker: Dr Gianfranco Morello (Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare Frascati (IT))
      • 9:50 AM
        A Novel Technique for the Measurement of the Avalanche Fluctuation of Gaseous Detectors 20m
        Gas amplification of the electrons created by X-rays, UV photons, or charged particles plays an essential role in their detection with gaseous detectors. It acts as a “preamplifier” with a sufficient gain. However, its gain fluctuates because of avalanche statistics, thereby degrading the energy resolution for monochromatic X-rays. For large Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) the azimuthal spatial resolution at long drift distances is limited by the relative variance of the gas gain for single drift electrons. Conventionally, avalanche fluctuations are estimated from the gas-amplified charge spectrum for single electrons created by a UV lamp or a laser. We have developed a novel technique for the measurement of the relative variance of avalanche fluctuation (*f*) using laser-induced tracks, exploiting the fixed cluster size of one for each ionization act along the tracks. The primary electrons are multiplied by a gas amplification device, and then collected by several readout pad rows arranged along the laser beam. The signal charges on adjacent pad rows are compared for each laser shot. The value of *f* is estimated from the width of the distribution of their differences using a straightforward relation. The technique is relatively simple and requires a short data-taking time of several tens of minutes. We present the experimental setup as well as the measurement principle, and the results obtained with a stack of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) for several gas mixtures.
        Speaker: Dr Makoto Kobayashi (KEK, IPNS)
      • 10:15 AM
        Two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector with electroluminescence gap and THGEM/GAPD-matrix multiplier 20m
        Two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors (CRADs) with THGEM multipliers have become an emerging potential technique for rare-event experiments. In this work the current status of the two-phase CRAD prototype in Ar, with electroluminescence (EL) gap and combined THGEM/GAPD-matrix multiplier, is described. The low threshold and high energy resolution of the detector is provided by the EL gap, optically read out in the VUV using compact cryogenic PMTs. The high spatial resolution of the detector is provided by the double-THGEM charge multiplier combined with a 5x5 matrix of Geiger-mode APDs (GAPDs), optically recording THGEM-hole avalanches in the Near Infrared (NIR). Proportional electroluminescence in EL gap in argon, with a minor (50 ppm) admixture of nitrogen to liquid Ar, has for the first time been systematically studied at cryogenic temperatures in the two-phase mode. The overall EL amplification parameter and the EL threshold measured in this work were in accordance with those predicted by the theory. The result on the EL threshold is particularly relevant to DarkSide and SCENE dark matter search-related experiments, where the operation electric field was thereby on the verge of appearance of the S2 signal. We also present the results on nuclear recoil detection in liquid Ar, using the two-phase CRAD and DD neutron generator, relevant in the field of energy calibration of rare-event detectors for dark matter search and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments.
        Speaker: Andrey Sokolov (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics)
    • 9:00 AM 10:40 AM
      Semiconductor Detectors: Miscellaneous EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Giacomo Sguazzoni (INFN (IT))
      • 9:00 AM
        Summary of Medipix Technology's 3-Years in Space and Plans for Future Developments 20m
        NASA has evaluated 7 Timepix-based radiation imaging pixel detectors from the CERN-based Medipix2 collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS), collecting 3-years of data, as well on the recent EFT-1 mission testing the new Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. These data along with data collected at ground-based accelerator facilities including the NASA Space Radiation Lab (NSRL) at Brookhaven in the US, as well as at the HIMAC facility at the National Institute for Radiological Sciences in Japan, have allowed the development of software analysis techniques sufficient to provide a stand-alone accurate assessment of the space radiation environment for dosimetric purposes. Recent comparisons of the performance of the Timepix with both n-on-p and p-on-n Si sensors will be presented. The further evolution of the Timepix technology by the Medipix3 collaboration in the form of the Timepix3 chip, which employs a continuous data-driven readout scheme, is being evaluated for possible use in future space research applications. The Medipix2 Collaboration is also in the process of designing an updated version of the Timepix chip, called the Timepix2, which will continue the frame-based readout scheme of the current Timepix chip. Current plans are to replace the Timepix by the Timepix2 with minimal reconfiguration of the supporting electronics. Longer-term plans include participation in the currently forming Medipix4 collaboration. A summary of the prospects will be included.
        Speaker: Prof. Lawrence Pinsky (University of Houston)
      • 9:25 AM
        Large area CNT-Si heterojunction for photodetection 20m
        Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) consist of multiple layers of graphite sheets arranged in concentric cylinders, from two to many tens. These systems are closely related to graphite layers but in some features MWCNTs behave quite differently from graphite. In particular, their ability to generate a photocurrent in a wide wavelength range has been demonstrated either without or with the application of a draining voltage. In addition, the photocurrent signal has been reported to reproduce the optical absorbance of MWCNTs, showing a maximum in the near UV region. In this talk we will present main characteristics of a novel large area photodetector featuring low noise, high efficiency and great surface uniformity. This detector has been obtained by coupling the optoelectronic characteristics of MWCNTs with the well-known properties of silicon. MWCNTs are growth on n-doped silicon layer by Chemical Vapour Deposition creating a p-n heterojunction with high sensitivity to the radiation from UV to IR. An additional MIS junction is obtained with a metallic conductive layer deposited on the back of silicon substrate. The heterojunction is characterized by a 2.5 V threshold and a well-defined tunnel effect proportional to the radiation intensity. In this framework, we will report accurate measurements of the detector responsivity, linearity, quantum efficiency and photocathode uniformity. In addition we will discuss about the heterojunction threshold and the tunnel effect below it.
        Speaker: Carla Aramo (INFN - Napoli)
      • 9:50 AM
        Characterization of a large CdZnTe coplanar quad-grid semiconductor detector 20m
        The COBRA collaboration aims to search for the neutrinoless double beta-decay of $^{116}$Cd. For this purpose, it operates a demonstrator setup with 64 CdZnTe detectors, each with a volume of 1cm$^3$, at the LNGS underground laboratory in Italy. Double beta-decays are associated with half-lifes of more than 10$^{25}$ years. To be sensitive to those half-lifes, a high detection efficiency and especially an ultra low-background setup are, among other aspects, important requirements. The usage of larger detectors is expected to be an improvement of the sensitivity. Detectors with a larger volume have a higher detection efficiency than the smaller ones. Due to the lower surface-to-volume ratio and the higher mass and thus, the usage of fewer detectors, the background can be reduced. A large (2$\times$2$\times$1.5)cm$^3$ CdZnTe detector with a new coplanar-grid design is characterized for applications in $\gamma$-ray spectroscopy and low-background operation. The four coplanar-grids on the anode side offer the possibility of separating the detector in four single sectors. The electric properties as well as the spectrometric performance, like energy response and resolution, are investigated in several measurements. Furthermore, studies concerning the operational stability and the possibility to identify multiple-scattered photons, are conducted.
        Speaker: Robert Theinert (TU Dortmund)
      • 10:15 AM
        First prototypes of two-tier avalanche pixel sensors for particle detection 20m
        In this paper, we present the proof-of-concept implementation and preliminary evaluation of a new type of silicon sensor based on Geiger-mode avalanche detectors. The proposed device, formed by two vertically-aligned pixelated detectors, exploits the coincidence between two simultaneous avalanche events to discriminate between particle-triggered detections and dark counts. This approach offers several advantages in applications requiring low material budget and fine detector segmentation as, for instance, for tracking and vertex reconstruction in particle physics experiments and charged particle imaging in medicine and biology. In addition, a timing resolution in the order of tens of picoseconds can potentially be achieved thanks to the fast onset of avalanche multiplication in Geiger-mode regime. A two-tier sensor assembly was designed and fabricated in a commercial 0.15μm CMOS process. The sensor consists of a 48x16 pixel array, and includes avalanche diodes of different sizes to evaluate the detection efficiency for different fill factors. Each pixel, having a 50μm x 75μm area, includes detectors and electronics on both layers, with the top-layer signal transmitted to the bottom layer using a vertical interconnection per pixel. The two layers were tested separately and proved to be fully functional. Several sensor samples are currently being vertically-integrated through bump bonding. The first test results on the vertically-integrated sensors will be discussed.
        Speaker: Lucio Pancheri (University of Trento and TIFPA)
    • 10:40 AM 11:30 AM
      Poster Session B

      Posters displayed on a board with an odd number

    • 11:30 AM 12:45 PM
      Gas Detectors: Drift Detectors EI9

      EI9

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      • 11:30 AM
        Construction and Test of New Precision Drift-Tube Chambers for ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Upgrades 20m
        The Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS muon spectrometer demonstrated that they provide very precise and robust tracking over large areas. Goals of ATLAS muon detector upgrades are to increase the acceptance for precision muon momentum measurement and triggering and to improve the rate capability of the muon chambers in the high-background regions when the LHC luminosity increases. Small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers have been developed for these purposes. With half the drift-tube diameter of the MDT chambers and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, sMDT chambers share the advantages with the MDTs, but have an order of magnitude higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit in. The chamber assembly methods have been optimized for mass production, reducing cost and construction time considerably and improving the the sense wire positioning accuracy to better than ten microns. The construction of twelve chambers for the feet regions of the ATLAS detector is currently in progress with the plan to install them in the winter shutdown 2016/17 of the LHC. Design and construction of the new sMDT chambers for ATLAS will be discussed as well as measurements of their precision and performance.
        Speaker: Dr Hubert Kroha (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (D)
      • 11:55 AM
        Development of an extremely thin-wall straw tracker operational in vacuum - The COMET Straw Tracker System - 20m
        The COMET experiment at J-PARC aims to search for a lepton-flavour violating process of muon to electron conversion in a muonic atom, μ-e conversion, with a branching-ratio sensitivity of better than $10^{-16}$, 4 orders of magnitude better than the present limit, in order to explore the parameter region predicted by most of well-motivated theoretical models beyond the Standard Model. The need for this sensitivity places several stringent requirements on the detector development. The experiment requires to detect the monochromatic electron of 105 MeV, the momentum resolution is primarily limited by the multiple scattering effect for this momentum region. In addition, high power proton driver is essential to accumulate an enough statistics, $ie$. high rate capability is necessary. Thus we need the very light material detector which can handle the high intensity beam in order to achieve an excellent momentum resolution, better than 2%, for 100 MeV region and to accumulate an enough statistics, up to $5\times10^{9}\mu^{-}$/s. In order to fulfill such requirements, we decided to develop the straw-base planar tracker which is operational in **vacuum** and made by an **extremely light** material. The COMET straw tracker consists of 10 mm diameter straw tube, longer than 1 m length, with 20 $\mu$m thickness Mylar foil and 70 nm aluminum deposition. Currently even thinner and smaller, 12 $\mu$m-thick and 5 mm diameter, straw is under development by the ultrasonic welding technique.
        Speaker: Hajime Nishiguchi (KEK)
      • 12:20 PM
        AXEL - high pressure xenon gas TPC for neutrinoless double beta decay search 20m
        Observation of neutrinoless double beta decay ($0\nu\beta\beta$) is of essential importance to reveal the nature of neutrino, such as mass hierarchy, absolute mass and especially its Majorana property. In order to search for $0\nu\beta\beta$, we, AXEL project, are developing a time projection chamber filled with high pressure Xenon gas. The detector can potentially achieve high energy resolution, large target mass and strong background rejection power by tracking. By using gaseous xenon, it is possible to realize a high energy resolution of 0.5% at 2.5MeV (Q value), better than several % in case of liquid. The deposited energy is determined by measuring the proportional scintillation lights which are generated by accelerating ionization electrons. We are developing a new readout scheme where light-emitting region is divided to cells and emitted lights are detected by MPPCs cell by cell. In addition to the robust structure, this scheme would have uniform response in wide area because the light-emitting region and MPPC corresponds one-to-one, so this scheme enables to achieve both high energy resolution and large size. We have produced a prototype chamber filled with 10 bar and 10 L Xe gas and evaluated the performance and obtained 5% (FWHM) energy resolution at 122 keV. This is expected to be further improved by the time of conference with new VUV-sensitive MPPCs. We will report about the studies of this prototype chamber and present future plans and final goals of AXEL.
        Speaker: Kiseki Nakamura (Kyoto University)
    • 11:30 AM 12:45 PM
      Photon Detectors EI8

      EI8

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      • 11:30 AM
        Tremendously Increased Lifetime of Microchannel-Plate PMTs 20m
        Microchannel plate (MCP) PMTs are very attractive photon sensors for low light level applications in B-fields. However, until recently the main drawback of MCP-PMTs was their aging behaviour which manifests itself in a limited lifetime due to a rapidly decreasing quantum efficiency (QE) of the photo cathode (PC) as the integrated anode charge (IAC) increases. In the latest models of PHOTONIS, Hamamatsu, and BINP novel techniques are applied to avoid these aging effects which are mainly caused by ion backflow impinging on the PC and damaging it. Since four years we are running an aging test for new lifetime-enhanced MCP-PMT models by simultaneously illuminating various PMT types with roughly the same photon rate. This allows a fair comparison of the lifetime of all investigated MCP-PMTs and will give some insight in the best techniques for a lifetime enhancement. In this presentation the results of comprehensive aging tests will be discussed. Gain, dark count rate and QE were investigated for their dependence on the IAC. The QE was measured spectrally resolved and as a function of the position across the photo cathode to identify regions where the PC damage develops first. For the best performing tubes the lifetime improvement in comparison to the older MCP-PMTs is a factor of ~50 based on an IAC of meanwhile >9 C/cm2. This breakthrough in the lifetime of MCP-PMTs was accomplished by coating the MCP pores using an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique.
        Speaker: Dr Albert Lehmann (Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg)
      • 11:55 AM
        Behaviour of hybrid avalanche photo-detector for the Belle II Aerogel RICH in magnetic field 20m
        For the Belle II spectrometer a proximity focusing RICH counter with an aerogel radiator (ARICH) will be employed as a PID system in the forward endcap region of the spectrometer. The main challenge during ARICH R&D was a reliable multichannel sensor for single photons that operates in the high magnetic field of the spectrometer (1.5 T) and withstands the radiation levels expected at the experiment. A 144-channel Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector (HAPD) was developed with Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. and recently the production of 450 HAPDs was completed. While our first tests of HAPD performance in the magnetic field (before mass production) showed no issues, we lately observed a presence of very large signal pulses ($\sim$5000$\times$ single photon signal), generated internally within about 20% of HAPDs, while operating in the magnetic field. The rate of these pulses varies from sample to sample. These pulses impact the HAPD performance in two ways: they introduce periods of dead time and in some cases damage to the front-end electronics was observed. In the talk we will present conditions under which such large pulses are generated, their properties and impact on HAPD performance, and discuss possible mechanism of their origin.
        Speaker: Luka Santelj (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK))
      • 12:20 PM
        Development of solar blind UV extended APD for the readout of Barium Floride crystals 20m
        In order to take advantage of the very fast scintillation component of barium fluoride (decay time 0.9 ns at 220 nm) it is necessary to have a fast photosensor with high efficiency in the UV that is also able to discriminate against the larger slow (decay time 650ns at 300 nm) scintillation component. We have developed a large area avalanche photodiode photosensor that has high quantum efficiency at 220 nm, strong discrimination against the 300 nm component and good rise and decay times. This sensor makes it possible to build a radiation-hard calorimeter based on barium fluoride for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab that has good energy and time resolution and high rate capability.
        Speaker: David Hitlin (Caltech)
    • 11:30 AM 12:45 PM
      Semiconductor Detectors: Strip Detectors EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Marko Dragicevic (HEPHY Vienna)
      • 11:30 AM
        The ATLAS ITK strip detector - status of R&D 20m
        While the LHC at CERN, where the ATLAS and CMS experiments have discovered the Higgs Boson in 2012, is ramping up luminosity, upgrades to the LHC and experiments are planned. The major upgrade is foreseen for 2024, with a roughly tenfold increase in luminosity, resulting in corresponding increases in particle rates and radiation doses. In ATLAS the entire Inner Detector will be replaced for Phase-2 running with an all-silicon system. This talk will concentrate on the strip part. Its layout foresees low-mass and modular yet highly integrated double-sided structures for the barrel and forward region. The design features conceptually simple modules made from electronic hybrids glued directly onto the silicon. Modules will then be assembled on both sides of large carbon-core structures with integrated cooling and electrical services. The modularity allows assembly and testing at multiple sites, while the high integration density facilitates macro-assembly and system tests. We will present the outcomes of the massive R&D effort underway, and show on-going development and prototyping efforts. A large number of components are currently being developed, with for many parts, prototyping efforts towards full-size components in full swing. The recent developments and test results will be presented. Particular emphasis will be given to silicon sensors and readout. In addition, assembly and QA procedures will be shown. We will also give an outlook towards mass production.
        Speaker: Dr Carlos Garcia Argos (CERN)
      • 11:55 AM
        Upgrades of the CMS outer tracker detector for the HL-LHC 20m
        The LHC machine is planning an upgrade program which will smoothly bring the luminosity up to or above 5*10^34/cm2/s sometimes after 2024, to possibly reach an integrated luminosity of 3000/fb at the end of that decade. In this ultimate scenario, called Phase-2, when LHC will reach the High Luminosity (HL-LHC) phase, CMS will need a completely new Tracker detector, in order to fully exploit the high-demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The new Tracker should have also trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R&D activities are ongoing to explore options and develop solutions that would allow including tracking information at Level-1. The design choices for the CMS Outer Tracker upgrades are discussed along with some highlights of the R&D activities.
        Speaker: Giacomo Sguazzoni (INFN (IT))
      • 12:20 PM
        Exploring the quality of latest sensor prototypes for the CMS Outer Tracker Upgrade 20m
        The LHC will reach its nominal luminosity soon which will be further increased by a factor of five to seven during the third Long Shutdown (LS3) around 2024. This significant increase in luminosity along with the increasing radiation damage requires a complete renewal of the CMS Outer Tracker, the Tracker Phase-2 Upgrade, during the LS3. Two types of modules named PS- and 2S-module, both featuring trigger capabilities, will be implemented during this upgrade. Milestones in the sensor R&D for the 2S-modules as well as first characterisation results are presented. AC-coupled silicon strip sensors of two vendors, produced on 6-inch as well as on 8-inch wafers, are considered. Both of them feature the demanded n-in-p technology. The wafer layout is presented which features new test structures improving the quality assurance at the manufacturer and in the laboratory is described. Results from the electrical characterization as well as first beam test results comprising full scale 2S-module prototypes are discussed. Concluding long-term behaviour studies under varying temperatures and humidities provide insights into the robustness under environmental stress.
        Speaker: Axel Konig (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
    • 3:00 PM 6:00 PM
      Ice stock sports Wiener Eislaufverein

      Wiener Eislaufverein

      Lothringerstraße 221030 Wien
    • 9:00 AM 10:40 AM
      Astroparticle Detectors: Cosmic Particles EI8

      EI8

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Convener: Jochen Schieck (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 9:00 AM
        Detection of High Energy Cosmic Rays with the Auger Engineering Radio Array 20m
        Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays induce extensive air showers in the Earth's atmosphere. Within the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina, the Auger Engineering Radio Array has been built to measure MHz radio emission of these showers in addition to established techniques based on fluorescence emission and particle detection on ground. An area of around 17km² has been instrumented by 153 autonomous radio stations which record radio signals with frequencies between 30 to 80 MHz, covering the full zenith angular range with a duty cycle close to 100%. Recent progress will be presented on thorough calibration efforts of the radio array, and on measurements of the primary cosmic ray energies.
        Speaker: Raphael Krause (RWTH Aachen University)
      • 9:25 AM
        Operation and performance of the EEE network array for the detection of cosmic rays 20m
        P.La Rocca for the EEE Collaboration The EEE (Extreme Energy Events) Project is an experiment for the detection of cosmic ray muons by means of a sparse array of telescopes, each made of three Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers, distributed over all the Italian territory. The main scientific goals of the Project are the investigation of the properties of the local muon flux, the detection of extensive air showers and the search for long distance correlation between far telescopes. The Project is also characterized by a strong educational and outreach aspect since the telescopes are managed by teams of students and teachers who previously also took care of their construction at CERN. The experiment took a first coordinated data taking (“Pilot-Run”) in fall 2014 and another (“Run-1”) from February to April 2015. About thirty telescopes collected several billions of cosmic ray events that have been stored, reconstructed and analyzed thanks to the computing facilities at CNAF – the biggest Italian storage and computing center managed by INFN. In this presentation an overall description of the experiment will be given, including the design, construction and performance of the single telescopes. The operation of the whole array is also presented by showing the most recent results obtained from the analysis of the collected data.
        Speaker: Paola La Rocca (Universita e INFN, Catania (IT))
      • 9:50 AM
        The Mini-EUSO telescope on the ISS 20m
        The Mini-EUSO project aims to perform observations of the UV-light night emission from Earth. The UV background produced in atmosphere is a key measurement for any experiment aiming at the observation of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) from space, the most energetic component of the cosmic radiation. The Mini-EUSO instrument will be placed within the International Space Station (ISS) in the Russian Module and measures through a UV transparent window. The installation is foreseen for 2017. The instrument comprises a compact telescope with a large field of view, based on an optical system employing two Fresnel lenses for increased light collection. The light is focused onto an array of photo-multipliers and the resulting signal is converted to digital, processed and stored via the electronics subsystems on-board. The instrument is designed and built by the members of the JEM-EUSO collaboration. JEM-EUSO is a wide-angle refractive UV telescope being proposed for attachment to the ISS, which has been designed to address basic problems of fundamental physics and high-energy astrophysics investigating the nature of cosmic rays with energies above 1020 eV. Mini-EUSO will be able to study beside UHECRs a wide range of scientific phenomena including atmospheric physics, strange quark matter and bioluminescence. The mission is approved by the Italian Space Agency and the Russian Space Agency. Scientific, technical and programmatic aspects of this project will be described.
        Speaker: Valentina Scotti
      • 10:15 AM
        CaloCube: a new-concept calorimeter for the detection of high-energy cosmic rays in space 20m
        The direct observation of high-energy cosmic rays, up to the PeV region, will increasingly rely on a highly performing calorimetry apparatus, and the physics performance will be primarily determined by the geometrical acceptance and the energy resolution of the deployed calorimeter. Thus, it is extremely important to optimize its geometrical design, granularity, and absorption depth, with respect to the total mass of the apparatus, which is the most important constraint for a space launch. Calocube is a homogeneous calorimeter whose basic geometry is cubic and isotropic, so as to detect particles arriving from every direction in space, thus maximizing the acceptance; granularity is obtained by filling the cubic volume with small cubic scintillating crystals. This design forms the basis of a three-year R&D activity which has been approved and financed by INFN. A comparative study of different scintillating materials have been performed. Optimal values for the size of the crystals and spacing among them have been studied. Different geometries, beyond the cubic one, and the possibility to implement dual readout techniques have been investigated. A prototype, instrumented with CsI(Tl) cubic crystals, has been constructed and tested with particle beams. An overview of the obtained results will be presented and the perspectives for future space experiments will be discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Elena Vannuccini (INFN Florence)
    • 9:00 AM 10:40 AM
      Gas Detectors: Micromegas EI9

      EI9

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Convener: Winfried Mitaroff (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 9:00 AM
        GridPix detector - Development and Application 20m
        The GridPix detectors are an interesting new technology which combine a highly granular readout structure implemented by the pixelized Timepix ASIC with a Micromegas mesh. The mesh is produced by photolithographic processing techniques and each mesh hole is aligned with one readout pixel. This allows for detecting single primary electrons with high detection efficiency. Both energy and spatial resolution profit from resolving the structure of tracks or X-ray conversions. We have developed a wafer-based production of GridPix detectors and a scalable readout system allowing the construction and simultaneous operation of a large number of GridPixes in a complete experimental setup. Several application will be presented: A test beam with a large volume TPC at DESY has demonstrated the smooth operation of 160 GridPix detectors recording tracks of up to 50 cm length. Another application which will be covered in this presentation is the good X-ray energy resolution of about 3.85 %, which is important for low-rate experiments such as solar axion searches. Finally also tests of a GridPix based transition radiation detector in a magnetic field will be presented.
        Speaker: Jochen Kaminski (Universitaet Bonn (DE))
      • 9:25 AM
        Performance studies of resistive Micromegas detectors for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer 20m
        Resistive Micromegas (Micro MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors have proven along the years to be a reliable high rate capable detector technology characterised by an excellent spatial resolution. The ATLAS collaboration has chosen the resistive Micromegas technology (mainly for tracking), along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC, mainly for triggering), for the phase-1 upgrade of the inner muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW). The NSW requires fully efficient Micromegas chambers with spatial resolution better than 100$\mu$m independent of the track incidence angle and the magnetic field (B<0.3T), with a rate capability up to ~10kHz/cm$^2$. Along with the precise tracking the Micromegas chambers should be able to provide a trigger signal, complementary to the sTGC, thus a decent timing resolution is required. Several tests have been performed on small (10x10cm$^2$) and medium size (1x0.5m$^2$) resistive Micromegas chambers (bulk type and mechanical floating mesh type) using medium (10GeV/c) and high (150GeV/c) momentum hadron beams at CERN including measurements inside magnetic field. Results on the measured efficiency, position and timing resolution will be shown demonstrating the excellent characteristics of the detectors that fulfill the NSW requirements. In addition, early test results from the first full size (2-3m$^2$) operational modules that will be realised during 2015, will be presented.
        Speaker: Fabian Kuger (Bayerische Julius Max. Universitaet Wuerzburg (DE))
      • 9:50 AM
        Anode charge-up in resistive Micromegas and its quenching effect on spark development 20m
        Fast evacuation of avalanche ions in Micromegas makes these detectors capable of withstanding very high rates with no loss of gain. But this intrinsic high-rate capability is often compromised by sporadic sparking which introduces dead time and is potentially harmful for the readout. Resistive electrode designs, by limiting spark current and keeping voltage drop locally, provide an effective remedy. They are thus quite popular, but there is actually more to them than simply spark attenuation. We propose that the spark probability is also drastically reduced because of charge-up of the resistive electrode surface. The underlying mechanism is a progressive reduction of field (in the region where spark-initiating avalanches develop) by the charges successively incoming onto the surface. We predict that the time constant with which the surface potential is relaxed is crucial to the success of this quenching mechanism. Small prototypes with a time constant varying over 5 orders of magnitude were built to verify this model. During tests in a high intensity hadron beam, spark quenching was observed for time constants larger than roughly 1-10 ns, corresponding to the avalanche timescale in Micromegas. These findings shed light on the basic mechanism of spark quenching in resistive detectors. Of general interest to the gaseous detector community, they also open the way to an optimisation of the resistivity value for best rate capability and full spark suppression.
        Speaker: Maximilien Chefdeville (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (FR))
      • 10:15 AM
        LHM: a new noble-liquid detector concept based on bubble-assisted electroluminescence 20m
        We present a new noble-liquid detection concept and experimental results in LXe, based on the bubble-assisted Liquid Hole Multiplier (LHM). In this “local dual-phase detection element”, a gas bubble is supported underneath a micro-pattern electrode (THGEM, GEM etc.) immersed inside the liquid. Ionization electrons and scintillation-induced photoelectrons (PE) extracted from a CsI photocathode, drift through the electrode's holes; they induce electroluminescence (EL) in the bubble, with tens of photons emitted per drifting electron. A cascaded-LHM detector, operated through photon-mediated process in noble-liquid, would provide high light yields – detectable with internal or external photo-sensors. We will present LHM-prototype results in LXe, demonstrating the stability of the bubble-assisted concept in GEM and THGEM. Examples are: energy resolution (7.5% for ~6,000 electrons), efficient PE extraction from a CsI-coated THGEM and GEM in LXe and their collection into holes; EL photo-yields, time resolution (10ns) with scintillation photons and results of the cascaded-LHM operation will be provided. The merits of the bubble-assisted LHM concept will be discussed in the context of future applications for rare-event and other searches.
        Speaker: Mr Eran Erdal (Weizmann Institute of Science)
    • 9:00 AM 10:40 AM
      Semiconductor Detectors: Pixel 1 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Convener: Doris Eckstein (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Hamburg and Zeuthen (DE))
      • 9:00 AM
        The Phase-1 Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector 20m
        The CMS experiment features a pixel detector with three barrel layers (BPIX) and two disks per side (FPIX). While the detector was delivering high-quality data during LHC Run 1, it was designed for the nominal instantaneous LHC luminosity of 1.0 x 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1. It is expected that the instantaneous luminosity will reach twice the design value before Long Shutdown 3. Under such conditions, the present readout chip would suffer from data loss due to buffer overflow. The CMS collaboration is constructing a new pixel detector, to replace the present device during the Winter shutdown 2016/2017. The goals of the Phase-1 Pixel Upgrade is three-fold: to operate with full efficiency at 2.0 x 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1; to increase detector acceptance and redundancy; and to reduce the material budget. The upgraded device thus features a modified readout scheme and a new readout chip, additional detection layers, and a new support mechanics as well as improvements of the services, including an evaporative cooling system based on CO2. This contribution will motivate the detector design and technological choices of the new pixel detector. Focussing then on BPIX, the implementation as well as the performance of new technical solutions will be outlined. Results from BPIX beam and system tests will be presented. The status of the BPIX construction and pixel module production will be described, and challenges, difficulties encountered as well as lessons learned will be discussed.
        Speaker: Katja Klein (RWTH Aachen)
      • 9:25 AM
        Pixel Sensors with slim edges and small pitches for the CMS upgrades for HL-LHC 20m
        The CMS experiment will build a third generation Pixel detector for the HL-LHC. The foreseen integrated luminosity of 3000 1/fb together with the high particle rates demands sensors with higher granularity and a sensor design with limited dead area surrounding the active Pixel array. This contribution will cover the recent development of pixelated sensors with the regular 100 um pitch and with pitches reduced to 50 and 25 um. Moreover, results will also be shown from silicon sensors where the inactive area surrounding the pixel array has been reduced to 200 um. The devices were first characterized in terms of DC performance at the probe station, mounted on readout boards and exposed to 120Gev protons at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. The contribution will include the bench characterization of the devices and the measurements of their tracking performances, in terms of efficiency and resolution, as measured in the beam. The prototypes were irradiated at the CERN PS irradiation facility and their performance post-irradiation will also be presented.
        Speaker: Caterina Vernieri (Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (US))
      • 9:50 AM
        Thin hybrid pixel assembly fabrication development with backside compensation layer 20m
        ATLAS will replace the entire tracking system for operation at the HL-LHC. This will include a significantly larger pixel detector of approximately 8 m2. It is critical to reduce the mass of the pixel modules and this requires thinning both the sensor and readout to about 150 micrometers each. The bump yield in thin module assembly using solder based bump bonding can be problematic due to wafer bowing during processing at high temperatures. A new bump-bonding process using backside compensation on the readout chip to address the issue of low yield will be presented. Results from characterization of assemblies produced from readout wafers thinner to 100 micrometers and the effect of applying backside compensation will be presented. Bond yields close to 100% have been measured using the FEI4 readout chip.
        Speaker: Francisca Munoz Sanchez (University of Manchester (GB))
      • 10:15 AM
        The NA62 GigaTracker 20m
        The GigaTracker is an hybrid silicon pixel detector built for the NA62 experiment aiming at measuring the branching fraction of the ultra-rare kaon decay $K^+ \to \pi^+ \nu \bar{\nu}$ at the CERN SPS. The detector has to track particles in a beam with a flux reaching 1.3 MHz/mm$^2$ and provide single-hit timing with 200ps RMS resolution for a total material budget of less than 1.5$X_0$. The tracker comprises three 60.8mm$\times$27mm stations installed in vacuum ($\sim10^{-6}$mbar) and cooled with liquid C$_6$F$_{14}$ circulating through micro-channels etched inside few hundred of microns thick silicon plates. Each station is composed of a 200$\mu$m thick silicon sensor readout by 2$\times$5 custom 100$\mu$m thick ASIC, called TDCPix. Each chip contains 40$\times$45 asynchronous pixels, each 300$\mu$m$\times$300$\mu$m and is instrumented with 720 time-to-digital converters with 100ps bin. In order to cope with the high rate, the TDCPix is equipped with four 3.2Gb/s serialisers sending out the data. We will describe the detector and the results from the 2015 NA62 run.
        Speaker: Mathieu Perrin-Terrin (CERN)
    • 10:40 AM 11:30 AM
      Poster Session A

      Posters displayed on a board with an even number

    • 11:30 AM 12:45 PM
      Electronics EI8

      EI8

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Convener: Alessandro Marchioro (CERN)
      • 11:30 AM
        Testbeam results of the first real time embedded tracking system with artificial retina 20m
        The retina experiment aims at developing a fast track finding system prototype for the high-luminosity LHC, capable to operate at 40 MHz event rate with hundreds of track per event. According to simulations this is technologically achievable by using the artificial retina algorithm, a massive parallel fast tracking algorithm, implemented in last generation commercial FPGAs. The artificial retina algorithm is inspired by neurobiology and is capable of pattern recognition and track fit. Hits from the tracking detectors are sent to a switch module routing the data to appropriate cellular units, the engines, that determine how well a set of hits matches with a specific track hypothesis. Finally a track fitter module interpolates the analog response of the engines and determines the track parameters with a resolution comparable with offline results. A tracking prototype system based on 8 silicon strip detectors has been built as practical demonstrator of this innovative tracking system. The sensors are readout using Beetle chips, accepting trigger rates up to 1.1 MHz, and a custom data acquisition board based on new generation Xilinx Kintex7 FPGA. The retina algorithm has been implemented in the FPGA using a fully pipelined architecture and the embedded tracking system has been tested in a real experimental environment using protons at the CERN SPS facility. Testbeam results are presented and compared with simulations. Perspectives for the future are also discussed.
        Speaker: Nicola Neri (Università degli Studi e INFN Milano (IT))
      • 11:55 AM
        Electronics Development for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Trigger and Readout for Future LHC Running 20m
        The upgrade of the LHC will provide 7 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters. Radiation tolerance criteria and an improved trigger system with higher acceptance rate and longer latency require an upgrade of the LAr readout electronics. In the first upgrade phase in 2019-2020, a trigger readout with up to 10 times higher granularity will be implemented. This allows an improved reconstruction of electromagnetic and hadronic showers and will reduce the background for electron, photon and energy-flow signals at the first trigger level. The analog and digital signal processing components are currently in their final design stages and a fully functional demonstrator system is operated and tested on the LAr Calorimeters. In a second upgrade stage in 2024-2026, the readout of all 183,000 LAr Calorimeter cells will be performed without trigger selection at 40 MHz sampling rate and 16 bit dynamic range. Calibrated energies of all cells will be available at the second trigger level operating at 1 MHz, in order to further mitigate pile-up effects in energy reconstruction. Radiation tolerant, low-power front-end electronics optimized for high pile-up conditions is currently being developed, including pre-amplifier, ADC and serializer components in 65-180 nm technology. This talk will give an overview of the future LAr readout electronics and present research results from the two upgrade programs.
        Speaker: Walter Hopkins (University of Oregon (US))
      • 12:20 PM
        The ALPIDE Pixel Sensor Chip for the Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System 20m
        The ALPIDE chip is a CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor being developed for the Upgrade of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment at CERN Large Hadron Collider. ALICE is the first experiment at LHC implementing a large detector with MAPS technology. The ALPIDE chip is implemented with a 180~nm CMOS Imaging Process and fabricated on substrates with a high-resistivity epitaxial layer. It measures 15~mm by 30~mm and contains a matrix of 512$\times$1024 pixels with in-pixel amplification, shaping, discrimination and multi-event buffering. The readout of the sensitive matrix is hit driven. There is no signaling activity over the matrix if there are no hits to read out and power is consumed proportionally to the occupancy. The requirements on detection efficiency above 99\%, fake-hit probability below $10^{-5}$, spatial resolution of $5~\mu m$ are met. The capability to read out Pb-Pb interactions at 100~kHz is provided. The power density of the ALPIDE chip is projected to be less than ${\rm 35~mW/cm^2}$ for the application in the Inner Layers and below ${\rm 20~mW/cm^2}$ for the Outer Barrel Layers, where the occupancy is lower. This contribution will describe the architecture, design and main features of the final ALPIDE chip, planned for submission at the beginning of 2016. Early results from the experimental qualification of the pALPIDE-3 full scale prototype predecessor will also be reported.
        Speaker: Gianluca Aglieri Rinella (CERN)
    • 11:30 AM 12:45 PM
      Gas Detectors: Micropattern Detectors EI9

      EI9

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Convener: Winfried Mitaroff (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 11:30 AM
        Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer for Operation at the HL-LHC 20m
        The High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) will increase the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to low-rate high-energy physics processes. In order to cope with the 10 times higher instantaneous luminosity compared to the LHC, the trigger system of ATLAS needs to be upgraded. The ATLAS experiment plans to increase the maximum rate capability of the first two trigger levels to 1~MHz at 6~$\mu$s latency and 400~kHz at 30~$\mu$s latency, respectively. This requires new trigger and read-out electronics for the RPC (resistive plate) and TGC (thin gap) trigger chambers, and the replacement of the read-out electronics of the MDT (monitored drift tube) precision chambers. The replacement of the MDT read-out electronics will make it possible to include their data in the first level trigger decision and thus to increase the selectivity of the first level muon trigger. The RPC trigger system in the barrel will have to be reinforced by the installation of additional thin-gap RPC with a substantially increased high-rate capability compared to the current RPCs. This addition of RPCs will also increase the acceptance of the barrel muon trigger from 75\% to 95\%.
        Speaker: Oliver Kortner (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (D)
      • 11:55 AM
        Advances in micro-Resistive WELL ($\mu$-RWELL) detectors 20m
        In this work we present the advances performed on the micro-Resistive WELL ($\mu$-RWELL) detector technology. The $\mu$-RWELL is a compact spark-protected single amplification stage Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD). The detector amplification stage, realized with a structure very similar to a GEM foil, is embedded through a resistive layer in the readout board. A cathode electrode, defining the gas conversion/drift gap, completes the detector mechanics. The proposed structure has some characteristics in common with previous MPGDs, such as C.A.T. and WELL, developed more than ten years ago. The new architecture, showing a fine space resolution, $\sim$60$\mu$m, is a very compact device, robust against discharges and exhibiting a large gain (>10$^4$), simple to construct and easy for engineering and then suitable for applications for large area tracking devices as well as huge digital calorimeters.
        Speaker: Giovanni Bencivenni (Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare Frascati (IT))
      • 12:20 PM
        R&D on a new type of micropattern gaseous detector: the Fast Timing Micropattern detector 20m
        Micropattern gaseous detectors (MPGD) underwent significant upgrades in recent years, introducing resistive materials to build compact spark-protected devices. Exploiting this technology further, various features such as space and time resolution, rate capability, sensitive area, operational stability and radiation hardness can be improved. This contribution introduces a new type of MPGD, namely the Fast Timing Micropattern (FTM) detector, utilizing a fully resistive WELL structure. It consists of a stack of several coupled layers where drift and WELL multiplication stages alternate in the structure, yielding a significant improvement in timing properties due to competing ionization processes in the different drift regions. Two FTM prototypes have been developed so far. The first one is uWELL-like, where multiplication takes place in the holes of a kapton foil covered on both sides with resistive material. The second one has a resistive Micromegas-like structure, with multiplication developing in a region delimited by a resistive mesh. The structure of these prototypes will be described in detail and the results of the characterization study performed with an X-Ray generator with two different gas mixtures will be presented. First results on rate capability and time resolution based on data collected with cosmic rays and muon/pion test beams will also be presented.
        Speaker: Ilaria Vai (Universita e INFN, Pavia (IT))
    • 11:30 AM 12:45 PM
      Semiconductor Detectors: Diamonds EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Convener: Doris Eckstein (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Hamburg and Zeuthen (DE))
      • 11:30 AM
        Test beam results of 3D detectors constructed with single-crystal and poly-crystalline diamond 20m
        Results from prototypes of a novel detector using chemical vapor deposited diamond and resistive electrodes in the bulk forming a 3D diamond device will be presented. The electrodes of the device were fabricated with laser assisted phase change of diamond into a combination of diamond-like-carbon, amorphous carbon and graphite. The connections to the electrodes of the 3D device were made using a photo-lithographic process. A detector system consisting of 3D devices, one based on single-crystal CVD diamond and one based on poly-crystalline CVD diamond was connected to a multi-channel readout and was successfully tested in a 120GeV proton beam at CERN proving for the first time the feasibility of the 3D diamond detector concept for particle tracking applications. The electrical properties and beam test results of the prototype devices will be presented.
        Speaker: Felix Caspar Bachmair (Eidgenoessische Tech. Hochschule Zuerich (CH))
      • 11:55 AM
        Progress and questions about sCVD Diamond Detectors for Particle Tracking 20m
        (On behlaf of the ANR 12-BS05-0014 "MONODIAM-HE) Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and now all LHC experiments. Diamonds are considered as an alternate sensor for use very close to the interaction region of the HL-LHC, where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. We present comparative test results of single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds from various sources (industrial manufacturers and research laboratory). The influence of various parameters have been evaluated : Nitrogen contens, surface finishing techniques, temperature, metallization techniques, choice of metal… Long term studies have been carried out. We will conclude about the readiness of diamond detectors for particle detection and tracking for the future programs at the High-Luminosity LHC.
        Speaker: Dr Jean-Marie BROM (IPHC - Strasbourg (France))
    • 12:45 PM 2:00 PM
      Lunch Break 1h 15m
    • 2:00 PM 3:40 PM
      Astroparticle Detectors: Dark Matter EI8

      EI8

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Convener: Manfred Jeitler (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 2:00 PM
        The COSINUS project: development of new NaI-based cryogenic detectors for direct dark matter search 20m
        Many astrophysical observations can be explained by the existence of cold dark matter. Although nowadays its contribution to the energy density of the universe is known precisely, its particle nature remains still unknown. Clarifying the nature and origin of dark matter is one of the big challenges for modern particle physics. Direct dark matter searches aim at the observation of dark matter particles interacting with the material of their earthbound detectors. Since many years there is a tension between the DAMA/LIBRA experiment observing an annual modulation signal, as expected for dark matter particles, and several other experiments with null results. COSINUS, an R\&D project recently initiated by INFN and located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), offers the unique possibility to investigate and clarify the above discrepancy. In particular, COSINUS is designed to combine the DAMA/LIBRA detector material NaI with the well established phonon/light technique for particle identification and background rejection. We will present first results using CsI (undoped), which has similar crystal properties as NaI, as a cryogenic scintillating calorimeter. Furthermore, we will describe our current plans to develop and operate such cryogenic calorimeter based on NaI (undoped). The dedicated detector design for the first NaI-based proof-of-principle detector, including a cryogenic light detector as well as the objectives for the COSINUS project are reported.
        Speaker: Achim Gütlein (Austrian Academy of Sciences)
      • 2:25 PM
        SABRE: WIMP Modulation Detection in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere 20m
        SABRE (Sodium-iodide with Active Background REjection) is a NaI(Tl) experiment designed to search for Dark Matter through the annual modulation signature. A DM signal on an Earth-based detector is expected to modulate yearly due to the change of the Earth's speed relative to the galactic halo reference frame. The long standing result from the DAMA/LIBRA experiment at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) is consistent with this scenario, while a confirmation of this result by an independent experiment is still missing. SABRE consists of highly pure NaI(Tl) crystals operated in an active liquid scintillator veto. The scintillator provides a veto against external backgrounds and allows to tag the background arising from detector components. The SABRE experiment follows a two-phase approach. In the first phase, high-purity NaI(Tl) crystals will be operated at LNGS in an active liquid scintillator veto with the goal of lowering the background in the region of interest for Dark Matter detection at a level that is significantly below the one observed by DAMA/LIBRA. An unprecedented radio-purity for both the NaI powder and the crystal growth is needed to achieve this goal. The second phase will consist of two NaI(Tl) detector arrays located at LNGS and in the Stawell Gold Mine in Australia. The operation of twin full-scale experiments in both the northern and the southern hemisphere will strengthen the reliability of the result against possible seasonal systematic effects.
        Speaker: Dr Claudia Tomei (INFN - Roma)
      • 2:50 PM
        WIMP tracking with cryogenic nuclear emulsion 20m
        Directional dark matter search experiment enable us to reveal the presence of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). A promising detector of directional measurement is a fine-grained nuclear emulsion consisting of fine silver bromide crystals with 20 nm or 40 nm size. A critical issue for the success of the emulsion dark matter search experiment is to discriminate the nuclear recoil tracks and electron background tracks which come from stopping beta rays of $^{14}$C decay in the emulsion. Since the intrinsic electron events will be significant background, a electron rejection power of at least 10$^{-8}$ is needed. We present a novel cryogenic approach to reject the electron background that makes use of phonon effect in nuclear emulsion. Since nuclear recoil tracks increase temperature of silver bromide crystals in the emulsion by producing phonon in the crystal, this approach allows us to extract nuclear recoil tracks and to achieve no sensitivity to electron tracks by operating the emulsion at LN$_{2}$ temperature. For proof of principle, we have been investigating the sensitivity of fine-grained nuclear emulsions as function of temperature by exposing to gamma rays and ion beams from an ion implant system in range of 77 -- 300 K. Results of gamma ray exposure indicate a dramatically reduction of the electron sensitivity with decreasing temperature. The nuclear track data is being analyzed. First results on the performance will be presented.
        Speaker: Dr Mitsuhiro Kimura (Nagoya University)
      • 3:15 PM
        PROSPECTS FOR DETECTION OF WIMP DARK MATTER AND COHERENT NEUTRINO SCATTERING WITH THE LUX-ZEPLIN DETECTOR 20m
        The LZ is a second generation dark matter experiment. It is a follow-on to the LUX detector, which is currently the most sensitive WIMP direct detection experiment. The central LZ detector will contain 7 tonnes of active, liquid xenon. Further, LZ is predicted to observe dozens of solar $\rm ^8B$ neutrino interactions via coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. Along with being extremely sensitive to WIMP dark matter detector LZ may be the first measurement of the coherent neutrino scattering process. Understanding the expected neutrino interaction rates is crucial for extracting the WIMP signal and neutrino properties. I will discuss the status of the LZ experiment along with its projected sensitivity.
        Speaker: Attila Dobi (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
    • 2:00 PM 3:40 PM
      Medical Applications: PET EI9

      EI9

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Convener: Mara Bruzzi (Universita e INFN, Firenze (IT))
      • 2:00 PM
        State of the art time resolution in TOF-PET detectors for various crystal sizes and types 20m
        Time of flight (TOF) in positron emission tomography (PET) has experienced a revival of interest after its first introduction in the eighties. This is due to a significant progress in solid state photodetectors (SiPMs) and newly developed scintillators (LSO and its derivates). Latest developments at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) lead to the NUV-HD SiPM with a very high photon detection efficiency of around 50%. Despite the large area of 4x4mm$^2$ it achieves a good single photon time resolution of 205$\pm$5ps FWHM. Coincidence time resolution (CTR) measurements using LSO:Ce codoped 0.4%Ca scintillators yield values of 73$\pm$2ps FWHM for 2x2x3mm$^3$, 83$\pm$4ps for 2x2x5mm$^3$, 100$\pm$4ps for 2x2x10mm$^3$ and 122$\pm$6ps for 2x2x20mm$^3$ crystal sizes. Results with standard LYSO:Ce are 95$\pm$5ps for 2x2x5mm$^3$, 105ps$\pm$4ps for 3x3x5mm$^3$, 130ps$\pm$5ps for 2x2x20mm$^3$ and 140ps$\pm$5ps for 3x3x20mm$^3$. A measured increase in cross-talk probability given by the crystal acting as a reflector could be a reason for the deteriorated CTR observed with the higher crystal cross-sections. Further measurements with various scintillator cross-sections (1x1mm$^2$ - 4x4mm$^2$) will be a basis for discussing this influence to timing in TOF-PET. Additionally, CTR measurements with LuAG and GGAG type samples are presented and the results are interpreted in terms of their scintillation properties, e.g. rise time, decay time, light yield and emission spectra.
        Speaker: Stefan Gundacker (CERN)
      • 2:25 PM
        Development of High-Resolution Detector Module with Depth of Interaction Identification for Positron Emission Tomography 20m
        We have developed a Time-of-flight high resolution and commercially viable SiPM based detector modules for the application in the new positron emission mammography (new ClearPEM) and other small organ specific PET scanners. The detector module has a single side readout and 4-to-1 coupling between LYSO crystals and SiPM, as opposite to the 1-to-1 coupling and double-side readout (with APDs) currently implemented into the ClearPEM. The crystal array consists of 8x8 pixels each with1.53x1.53x15 mm3 separated by reflective foils. The crystal array is optically coupled to 4x4 SiPM array and readout by a high performance front-end ASIC with TDC capability (50 ps time binning). Optical simulations of the detector module has been done in Geant4 to study the different crystal surface treatments, as well as several coupling configurations between scintillators and SiPM to optimize the performance of the module. In this paper we present the results for two detector modules being one made up of crystal pixels with all sides polished capable of identifying all 64 crystals and another one made up of crystal pixels with the longer sides unpolished to get both depth of interaction and crystal identification. The preliminary results show a timing resolution of 375 ps, an average DOI resolution of 3 mm sigma and an average energy resolution of 28% FWHM.
        Speaker: Tahereh Niknejad (LIP)
      • 2:50 PM
        The SAFIR project: Status and perspectives 20m
        SAFIR (Small Animal Fast Insert for mRi) is a non conventional preclinical PET detector, currently under development, to be used inside the bore of a 7T MRI scanner. The goal is simultaneous PET/MR imaging of small animals, with time granularities of the order of a few seconds, for fast and dynamic quantitative analysis of different biological processes (e.g. oxygen brain perfusion) at temporal resolutions never achieved so far. To compensate for the statistics loss due to the short acquisition duration, high activities – up to 500 MBq – have to be injected into the animals. Beside the MR-compatibility, a high sensitivity (~ 5%), a good spatial resolution (~ 2 mm FWHM), an excellent coincidence timing resolution (~ 300 ps FWHM) and a high data throughput DAQ system are required. The SAFIR detector will rely on matrices of L(Y)SO-type crystals, one-to-one coupled to SiPM arrays, and arranged into several rings, stacked axially. Different readout options are being investigated for the SiPM readout: the TOFPET, the STiC and the PETA ASICs. High rate tests with 2 matrices of LYSO crystals coupled to SiPM arrays, readout by each one of the proposed solutions have been performed, with two modules exposed to 500 MBq of FDG tracer in ~0.5 cm3 volume and operated in coincidence. The status and perspective of the SAFIR project will be presented, with special emphasis on the results of the high rate tests.
        Speaker: Chiara Casella (Eidgenoessische Tech. Hochschule Zuerich (CH))
      • 3:15 PM
        Intraoperative probe for radioguided surgery with beta- decays in brain tumor resection 20m
        The radio-guided surgery (RGS) represents a very useful surgical adjunct to intraoperatively detect millimetric tumor residues, enabling a radical resection. The main innovation of the RGS exploiting beta- emitters is the lower target-to-background ratio compared to the established technique using gamma or beta+ radiation, that allows the extension of the RGS to further clinical cases. For feasibility studies on brain tumors we developed and tested prototypes of an intraoperative probe detecting beta- decays, the device core being a scintillator with high light yield, non-hygroscopic property and low density. Portable readout electronics with wireless data transfer to the PC has been customized to match the surgeon needs. Preclinical tests with dedicated phantoms and test on *ex-vivo* specimen showed very promising results for the RGS application on brain tumors. This presentation will discuss the innovative aspects of the method, the status of the intraoperative probe development, the preclinical tests and the first tests on *ex-vivo* specimen of patients affected by meningiomas.
        Speaker: Elena Solfaroli Camillocci (Sapienza)
    • 2:00 PM 3:40 PM
      Semiconductor Detectors: Pixel 2 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Convener: Thomas Bergauer (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 2:00 PM
        From Vertex detectors to Inner Trackers with CMOS pixel sensors 20m
        The use of CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS) for high resolution, low material, vertex detectors has been validated with the 2014 and 2015 physics runs of the STAR-PXL detector at RHIC/BNL. This opens the door to the use of CPS for inner tracking devices, with 10-100 times larger sensitive area, which require therefore a sensor design privileging power saving, response uniformity and robustness. Exploiting the relaxed constrained on the spatial resolution of trackers and the added value of a $180~{\rm nm}$ CMOS process, a specific small CPS prototype was fabricated in 2014, with 5 times larger pixels than those used in STAR. Its detection performances were assessed with particle beams, investigating in particular the impact of the reduced sensing node density on the detection efficiency. The studies were complemented by those of a full scale prototype ($160{\rm k}$ pixels) featuring small pixels for a vertex detector, in which large pixels could be implemented as a next step. The most prominent outcomes of this R&D, which validates for the first time the concept addressed, will be presented.
        Speaker: Luis Alejandro Perez Perez (IPHC - CNRS)
      • 2:25 PM
        Current development status of High Voltage and High Resistivity CMOS technology for high energy physics applications 20m
        CMOS active pixel sensors are currently being investigated for a potential application in the high-energy physics experiments. The integration of the CMOS circuitry in the sensing substrate will offer substantial reduction in the material budget and manufacturing costs. Additionally, having the pre-amplifier and discriminator built-in, could eliminate the need for bump-bonding for pixel sensors, while maintaining characteristics needed for particle tracking. Figure 1: Unit cell of the sensor with integrated CMOS circuitry The upcoming upgrades of the LHC demand new particle tracking systems, which would be able to sustain tenfold increase in luminosity. Therefore, one of the key development aspects is to understand radiation hardness of the samples manufactured in various commercially available processes. This work will report on two different commercially available technologies: High-Voltage CMOS (fig. 1) in the AMS HV-CMOS 350nm process, and High-Resistivity CMOS in the TowerJazz HR-CMOS 180nm process. The main areas of investigation are in-pixel charge collection efficiency, radiation hardness, uniformity and speed of the response, gain variation and pixel noise. The summary will be given of the latest results from non-irradiated and irradiated test structures up to HL-LHC strip tracking layer fluences, which reach $10^{15}$ $n_{eq}/cm^2$.
        Speaker: Kestutis Kanisauskas (University of Glasgow (GB))
      • 2:50 PM
        Recent results with HV-CMOS and planar sensors for the CLIC vertex detector 20m
        The physics aims at a future multi-TeV CLIC linear e+e- collider impose high precision requirements on the vertex detector. The detector also has to match the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of 3 micron, 10 ns time stamping capabilities, ultra-low mass (0.2% X0 per layer), very low power dissipation (compatible with air-flow cooling) and pulsed power operation. The R&D for the pixel detector follows an integrated approach addressing simultaneously the physics requirements and the engineering constraints. Two types of hybrid pixel detectors with ultra-small pitch (25*25 micron) and analogue readout are explored. Both make use of a dedicated readout ASIC (CLICpix), developed in 65 nm technology. CLICpix is either bump bonded to ultra-thin planar silicon sensors (with and without active edges), or AC coupled through a thin layer of glue to active HV-CMOS sensors. Results of recent beam tests and laboratory calibrations of a variety of assemblies with different sensor thicknesses are presented. Detailed simulations based on Geant4 and TCAD validate the experimental results and serve to optimise the detector design. The R&D project also includes the development of through-silicon via (TSV) technology, as well as various engineering studies involving thin mechanical structures and full-scale air-cooling tests.
        Speaker: Niloufar Alipour Tehrani (Eidgenoessische Tech. Hochschule Zuerich (CH))
      • 3:15 PM
        The MuPix HV-MAPS system-on-chip for the Mu3e experiment 20m
        Mu3e is a novel experiment searching for charged lepton flavor violation in the rare decay mu->eee. Decay vertex position, decay time and particle momenta have to be precisely measured in order to reject both combinatorial and physics background. A silicon pixel tracker based on 50 um thin high voltage monolithic active pixel sensors (HV-MAPS) in a 1T magnetic field will deliver precise vertex and momentum information. The MuPix HV-MAPS chip combines pixel sensor cells with integrated analog electronics and a complete digital readout. The MuPix7 is the first HV-MAPS prototype having all functionality of the full sensor including a fast readout state machine and high speed serialization with 1.25 Gbit/s data output. Measurements for the MuPix7 pixel sensor chip including >98% efficiency for the full system in a high rate beam test will be shown.
        Speaker: Dirk Wiedner (Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg (DE))
    • 3:40 PM 4:30 PM
      Poster Session B

      Posters displayed on a board with an odd number

    • 4:30 PM 6:10 PM
      Astroparticle Detectors: Miscellaneous EI8

      EI8

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Convener: Manfred Jeitler (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 4:30 PM
        Operating performance of GCT: an end-to end Schwarzchild-Couder telescope prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array 20m
        The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project aims to build the next generation ground-based Very High Energy instrument. It will be devoted to the observation of gamma rays over a wide band of energy, from 20 GeV to 300 TeV. Two sites are foreseen, one in the northern and the other in the southern hemisphere, allowing the viewing of the whole sky. The southern hemisphere array will consist of three types of telescopes with different mirror areas covering the low, intermediate and high energy domains. The high energy telescopes operate from 5 TeV to 300 TeV and will consist of a large number of Small Size Telescopes (SSTs) with a field-of-view of around 10 degrees. The Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope (GCT), a telescope based on a Schwarzschild-Couder dual-mirror optical design is one of the proposed CTA telescope designs for which an end-to-end prototype is currently being built. The assembly of the GCT started on the French site of the Observatoire de Paris in spring 2015. The camera has been mainly assembled in Leicester and has been integrated in the GCT in fall 2015. The telescope is now fully assembled and operational. Its characteristics as well as its performance in the context of CTA specifications are presented in this contribution.
        Speaker: Dr Jean-Laurent Dournaux (GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, PSL Research University, Université Paris Diderot)
      • 4:55 PM
        New application of superconductors: high sensitivity cryogenic light detectors 20m
        When we apply an AC current to a superconductor, the Cooper pairs oscillate and acquire kinetic inductance, that can be measured by inserting the superconductor in a LC circuit with high merit factor. Interactions in the superconductor can break the Cooper pairs, causing sizable variations in the kinetic inductance and, thus, in the response of the LC circuit. The continuous monitoring of the amplitude and frequency modulation allows to reconstruct the incident energy with excellent sensitivity. This concept is at the basis of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs), that are characterized by natural aptitude to multiplexed read-out (several sensors can be tuned to different resonant frequencies and coupled to the same line), resolution of few eV, stable behavior over a wide temperature range, and ease in fabrication. We present the results obtained by the CALDER collaboration with 2$\times$2 cm$^2$ substrates sampled by 1 or 4 Aluminum KIDs. We show that the performances of the first prototypes are already competitive with those of other commonly used light detectors, and we discuss the strategies for a further improvement.
        Speaker: Laura Cardani (INFN - National Institute for Nuclear Physics)
      • 5:20 PM
        Performance study of glass RPC detectors for INO-ICAL experiment. 20m
        Resistive plate chamber (RPC) detectors are known for their excellent timing and good spatial resolution, which make them favourable candidates for the tracking and triggering in many high energy physics experiments. The Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector at India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is one such experiment, which will use RPCs as an active detector element. The ICAL experiment is designed to study atmospheric neutrinos and various issues related with neutrino physics. The INO-ICAL has geometry that utilizes about 29000 RPC’S of 2m x 2m in size, interleaved between thick iron plates, producing muons via the interaction of atmospheric neutrinos with iron. The tracking information of the muons will be extracted from the two dimensional readout of the RPC’s and its position in respective layer along with the upward and downward directionality determined from the timing information. As a result, a precise measurement of timing response of these RPC detectors is quite important. Further, to design readout system for the ICAL detector, induced signal study and charge information is needed as well. In this paper, we present the detailed timing and charge spectra study for various glass RPC candidates. We also report the effect of various gas compositions on the timing and charge spectra of these RPC detectors.
        Speaker: Mr Ankit Gaur (University of Delhi)
      • 5:45 PM
        The FLARES project: an innovative detector technology for rare events searches 20m
        FLARES is an innovative project in the field of rare events searches, such as the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay. It aims to demonstrate the high potentiality of a technique that combines ultra-pure scintillating crystals to arrays of high performance silicon drift detectors (SDD), used to read their light. By optically coupling the two devices and working at temperatures of about 120K, a strong enhancement of the light emission should be obtained. This would allow to reach a 1% level energy resolution in a scintillation particle detector. The proposed technique will therefore combine in a single device all the demanding features needed by an ideal experiment looking for rare events. It should in fact guarantee high energy resolution, background abatement (provided specific features of the scintillating crystals that allow a strong abatement of the background due to alpha particles), low cost mass scalability and high flexibility in choice of the crystal. The performances of a first production of matrices of SDD as well as first measurements of the low temperature light yield of a selection of high purity scintillating crystals will be presented and discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Luca Gironi (Universita` e INFN di Milano Bicocca)
    • 4:30 PM 6:10 PM
      Medical Applications: Hadron Therapy EI9

      EI9

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      • 4:30 PM
        proton Computed Tomography images with algebraic reconstruction 20m
        Proton Computed Tomography (pCT) is a new imaging method with a potential for increasing accuracy of treatment planning and patient positioning in hadron therapy. A pCT system based on a silicon tracker and a YAG:Ce calorimeter has been developed within the PRIMA/RDH/IRPT INFN CSN5 collaboration. The pCT prototype has been tested under 62MeV and 180MeV proton beams at respectively Laboratori Nazionali del Sud ( Catania, Italy ) and Svedberg Laboratory (Uppsala, Sweden). Data analysis has been performed using algebraic iterative reconstruction algorithms. In this talk, functional characteristics of the pCT system under test beam will be discussed; images of non homogeneous phantoms resulting from the pCT reconstruction will be shown and main results in term of spatial and density resolutions will be reviewed.
        Speaker: Mara Bruzzi (INFN Firenze and University of Florence (IT))
      • 4:55 PM
        Design of a tracking device for on-line dose monitoring in hadron therapy 20m
        Hadron therapy is a technique for cancer treatment that exploits ion beams (mostly protons and carbons). A critical issue is the accuracy that is achievable when monitoring the dose released by the beam to the tumor and to the surrounding tissues. We present the design of a tracking device, developed in the framework of the INSIDE project, capable of monitoring, in real time, the longitudinal profile of the dose delivery in the patient. It is possible by detecting the secondary particles produced by the beam in the tissues. The position of the Bragg peak can be correlated to the charged particles emission point distribution measurement. The device will be able to provide a fast response on the dose pattern by tracking the secondary charged fragments. The tracks are detected using 6 planes of scintillating fibers, providing the (x,y,z) coordinates of the track intersection with each plane. The fibers planes are followed by a plastic scintillator and by a small calorimeter built with a pixelated LFS crystal. A complete detector simulation, followed by the event reconstruction, has been performed to determine the achievable monitoring spatial resolution.
        Speaker: Dr Silvia Muraro (INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano, Italy)
      • 5:20 PM
        The iMPACT project tracker and calorimeter 20m
        In recent years the use of energetic protons and carbon ions (hadrons) for cancer radiation treatment has exponentially grown in importance. Its effectiveness is anyway still limited by the necessity to rely on X-rays CT data to plan the dose delivery, which leads to aiming errors. Many groups are therefore trying to realize a proton CT (pCT) to overcome this limitation. The iMPACT project (innovative Medical Protons Achromatic Calorimeter & Tracker) aims building a pCT scanner which overcomes present state-of-the-art limitations, mostly the low tracking speed, which requires long times (many minutes) to acquire a target 3D image. The iMPACT goal tracking speed is in fact 1 GHz, which would reduce the acquisition time from minutes to seconds. The tracker will use CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) for tracking high rate particles over a large area. MAPS allow to practically cover large areas respect to hybrid-pixel or micro-strip sensors, but specific improvements are necessary to effectively use them in a pCT scanner at such speed. Present state-of-the-art also does not offer a calorimeter capable of 1 GHz particle tracking. An achromatic calorimeter will hence be employed, i.e. a calorimeter where the position of the proton maximum stopping power (dE/dx) is used to derive its entrance energy. This contribution will illustrate which solutions have been devised for both the tracker and the calorimeter and how that will boost the actual tracking performances.
        Speaker: Serena Mattiazzo (Universita e INFN, Padova (IT))
      • 5:45 PM
        Development of a compact scintillator-based high-resolution Compton camera for molecular imaging 20m
        Recently, the Compton camera that can conduct measurements across a wide range of energy (from a few hundred kiloelectronvolts to a few megaelectronvolts) has been studied in the medical imaging field such as nuclear medicine and ion beam therapy. We have earlier developed a small, lightweight scintillator-based handheld Compton camera for environmental surveys. Although the handheld Compton camera showed very high efficiency, its angular resolution of ~8° (FWHM) for a 137Cs source was slightly poor for medical imaging. Hence, in this study, we developed a new Compton camera to improve the angular resolution. Both the scatterer and the absorber consist of a Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (Ce:GAGG) scintillator array and multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) arrays. In the absorber, we applied a 3D position-sensitive scintillator block using a dual-side readout technique. Based on the results of the fundamental imaging test, we confirmed that the new Compton camera showed a significantly improved angular resolution from ~8.9° (FWHM) of the present handheld camera to 5.4° (FWHM) for 662 keV gamma rays. In this study, we also present results of the basic detector performances and that of 3D image reconstruction toward “color” molecular imaging using the new Compton camera.
        Speaker: Ms Aya Kisihimoto (Waseda University)
    • 4:30 PM 6:10 PM
      Semiconductor Detectors: Pixel 3
      • 4:30 PM
        A low mass vertically integrated pixel system for the HL-LHC 20m
        We will present the first characterization of a low mass, vertically integrated modular system optimized for the demanding thermal environments expected in the innermost layers of LHC experiments after the PH2 upgraded luminosity. The system is composed by a stack of three silicon layers for a total thickness of less than 1mm. From the top a radiation hard, 230 micron thick 3D silicon sensor (fabricated at CNM-Barcelona) with the same design of the ones used for the ATLAS-Insertable-B-Layer, integrated to a 100 micron thick FE-I4 front-end electronics pixel chip and a silicon micro-channel layer designed to circulate evaporated CO2. The paper will show the system electrical and thermal functionalities, discuss results on the use of 3D printed ceramic components which could further improve the detector system’s large area design and conclude with future plans.
        Speaker: Cinzia Da Via (University of Manchester (GB))
      • 4:55 PM
        Improved Process Technologies in the SOI Pixel Detectors 20m
        A monolithic detector using Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology is one of promising technologies for future pixel detectors in various kinds of applications. It fabricates both sensors and readout circuits in a semiconductor process. It is also known that the technology is immune to Single Event Effect (SEE). Remaining issues in the SOI pixel technology are radiation tolerance for Total Ionization Dose (TID) and sensor crosstalk from circuit signals. We have solved these issues by introducing double SOI technology and modifying implantation dose of Lightly Doped Drain (LDD) region of transistors. In the double SOI technology, an additional Si layer is inserted under transistor layer, so it shields the crosstalk. We confirmed the middle Si layer could suppress the crosstalk very efficiently. In addition, by applying bias voltage to the middle layer, it can compensate electric field created by oxide-trapped hole generated by irradiation. Thus the threshold shift caused by radiation can be adjusted to original value even in the device which is irradiated more than 10 Mrad(Si). However, we observed drain current reduction after heavy irradiation. We found this is caused by parasitic transistors exist in the LDD region of transistors. By increasing the doping level of the LDD region, we confirmed such reduction could be avoided. We also found this doping level change improves Id-Vd characteristics of transistor in ultra-low temperature region (< 3K).
        Speaker: Yasuo Arai (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK))
      • 5:20 PM
        Performance of M\"{O}NCH, a 25~$\mu {\mathrm m}$ pixel pitch detector\\for photon science\\ 20m
        MÖNCH is a hybrid silicon pixel detector based on charge integration and with analog readout, featuring a pixel size of 25x25 μm2. Several prototypes have been commissioned, aimed at experimenting different solutions to optimize the detector performances for high and low flux applications at synchrotrons and X-FELs. With an ENC of the order of 35 electrons RMS, MÖNCH is competitive with monolithic detectors and with CCDs in the fields of high resolution imaging and soft X-ray detection below the keV level, and its kHz frame rate capability can substantially shorten the time needed for a single measurement. Due to its extremely small pixel pitch, MÖNCH intrinsically features an elevate position resolution which, in low flux condition, can even overcome the pixel size: charge sharing between neighboring pixel can be exploited in position interpolation algorithms which can achieve a sub-micron resolution. In order to achieve the high dynamic range required by XFEL experiments, one of the MÖNCH prototypes features a dynamic gain switching pixel architecture, which allows to adapt the pixel gain setting to the impinging photon flux. Characterization results of different MÖNCH prototypes in terms of bump-bonding yield, linearity, dynamic range and position resolution will be shown, together with preliminary measurements. Finally, the perspective for the realization of a future low energy detector using 4x3 cm2 modules will be discussed.
        Speaker: Marco Ramilli (Paul Scherrer Institut)
      • 5:45 PM
        The DEPFET Detector-Amplifier Structure for Spectroscopic Imaging in Astronomy and for Experiments at Free Electron Lasers 20m
        The DEPFET detector-amplifier structure possesses several unique properties which make it extremely useful as readout element in semiconductor detectors and in particular as building block of semiconductor pixel detectors. Variations of DEPFETs can be tuned to specific requirements as to be sensitive only in predetermined time intervals, to measure signal charge with sub-electron precision, dead-time less readout and DEPFETs with signal compression. These devices have been shown to work in simulations and in prototypes. Now the first two fully developed detector systems have been finished and installed in the MIXS instrument of the Bepi-Colombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter scheduled to be launched in 2016. A further DEPFET detector system under development is the DSSC that will be installed in one of the beam-lines of the XFEL. The requirements on the two projects are rather different. While the MIXS sensors are supposed to measure precisely the energy and position of single photons down to very low energies but at moderate rates, the DSSC has to measure the number of photons arriving in each pixel within a time interval of 220 ns. Here the challenge is the capability of detecting single X-ray photons in one pixel simultaneously with up to 10.000 photons in some other pixels. Device functioning has been verified with sensors produced in a research laboratory. Now process and design have been adapted to an industrial type production line, allowing additional improvements.
        Speaker: Dr Gerhard Lutz (PNSensor GmbH)
    • 7:30 PM 11:00 PM
      Conference Dinner Palais Ferstel

      Palais Ferstel

    • 9:00 AM 10:40 AM
      Plenary 4 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Convener: Joachim Mnich (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Hamburg and Zeuthen (DE))
      • 9:00 AM
        Detector requirements for a 100-TeV collider 45m
        A 100 TeV hadron collider is the core aspect of the Future Circular Collider (FCC) study, an integral conceptual design study for post-LHC particle accelerator options in a global context. The study is exploring the potential of hadron and lepton circular colliders, performing an in-depth analysis of infrastructure and operation concepts and considering the technology research and development programs that would be required to build a future circular collider. This talk will give an overview of the FCC accelerator studies and present the environment for experiments and detectors at the 100 TeV hadron collider. Detector concepts and requirements are discussed in some detail.
        Speaker: Werner Riegler (CERN)
      • 9:50 AM
        Prospective overview of the CEPC detector 45m
        The Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) has been proposed by the Chinese High Energy Physics Community to operate as a Higgs Factory, which would allow precision measurements of the properties of the recently discovered Higgs boson. The CEPC detector, with similar performance requirements to the ILC detectors but without power-pulsing, needs to provide significantly improved precision compared to the LEP detectors to make possible the Higgs precision measurements. This would require many innovative detector technologies and advanced electronics to be deployed. In this presentation, I will give an overview of the requirements and challenges, and discuss the possible detector technologies for each sub-detector. I will also report briefly the progress on several detector R&D topics.
        Speaker: Hongbo Zhu (Chinese Academy of Sciences (CN))
    • 10:40 AM 11:20 AM
      Coffee Break 40m
    • 11:20 AM 12:35 PM
      Plenary 4 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Convener: Joachim Mnich (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Hamburg and Zeuthen (DE))
      • 11:20 AM
        Status and future perspectives of the ILC project 20m
        The International Linear Collider (ILC) has been designed to lead the new era ushered in by the discovery of the Higgs boson. It requires a world-wide collaboration in physics case studies, advanced R&Ds on the accelerator and detector technologies, as well as government-level international agreements. Instruments with advanced technologies are developed and the physics reach with Higgs, top quark and new particle searches/studies are studied. Following the world-wide developments and supports by the researchers, the Japanese government is now seriously evaluating the case for hosting the ILC and various activities towards its realization have begun involving communities outside academic fields. In this talk, we introduce the recent status of ILC project and discuss its perspectives.
        Speaker: Prof. Satoru Yamashita (ICEPP, The University of Tokyo)
      • 11:45 AM
        Studies on Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) modules of a Large Prototype TPC for the ILC 20m
        The International Large Detector (ILD) is one of two detector concepts at the ILC. It relies on highly granular calorimetry and a high precision tracking system. The tracking system consists of a Silicon vertex detector, forward tracking disks and a large volume Time Projection Chamber (TPC), which will be read out with micro-pattern gas detectors (MPGD). Within the framework of the LCTPC collaboration, a Large Prototype (LP) TPC has been built as a demonstrator. Its endplate is able to contain up to seven identical modules of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors (MPGD). Recently, the LP has been equipped with MPGD modules and studied with electron beams (1-6 GeV) in a 1 Tesla magnetic field. The interest of this talk lies in the studies of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) modules. In particular, after introducing the LP, recent results (drift velocity, field distortions, spatial resolution, alignment measurements) as well as the current status and future plans of the LCTPC R&D will be presented.
        Speaker: Dimitra Tsionou (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Hamburg and Zeuthen (DE))
      • 12:10 PM
        The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory 20m
        The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) is a multipurpose neutrino-oscillation experiment designed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal, by detecting reactor antineutrinos from two power plants at 53-km distance. The detector is placed at 1800-m.w.e deep underground and consists on a 20 kiloton liquid scintillator volume contained in a 35m-diameter acrylic ball and instrumented by more than 17000 20-inch PMTs ensuring a 77% photocatode coverage. To reach an unprecedented 3% energy resolution (at 1 MeV), the PMTs need a maximum quantum efficiency of ~35% and the attenuation length of the liquid has to be better than 22m (at 430nm). This precision on the energy is a key point to determine at the 3-4 sigma significance level the neutrinos mass hierarchy with six years of running. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum will also lead to the precise determination of three out of the six oscillation parameters to an accuracy of better than 1%. The experiment will also be able to observe neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources. The international collaboration of JUNO was established in 2014, the civil construction has started in 2015 and the R&D of the detectors is ongoing. JUNO is planning to start data taking around 2020. An overall picture of the detector as well as details on the different parts (inner target, water Cherenkov pool and muon tracker) and associated recent developments will be presented in this talk.
        Speaker: Timothée BRUGIERE (IPHC / CNRS-IN2P3)
    • 12:35 PM 2:00 PM
      Lunch Break 1h 25m
    • 2:00 PM 3:40 PM
      Plenary 5 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      • 2:00 PM
        Detector evolution for Gravitational Waves observations 45m
        In the last two decades there has been a growing interest around the possibility to detect on Earth Gravitational Waves emitted by astrophysical sources. One hundred years after Einstein’s presentation to the scientific community of the theory of General Relativity, predicting their existence as a perturbation of space-time traveling through the Universe at the speed of light, a network of second generation detectors is being put into operation. It is based on ground based suspended Michelson interferometers aiming at the first direct detection of Gravitational Waves together with the possibility to localize their sources in the sky. An overview of the technological improvements performed in the construction of these sophisticated detectors is presented here with particular emphasis on the Advanced VIRGO interferometer. This experimental apparatus together with two similar ones known as Advanced LIGO will have the opportunity to increase the observable volume of the Universe by a factor of 1000, thus opening the era of Gravitational Waves astronomy.
        Speaker: Franco Frasconi (Universita di Pisa & INFN (IT))
      • 2:50 PM
        A new cryogenic detector for low mass dark matter search with CRESST-III 20m
        The CRESST-II (Cryogenic Rare Event Search with Superconducting Thermometers) experiment, which second phase has successfully finished in summer 2015, aims at the direct detection of dark matter particles. CRESST uses CaWO$_4$ crystals operated as cryogenic detectors. Compared to previous runs the intrinsic radiopurity of CaWO$_4$ crystals, the capability to reject recoil events from alpha-surface contamination and the energy threshold were significantly improved. The acquired data provides competitive limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section and probes a new region of parameter space for WIMP masses below 2\,GeV/c$^2$. This potential for low-mass WIMP search can be further exploited by a new detector design planned for CRESST-III. We describe the experimental strategy for the near future and give a detailed technical description of the new cryogenic detector technology.
        Speaker: Raimund Strauss
      • 3:15 PM
        Development of a composite large-size SiPM (assembled matrix) based modular detector cluster for MAGIC 20m
        The MAGIC collaboration operates two 17m diameter Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) on the Canary Island of La Palma. Each of the two telescopes is currently equipped with 1039 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Due to the advances in the development of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs), they are becoming a widely used alternative to PMTs in many research fields including gamma-ray astronomy. Within the Otto-Hahn group at the Max Planck Institute for Physics in Munich, we are developing a SiPM based detector module for a possible upgrade of the MAGIC cameras and also for future experiments as, e.g., the Large Size Telescopes (LST) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Because of the small detector size (6mmx6mm) with respect to the 1-inch diameter PMTs currently used in MAGIC, we use a self assembled matrix of SiPMs to cover the same detection area. We developed an analog transistor circuit to sum up and amplify the SiPM signals of one pixel to a composite output without the drawback of summing the sensors capacitances. Existing non-imaging hexagonal light concentrators (Winston cones) used in MAGIC have been modified for the angular acceptance of the SiPMs using C++ based ray tracing simulations. The first prototype of our SiPM based detector module consists of seven channels and was installed into the MAGIC camera in May 2015. We will present the results of the first prototype and its performance as well as the status of the project and discuss its challenges.
        Speaker: Mr Alexander Hahn (Max Planck Institute for Physics (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Munich, Germany)
    • 3:40 PM 4:20 PM
      Coffee Break 40m
    • 4:20 PM 4:45 PM
      Plenary 5 EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      • 4:20 PM
        Construction and tests of an in-beam PET-like detector for hadrontherapy beam ballistic control. 20m
        We present the electronics, the construction and the first results obtained with a detector, called LAPD for Large Area Pixelized Detector. The LAPD is dedicated to the beam ballistic control in the context of hadrontherapy, using in-beam and real time detection of secondary particles emitted during the irradiation of the patient. These particles could be high energy photons ($\gamma $ prompt), or charged particles like protons, or 511 keV $\gamma $-ray photons from the annihilation of a positron issued from the $\beta $+ emitters induced in the patient tissues along the beam path. The LAPD detector focuses on these 511 keV $\gamma $ and is similar to a conventional PET (Positron Emission Tomography) camera. Nevertheless, there are some specific constraints, compared to conventional PET, to take into account when trying to use 511 keV $\gamma$ from positron annihilations for the ballistic control in hadrontherapy, such as the low $\beta$+ activity, the short lives isotopes, the isotope diffusion through the patient tissues, and the large $\gamma$ prompt background. Specific electronics based on Switch Capacitor Array (DRS 4) for the digitization and on the µTCA standard for the data acquisition system have been developed in order to acquire data with a minimum dead time. This detector has been partially tested in beam at HIT, and has also been characterized using FDG sources at the cancer therapy center of Clermont-Ferrand, and some preliminary results will be shown.
        Speaker: Gerard Montarou (Universite Blaise Pascal de Clermont-Ferrand II)
    • 4:45 PM 5:05 PM
      Award Ceremony 20m EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Speaker: Robert Klanner (Hamburg University (DE))
    • 5:05 PM 5:55 PM
      Summary Talk 50m EI7

      EI7

      Vienna University of Technology

      Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien
      Speaker: Junji Haba (KEK)
    • 5:55 PM 6:00 PM
      Closing 5m
      Speaker: Manfred Krammer (CERN)