Astroparticle Physics - A Joint TeVPA/ IDM Conference

Europe/Zurich
Amsterdam

Amsterdam

Tuschinski Theatre Reguliersbreestraat 26 1017 CN Amsterdam
Description

ON-SITE REGISTRATION

Date & Time:  Monday 23rd June 2014, 08:00 - 09:00

Location:  Tuschinski Theatre, Main Foyer

Conference participants are kindly asked to register and collect their conference packs and badges between 08:00 - 09:00 on Monday 23rd June 2014.  Registration desks will be set up in the main foyer of the Tuschinski Theatre.

Mid-Week Registration

Participants arriving later in the week will be able to register on all subsequent days between 08:30 - 09:00.  If you are arriving during the day, please make sure to pick up a badge and conference pack from one of the on-site support staff.

Early Registration (participants attending the Symposium on the History and Future of Dark Matter only)

Date & Time:  Sunday 22nd June 2014, 12:30 - 14:00

Location:  Koepelkerk

Participants attending the above symposium can register for the conference and collect their conference packs and badges early.  It is important that you wear your badges at all times whilst at+ the conference venue. 


PLEASE NOTE, LUNCH WILL NOT BE PROVIDED.  PARTICIPANTS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR GETTING THEIR OWN LUNCH DURING THE BREAK BEFORE THE AFTERNOON SESSIONS.


"Astroparticle Physics: a joint TeVPA/IDM conference" brings together two major international conference series in Astroparticle Physics: TeV Particle Astrophysics and Identification of Dark Matter.

This 6-day conference aims to provide the stage for the most recent advances in the booming field of Astroparticle Physics, bringing to Amsterdam - a city that has recently invested a lot into this research area through initiatives like GRAPPA and the D-ITP - leading members of the scientific communities that are contributing to its success. 
 
The scientific programme will include topics such as: 

  • Cosmic Rays
  • Dark Matter in Cosmology
  • Direct Dark Matter Searches
  • Indirect Dark Matter Searches
  • High Energy Particle Physics
  • Neutrinos
  • High Energy Astrophysics

Venue

The conference will be held at the Tuschinski Theatre, an extraordinary landmark in the heart of Amsterdam, which was built in 1921 in a spectacular mix of Amsterdam School, Jugendstil, Art Nouveau and Art Deco. The main auditorium, which hosts many Dutch film premieres, is considered one of the most beautiful cinemas in the world.

For further information on the venue, including address and directions, please visit the Venue and Location page via the main menu.


Conference Dinner
 
A special social event is planned at Het Scheepvaartmuseum. It will include a guided visit to the exhibition halls and a sumptuous dinner under the recently installed Atrium. 

Participants are welcome to bring guests to the conference dinner.  Guest Conference Dinner Passes can be purchased along with the Conference Pass when registering via the online registration form. 

Further information can be found on the Social Programme page, via the main menu.


Registration and Abstract Submission

The schedule of the conference is organized with plenary sessions in the mornings, and parallel sessions in the afternoon.

Registration:

Registration for this conference is via our online registration form (see main menu) and conference fees are as follows:

Early Bird Registration (until 15 April):  €355,00
Full Registration (until 12 June):  €430,00

Please note that the Early Bird fee is only valid if you pay before the 15th April 2014.  Registering alone will not guarantee you the reduced rate.

The above conference fees also cover a full social programme, including the conference dinner.  Please continue to check the website for updates regarding the social programme.

Abstract Submission:

If you are interested in giving a talk at one of the afternoon parallel sessions, please submit your abstract via our abstract submission system, which is separate to the registration form and accessible via the Abstract Submission tab in the main menu.

Abstract Review:

Participants wishing to take advantage of the early bird registration fee should submit their abstract no later than the 1st April 2014.  We will then endeavour to review the abstracts and notify participants of the outcome before this deadline, which is the 15 April 2014.

Please note that abstract submission for this conference closes on the Sunday 11 May 2014 and registration closes on the Thursday 12 June 2014.


Practical Information:

Travel and Accommodation

Participants are responsible for making their own travel and accommodation arrangements, but in anticipation of the busy summer period in Amsterdam, the conference organisers have block booked a number of rooms with various hotels in the city centre.  Please see the Accommodation page for more details.

Visa

Participants requiring a Visa for their trip should let organisers know in advance, so that the appropriate invitation letters can be sent out in good time.  Participants submitting abstracts to the afternoon sessions should contact the session conveners directly (see Scienctific Programme).  Participants who are not planning on giving a presentation should contact the organisers directly, at app14@uva.nl. 


Local Organising Committee:

Shin'ichiro Ando (GRAPPA)
Stan Bentvelsen (NIKHEF)
David Berge (GRAPPA/ Institute of High Energy Physics)
Gianfranco Bertone (GRAPPA) - Chair
Patrick Decowski (NIKHEF)
Paul de Jong (NIKHEF)
Sera Markoff (Anton Pannekoek Institute/ GRAPPA)
Kalliopi Petraki (NIKHEF)
Marieke Postma (NIKHEF)
Jacco Vink (Anton Pannekoek Institute/ GRAPPA)
Christoph Weniger (GRAPPA)
Fabio Zandanel (GRAPPA)

The international Scientific Committee of this conference includes all the members of the Steering Committee of the IDM and the TeVPA conference series. Please follow the links to see the composition of the committees.

For questions, please contact the conference secretary at app14@uva.nl.

This conference is sponsored by the following organisations:

 


 

 

Poster
Submitter's Guide
Participants
  • Aaron Ludlow
  • Aaron Vincent
  • aart heijboer
  • Achim Stoessl
  • Agustín Sánchez Losa
  • Ahmad Galea
  • Aion Viana
  • Akira Hitachi
  • Albert Bosma
  • Albert De Roeck
  • Alberto Oliva
  • Alessandra Buonanno
  • Alessandro Cuoco
  • Alex Geringer-Sameth
  • Alexandre Lindote
  • Alexey Boyarsky
  • Alfredo Urbano
  • Alyson Brooks
  • Amy Furniss
  • Andi Hektor
  • andrea chiappo
  • Andrea De Simone
  • Andrea Vittino
  • Andrew Nelson
  • Andrew Scarff
  • Andrii Neronov
  • André Martins
  • Angela V Olinto
  • Anna Bernhard
  • Anna Franckowiak
  • Anna Lamperstorfer
  • Anne Green
  • Annika Peter
  • Antonio Palazzo
  • Arman Esmaili Taklimi
  • Asen Christov
  • Auke Colijn
  • Aurel Schneider
  • Aurora Meroni
  • AZZA SELMI
  • Benjamin Büttner
  • Bernard Sadoulet
  • Bradley Kavanagh
  • Brian Feldstein
  • Brian Reville
  • Camilo Garcia Cely
  • Carl Niblaeus
  • Carl Pfendner
  • Carlos de los Heros
  • Carmelo Evoli
  • Carsten Krauss
  • Carsten Rott
  • Chris Kelso
  • Christian Stegmann
  • Christian Beck
  • Christian Farnier
  • Christoph Tönnis
  • Christoph Weniger
  • Christophe Grojean
  • Christopher McCabe
  • Christopher Tunnell
  • Chung-Lin SHAN
  • Csaba Balazs
  • Damiano Caprioli
  • Dan Hooper
  • Daniel Mazin
  • Daniel Snowden-Ifft
  • Daniela Hadasch
  • Daniele Gaggero
  • Dario Grasso
  • David Berge
  • Denis Robertson
  • Dinesh Loomba
  • Dirk Lennarz
  • Djoeke Schoonenberg
  • Dorothea Samtleben
  • Doug Cowen
  • Douglas Finkbeiner
  • Douglas Spolyar
  • Ed Kearns
  • Elena Amato
  • Elina Lindfors
  • Elisa Resconi
  • Elisabetta Baracchini
  • Emanuele Re
  • Emiliano Carmona
  • Emiliano Molinaro
  • Emilija Pantic
  • Emma de Oña Wilhelmi
  • Emmanuel Nezri
  • Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano
  • Erwin Visser
  • Esteban Roulet
  • Eun-Joo Ahn
  • Fabio Iocco
  • Fabio Zandanel
  • Federico Izraelevitch
  • Felix Kahlhoefer
  • Filippo Sala
  • Fiorenza Donato
  • Florian Folger
  • Florian Reindl
  • Foteini Oikonomou
  • Francesc Ferrer
  • Francesca Calore
  • Frederic Mayet
  • Gabrijela Zaharijas
  • Gaëlle Giesen
  • Giampiero Mancinelli
  • Gianfranco Bertone
  • Giorgio Busoni
  • Giovanni Morlino
  • Giovanni Piano
  • Giuliana Fiorillo
  • Giuseppe Di Bernardo
  • Glennys Farrar
  • Guenakh Mitselmakher
  • Gwenael Giacinti
  • HAI-BO YU
  • Hamish Silverwood
  • Harm Schoorlemmer
  • Heino Falcke
  • Herbi Dreiner
  • Hiroyuki Sekiya
  • Holger Motz
  • Iason Baldes
  • Ilias Cholis
  • Ioannis Giomataris
  • Irene Tamborra
  • Jacco Vink
  • Jaco de Swart
  • Jacob Lamblin
  • Jan Hamann
  • Jan Heisig
  • Jan Kunnen
  • Javier Rico
  • Jernej F. Kamenik
  • Jeroen Franse
  • Jeter Hall
  • Jim Brooke
  • Joakim Edsjö
  • Jocelyn Monroe
  • Joerg Jaeckel
  • Johann Collot
  • John Beacom
  • Jonathan Davis
  • Jonathan Feng
  • Joost Veenkamp
  • Jordi Casanellas
  • Jorge Penarrubia
  • Juanan Garcia Pascual
  • Julia Tjus
  • Julien Billard
  • Justin Read
  • Jörg Hörandel
  • Jörn Kersten
  • Kaitlin Nadson
  • Kaixuan Ni
  • Kalliopi Petraki
  • Katarina Markovic
  • Katsuki Hiraide
  • Kazumasa Kawata
  • Kazunori Kohri
  • Keith Bechtol
  • Kiseki Nakamura
  • Klaus Eitel
  • Kumiko Kotera
  • Kwang-Chang Lai
  • Kyungwon Kim
  • Lars Aalsma
  • Lars Bergström
  • Laura van der Schaaf
  • Laurent Dufour
  • Liantao Wang
  • Lopez Honorez Laura
  • Lorenzo Ubaldi
  • Luca Baldini
  • Luca Panizzi
  • Lucas Guillemot
  • Luigi Tibaldo
  • M. Angeles Perez-Garcia
  • M. Patrick Decowski
  • Maarten de Jong
  • Maksim Piskunov
  • Manon Wigbers
  • Marco Cirelli
  • Marco Regis
  • Marco Taoso
  • Marek Kos
  • Maria Archidiacono
  • Maria Concepcion Gonzalez-Garcia
  • Maria Martinez
  • Marianne Lemoine-Goumard
  • Marie-Helene GRONDIN
  • Marieke Postma
  • Mark Lovell
  • Markus Ackermann
  • Markus Ahlers
  • Martin Bissok
  • Martin Lemoine
  • Martin Vollmann
  • Martina Cardillo
  • Matteo Viel
  • Matthew Liska
  • Matthieu Kieffer
  • Mattia Di Mauro
  • Mattia Fornasa
  • Mauricio Bustamante
  • Meike de With
  • Melissa Pesce Rollins
  • Meng Su
  • Michael Feyereisen
  • Michael Gustafsson
  • Michael Loewenstein
  • Michael Schmidt
  • Michael Wiechers
  • Michel Tytgat
  • Michele Maltoni
  • Michele Re Fiorentin
  • Miguel Pato
  • Miguel Peiró
  • Mikhail Shaposhnikov
  • Mikko Meyer
  • Morisi Stefano
  • Nassim Bozorgnia
  • Neil Spooner
  • Nepomuk Otte
  • Nguyen Phan
  • Nicholas Rodd
  • Nicola Mori
  • Nicolás Bernal
  • Oleg Ruchayskiy
  • Oliver Buchmueller
  • Omer Tzuk
  • Paolo Bernardini
  • Paolo Cumani
  • Paolo Gondolo
  • Paolo Panci
  • Paolo Salucci
  • Pascal Steger
  • Patricia Villar
  • Patrick Steppeler
  • Paul de Jong
  • Pearl Sandick
  • Pepijn Bakker
  • Peter Mészáros
  • Philip von Doetinchem
  • Philipp Mertsch
  • Pierluigi Belli
  • Pol Mollitor
  • Raimund Strauss
  • Ralph Bird
  • Regis Terrier
  • Reina Maruyama
  • Renjie Wang
  • Reyco Henning
  • Richard Bartels
  • Rick Gaitskell
  • Rikard Enberg
  • Robert Foot
  • Robert Parsons
  • Roberta Diamanti
  • Roberta Sparvoli
  • Roberta Zanin
  • Roberto Franceschini
  • Roberto Ruiz de Austri
  • Rolf Heuer
  • Rolf Buehler
  • Ryan Wilkinson
  • Sam McDermott
  • Samuel Lee
  • Satyendra Thoudam
  • Sebastian Liem
  • Sebastian Wild
  • Sheldon Campbell
  • Shigetaka Moriyama
  • Shin'ichiro Ando
  • Shin-Ted LIN
  • shoji torii
  • Silvia Mollerach
  • Silvia Scorza
  • Simon Peeters
  • Simon White
  • Sofia Sivertsson
  • Stefan Ohm
  • Stefano Colucci
  • Stefano Gabici
  • Stephan Zimmer
  • Stephane Coutu
  • Stephen Portillo
  • Stijn Buitink
  • Sylvie Rosier-Lees
  • Takashi Toma
  • Tansu Daylan
  • Thomas Jacques
  • Thomas Lacroix
  • Thomas Richardson
  • Thomas Schwetz
  • Tim Linden
  • Tim Tait
  • Timur Delahaye
  • Tom Theuns
  • Torsten Bringmann
  • Toyoko Orimoto
  • Tracy Slatyer
  • Tristan du Pree
  • Troels Petersen
  • Tsuguo Aramaki
  • Uwe Oberlack
  • Valentina De Romeri
  • Valerie Connaughton
  • Valerio Rossetti
  • Valerio Vagelli
  • Veerle Tammer
  • Vincent Giangiobbe
  • Vincenzo Vitale
  • Vitaly Kudryavtsev
  • Viviana Niro
  • Walter Winter
  • Wim de Boer
  • Wouter Waalewijn
  • Xiaojun Bi
  • Yannick Mellier
  • Yeongduk Kim
  • Yerbol Khassen
  • Yi Cai
  • Yonggang Luo
    • 08:00 09:00
      Registration 1h Main Foyer (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Main Foyer

      Tuschinski Theatre

    • 09:00 09:15
      Opening: Address by Rector Magnificus of the University of Amsterdam, Dymph van den Boom Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

    • 09:15 09:30
      Opening: Conference Overview, Gianfranco Bertone Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

    • 09:30 10:30
      Plenary Talks Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 09:30
        Invited Talk: Direct Detection with Cryogenic Experiments 30m
        Cryogenic dark matter experiments composed of semiconductors operated at milliKelvin temperatures are one of the leading technologies in dark matter searches, currently setting the most stringent limits to the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section for dark matter masses between 2-6 GeV. I will review the principles of direct dark matter detection and the various experiments using this technique, which offers exquisite background rejection capabilities for zero-background dark matter searches, the ability to achieve very low experimental thresholds for light-mass dark matter searches, and the ability to field different target materials which is crucial in the interpretation of potential positive signals.
        Speaker: Prof. Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano (MIT)
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Invited Talk: Dark Matter Direct Detection: Signal or no signal? The best way forward. 30m
        Particle dark matter is thought to be the overwhelming majority of the matter in the Universe. Its gravitational contribution overwhelms that from the ordinary matter that we, the earth and the stars, are composed of. However, direct evidence for the existence of particle dark matter remains controversial. In the last few years a number of experimental collaborations have reported possible direct-detection signals consistent with dark matter discovery. We have been searching for the direct interactions of dark matter in sub-terrestrial detectors for 27 years. A wide-range of techniques have been employed in order to establish convincing evidence for these interactions. I have worked on five of them during this period. In the early-experimental stages of our searches interaction rates of 1000 per kg of detector per day were explored. Today we are looking for dark matter events which are as rare as 1 per kg per century. We carry this out with detectors that have active masses that are at the tonne-scale, but yet they can be sensitive to particle interactions with energies of less than 1 keV. The detectors exploit a wide range of detection techniques including the scintillation and ionization properties of noble elements, bubbles in superheated fluids, quasiparticles in superconductors, ionization in semiconductors, and phonons in milliKelvin targets. Often these technologies are combined together. I will discuss some of the latest results in the field of direct detection, and look at the best techniques that may help us to definitively detect the illusive dark matter particles.
        Speaker: Prof. Richard Gaitskell (Brown University)
        Slides
    • 10:30 11:00
      Coffee Break 30m Main Foyer (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Main Foyer

      Tuschinski Theatre

    • 11:00 12:30
      Plenary Talks Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 11:00
        Invited Talk: A Review of the Directional Signature for Dark Matter Searches 30m
        Over the past decade a world-wide experimental effort has grown significantly to the point where today there are over half a dozen directional dark matter experiments, with four collecting data underground. Although most of the efforts employ time projection chambers with low pressure gas-based targets, R&D on novel approaches in liquids and solids is also proceeding. We review the directionality signature in dark matter searches and give the current status of this diverse experimental efforts.
        Speaker: Dinesh Loomba (University of New Mexico)
        Slides
      • 11:30
        Invited Talk: Search for cosmological dark matter with noble liquids 30m
        Noble liquid detectors are continuing to probe dark matter (DM) candidates in a wide parameter space. They utilize large targets of a very low background with a capability to reconstruct interaction point, allowing active background rejection. Liquid xenon (LXe) is an intrinsically radio-pure, efficient and fast scintillator with the best self-shielding capabilities. Liquid argon (LAr) is an equally efficient scintillator whose timing properties enable excellent rejection against electromagnetic backgrounds such as argon radioactive isotopes. Time projection chamber (TPC) filled with noble liquid offer additional rejection of electromagnetic backgrounds based on ratio of measured ionization and scintillation signals. During the last decade, noble liquid detectors have convincingly demonstrated their sensitivity for “weak” scale DM interacting with nuclear matter and validated the technology to achieve at least two orders of magnitude increase in sensitivity. The light DM candidates can also be probed by using only ionization signal and accurately determining detector response at very low energies. I will review the basic concepts of noble liquid detectors, current state of experiments and projections for the future.
        Speaker: Emilija Pantic (UCLA)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Invited Talk: Evidences and hints of Dark Matter 30m
        An overview of the latest results of DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 will be presented and the evidence obtained by exploiting the model independent annual modulation signature for the presence of Dark Matter particles in the galactic halo will be discussed. The data of the former DAMA/NaI and of the DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 satisfy all the many requirements of the Dark Matter annual modulation signature at high confidence level. Possible hints of Dark Matter particles in the galactic halo from some other experiments using different procedures and different techniques (such as CoGeNT, CRESST and CDMS II) will be discussed. Results, implications and experimental perspectives will be addressed.
        Speaker: Pierluigi Belli (INFN - Roma Tor Vergata)
        Slides
    • 12:30 14:30
      Lunch Break 2h
    • 14:30 16:00
      Cosmic Rays Room 4 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 4

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Elena Amato (INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri)
      • 14:30
        Cosmic Ray acceleration and escape in SNRs 25m
        In recent years, our understanding of cosmic-ray acceleration at supernova shocks has advanced considerably. Observations of nearby SNR show clear evidence for magnetic field amplification, while theory and simulation has developed to the point where we can now investigate the plasma physics in these energetic environments self-consistently. I will review some of the recent developments in the theory of cosmic ray confinement at SNR shocks, and discuss its implications for the origin of PeV cosmic-rays.
        Speaker: Dr Brian Reville (Queen's University Belfast)
      • 14:55
        Hybrid simulations of cosmic ray acceleration at shocks 25m
        Hybrid particle in cell simulations (with kinetic protons and fluid electrons) are providing us with unprecedented insights into the microphysics of collisionless shocks, also attesting to their ability to accelerate particles and to generate magnetic fields. I present state-of-the-art 2D and 3D simulations of non-relativistic shocks, discussing under which conditions (shock strength and inclination) ions are injected and energized via diffusive shock acceleration. I also show how resonant and non-resonant instabilities generate magnetic turbulence, illustrating the energy spectrum of the self-generated turbulence. Finally, I outline the relevance of these findings for cosmic ray acceleration at supernova shocks, also discussing the observational counterparts of the presented theory in selected remnants.
        Speaker: Damiano Caprioli (Princeton University)
        Slides
      • 15:20
        The Transition between Galactic and Extragalactic Cosmic Rays 25m
        The energy around which the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays (CR) occurs is still unknown. Solving this major question would bring valuable clues about the nature and characteristics of Galactic and extragalactic CR sources, such as the maximum energy reachable by Galactic accelerators. The transition must lie between the knee (energy E ~ 4 PeV) and the ankle (E ~ 3 EeV). I will argue that important progress has been made thanks to recent observational data on the CR composition and anisotropy from the knee to the highest energies. I will show how one can constrain the energy of the transition with the existing data and the current knowledge of the Galactic magnetic field. Implications for sources will also be addressed. Finally, I will discuss which measurements would be needed in the future in order to solve this question.
        Speaker: Gwenael Giacinti (University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Measurement of the Cosmic Ray energy spectrum by the ARGO-YBJ experiment 15m
        The ARGO-YBJ detector layout, features and location at high altitude (the Cosmic Ray Observatory of Yangbajing in Tibet, China, at about 606 g/cm^2 of atmospheric depth), joined to the analog readout of the RPC (Resistive Plate Chamber) streamer signals, provide the opportunity to study, with unprecedented resolution and without saturation, the distribution of the charged particles of extensive air showers (EAS) down to few meters from the axis, thus allowing to describe its shape in detail and to estimate the shower age at the detection level. Exploiting such features, the study of cosmic ray physics in the primary energy region 10^12 - 10^16 eV has been performed, which is among the main scientific goals of the experiment. Here, the preliminary results of the measurement of all-particle and light-component (i.e. protons and helium) energy spectra between approximately 5 TeV and 5 PeV will be in particular reported and discussed. The study of such energy region is particularly interesting because not only it allows a better understanding of the so called knee of the energy spectrum and of its origin, but also provides a powerful cross-check among very different experimental techniques. The comparison between direct measurements by balloon/space-borne spectrometers and the results by surface detectors, implying the knowledge of shower development in the atmosphere, also allows to test the hadronic interaction models currently used for understanding particle and cosmic ray physics up the highest energies.
        Speaker: Paolo Bernardini (Universita' del Salento - INFN)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Dark Matter: Direct Detection Room 5 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 5

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Neil Spooner (University of Sheffield)
      • 14:55
        Measuring the dark matter mass - in spite of astrophysical uncertainties 20m
        The interpretation of future dark matter (DM) direct detection data is fraught with uncertainties. In particular, measurements of the WIMP mass and cross section can be biased by poor assumptions about the WIMP speed distribution. I will present a new technique, based on parametrizing the logarithm of the WIMP speed distribution, which allows the dark matter mass and the speed distribution itself to be reconstructed simultaneously and without bias [1]. The limited energy range of direct detection experiments, however, still leads to an unavoidable degeneracy in the DM interaction cross section. I will present ongoing work towards breaking this degeneracy by incorporating information from low speed WIMPs from neutrino telescope experiments, such as IceCube. With these complementary experiments, we can reconstruct the WIMP mass and interaction cross sections without bias, as well as accurately reconstructing the speed distribution over the full range of interest - allowing us to extract fundamental information about both particle physics and astrophysics from these upcoming experiments. [1] B. J. Kavanagh and A. M. Green, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 031302 (2013)
        Speaker: Bradley J. Kavanagh (University of Nottingham)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Direct dark-matter detection with LAr: DEAP-3600 20m
        DEAP-3600 is a single phase liquid argon direct-detection dark-matter experiment located at SNOLAB in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, with projected WIMP-nucleon scattering sensitivity of $10^{-46}$ cm$^2$ in 3 years, a factor of 20 beyond current experimental results at 100 GeV WIMP mass. The detector commissioning starts in Spring 2014, and DEAP3600 is projected to reach competitive sensitivity by the end of 2014. In this presentation I will describe the experiment status and will show the first detector commissioning data.
        Speaker: Simon Peeters (University of Sussex)
        Slides
      • 15:35
        Simple steps to analyse direct detection experiments without halo uncertainties 20m
        Uncertainty in the local dark matter velocity distribution is a key difficulty in the analysis of data from direct detection experiments. In my talk, I will propose a completely new approach for dealing with this uncertainty, which does not involve any assumptions about the structure of the dark matter halo. Given a dark matter model, this approach yields the velocity distribution which best describes a set of direct detection data as a finite sum of streams with optimized speeds and densities. The method is conceptually simple and numerically very efficient. As a possible application I will discuss how to use the method to determining the ratio of proton to neutron couplings of dark matter from a hypothetical set of future data.
        Speaker: Felix Kahlhoefer (University of Oxford)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Dark Matter: Indirect Detection: Gammas and the GC Excess Room 6 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 6

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Dr Tracy Slatyer (MIT)
      • 14:30
        Recent results on dark matter search with the Fermi-LAT 25m
        High-energy gamma rays are one of the most promising ways to constrain or reveal the nature of dark matter. Through the first five years of the Fermi-LAT mission we have witnessed an exciting progress in this respect, with constraints on the dark matter cross section to various particle channels moving well into the theoretically motivated region of the parameter space and several hints of detection being scrutinized. I will present an overview of the recent Fermi-LAT dark matter results, putting them in the broader context of the related astrophysical observations and discussing the prospects for near-term improvements.
        Speaker: Dr Gabrijela Zaharijas (ICTP and INFN, Trieste)
        Slides
      • 14:55
        Search for DM-induced gamma-rays from Galaxy Clusters with the Fermi-LAT 10m
        Galaxy Clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in our universe. The majority of their mass is believed to be in the form of dark matter (DM). If DM manifests itself as weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) these WIMPs may self-annihilate or decay, and galaxy clusters would then be excellent targets for searches of DM-induced gamma rays. In addition, N-body cosmological simulations predict galaxy clusters to host thousands of DM sub halos. The presence of these substructures may yield an enhancement of the expected DM-induced gamma-ray flux, making galaxy clusters potentially observable with current gamma-ray observatories such as the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite. Here we present initial results of a joint likelihood analysis searching for DM signatures towards the direction of a sample of 34 galaxy clusters in 5 years of existing LAT data. In the absence of a DM signal, we provide updated constraints on the DM annihilation cross section, which are possible thanks to our improved understanding of the DM modeling and the gamma-ray sky.
        Speaker: Mr Stephan Zimmer (OKC/ Stockholm University)
        Slides
      • 15:05
        Optimized dark matter searches in deep observations of Segue 1 with MAGIC 25m
        Determining the nature of dark matter (DM) is one of the most exciting tasks of modern science. In most of the suggested hypothesis, DM particles should annihilate or decay into standard matter, which would produce high energy gamma-ray signal. The MAGIC telescopes search for such a DM signature in the 50 GeV - 50 TeV energy range. Suitable targets are the Galactic centre, local DM clumps, satellite dwarf spheroidal galaxies and galaxy clusters. We concentrated our effort on one of the most promising candidates, the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Segue 1, which has a mass-to-light ratio estimated to the order of 1000. The 160 hours of observation, carried out between 2011 and 2013, were analysed with a likelihood approach optimized for signals with characteristic spectral features of different DM theoretical scenarios. Our results represent the most stringent constraints to the annihilation cross-section and decay lifetime obtained from satellite galaxy observations, for masses above few hundred GeV.
        Speaker: Javier Rico (IFAE)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        The GeV Galactic Center Excess: Implications for Particle Physics 15m
        A spatially extended excess of ~1-3 GeV gamma rays from the region surrounding the Galactic Center has been observed, consistent with the emission expected from annihilating dark matter. Recent improvements in analysis techniques have found this excess to be robust and highly statistically significant, with a spectrum, angular distribution, and overall normalization that is in good agreement with that predicted by simple annihilating dark matter models. For example, the signal is very well fit by a 31-40 GeV dark matter particle annihilating to b quarks with an annihilation cross section of sigma v = (1.7-2.3) x 10^-26 cm^3/s. I will discuss the varieties of particle physics models that can account for this signal, and discuss the prospects for observing such particles in direct detection experiments and at the LHC.
        Speaker: Dr dan hooper (fermilab)
      • 15:45
        Minimal Simplified Models for the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess 15m
        We are interested in exhausting the list of possible minimal models that could produce the galactic center gamma-ray excess at tree level, without adopting the simplifications inherent in the effective operator approach. We wish to take a holistic but general view of the types of interactions that could produce the galactic center gamma-ray excess. This leads us to the simplified model formalism: we write down all possible combinations of renormalizable dimension-four operators and super-renormalizable dimension-three operators compatible with Lorentz invariance that, in combination, can lead to dark matter annihilation to Standard Model fermions. Interactions of this sort will necessarily mediate direct scattering and production diagrams. We are interested in understanding how generically we can decouple the strength of these effects for the purpose of verifying that the galactic center excess can be mediated by tree-level diagrams without being in tension with null direct detection and direct production searches.
        Speaker: Samuel McDermott
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Gamma-Ray Astrophysics: Instrument + ExGal I Room 2 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 2

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Elina Lindfors (U)
      • 14:30
        The current status of the HAWC observatory 20m
        The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is an extensive air shower (EAS) detector currently under construction in central Mexico at an altitude of 4,100 m above sea level. It improves the water Cherenkov technique, where gamma rays in the 100 GeV - 100 TeV range are detected by measuring Cherenkov light from secondary particles, by having an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. HAWC is the most sensitive wide field of view ($\approx2$ sr instantaneous field of view) and continuously operating (>95 % duty cycle) TeV gamma-ray observatory ever constructed. In this presentation I will discuss the construction and operation status of HAWC and a sky map from the first few months of HAWC observations, including the Crab nebula, Mrk 421, Mrk 501, the complex Cygnus region and other extended TeV objects with unidentified source associations.
        Speaker: Dirk Lennarz (Georgia Tech)
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Highlights from H.E.S.S. 20m
        The H.E.S.S. telescope system is operating since more than 10 years and the collaboration contributes significantly to the rapidly progressing field of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy. With the recent start of the operation of a new telescope with a mirror diameter of 28m the detection capabilities if the H.E.S.S. telescope system are significantly enhanced and the energy threshold is much reduced. With the new telescope the H.E.S.S. collaboration operates the first hybrid system in VHE gamma-ray astronomy. In the presentation an overview of the results achieved with the H.E.S.S. system will be given with a special emphasis on the capabilities of the system with the new telescope.
        Speaker: Prof. Christian Stegmann (DESY)
        Slides
      • 15:10
        Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares 20m
        During its first six years of operation, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected >30 MeV gamma-ray emission from more than 40 solar flares, nearly a factor of 10 more than EGRET detected. Detections sample both the impulsive phase and long-duration emission, extending up to ~20 hours for the 2012 March 7 X-class flares, and include the first detection of >100 MeV emission from a behind-the-limb flare. As a result of recent improvements to LAT data classes, the centroid of gamma-ray emission is consistently localized with the solar active region from which the flare occurred, providing clues to the acceleration mechanisms at work. Here we present an overview of LAT solar flare detections.
        Speaker: Melissa Pesce-Rollins (INFN-Pisa)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Binary systems 20m
        The small source class of gamma-ray binaries consists at present of six known objects with different orbital periods ranging from days up to several years. One of the best studied gamma-ray binary across all frequencies, LS I +61 303, is highly variable at any given orbital phase and was lately discovered to show on top of orbital also superorbital variability at high energies. In contrary, the other famous binary, LS 5039, shows no variations apart from those related to the orbital period. The other unresolved mystery in most of these sources is the nature of their compact object. Both neutron star (e.g. PSR B1259-63) and probable black hole (microquasar, e.g., Cyg X-3) binary systems have been detected at GeV energies, hence both types of compact object are viable in the undetermined systems. In this talk I will present the recent findings on the known gamma-ray binaries up to now and discuss their behavior at high and very high energies.
        Speaker: Daniela Hadasch (University of Innsbruck)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Particle Physics Room 3 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 3

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Albert De Roeck (CERN)
      • 14:30
        Progresses on Minimal Dark Matter 15m
        We extend the Standard Model with a new particle, chosen from those that are automatically stable without adding any extra symmetry to the theory. Despite being a potential Dark Matter candidate, other motivations for such a new state will be discussed, like the stabilisation of the EW vacuum. Its phenomenology is controlled by a single parameter, its mass, which is fixed in the multi-TeV range if the correct relic abundance is imposed. Prospects for direct detection of such a Dark Matter candidate are not promising, and indirect detection ones suffer from large astrophysical uncertainties. This makes particularly interesting the study of future colliders searches of this state, for which we present some preliminary results. The phenomenology we discuss is relevant also for other widely studied theories, in particular for models of Supersymmetry with coloured sparticles beyond the LHC reach.
        Speaker: Filippo Sala (CEA/Saclay and CNRS)
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Using Energy Peaks to Count Dark Matter Particles in Decays 15m
        We study the determination of the symmetry that stabilizes a dark matter (DM) candidate produced at colliders. Our question is motivated per se, and by several alternative symmetries that appear in models that provide a DM particle. To this end, we devise a strategy to determine whether a heavy mother particle decays into one visible massless particle and one or two DM particles. The counting of DM particles in these decays is relevant to distinguish the minimal choice of Z2 from a Z3 stabilization symmetry, under which the heavy particle and the DM are charged and the visible particle is not. Our method is novel in that it chiefly uses the peak of the energy spectrum of the visible particle and only secondarily uses the MT2 endpoint of events in which the heavy mother particles are pair-produced. We present new theoretical results concerning the energy distribution of the decay products of a three-body decay, which are crucial for our method. To demonstrate the feasibility of our method in investigating the stabilization symmetry, we apply it in distinguishing the decay of a bottom quark partner into a b quark and one or two DM particles. The method can be applied generally to distinguish two- and three-body decays, irrespective of DM.
        Speaker: Roberto Franceschini (E)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        SUSY after LHC run1 20m
        Supersymmetry is the most prominent candidate for new physics beyond the Standard Model. However, we have not seen any sign of it during the LHC run 1. In this talk, I will give an overview of the current status of SUSY, including important questions such as naturalness and Higgs physics. I will also remark on promising directions for further pursuit.
        Speaker: LianTao Wang (University of Chicago)
        Slides
      • 15:20
        Supersymmetry Searches in ATLAS and CMS 20m
        As the last and most advanced results of the Run1 ATLAS and CMS SUSY searches are in the process of being finalized, the status of these searches after LHC Run1 is that no indication for any signal has yet been seen. All data has been compatible with the estimated standard model backgrounds, and limits have therefore been set on the masses of various supersymmetric particles. I will cover a broad and representative but not complete array of results from ATLAS and CMS, which will outline the status of SUSY searches after LHC Run1, and highlight some of the most interesting results seen from a cosmological point of view.
        Speaker: Troels Petersen (University of Copenhagen (DK))
        Slides
      • 15:40
        The Incredible Bulk 15m
        Recent experimental results from the LHC have placed strong constraints on the masses of colored superpartners. Additionally, direct dark matter searches put a strong upper limit on cross sections of interactions between the WIMP and quark sectors. However, leptophilic versions of the MSSM can potentially survive these constraints while explaining the observed abundance of dark matter. We consider a scenario in which the requirements of minimal flavor violation and vanishing $CP$-violation are relaxed, and find that the lightest neutralino can achieve a cosmologically viable thermal relic abundance via light slepton exchange, analogously to the original bulk region. We find that these leptophilic models are constrained by measurements of the magnetic and electric dipole moments of the electron and muon, and that they may lead to interesting signatures at a variety of indirect detection experiments.
        Speaker: Ms Pearl Sandick (University of Minnesota)
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:30 18:30
      Cosmic Rays Room 4 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 4

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Elena Amato (INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri)
      • 16:30
        On the CR spectrum released by a type II Supernova Remnant expanding in the presupernova wind. 18m
        One of the main open issues about the origin of Galactic CRs is the maximum energy that can be achieved by acceleration in Supernova Remnants. In a rigidity dependent acceleration mechanism, protons are expected to reach a few PeV and heavier ions correspondingly higher energies. A recent theory suggests that, in a core-collapse SNR expanding in its pre-supernova wind, magnetic field amplification through the so called Non-Resonant Hybrid Instability (NRH) could explain energies of the PeV order. If this instability is the main responsible for particle scattering, then the maximum achievable energy in a SNR is reached very early during its evolution and then decreases at later stages. In this work, assuming that the maximum energy is set by the NHR instability at every time during the evolution of a type II Supernova Remnant, we computed the particle spectrum injected in the ISM by this kind of source. We showed that the released particle spectrum is a power-law both during the Ejecta dominated and the Sedov-Taylor expansion phase, but with a steeper index during the first. We address the question of whether this mechanism can naturally reproduce the observed overallCR spectrum up to energies of order 100 PeV.
        Speaker: Martina Cardillo (INAF - Osservatorio astrofisico di Arcetri)
        Slides
      • 16:48
        Cosmic-ray spectral anomaly at GeV-TeV energies 18m
        Recent measurement of cosmic rays by the ATIC, CREAM and PAMELA experiments have found that the energy spectrum in the TeV region is harder than at GeV energies. The origin of the hardening is not clearly understood. Suggested explanations include hardening in the cosmic-ray source spectrum, changes in the cosmic-ray propagation properties in the Galaxy and the effect of the nearby sources. In this contribution, I will discuss the possibility that the spectral anomaly might be an effect of re-acceleration of cosmic rays by weak shocks in the Galaxy. After acceleration by strong supernova remnant shock waves, cosmic rays undergo diffusive propagation in the Galaxy. During the propagation, cosmic rays may again encounter expanding supernova remnant shock waves, and get re-accelerated. As the probability of encountering old supernova remnants is expected to be larger than the young ones due to their bigger size, the re-acceleration is expected to be produced mainly by weaker shocks. Since weaker shocks generate a softer particle spectrum, the resulting re-accelerated component will have a spectrum steeper than the initial cosmic-ray source spectrum produced by strong shocks. For a reasonable set of model parameters, I will show that such re-accelerated component can dominate the GeV energy region while the non-reaccelerated component dominates at higher energies, thereby explaining the observed GeV-TeV spectral anomaly.
        Speaker: Satyendra Thoudam (R)
        Slides
      • 17:06
        Anisotropic cosmic ray propagation 18m
        We present some results obtained with the anisotropic version of the CR propagation package DRAGON. First we describe some quantitative test of the code in simple conditions for which the analytical solution of CR transport is known, both for a the case of a dominant parallel or perpendicular diffusion. Then we show that, for the first time, we are able to reproduce the most important CR observables (namely, proton spectrum and light nulcei ratios), in a fully anisotropic setup for different values of the parallel/perpendicular diffusion coefficient ratio, and within a realistic 3D model of the Galaxy where a spiral regular magnetic field is considered. We also show some preliminary results of the impact of spatial variations of both parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients on the CR spatial distribution, and show how it is possible to solve the CR gradient problem
        Speaker: Daniele Gaggero
      • 17:24
        SNR shocks in partially ionized plasmas 25m
        We present the theory of non-linear particle acceleration in collisionless shocks in the presence of atomic neutral material in the acceleration region. The main new aspect consists in accounting for charge exchange and ionization of neutral hydrogen, which profoundly change the structure of the shock. We also present the self-consistent calculation of the Balmer emission lines from the shock region: the broad Balmer line due to charge exchange of hydrogen atoms with hot ions downstream of the shock is shown to become narrower as a result of the energy drainage into cosmic rays, while the narrow Balmer line due to charge exchange in the CR-induced precursor is shown to get broader. We discuss the potential use of the measurements of the anomalous width of the components of the Balmer line in order to infer the cosmic ray acceleration efficiency in supernova remnants showing Balmer emission.
        Speaker: Giovanni Morlino (G)
        Slides
      • 17:49
        Cosmic Rays, Synchrotron Emission and Diffuse Galactic Gamma Rays: Consistent Analysis and Impications 18m
        Fairly poor knowledge is still present about the cosmic ray (CR) spectra at low energies, due to the distortion produced by the solar wind on the particle fluxes. A self-consistent galactic plus solar propagation model turns out necessary in order to correctly reproduce the CR nuclear and lepton spectra. For that, a detailed transport description in the galaxy has been numerically  implemented in a full three-dimensional code (DRAGON), to compute the local interstellar spectra (LIS) of several CR species. Then, we propagate the charged particles in the heliosphere,  where charge-sign dependent motion effects are taken in account. Going beyond the standard force-field solar modulation,  we are able to interpret the data available nowadays.  In particular the hadron and lepton spectra provided by observations at Earth, from the PAMELA and AMS-02 missions. In a multichannel analysis of cosmic ray electron and positron spectra, we therefore study the diffuse synchrotron emission of the Galaxy. Below 4 GeV, we find that the electron primary spectrum is significantly suppressed so that the low-energy total spectrum will turn out to be dominated by secondary particles. Finally, we investigate the high latitude (|b| >10 deg) diffuse gamma-ray emission in the Galaxy in light of the recently published data from the Fermi-Lat Collaboration, at energies between 100 MeV and 100 GeV.
        Speaker: Giuseppe Di Bernardo
        Slides
      • 18:07
        Modeling of the galactic and extragalactic diffuse radio emission. 18m
        The observed radio sky at frequencies below few GHz is the sum of the isotropic extragalactic background and the Galactic emission. The latter includes the diffuse synchrotron radiation produced by cosmic-rays electrons spiraling in the Galactic magnetic field. Therefore radio maps are an useful tool to constrain the interstellar electrons spectrum and magnetic fields. We present a detailed model of the Galactic emission, employing state-of-the-art models of cosmic-ray propagation and magnetic fields. Comparing galactic templates with radio surveys we obtain a new determination of the extragalactic radio background. The intensity lies significantly above the contribution from observed extragalactic sources. We compare our findings with previous estimates and we discuss the main sources of uncertainties entering in the calculations.
        Speaker: Marco Taoso
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      Dark Matter: Direct Detection Room 5 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 5

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano (MIT)
      • 16:30
        Impact of anisotropic distribution functions on direct dark matter detection 20m
        In analyzing data from dark matter direct detection experiments, usually an isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution is assumed. However, dark matter N-body simulations suggest that the velocity distribution of dark matter is anisotropic. I will discuss how to use information from kinematical data on the Milky Way to constrain the properties of the dark matter phase space distribution, based on assumptions motivated by the results of N-body simulations. Finally, I will present an analysis of current data from dark matter direct detection experiments for anisotropic halo models, and discuss the impact of astrophysical uncertainties on the interpretation of the data.
        Speaker: Dr Nassim Bozorgnia (MPIK)
        Slides
      • 16:50
        NEWS experiment and ultra-light dark matter search 20m
        Abstract We present recent results taken at the LSM laboratory using the new spherical gaseous detector. It consists of a large spherical gas volume with a central electrode forming a radial electric field. A small spherical sensor located at the center is acting as a proportional amplification structure. Sub-keV energy threshold and versatility of the target (Ne, He, H) opens the way to push WIMP sensitivity down to 100 MeV. Results obtained with a low radioactivity detector and expected sensitivity will be presented.
        Speaker: Dr ioannis giomataris (CEA-Saclay)
      • 17:10
        Axion mass estimates from resonant Josephson junctions 20m
        This talk will be on a recent proposal that QCD dark matter axions from the galactic halo that pass through Earth can produce a small Shapiro step-like signal in Josephson junctions whose Josephson frequency resonates with the axion mass [1]. The axion field equations in a voltage-driven Josephson environment allow for a nontrivial solution where the axion-induced electrical current manifests itself as a supercurrent. After briefly explaining the theory I will concentrate on experimental aspects and derive a condition for the design of Josephson junction experiments so that they can act as optimum axion detectors. Four independent recent experiments based on different types of Josephson junctions are discussed in this context. The observed Shapiro step anomalies of all four experiments consistently point towards an axion mass of (110 $\pm$ 2) $\mu$eV. This mass value is compatible with the recent BICEP2 results and implies that Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking was taking place after inflation [2]. One can also use the signal intensity to estimate the axionic dark matter density near the Earth to be about 0.05 GeV$/cm^3$, although the theoretical uncertainties for this are much higher. I will discuss future experimental checks to either confirm or refute the dark-matter nature of the observed signals. [1] C. Beck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 231801 (2013) [arXiv:1309.3790] [2] C. Beck, arXiv:1403.5676
        Speaker: Prof. Christian Beck (Queen Mary, University of London, School of Mathematical Sciences)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Axion searches in the helioscope technique: CAST and IAXO 20m
        Axions are well motivated particles proposed in an extension of the SM as a solution to the strong CP-problem. On the other hand there is the category of axion-like particles (ALPs) which appear in diverse extensions of the SM and share the same phenomenology of the axion. Axions and ALPs are hypothetical neutral and light particles which interacts weakly with the matter, being candidates to solve the Dark Matter problem. Several techniques have been developed to search for axions and ALPs, among which the axion helioscope is one of the more promising. CAST (CERN Axion Solar Telescope) is the most sensitive axion helioscope so far. The latest results from the CAST experiment up to axion masses of 1.17 eV will be presented. Moreover CAST will improve its sensitivity due to the improvement of the background level of the X-ray detectors and the installation of a new X-ray optic. Beyond CAST a new generation helioscope has been proposed: IAXO-the International AXion Observatory. IAXO will exploit the helioscope technique with a dedicated magnet, optics and low background detectors. IAXO will have a sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling of more than one order of magnitude beyond CAST, entering a large fraction of unexplored parameter space. IAXO could became a generic facility for axion research. The possibility of hosting dark matter axion detectors in IAXO is under study. The details of the IAXO proposal will be described.
        Speaker: Mrs Juan Antonio Garcia Pascual (Universidad de Zaragoza)
        Slides
      • 17:50
        New Results from the CRESST Experiment 20m
        The CRESST (Cryogenic Rare Event Search with Superconducting Thermometers) experiment has started a new Dark Matter run in summer 2013 with a total target mass of ~5kg. Significant improvements have be achieved with respect to previous measuring campaigns in terms of the intrinsic radiopurity of CaWO$_4$ crystals and the rejection of recoil events from $\alpha$ surface contamination. The first ~80 live-days of data acquired by a single 250g CaWO$_4$ detector which combines an unprecedented background level with a low trigger threshold of ~600eV have been analyzed. In this talk, we present a new detector design and the results of a low-threshold analysis which sets stringent limits for the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section, in particular for WIMP masses as low as 1GeV.
        Speaker: Raimund Strauss (Max-Planck-Institut für Physik)
        Slides
      • 18:10
        Self-consistent velocity distributions for local Dark Matter 20m
        Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiments usually assume a simple “Standard Halo Model” for the Milky Way halo, in which the velocity distribution f(v) is Maxwellian. In an alternative observation-oriented approach the DM velocity distribution is derived from our knowledge of the composition of the Milky Way (i.e. its mass model), obtaining, thus, a “self-consistent” f(v). This is possible under some specific assumptions, that normally include considering an isotropic velocity tensor (i.e. the so-called Eddington formalism). I extended this approach to anisotropic distributions, describing how it is possible to generate self-consistent solutions without the requirement of isotropy. I also studied the effect of having different angular-moment-dependent components of the DM phase-space density F(E,L) and, integrating over a complete sample, I determined which is the largest uncertainty on f(v) associated with our ignorance on the anisotropic part of F(E,L).
        Speaker: Mattia Fornasa (U)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      Dark Matter: Indirect Detection Room 6 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 6

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Gabrijela Zaharijas (CEA Saclay)
      • 16:30
        Cosmological limits on dark matter annihilations 20m
        In my talk I will review the most recent cosmological constraints on dark matter annihilation with a special focus on CMB probes.
        Speaker: Laura Lopez Honorez (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)
        Slides
      • 16:50
        Modeling Dark Matter Self-Interactions Involving an Excited State 20m
        Discrepancies between N-body dark matter simulations and the observed distribution of dark matter on galactic and sub-galactic scales have been advanced as evidence of a complex dark sector. Dark matter self-interactions can flatten density cusps and reduce halo concentrations, and the down-scattering of a relic population of dark matter particles in a nearly-degenerate excited state could have similar effects via the ejection of dark matter particles from halo cores. I will present a new semi-analytic approximation for dark matter self-scattering in such a multi-state model, at low velocities and force carrier masses where the Born approximation does not apply, allowing analytic study of the behavior of the inelastic scattering cross sections and the effects of the presence of the excited state on elastic scattering.
        Speaker: Prof. Tracy Slatyer (MIT)
        Slides
      • 17:10
        Fingerprints of Dark Matter in the gamma-ray sky (?) 25m
        The quest for Dark Matter signals in the gamma-ray sky is one of the most intriguing and exciting challenges in astrophysics. In this talk I will discuss the energy spectrum of the Fermi bubbles at different latitudes, making use of the gamma-ray data collected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. At high latitude, $|b|=20^{\circ}-50^{\circ}$, the Fermi bubbles energy spectrum can be reproduced by gamma-ray photons generated by inverse Compton scattering processes, assuming the existence of a population of high-energy electrons. At low latitude, $|b|=10^{\circ}-20^{\circ}$, the presence of a bump at $E_{\gamma}\sim 1-4$ GeV, reveals the existence of an extra component compatible with Dark Matter annihilation.
        Speaker: Dr Alfredo Urbano (SISSA)
        Slides
      • 17:35
        The origin of the Extra-Galactic Gamma-ray Background through its anisotropy and cross-correlations 25m
        I will describe the current status of the measurement of the Extra-Galactic Gamma-ray Background (EGB) anisotropy (its angular power spectrum) and correlations with galaxy catalogues (cross-correlation functions) derived using data from the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray observatory. I will then discuss the implications for the origin of the EGB, in particular in relation to the presence of a possible Dark Matter contribution.
        Speaker: Alessandro Cuoco (U)
      • 18:00
        Searching for dark matter in the extragalactic gamma-ray background 15m
        The approximately isotropic gamma-ray background measured by Fermi-LAT probes the contribution from several classes of astrophysical sources. Using the catalog of known gamma-ray sources along with similar catalogues at radio wavelengths, we can model and constrain the contributions to the extragalactic gamma-ray background from astrophysical sources, as are radio galaxies, star-forming galaxies, and blazars. Then combine that information with the measurement of the gamma-ray background one can derive constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section, including contributions from both extragalactic and galactic halos and subhalos. The resulting current constraints are competitive with the strongest current constraints from the galactic center and dwarf spheroidal galaxies. With a greater number of astrophysical sources observed in gamma-rays and other wavelengths, the gamma-ray contribution from various classes of extragalactic objects will become more tightly constrained, leading to subsequent improvement of the potential constraints on the dark matter annihilation. At the end of the Fermi-LAT mission, the sensitivity to dark matter annihilations will exceed the strongest current gamma-ray constraints by a factor of ~ 5–10. In addition, the contribution from dark matter annihilations to the anisotropy of the gamma-ray sky at high multipoles is maximal from low redshift galaxies. Thus, cross-correlating the observed gamma-ray map with known galaxies, increases the sensitivity of dark matter annihilation searches in such objects and provides limits competitive to other gamma-ray searches.
        Speaker: Ilias Cholis (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory)
      • 18:15
        Systematic uncertainties in dark matter searches due to halo asphericity 15m
        We study the impact of aspherical dark matter density distribution in Milky-Way like halo on direct and indirect searches. Using data from large N-body cosmological simulation Bolshoi, we perform a complete statistical analysis and quantify the systematic uncertainties that affect the determination of local dark matter density and $J$ factors for annihilating and decaying dark matter. We find that the systematic effects can be as large as 50% at 95% CL for a spherically averaged local density of 0.3 GeV/cm^3. Similarly, systematic uncertainties for $J$ factors evaluated around the galactic center can be as large as 20% and 15% at 95% CL for decaying and annihilating dark matter, for typical NFW profiles.
        Speaker: Nicolas Bernal
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:40
      Gamma-Ray Astrophysics: Instrument + ExGal I Room 2 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 2

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Daniel Mazin (IFAE)
      • 16:30
        Gamma-ray Observations of Galaxy Clusters 20m
        Galaxy clusters are unique environments to study cosmic-ray acceleration. In comparison to Galactic accelerators, large-scale structure formation shocks associated with merger events and accretion have lower Mach numbers and occur in high-temperature weakly magnetized plasma. Leptonic cosmic rays in clusters are well established observationally through studies of Mpc-scale diffuse radio halos and relics. However, firm evidence for hadronic cosmic rays via detections of diffuse gamma-ray emission has been lacking, even after deep searches with air-Cherenkov telescopes and more than five years of the *Fermi*-LAT survey. The gamma-ray non-detections are notable because cosmic-ray nuclei accelerated in large-scale shocks, injected by AGN, and escaping from cluster galaxies accumulate in the intracluster medium over Gyr timescales and must produce high-energy emission at some level. This integrated non-thermal history of cluster formation encoded in hadronic populations cannot be readily deduced from the shorter-lived leptonic populations alone. I will review current constraints from gamma-ray observations, discuss the implications for cosmic rays and magnetic fields, and consider future observations in gamma rays and other wavebands that may elucidate the role of non-thermal processes in clusters.
        Speaker: Keith Bechtol
        Slides
      • 16:50
        Multi-messenger Astroparticle with Clusters of Galaxies 15m
        Relativistic particles are revealed in clusters of galaxies from observations of diffuse synchrotron radio emission. At least part of this emission can be originated by secondary electrons produced by cosmic-ray protons interacting with the protons of the intra-cluster medium. This should be accompanied by the production of gamma rays, potentially detectable by the Fermi satellite and Cherenkov telescopes, and neutrinos, potentially detectable by IceCube. I will present the latest constraints and predictions.
        Speaker: Fabio Zandanel (University of Amsterdam)
        Slides
      • 17:05
        M 31 as a probe for diffuse VHE gamma ray emission with VERITAS 15m
        VERITAS, an array of 12 m imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes in southern Arizona, is one of the world's most sensitive detectors of astrophysical very-high-energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) gamma rays. The current status of the VERITAS observations of M 31 (Andromeda Galaxy) including an upper limit on the VHE flux, an updated analysis of the Fermi-LAT data and a comparison with theoretical predictions, including the potential dark matter contribution, will be presented. The dominant mechanism for the formation of diffuse gamma rays is expected to be through the inelastic collision of high-energy cosmic rays with the interstellar medium (ISM). M 31 provides an opportunity to probe this mechanism due to its proximity and spatial extent, with the VERITAS point-spread function sufficient to resolve features of M 31 like its dense, gas rich star-forming ring and the core of the galaxy with its large population of supernova remnants.
        Speaker: Ralph Bird (UCD Dublin)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Prospects for detecting Gamma-Ray Bursts at the highest energies 20m
        Our understanding of high-energy emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts has greatly advanced with observations from the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope. I will review the Fermi observations and explain why they give hope to the very high-energy communities in their quest for Gamma-Ray Burst detections with the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) and Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) experiments. I will also discuss the importance of these very high-energy observations both in astrophysics and in areas of fundamental physics.
        Speaker: Dr Valerie Connaughton (National Space Science and Technology Centre)
        Slides
      • 17:40
        Observations of gamma-ray bursts with the HAWC observatory 15m
        The temporal evolution and end of GRB spectra have important implications for the acceleration mechanisms of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Above $\approx10$ GeV the effective area of \emph{Fermi}-LAT is approximately constant and since the photon flux is steeply decreasing with energy, an insufficient number of photons is detected. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a gamma-ray detector in the 100 GeV - 100 TeV range currently under construction in central Mexico that has the potential to measure GRB spectra beyond the LAT energy range. Unlike Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes, it has a large field of view and near 100 % duty cycle that will allow for observations of the prompt GRB phase. In this presentation I will show first results of GRB observations with the partially completed HAWC array, including GRB 130427A, the most energetic GRB so far detected at a redshift $z<0.5$.
        Speaker: Dirk Lennarz (Georgia Tech)
        Slides
      • 17:55
        Time Stretching of the GeV Emission of GRBs: Fermi LAT data vs geometrical model 15m
        Numerous observations confirm that the high energy (> 100 MeV) emission of gamma ray bursts is delayed with respect to the low energy emission. However, the difference of light curves in various high energy bands has not been studied properly. In this paper we consider all the bursts observed by Fermi-LAT since 2008 August 4 to 2011 August 1, for which at least 10 events with energies 1 GeV or higher were observed. There are 3 of them: GRB080916C, GRB090902B, and GRB090926A. We study their light curves in two bands, (100 MeV, 1 GeV) and (1 GeV, 300 GeV). The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to check whether the light curves for these two bands are the same. No significant difference was found for GRB080916C and GRB090902B. However, we observed with statistical significance of 3.4 sigma, that the higher energy light curve of GRB090926A is stretched with respect to the lower-energy one. We suggest a simple geometrical model to explain this result. The main assumption is the jet opening angle dependence on radiation energy --- the most energetic photons are emitted near the axis of the jet. To test this model, we compute the total energy of the burst, and confirm that it is below the constraint. We also compute the fraction of observable bursts in (100 MeV, 1 GeV) band, which can also be observed in higher energies. This fraction matches the observations. Finally, we predict the distribution of observable stretching factors, which may be tested in the future when more observational data will be available.
        Speaker: Maxim Piskunov (Institute for Nuclear Research RAS)
        Slides
      • 18:10
        ImPACT: A Monte Carlo Template based analysis for Air-Cherenkov Arrays 15m
        We present a high-performance event reconstruction algorithm: an Image Pixel-wise fit for Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ImPACT). This gamma-ray event reconstruction algorithm is based around the comparison of camera pixel amplitudes to an expected image template, performing a maximum likelihood fit to find the best-fit shower parameters. Related reconstruction algorithms have already been shown to provide significant improvements over traditional reconstruction techniques for both current and previous generation experiments. We demonstrate a significant improvement to the template generation step of the procedure, by the use of a full Monte Carlo air shower simulation in combination with a ray-tracing optics simulation to more accurately model the expected camera images. This reconstruction step is combined with an MVA-based background rejection. Application of the ImPACT analysis to both simulated and measured (from a strong VHE source) gamma-ray data from the H.E.S.S. array demonstrates an improvement in sensitivity of more than a factor two in observation time over traditional image moments-fitting methods, with comparable performance to previous likelihood fitting analyses. ImPACT is a particularly promising approach for future large arrays such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) due to its improved high-energy performance and suitability for arrays of mixed telescope types.
        Speaker: Dr Robert Parsons (Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik)
        Slides
      • 18:25
        Model Independent Measurements of Angular Power Spectra 15m
        Spatial fluctuations of astrophysical signals are a powerful probe of source distributions, radiation production mechanisms, and propagation effects. The precision of measuring angular power spectra is currently estimated as a combination of shot noise, instrument systematics, and cosmic variance. We show that an important contribution, dependent on the finite statistics of the experiment, has been neglected. These new results allow for improved estimates of sensitivities to angular power by statistics-limited observations, such as for high-energy gamma rays.
        Speaker: Sheldon Campbell (T)
    • 16:30 18:30
      Particle Physics Room 3 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 3

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Troels Petersen (University of Copenhagen (DK))
      • 16:30
        The MEG experiment: past, present and future 15m
        We will present the latest result from the MEG experiment, based on the data collected at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), in search of the Lepton Flavour Violating (LFV) decay $\mu^+ \to e^+ \gamma$. Such decay is forbidden within the Standard Model (SM), nevertheless most of its viable extensions predict a branching ratio in the 10$^{−14}$ to 10$^{−12}$ range. An observation of the $\mu^+ \to e^+ \gamma$ decay would therefore represent an unambiguous sign of New Physics (NP) beyond the SM, whereas a tight upper limit significantly constraints the parameter space of NP scenarios, in a way complementary to high energy colliders measurements. With the analysis of the data collected in the years 2009-2011, we set the most stringent upper limit to date on charged LFV processes with BR ($\mu^+ \to e^+ \gamma$) < 5.7 × 10$^{−13}$ at 90% confidence level. The MEG collaboration is working on a detector upgrade, MEG II, whose design and associated research and development projects will be illustrated as well.
        Speaker: Mrs Elisabetta Baracchini (The University of Tokyo)
        Slides
      • 16:45
        LHC searches in rare heavy-flavor decays 20m
        Rare decays of beauty hadrons test the flavour structure of the Standard Model and of other theories at the level of quantum corrections. They provide information on the couplings and masses of heavy virtual particles appearing as intermediate states. A review of recent results from the the LHCb, ATLAS, and CMS collaborations on new physics searches in b -> s transitions will be presented.
        Speaker: Giampiero Mancinelli (CPPM, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille, France)
        Slides
      • 17:05
        Mono- and di-photon searches for new physics at the LHC 20m
        The ATLAS and Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiments are general-purpose particle detector experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. ATLAS and CMS have successfully collected a large dataset consisting of approximately 20/fb (5/fb), of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV (7 TeV). In addition to clarifying the origins of electroweak symmetry breaking, one of the major goals of these experiments is to discover new physics beyond the Standard Model. This presentation will highlight results from new physics searches with a single photon or two photons in the final state, ranging from searches for dark matter and supersymmetry to extra dimensions.
        Speaker: Prof. Toyoko Orimoto (Northeastern University)
        Slides
      • 17:25
        Other BSM searches at the LHC 20m
        Besides studies of the Higgs boson, supersymmetry, and dark matter, the ATLAS and CMS experiments conduct a broad program of searches for more exotic new physics possibilities. These investigations include searches for heavy gauge bosons, leptoquarks, long-lived particles, vector-like quarks, excited leptons, heavy neutrinos, extra dimensions, black holes, and many other models. This presentation summarizes these BSM searches conducted with the data samples collected in 2011 and 2012 at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV at the LHC, studying a wide variety of final states, ranging from multileptonic to fully hadronic, and including the usage of novel reconstruction techniques for boosted topologies in which these processes could be produced.
        Speaker: Tristan Arnoldus Du Pree (Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL) (BE))
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Expectations for LHC run-II 20m
        LHC run 2 will significantly enhance the reach of new physics searches. In this talk, I will give an overview of the new ground to be covered and new questions to be answered. I will attempt to identify a set of top physics targets, as well as some challenges.
        Speaker: LianTao Wang (University of Chicago)
        Slides
      • 18:05
        Future high-energy collider options and physics prospects 20m
        In 2012 the Large Hadron Collider, at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland, discovered a new type of particle, a Higgs Boson, which is anticipated to have played a crucial role at the beginning of the Universe, giving mass to the elementary particles. This paradigm shifting discovery was made by large experimental collaborations analysing the data of the LHC collected in the years 2011and 2012. It has given directions to the next questions which are important to study for a deeper understanding of the fundamental particles and interactions in the coming future. In this overview we will discuss what the next physics goals of the LHC are, and present the current thinking and initiatives for new scientific instruments that will go beyond the capabilities of the LHC, such as a very large energy proton collider with centre of mass collisions at 100 TeV, and circular or linear electron-positron colliders that could operate as Higgs factories and more.
        Speakers: Albert De Roeck (CERN), Albert De Roeck (CERN)
        Slides
    • 09:30 10:30
      Plenary Talks Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 09:30
        Invited Talk: The local dark matter density: new constraints on the Milky Way's dark disc and the local shape of the Milky Way halo 30m
        I review current efforts to measure the mean density of dark matter near the Sun. This encodes valuable dynamical information about our Galaxy and is also of great importance for direct detection dark matter experiments. I briefly discuss theoretical expectations in our current cosmology; the theory behind mass modelling of the Galaxy; and I show how combining local and global measures probes the shape of the Milky Way dark matter halo and the possible presence of a 'dark disc'. I collate the latest measurements and show that, once the baryonic surface density contribution is normalised across different groups, there is remarkably good agreement. The very latest measures based on ~10,000 stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey leave little room for significant halo flattening at the Solar position, suggesting that the Galaxy has a rather weak dark matter disc, with a correspondingly quiescent merger history. This is further supported by the apparent lack of accreted stars that should accompany any significant dark disc.
        Speaker: Prof. Justin Read
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Invited Talk: How Baryons Influence the Dark Matter Structure of Galaxies 30m
        The cosmological model based on cold dark matter (CDM) and dark energy has been hugely successful in describing the observed evolution and large scale structure of our Universe. However, at small scales (in the smallest galaxies and at the centers of larger galaxies), a number of observations seem to conflict with the predictions CDM cosmology, leading to recent interest in Warm Dark Matter (WDM) and Self-Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) models. These small scales, though, are also regions dominated by the influence of baryons (gas and stars). I will present results from high resolution cosmological galaxy simulations that include both baryons and dark matter to show that baryonic physics can significantly alter the dark matter structure and substructure of galaxies, revolutionizing our expectations for galaxy structure and influencing our interpretation of the Dark Matter model.
        Speaker: Dr Alyson Brooks (Rutgers University)
        Slides
    • 10:30 11:00
      Coffee Break 30m Main Foyer (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Main Foyer

      Tuschinski Theatre

    • 11:00 12:30
      Plenary Talks Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 11:00
        Invited Talk: Constraints on dark matter coldness and neutrinos from intergalatic space 30m
        I will review the constraints that can be placed on the coldness of cold dark matter and total neutrino mass by using the Lyman-alpha forest, which is the main manifestation of the intergalactic medium. The intergalactic medium cosmic web probes mildly non-linear scales of the matter distribution at redshifts z=2-6, in a crucial phase of the formation of cosmic structures. I will describe how state-of-the-art data, from Sloan Digital Sky Survey and high resolution spectroscopy, can be used together with high-resolution hydro dynamic simulations to: i) infer lower limits on the mass of a warm dark matter thermal relic or sterile neutrino; ii) infer upper limits on the total mass of active neutrinos.
        Speaker: matteo viel
        Slides
      • 11:30
        Invited Talk: Beyond Collisionless Dark Matter 30m
        Dark matter self-interactions have important implications for the distributions of dark matter in the Universe, from dwarf galaxies to galaxy clusters. In this talk, I will discuss recent progress in self-interacting dark matter.
        Speaker: Hai-Bo Yu (University of Michigan)
      • 12:00
        Movie "The Dark Universe" 30m
    • 12:30 14:30
      Lunch Break 2h
    • 14:30 16:00
      Cosmic Rays Room 4 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 4

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Veronica Bindi (University of Hawai'i at Manoa (US))
      • 14:30
        Main results of the PAMELA space experiment after 8 years in orbit 25m
        In about 8 years of data taking in space, the experiment PAMELA has shown very interesting features in cosmic rays, namely in the fluxes of protons, heliums, electrons, that could have significant implications on the production, acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy. In addition, PAMELA measurements of cosmic antiproton and positron fluxes are setting strong constraints to the nature of Dark Matter. PAMELA is also measuring the radiation environment around the Earth, and has recently discovered an antiproton radiation belt. The study of particles related to the Solar activity is part of the scientific program of PAMELA too, providing important improvements in the comprehension of the solar modulation mechanisms. In this talk PAMELA main results are reviewed.
        Speaker: Roberta Sparvoli (University of Rome Tor Vergata)
        Slides
      • 14:55
        Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass for the International Space Station (ISS-CREAM) 25m
        The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment was flown for ~161 days in six flights over Antarctica. High energy cosmic-ray data were collected over a wide energy range from ~ 10^10 to > 10^14 eV at an average altitude of ~38.5 km with ~3.9 g/cm2 atmospheric overburden. Cosmic-ray elements from protons (Z = 1) to iron nuclei (Z = 26) are separated with excellent charge resolution. Building on success of the balloon flights, the payload is being reconfigured for exposure on the International Space Station (ISS). This ISS-CREAM instrument is configured with the CREAM calorimeter for energy measurements, and four finely segmented Silicon Charge Detector layers for precise charge measurements. In addition, the Top and Bottom Counting Detectors (TCD and BCD) and Boronated Scintillator Detector (BSD) have been newly developed. The TCD and BCD are scintillator based segmented detectors to separate electrons from nuclei using the shower profile differences, while BSD distinguishes electrons from nuclei by detecting thermal neutrons that are dominant in nuclei induced showers. An order of magnitude increase in data collecting power is possible by utilizing the ISS to reach the highest energies practical with direct measurements. The project status including results from on-going analysis of existing data and future plans will be discussed.
        Speaker: Prof. Eun-Suk Seo (University of Maryland)
      • 15:20
        The Calorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) on ISS for High Energy Astroparticle Physics 25m
        The CALET space experiment, currently under development by Japan in collaboration with Italy and the United States,will measure the flux of Cosmic Ray electrons (and positrons) to 20 TeV, gamma rays to 10 TeV and nuclei with Z=1 to 40 up to 1,000 TeV during a five year mission. These measurements are essential to investigate possible nearby astrophysical sources of high energy electrons, study the details of galactic particle propagation and search for dark matter signatures. The instrument consists of a module to identify the particle charge, a thin imaging calorimeter (3 radiation lengths) with tungsten plates interleaving scintillating fiber planes, and a thick calorimeter (27 radiation lengths) composed of lead-tungstate logs. CALET has the depth, imaging capabilities and energy resolution necessary for excellent separation between hadrons, electrons and gamma rays. The instrument is currently being prepared for launch in JFY 2014 (by March,2015) to the International Space Station (ISS) for installation on the Japanese Experiment Module – Exposure Facility (JEM-EF).
        Speaker: Prof. Shoji Torii (Waseda University)
        Slides
      • 15:45
        The cosmic electron and positron flux measurement with the AMS-02 experiment 15m
        The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance cosmic ray detector operating on the International Space Station since May 2011. About 40 billion events have been collected by the instrument in the first 30 months of data taking. Among them, 10.5 million of electrons and positrons have been selected to measure the cosmic lepton energy spectrum at energies up to the TeV. In this contribution we will present the latest result on the electron and positron energy spectrum evaluation, we will review the employed analysis techniques and we will discuss the implications of this measurement in the investigation of sources for high energy cosmic leptons.
        Speaker: Valerio Vagelli (KIT - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (DE))
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:10
      Dark Matter: Indirect Detection: Charged Antiparticles Room 6 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 6

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Dr dan hooper (fermilab)
      • 14:55
        Anti-nuclei from Dark Matter 25m
        Light anti-nuclei, namely anti-deuteron and anti-helium, can be produced through the nuclear coalescence of the anti-protons and the anti-neutrons that are originated in a dark matter pair annihilation event. At low kinetic energies, the fluxes of these bound states are found to dominate over the astrophysical background and thus anti-nuclei may be considered as a very promising channel for a dark matter indirect detection, especially for WIMPs with a low or intermediate mass. In this talk, an overview on the principal issues related both to the anti-nuclei production and to their subsequent propagation through the interstellar medium and the heliosphere will be given. Then, the capability of current and future experiments to detect a light anti-nuclei flux produced by dark matter annihilation will be investigated in relation to the constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section that can be derived from the latest measurements of the cosmic anti-proton flux.
        Speaker: Andrea Vittino (Universita' di Torino and IPhT/CEA Saclay)
        Slides
      • 15:20
        Searching for Dark Matter Signatures in Cosmic Rays with CALET 15m
        The Calorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) will be installed at the ISS in JFY 2014 and measure the energy and direction distribution of electron/positron cosmic rays well into the TeV range. Featuring a proton rejection capability of $1:10^5$ and an energy resolution of 2$\%$, it is well suited to investigate features in the spectrum, testing the hypotheses of Dark Matter annihilation and/or local accelerators being responsible for the observed positron excess. Under the assumption that the excess is primarily due to local accelerators, the sensitivity of CALET to exclude a contribution from Dark Matter annihilation has been calculated for several Dark Matter candidates. It is also shown that especially Kaluza-Klein Dark Matter alone could be the cause of the excess based on the measurements of AMS-02 and Fermi, and the expected constraints on Dark Matter properties from CALET data assuming this case are presented.
        Speaker: Dr Holger Motz (Waseda University)
        Slides
      • 15:35
        Cosmic-ray antiproton constraints on WIMP annihilation in our Galaxy 15m
        The latest years have seen steady progresses in weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested both in direct and indirect detection. Cosmic-ray (CR) antiprotons play a key role in this context, since WIMP annihilations can be a copious source of antiprotons, and, at the same time, the antiproton flux from conventional astrophysical sources is predicted with fair accuracy and makes for a potentially very good signal/background ratio. In this talk, we focus on antiprotons as a tool to set constraints on DM models. In particular, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated with propagation of CRs both in the Galaxy and in the Solar System in the light of upcoming CR spectral data from the AMS-02 observatory. We show that current antiproton data can place tight constraints on DM models, excluding some of those suggested in connection with indirect and direct searches. Finally, we compare our findings with the constraints that we have obtained from the diffuse gamma-rays on a variety of assumptions on DM particle physics properties.
        Speaker: Carmelo Evoli (Hamburg University)
        Slides
      • 15:50
        Dark matter annihilations and decays after the AMS-02 positron measurements 15m
        We use the new positron data from the AMS-02 experiment to set limits on dark matter annihilations and decays in different channels. In this work it is assumed that the positron background consists of secondary positrons from spallations and an additional primary component of astrophysical origin. We show that the positron flux and the positron fraction give competitive limits on the dark matter properties. Concretely, we can exclude the thermal cross section for dark matter masses below 100 GeV in the electron channel and for masses below 60 GeV in the muon channel.
        Speaker: Anna Lamperstorfer (TUM)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Gamma-Ray Astrophysics: Instrument + exGal II Room 3 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 3

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Marianne Lemoine-Goumard (CNRS)
      • 14:30
        Status of VERITAS after the Upgrade 20m
        VERITAS is an array of four 12 m class Cherenkov telescopes for very-high-energy gamma-ray (>50 GeV) observations. The VERITAS Collaboration completed a series of upgrades in summer 2012 with the objective of lowering the energy threshold and improving the sensitivity of the array at all accessible energies. One telescope was relocated, the trigger system was replaced, and the cameras were updated with high-efficiency photomultiplier tubes. In this contribution I discuss the performance improvements of VERITAS achieved with the upgrade program and present a selection of recent observation highlights.
        Speaker: Dr Nepomuk Otte (Georgia Institute of Technology)
      • 14:50
        Status and recent results of the MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes 20m
        MAGIC, the system of two imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes located at the Canary island of La Palma, has successfully explored the very-high-energy (VHE) sky in stereoscopic mode since 2009. Thanks to its two 17-m diameter mirror dishes, MAGIC has provided unique results in the low-energy range of ground-base gamma-ray astronomy. In addition, the substantial upgrades introduced in the last years have improved the stability and the performance of these instruments, increasing its scientific potential for the coming years. In this talk I will review the current (upgraded) performance of the telescopes, and will briefly report on the most exciting results obtained with MAGIC during the last year.
        Speaker: Dr Emiliano Carmona (CIEMAT)
        Slides
      • 15:10
        Extragalactic Background Light and Intergalactic Magnetic fields 20m
        I will review the techniques of the measurement of optical / infrared extragalactic background light (EBL) and of intergalactic magnetic fields (IGMF) using the effect of absorption of very-high-energy gamma-rays in the intergalactic medium. I will summarise the existing constraints on both EBL and IGMF and discuss perspectives of improvement of the measurements with the next generation gamma-ray telescopes.
        Speaker: Andrii Neronov (Universite de Geneve (CH))
      • 15:30
        Very High Energy Gamma-rays from Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars 20m
        The detection of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs) in the Very High Energy (VHE, E>100 GeV) range is challenging, mainly because of their steep soft spectra and relatively large distances. Nevertheless three FSRQs are now known to be VHE emitters, all of them have been detected by the MAGIC telescopes. The detection of the VHE gamma-rays has challenged the emission models of these sources. The three sources are found to exhibit different multiwavelength behaviour, implying that VHE gamma-rays can be emitted under different conditions. I will give an overview of what is known about the VHE emission of these sources, about the multiwavelength signatures that are connected to the VHE gamma-ray emission, and present the prospects for observations of FSRQs with the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array.
        Speaker: Elina Lindfors (U)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Neutrinos: IceCube Neutrino Signal Room 5 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 5

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Walter Winter (Wurzburg University)
      • 14:30
        Galactic Sources of High-Energy Neutrinos 20m
        The recent IceCube observation of astrophysical neutrinos in the TeV-PeV energy range has opened a new window to the high-energy Universe. The origin of this flux is unknown. Cosmic neutrinos at PeV energies are produced by hadronic interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nucleons at 20-30 PeV and can possibly be related to a Galactic source population. I will review Galactic candidate sources of high-energy neutrino emission in general and comment on possible connections to the IceCube results.
        Speaker: Markus Ahlers
        Slides
      • 14:50
        On the interpretation of the IceCube astrophysical neutrino signal 20m
        Recently, the IceCube collaboration has announced a first evidence of a high-energy neutrino signal from astrophysical sources. The signal, based on a number of 28 events, is at a level of approximately $E^{2}*dN/dE\sim 10^{-8}$ GeV/(s sr cm$^{2}$) and at this point does not show any directional correlation. In this talk, the different cosmic ray emitting source candidates are reviewed in the context of this signal. Multimessenger information is used in order to investigate which of the source classes can be responsible for the signal and which can be excluded. We focus on the most prominent potential cosmic ray emitters like Supernova Remnats and starburst galaxies as PeV-accelerators and extragalactic sources like Active Galaxies and gamma-ray bursts as possible sources to explain the flux of ultra high-energy cosmic rays.
        Speaker: Julia Tjus
        Slides
      • 15:10
        A revised view of the ultra-high energy cosmic ray-neutrino connection: the case of gamma-ray bursts 20m
        The origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), with energies above $10^{18}$ eV, remains unknown fifty years after their discovery. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are arguably among the most likely sources: their high luminosities (> $10^{52}$ erg/s) hint at the possibility that strong magnetic fields in them are able to shock-accelerate protons to the high energies that are necessary to explain the UHECR observations. Interactions of these protons with photons in the source would lead to the production of UHE neutrinos, the detection of which would be the smoking gun of the occurrence of hadronic acceleration in the sources. Recently, km-scale neutrino telescopes such as IceCube have finally reached sensitivities that put pressure on the neutrino predictions of some of the existing GRB models. On that account, we present here a revised, self-consistent model of joint UHE proton and neutrino production at GRBs that includes a state-of-the-art, improved numerical calculation of the neutrino flux (NeuCosmA); that uses a generalised UHECR emission model where some of the protons in the sources are able to "leak out" of their magnetic confinement before having interacted; and that takes into account the energy losses of the protons during their propagation to Earth. In doing so, we also compute the production of cosmogenic neutrinos created in the interaction of the protons with the cosmological photon backgrounds. We use our predictions to take a close look at the cosmic ray-neutrino connection and find that the current UHECR observations by giant air shower detectors, together with the upper bounds on the flux of neutrinos from GRBs and of cosmogenic neutrinos, are already sufficient to put tension on several possibilities of particle emission and propagation, and to point us towards some requirements that should be fulfilled by GRBs if they are to be the sources of the UHECRs.
        Speaker: Mauricio Bustamante (DESY Zeuthen / Universität Würzburg)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Diffuse Neutrino Flux from Star-forming Galaxies 15m
        Star-forming galaxies are predicted to contribute considerably to the cosmic gamma-ray background as they are the most numerous population of gamma-ray sources. The hadronic interactions responsible for high-energy gamma rays also produce high-energy neutrinos. We discuss the expected intensity of the diffuse high-energy neutrinos from star-forming galaxies and conclude that such a population could be the main contributor to the high-energy neutrinos observed by the IceCube experiment.
        Speaker: Irene Tamborra
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Neutrinos from Galactic Sources in the Light of Recent Results in Gamma Ray and Neutrino Astronomy 15m
        We revisit the prospect of observing the sources of the Galactic cosmic rays. In particular, we update the predictions for the neutrino flux expected from sources in the nearby star-forming region in Cygnus, considering the recent TeV gamma ray measurements of their spectra. We focus on three Milagro sources: MGRO J2019+37, MGRO J1908+06 and MGRO J2031+41 and calculate the confidence level limits and statistical significance as a function of the exposure time. We also evaluate the prospects for a kilometer-scale detector in the Mediterranean to observe and elucidate the origin of the cosmic neutrino flux measured by IceCube.
        Speaker: Viviana Niro (U)
        Slides
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:10 16:30
      Coffee Break 20m
    • 16:30 18:35
      Cosmic Rays Room 4 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 4

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Veronica Bindi (University of Hawai'i at Manoa (US))
      • 16:30
        Interpretation of AMS-02 electrons and positrons data and Dark Matter constraints. 15m
        We perform a combined analysis of the recent AMS-02 data on electrons, positrons, electrons plus positrons and positron fraction, in a self-consistent framework where we realize a theoretical modeling of all the astrophysical components that can contribute to the observed fluxes in the whole energy range. The primary electron contribution is modeled through the sum of an average flux from distant sources and the fluxes from the local supernova remnants in the Green catalog. The secondary electron and positron fluxes originate from interactions on the interstellar medium of primary cosmic rays, for which we derive a novel determination by using AMS-02 proton and helium data. Primary positrons and electrons from pulsar wind nebulae in the ATNF catalog are included and studied in terms of their most significant (while loosely known) properties and under different assumptions (average contribution from the whole catalog, single dominant pulsar, a few dominant pulsars). We obtain a remarkable agreement between our various modeling and the AMS-02 data for all types of analysis, demonstrating that the whole AMS-02 leptonic data admit a self-consistent interpretation in terms of astrophysical contributions. Other exotic emission mechanisms could produce a sizeble flux of electrons and positrons. Probably the most popular one is from the interaction of Weakly Interactive Massive particles (WIMPs) of Dark Matter (DM). Taking into account the above cited astrophysical contributions and adding also the flux from DM annihilation, we derive upper limits for the annihilation cross section of DM. We compare also the shape of high energy positrons flux from pulsars wind nebulae and DM respect to AMS-02 data trying to predict which of these two components should explain this part of the measured spectra.
        Speaker: Mattia Di Mauro (University of Turin and INFN Turin)
        Slides
      • 16:45
        PAMELA and AMS-02 electron and positron spectra: what do they imply ? 15m
        We use the three-dimensional upgrade of the DRAGON code to model the electron and positron spectra measured by PAMELA and AMS-02. Presently this is the only cosmic ray (CR) propagation package which allows to account for a realistic spiral arm distribution of CR source in the Galaxy. We find that, once the propagation models are tuned to reproduce the B/C and proton data the lepton data provide valuable new informations about CR propagation properties and on the nature of the $e^- +\ e^+$ extra component responsible for the positron excess. The most relevant implications are: 1 ) the extra component is likely to be generated in the Galactic arms. In that case its source spectrum must be peaked at about 10 TeV; 2 ) its energetic is compatible with SNR or pulsar origin; 3 ) if a charge symmetric extra component is adopted, the observed electron spectrum hints to the presence of one or more $e^-$ nearby sources; 4 ) strong reacceleration propagation models are severely disfavored. We will discuss the impact of those result on the pulsar and the secondary SNR acceleration scenarios for the extra component origin. We also compare the predictions of some popular dark-matter models which have been proposed to reproduce the positron fraction measured by PAMELA and AMS-02 with the newly measured absolute lepton spectra. (partially based on arXiv:1311.5575 accepted for publication in PRD).
        Speaker: Dario Grasso (INFN)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Constraints on cosmic-ray origin from gamma-ray observations of supernova remnants 25m
        Supernova remnants (SNRs) are thought to be the primary sources of the bulk of Galactic cosmic-ray protons observed at Earth, up to the knee energy at ~3 PeV. Our understanding of CR acceleration in SNRs mainly relies on the so-called Diffusive Shock Acceleration theory which is commonly invoked to explain several observational (though, indirect) lines of evidence for efficient particle acceleration at the SNR forward shocks up to very high energies. In particular, recent observations of young SNRs in the high-energy (HE; 0.1 < E < 100 GeV) and very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray domains have raised several questions and triggered numerous theoretical investigations. However, these detections still do not constitute a conclusive proof that supernova remnants accelerate the bulk of Galactic cosmic-rays, mainly due to the diculty of disentangling the hadronic and leptonic contributions to the observed gamma-ray emission. In this presentation, I will review the most relevant results of gamma ray astronomy on supernova remnants (shell-type and middle-age interacting with molecular clouds) and the constraints derived concerning their efficiency to accelerate cosmic-rays.
        Speaker: Marianne Lemoine-Goumard (CNRS)
        Slides
      • 17:25
        Overview and status of cosmic ray antideuteron searches 25m
        In recent years the interest in cosmic ray antideuteron measurements has increased due to detection potential of signals from a variety of dark matter, primordial black hole, or gravitino models. This talk will review the motivations and status of cosmic ray antideuteron searches and discuss future detection prospects.
        Speaker: Prof. Philip Von Doetinchem (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
      • 17:50
        Measurement of the Cosmic Rays Boron-to-Carbon Ratio with AMS-02. 15m
        AMS-02 is a high-energy particle physics experiment operating continuosly since May 2011 onboard of the International Space Station. Given the wide acceptance, long exposure time and particle identification capabilities, AMS-02 is able to determine the cosmic rays (CRs) chemical composition from charge $Z=1$ up to at least $Z=26$ in a kinetic energy range from GeV/n to few TeV/n. Among the CRs nuclei measurement the Boron-to-Carbon fluxes ratio is of particular importance, being the B/C one of the most sensitive observables for the CRs propagation modeling. AMS-02 is able to accurately identify Boron and Carbon samples using energy deposition in Silicon Tracker and in the Time-of-Flight. Charge-changing interactions (as C $\rightarrow$ B) are controlled using the energy deposition distribution of the Silicon layer on the top of AMS. Detection efficiencies differences of Boron and Carbon have been investigated and corrected using data driven approaches. Difference of flux attenuation due to hadronic interaction in AMS materials are accounted using Monte-Carlo simulation, validated with comparisons with data.
        Speaker: Alberto Oliva (Centro de Investigaciones Energ. Medioambientales y Tecn. - (ES)
        Slides
      • 18:05
        Measurement of the boron and carbon fluxes with the PAMELA experiment 15m
        PAMELA is a satellite-borne experiment, aimed at precision measurements of the charged light component of the cosmic-ray spectrum. It consists of a magnetic spectrometer, a time-of-flight system, an electromagnetic calorimeter, an anticoincidence system and a neutron detector. Recently, the PAMELA collaboration has finalized the measurement of the absolute fluxes of boron and carbon and of the B/C ratio. The B/C plays a central role in galactic propagation studies in order to derive the injection spectra at sources (both astrophysical and exotic) from measurements at Earth. The data analysis techniques and the final results will be presented.
        Speaker: Nicola Mori (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 18:20
        Secondaries from supernova remnants and new AMS-02 data 15m
        Recently, the AMS-02 collaboration has presented data on cosmic ray protons, Helium, electrons and positrons as well as the boron-to-carbon ratio. We present the first consistent modelling of these data, paying particular attention to the contribution due to production and acceleration of secondary electrons and positrons in nearby supernova remnants. This process results in an additional, harder component that becomes dominant at high energies and can explain the rise in the positron fraction observed earlier by PAMELA. We find a concomitant rise in the boron-to-carbon ratio at somewhat higher energies, still in agreement with the latest AMS-02 data. We comment on how data on the antiproton-to-proton ratio (that will be available by the time of this conference) can be used to test this model and distinguish it from other astrophysical explanations of the rise in the positron ratio.
        Speaker: Philipp Mertsch (KIPAC, Stanford University)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      Dark Matter: Indirect Detection: Neutrinos Room 6 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 6

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Arman Esmaili Taklimi
      • 16:30
        New directions in Dark Matter Searches from the Sun 20m
        Dark matter particles captured by the Sun through scattering may annihilate and produce neutrinos, which escape. Current searches have focused on the high-energy neutrino signal produced in the prompt decays of some final states. Interactions of hadronic annihilation products lead to other interesting final states with potentially observable neutrino signals. The talk will discuss the sensitivity of present and future neutrino detectors towards observing these neutrino signals. The talk will further review astrophysical uncertainties in the dark matter capture process in the Sun and describe their impact on the sensitivity of indirect dark matter searches.
        Speaker: Carsten Rott (Sungkyunkwan University)
        Slides
      • 16:50
        Search for Neutrinos from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Galactic Center with IceCube 10m
        Dark matter may self-annihilate, and produce a flux of final-state particles, including neutrinos. Indirect dark matter searches target regions of increased dark matter density, and thus increased expected flux, with the Galactic center being the most prominent target region in the Milky Way. IceCube is a cubic-kilometer-scale neutrino detector embedded in glacial ice at the South Pole. The low-energy in-fill array DeepCore reduces the energy threshold to about 10 GeV. The use of parts of IceCube as veto against a background of atmospheric muon makes the southern hemisphere, and thus the Galactic center accessible for neutrino astronomy. We present results from two analyses of data taken with the 79-string configuration of IceCube. These analyses were optimized independently to cover a wide range of dark matter masses from 30 GeV to 10 TeV.
        Speaker: Martin Bissok (RWTH Aachen)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Searching for annihilating dark matter in nearby galaxies and galaxy clusters with IceCube 10m
        In many models, the self-annihilation of dark matter particles will create neutrinos which can be detected on Earth. An excess flux of these neutrinos is expected from regions of increased dark matter density, for example galaxies and galaxy clusters. The IceCube neutrino observatory, a cubic-kilometer neutrino detector at the South Pole, is capable of detecting neutrinos down to energies of the order of 10 GeV. Therefore it is able to constrain the self-annihilation cross section in a mass range where many models predict the WIMP mass to be. We will present the first search for neutrinos from dark matter annihilations in (dwarf) galaxies and clusters with the full IceCube detector.
        Speaker: Meike de With (Humboldt University, Berlin)
        Slides
      • 17:10
        A search for Dark Matter in the centre of the Earth with the IceCube neutrino detector. 10m
        Many models predict that dark matter consists of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Heavy celestial bodies, such as the Earth, might capture these WIMPs, accumulate them in their gravitational centre and over time these dark matter particles will self-annihilate. These annihilations may produce standard model particles, including neutrinos. Large scale neutrino telescopes, such as the cubic kilometre IceCube Neutrino Observatory located at the South Pole, can be used to search for such neutrino fluxes. The dark matter annihilation rate in the centre of the Earth, and thus the resulting neutrino flux depend on the local Dark Matter density and the mass of the Dark Matter particle. This weak, but very specific neutrino flux could be within reach of a large neutrino detector like IceCube. We will present the status of the first search for a neutrino signal from Earth WIMPs with the IceCube detector.
        Speaker: Mr Jan Kunnen (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        The indirect search for dark matter with the ANTARES neutrino telescope 15m
        One of the main goals of neutrino telescopes is the indirect search for dark matter. The ANTARES detector, installed in the Mediterranean Sea, has been taken data since 2007. In this talk we present the results on different dark matter potential sources, including the Sun, the Galactic Center, the Earth, dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters produced with different analysis methods and will show the specific advantages of these detectors in general and of ANTARES in particular. As an example, the detection of a signal of high energy neutrinos from the Sun would be free of astrophysical backgrounds, contrary to what happens with the hints observed by gamma ray or cosmic ray experiments. Moreover, neutrino detectors can provide the best limits for spin dependent WIMP-nucleon cross section.
        Speaker: Christoph Tönnis (Universitat de Valencia)
        Slides
      • 17:35
        Higher order dark matter annihilations in the Sun and implications for IceCube 25m
        Dark matter particles captured in the Sun would annihilate producing a neutrino flux that could be detected at the Earth. In some channels, however, the neutrino flux lies in the MeV range and is thus undetectable at IceCube, namely when the dark matter particles annihilate into electrons, muons or light quarks. In this talk we show that the same interaction that mediates the annihilations into light fermions also necessarily leads, via higher order effects, to the production of weak gauge bosons that generate a high energy neutrino flux potentially observable at IceCube. We then present limits on the scattering cross section of dark matter particles with protons in scenarios where the dark matter particle couples to electrons, muons or light quarks, using latest IceCube data. Interestingly, we find that the limits on the spin-dependent scattering cross section are, for some scenarios, stronger than the limits from direct detection experiments.
        Speaker: Mr Sebastian Wild (Technical University Munich)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Constraints on Self Interacting Dark Matter from IceCube Results 15m
        If dark matter particles self-interact, their capture by astrophysical objects should be enhanced. As a consequence, the rate by which they annihilate at the center of the object will increase. If their self scattering is strong, it can be observed indirectly through an enhancement of the flux of their annihilation products. Here we investigate the effect of self-interaction on the neutrino flux produced by annihilating dark matter in the center of the Sun. We consider annihilation into two channels: $W^+W^−$ (or $\tau^+\tau^-$ for a dark matter mass below the W mass) and $b\bar{b}$. We estimate the event rate in the IceCube detector, using its 79-string configuration, and compare our prediction to their experimental results, hence probing dark matter self interacting models.
        Speaker: Denis Robertson (Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo)
        Slides
      • 18:15
        Constraining asymmetric dark matter with asteroseismology 15m
        Low-mass asymmetric dark matter (DM) particles are appealing DM candidates that are not detectable with most indirect DM searches. However, these particles may efficiently accumulate in the core of low-mass stars, reducing their central temperatures and inhibiting the formation of small convective cores in 1.1-1.3 M$_{\odot}$ stars, thus leaving a characteristic signature in the low-degree modes of the stellar oscillations. Here I will present the first asteroseismic constraints to the properties of these DM particles, obtained comparing the oscillations of Alpha Cen B with modified stellar models. To conclude, I will discuss the prospects of using this approach with targets of the Kepler mission such as red giants and stars with detected convective cores.
        Speaker: Dr Jordi Casanellas (Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute))
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:35
      Gamma-Ray Astrophysics: Gamma-Ray Physics Room 3 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 3

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Luigi Tibaldo (SLAC)
      • 16:30
        The intensity and origin of the isotropic gamma-ray background 20m
        The data collected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) enable a huge step forward in measuring and understanding the origins of the isotropic gamma-ray background (IGRB) . The IGRB originates from the superposition of different populations of unresolved sources with possible contributions from genuinely diffuse and exotic processes. In most parts of the sky it is sub-dominant to the Galactic diffuse emission, which represents a foreground to be subtracted to allow a measurement of the IGRB intensity. In the most recent study we use 50 months of LAT data to extend the measurement of the spectrum of the IGRB to the energy range between 100 MeV and 820 GeV. Futhermore, this study is based on an improved event selection, a better understanding of the Galactic diffuse emission, the solar system foregrounds, and charged particle backgrounds, when compared to the results published in Abdo et al., 2010. We discuss the possible presence of a high-energy cutoff (>100 GeV) in the IGRB spectrum and its implications, and how systematic uncertainties from the foreground modeling impact the shape and normalization of the measured spectrum.
        Speaker: Markus Ackermann (D)
      • 16:50
        Very High Energy Blazars and the Potential for Cosmological Insight 20m
        Gamma-ray blazars are among the most extreme astrophysical sources, harboring phenomena far more energetic than those attainable by terrestrial accelerators. These galaxies are understood to be active galactic nuclei that are powered by accretion onto supermassive black holes and have relativistic jets pointed along the Earth line of sight. The emission displayed is variable at all wavelengths and timescales probed thus far, necessitating contemporaneous broadband observations to disentangle the details of the emission processes within the relativistic jets. The very high energy (VHE; E> 100 GeV) photons emitted by these sources are detectable with ground based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as VERITAS. As these photons propagate extragalactic distances, the interaction with the diffuse starlight that pervades the entire Universe results in a distance and energy dependent gamma-ray opacity, offering a unique method for probing photon densities on cosmological scales. These galaxies have also been postulated to be potential sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, a theory which can be examined through the deep gamma-ray observations of sources which probe moderate gamma-ray opacities. Within this talk, I will highlight ongoing research regarding the broadband emission from VERITAS-observed VHE blazars, as well as the potential to use them for cosmological insight.
        Speaker: Amy Furniss
        Slides
      • 17:10
        Extended Blazar Observations by VERITAS and Implications for the Extragalactic Background Light 15m
        The VERITAS Collaboration has been conducting long-term observations of several TeV blazars at a variety of redshifts to characterise their temporal and spectral properties. The very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) spectra of TeV blazars are expected to show energy-dependent absorption that increases with redshift due to the interaction of VHE photons with infra-red photons of the extragalactic background light (EBL), hence allowing insight into the intensity of the EBL. We present the VERITAS results (spectra and light curves) of eight TeV blazars: 1ES 0229+200, 1ES 0414+009, 1ES 1218+304, 1ES 1959+650, 1ES 2344+514, H 1426+428, PG 1553+113 and RGB J0710+591 along with high-energy (100 MeV - 100 GeV) archival observations by the Fermi LAT, where EBL absorption is negligible. The VHE spectra of these blazars are shown to have hard slopes despite their cosmological redshifts.
        Speaker: Mr Yerbol Khassen (University College Dublin)
        Slides
      • 17:25
        Radio galaxies and their central machine 20m
        Radio galaxies are a prime target for studies of the processes that lead to the formation of extragalactic jets. Their spectral energy distributions do not agree with the ones of blazars after an appropriate increase of the orientation angle. In fact, the de-boosted emission from the relativistic jets opens the view to the magnetospheric jet formation region associated with accreting supermassive black holes. Particle acceleration in magnetospheric gaps can produce variable gamma-ray and neutrino emission.
        Speaker: Prof. Karl Mannheim (University Wuerzburg)
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Gamma-ray Astrophysics with AGILE: Surprises and Challenges 20m
        The AGILE space mission, currently in its eight year of operations in orbit, obtained a large number of crucial and unexpected results. We will review the main results for both Galactic and extragalactic sources, and outline some of the most surprising discoveries (gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula, detection of Cygnus X-3 and Cygnus X-1 in coincidence with special spectral transitions, identification of an unambiguous signature for hadronic cosmic rays in Supernova Remnants, very intense flaring from a class of Active Galactic Nuclei). AGILE is very actively continuing to observe the gamma-ray sky with very fast processing and alert capability for transients. Particular emphasis is now given to the study of Galactic binaries that can erratically produce gamma-ray emission such as the "hidden" black hole system MWC 656 that was recently discovered because of an AGILE detection.
        Speaker: Dr Giovanni Piano (INAF)
        Slides
      • 18:05
        Decaying Dark Matter inside Neutron stars 15m
        We propose that the existing population of neutron stars in the galaxy can help constrain the nature of decaying dark matter. The amount of decaying dark matter, accumulated in the central regions in neutron stars and the energy deposition rate from decays, may set a limit on the neutron star survival rate against transitions to more compact stars and, correspondingly, on the dark matter particle decay time, $\tau_{\chi}$. We find that for masses $(m_{\chi}/ \rm TeV) \gtrsim 9 \times 10^{-4}$ or $(m_{\chi}/ \rm TeV) \gtrsim 5 \times 10^{-2}$ in the bosonic or fermionic cases, lifetimes ${\tau_{\chi}}\lesssim 10^{55}$ s or ${\tau_{\chi}}\lesssim 10^{53}$ s are excluded respectively. These results may pose a problem for models including dark matter with smaller lifetimes aimed to explain the galactic excess in the ratio of positrons to electrons.
        Speaker: Dr M. Angeles Perez-Garcia (University of Salamanca and IUFFyM)
        Slides
      • 18:20
        Synchrotron pair halo and echo emission from blazars in the cosmic web: application to extreme TeV blazars 15m
        High frequency peaked, high redshift blazars, are extreme in the sense that their spectrum is particularly hard and peaks at TeV energies. Standard leptonic scenarios often require peculiar source parameters and/or a special setup in order to account for these observations. Electromagnetic cascades seeded by ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) in the intergalactic medium have also been invoked, assuming a very low intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF). I will present an alternative explanation for the observed spectra of such extreme blazars in which the observed TeV emission is the synchrotron emission of UHECR secondaries produced in blazars located in magnetised environments, and demonstrate that it is a viable explanation for the observed spectra of extreme TeV blazars, focusing on three sources: 1ES 0229+200, RGB J0710+591, and 1ES 1218+304. I will show that this synchrotron pair halo/echo flux at the peak energy is not sensitive to variations in the overall IGMF strength, which is appealing in view of the large uncertainties on the IGMF in voids of large scale structure. I will also discuss the observed variability of the gamma-ray emission of these sources and show that it can be accommodated by the synchrotron emission of secondary products of ultra-high energy neutral beams if these are emitted by UHECR accelerators inside magnetised regions.
        Speaker: foteini oikonomou (University College London)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      Neutrinos: Astrophysics Neutrino Searches Room 5 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 5

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Carlos de los Heros (Uppsala University)
      • 16:30
        Latest Results on Searches for Point and Extended Sources with Time Integrated and Time Dependent emissions of Neutrinos with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory 20m
        We have performed a variety of searches for neutrino emission from astrophysical sources using multiple years of IceCube data collected between April 2008 and May 2011 by the partially-completed IceCube detector, as well as the first year of data from the completed 86-string detector. Utilizing spatial, energy and time information, an unbinned maximum likelihood method is used to distinguish astrophysical signals from atmospheric backgrounds. We performed a generic search anywhere in the sky for individual point and spatially extended sources, as well as searches for catalogues of individual sources and stacked ensembles of similar sources. To enhance the discovery potential for sources with non-steady emission another set of searches was done including the neutrino arrival time information. An untriggered scan was done over separate years of IceCube data seeking to identify any high-energy neutrino events significantly clustered both in space and time. Then a search targeting a selection of flaring gamma ray sources observed by the Fermi experiment and other TeV telescopes for neutrino events coinciding with the gamma-ray light curves was carried out. In addition a search was performed for periodic emissions from a selected catalog of microquasars and binary systems with known periodicities from X-Ray, Gamma Ray and Radio observations. These analyses are sensitive to TeV–PeV energy neutrinos in the northern sky and PeV–EeV neutrinos in the southern sky. Limits on extraterrestrial neutrino fluxes are compared to model predictions. The expected performance with multiple years of data from the full IceCube detector is discussed.
        Speaker: Asen Christov (Universite de Geneve (CH))
        Slides
      • 16:50
        Searches for point sources and small-scale anisotropies in IceCube 15m
        The IceCube neutrino observatory built in the antarctic ice offers unique opportunities for studying high energy neutrino emission from galactic and extragalactic sources. Detecting such neutrino emission could give invaluable information about the origin of cosmic rays. Recently, the first evidence for astrophysical neutrinos in the PeV range was found with IceCube. No identification of point sources has been achieved yet, but advanced analysis methods are being developed in order to improve the sensitivity to point sources. An energy-dependent likelihood scan was performed on IceCube data. A complementary way to get insight into the cosmic ray production is the study of an event clustering at small scales for high-energy neutrinos. We will also report about a search for multiple neutrino point sources with four years of IceCube data, performing an autocorrelation test on the full sky. In addition, we will present an autocorrelation analysis of the Cygnus region, which is a promising area in terms of star formation and therefore a particularly interesting target for high-energy neutrinos.
        Speaker: Anna Bernhard (TU München)
        Slides
      • 17:05
        A search for partially contained neutrino induced particle showers with IceCube 15m
        Recent results from IceCube show evidence for a diffuse, highly energetic flux of astrophysical neutrinos. The analysis to select neutrino candidate events employ veto techniques which use the outer part of the detector to suppress the atmospheric muon background. Shower-like events comprise an important part of observed evidence for extraterrestrial neutrino induced events for the veto search. However, the veto search only identifies neutrino induced shower-like events that are fully contained. The analysis presented here demonstrates the feasibility of identifying shower-like events of all neutrino flavors with interaction vertices at the edge of the instrumented array, with the use of IceCube data from the years 2010/2011. The effective volume for detecting shower-type events is increased by a factor of almost two compared to previous shower-type event searches that use the outer detector parts as a veto against incoming tracks.
        Speaker: Mr Achim Stoessl (DESY)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Results from the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope 20m
        Operating off the coast of France since 2007, the ANTARES neutrino telescope is the most sensitive high energy neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. I will present an overview of the science output, including searches for neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles regions and GRBs. Emphasis will be on results from a recent time-integrated search for point-like sources of neutrinos. At energies below 100 TeV, this search constitutes the most sensitive exploration of the Southern Hemisphere, which includes the galactic center, among many other potential neutrino sources.
        Speaker: aart heijboer (nikhef)
        Slides
      • 17:40
        Search for a diffuse cosmic neutrino flux using the ANTARES data from 2007-2012 15m
        The ANTARES neutrino telescope, located in the deep sea offshore the French Mediterranean coast, aims at the detection of cosmic neutrinos in the TeV/PeV range. It has been continuously taking data since 2007. In this contribution a search for a diffuse cosmic neutrino flux is presented. The focus is laid on a recently finished analysis of showering events induced by all three neutrino flavours from an effective data taking lifetime of 1247 days. Further, earlier searches for a diffuse cosmic neutrino flux with muon neutrino induced track events are summarized. As none of these studies has measured a statistically significant excess of cosmic neutrinos over the atmospheric background, $90\,\%$ confidence upper limits on the flux have been set.
        Speaker: Florian Folger (University of Erlangen)
        Slides
      • 17:55
        Multi-Messenger analyses with the ANTARES High Energy Neutrino Telescope 15m
        ANTARES is currently the largest operating neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere, mainly sensitive to TeV neutrinos. Its main goal is the detection of high energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources, which would provide important insights about the processes powering their engines and would help understand the origin of high energy cosmic rays. To identify unambiguously such sources, ANTARES has developped several online and offline programs to reveal possible time and/or space correlations of neutrino candidates with other cosmic messengers : photons (mainly X-rays and GeV/TeV gamma-rays through the search from Gamma-ray bursts or GeV-flaring blazars, but also in the optical domain through alert and follow-up programs), cosmic rays and gravitational wave bursts detected by the Virgo/LIGO interferometers. Some of the most relevant results of these multi-messenger analyses will be presented in this contribution.
        Speaker: Agustín Sánchez Losa (IFIC (Spain))
        Slides
      • 18:10
        ANTARES constraints on the neutrino flux from the Milky Way 20m
        A guaranteed source of neutrinos is the production in cosmic ray interactions with the interstellar matter in our galaxy. The Antares neutrino telescope located in the Mediterranean Sea offers a high visibility of the central region of the Milky Way where most of this diffuse neutrino flux is expected. Antares data from 2007-2012 were used to compare the flux from a region centered around the Galactic center, extending 39 degrees in galactic longitude and 4.5 degrees in galactic latitude, with the flux from multiple equivalent off-source regions. The analysis will be presented together with the resulting constraints on the diffuse emission of high energy neutrinos from the Galactic plane.
        Speaker: Erwin Visser (Nikhef)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:30
      Plenary Talks Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 09:00
        Invited Talk: Phenomenology with Massive Neutrinos 30m
        I will review our present understanding of neutrino properties in the light of the existing data: their masses, the leptonic mixing, CP violation, the possibility of new light states, non-standard interactions.
        Speaker: Concepcion Gonzalez-Garcia (YITP, Stony Brook and ICREA, U. Barcelona)
        Slides
      • 09:30
        Invited Talk: Cosmic Rays 30m
        I will give a brief overview on the recent developments in cosmic ray research. The current hypotheses about the origin of these particles will be discussed. The connections with photon (from radio to gamma rays) and neutrino observations will be highlighted.
        Speaker: Dr Stefano Gabici
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Invited Talk: Extragalactic Gamma Ray Sources 30m
        I will review the most prominent types of extragalctic gamma-ray sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, AGNs and other galaxies, including some specific individual sources, and the effects expected from intergalactic shocks. I will then discuss some of the physical models used to describe these objects, and the possible connections between the gamma-ray emission and cosmic ray as well as neutrino fluxes, together with the related diffuse radiations backgrounds.
        Speaker: Prof. Peter Meszaros (Pennsylvania State University)
        Slides
    • 10:30 11:00
      Coffee Break 30m Main Foyer (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Main Foyer

      Tuschinski Theatre

    • 11:00 12:30
      Plenary Talks Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 11:00
        Invited Talk: Galactic particle accelerators 30m
        Our galaxy hosts a zoo of astronomical particle accelerators. In this presentation I will discuss recent gamma-ray observations of these sources and what they have told us about their inner workings. Among others, I will discuss recent observations of Super Novae Remnants and Pulsars. I will also talk about the increasing population of time variable gamma-ray sources, as Novae, Binary systems and the Crab nebula, which allow us to observe particle acceleration in real time.
        Speaker: Dr Rolf Buehler (DESY)
        Slides
      • 11:30
        Invited Talk: Status and Future of Cherenkov Telescope Arrays 30m
        The enormous potential of the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique (IACT) for high energy astrophysics has been demonstrated by the currently operating HESS, MAGIC and VERITAS telescope arrays. The technique provides excellent angular resolution at high energies and huge collection area in comparison with space-based instruments such as Fermi-LAT. The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a global project (27 nations, >1000 scientists) to build the successor to these instruments: a facility-level Observatory for photon astronomy at the highest energies (~20 GeV to ~300 TeV). CTA will make major advances in sensitivity, energy range, angular resolution and field of view relative to current instruments. I in this talk I will discuss some of the scientific motivations for a major new IACT array and present briefly the technical status of the CTA project.
        Speaker: Jim Hinton (University of Leicester)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Invited Talk: The Fermi Large Area Telescope: science highlights and prospects for the extended mission 30m
        Launched on June 11 2008, the the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has successfully completed its first sixth years of operation in space. We shall briefly review the status of the observatory, along with some of the most recent science highlights, and discuss the prospects for the extended phase of the mission.
        Speaker: Luca Baldini (INFN-Pisa)
        Slides
    • 12:30 14:30
      Lunch Break 2h
    • 12:30 14:30
      Lunch Break 2h
    • 12:30 14:30
      Lunch Break 2h
    • 12:30 14:00
      Lunch Break 1h 30m
    • 14:00 16:05
      Gamma-Ray Astrophysics: Galactic Room 4 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 4

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Dr Valerie Connaughton
      • 14:00
        Status of observations of PWNe and SNRs in the gamma-ray regime 20m
        The last few years have witness a revolution in very high gamma-ray astronomy (VHE; E>100 GeV) driven largely by a new generation of Cherenkov telescopes. These new facilities, namely H.E.S.S. and the new 28-meter-sized mirror H.E.S.S. 2, MAGIC and its upgrade MAGIC 2 and Veritas were designed to increase the flux sensitivity in the energy regime of hundreds of GeV, expanding the observed energy range from 100 (50) GeV to multi-TeV, and fostered as a result a period of rapid growth in our understanding of the Non-Thermal Universe. As a result of this fast development the number of new VHE Galactic sources detected has increased from a few in the early 90's to nearly 50 Galactic sources nowadays. A review of the most recent Galactic VHE results will be discussed, emphasizing in particular results concerning Pulsar Wind Nebulae and Supernova Remnants, the most numerous TeV galactic population and the expectations for the future observatory CTA.
        Speaker: Ms Emma De Ona Wilhelmi (IEEC-CSIC Barcelona)
        Slides
      • 14:20
        Gamma-ray observations of the pulsar wind nebula 3C58 with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope 15m
        Successfully launched on June 11, 2008, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is sensitive to gamma-rays with energies from about 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV and covers the full sky every 3 hours. The improved sensitivity and the unprecedented statistics offered by the LAT in comparison to its predecessor EGRET enable the study of various classes of gamma-ray sources, such as pulsars and pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). Pulsars characterized by high rotational energy loss rates are likely to power PWNe and therefore provide excellent laboratories to study the acceleration and diffusion of relativistic particles in their surrounding environment. Here we will report on the detection of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the PWN 3C58 surrounding the young and energetic pulsar PSR J0205+6449. In combination with current flux uppers limits at TeV energies, we explore the origins for high-energy gamma-ray emission from the PWN. The LAT detection places an important constraint on emission models of the nebula, helping to constrain the age and energetics of the system.
        Speaker: Dr Marie-Helene GRONDIN (CENBG, Bordeaux, France)
        Slides
      • 14:35
        HESS J1640$-$465 - an exceptionally luminous TeV gamma-ray SNR 15m
        HESS J1640$-$465 is among the brightest Galactic TeV gamma-ray sources ever discovered by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). Its likely association with the shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) G338.3$-$0.0 at a distance of $\sim$10 kpc makes it the most luminous Galactic source in the TeV regime. Our recent analysis of follow-up observations with H.E.S.S. reveal a significantly extended TeV morphology with a substantial overlap with the northern part of the SNR shell. Furthermore, the source features a seamless powerlaw spectrum over four orders of magnitude from GeV to TeV energies, with a spectral index of $\Gamma = 2.15\pm 0.10_\mathrm{stat}\pm 0.10_\mathrm{sys}$ and a cut-off energy of $E_c = 7.3^{+2.5}_{-1.8}$ TeV. These new spectral and morphological results suggest that at least part of the TeV emission is likely of hadronic origin where the product of total proton energy and mean target density could be as high as $W_p n_H \sim 4 \times 10^{52}(d/10\mathrm{kpc})^2$ erg cm$^{-3}$.
        Speaker: Stefan Ohm (D)
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Fermi LAT observations of gamma-ray pulsars 20m
        Observations of the gamma-ray sky with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite have revealed significant pulsations from about 150 young and recycled, millisecond pulsars. These observations have shown that pulsars are by far the largest source class in the Galactic plane at GeV energies, and new pulsars are still continuously being found at the locations of LAT sources with no known counterparts, especially in the radio domain. In this presentation I will give an overview of the main results from pulsar observations with the Fermi LAT and from multi-wavelength studies of unassociated LAT sources likely to contain pulsars. I will also discuss some of the implications of the results in terms of emission properties and population statistics.
        Speaker: Lucas Guillemot (L)
        Slides
      • 15:10
        The Galactic Centre 20m
        The centre of our Galaxy is a major laboratory for high energy astrophysics. In particular, it harbours the closest supermassive black hole (SMBH) to us. Its luminosity is extremely low for an object of several million solar masses but there is growing evidence that it experienced periods of much stronger activity in the past. A sustained star formation activity is also taking place in the central hundred parsecs. The latter therefore harbor numerous young massive star explosion remnants and should be the site of intense cosmic-ray acceleration. We review observational results on the high energy emission of the Galactic Centre and discuss their impact on the astrophysics of the region.
        Speaker: Regis Terrier (C)
      • 15:30
        Galactic interstellar gamma-ray emission 20m
        The Milky Way shines in gamma rays from MeV to above TeV energies due to interactions of high-energy cosmic rays with interstellar gas and radiation fields. I will review the current status and future challenges for both space-borne and ground-based observations, and I will discuss some implications for the physics of cosmic rays and of the interstellar medium, as well as for the modeling of backgrounds in indirect dark-matter searches.
        Speaker: Luigi Tibaldo (SLAC)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Dark Matter: Direct Detection Room 3 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 3

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Uwe Oberlack (R)
      • 14:30
        Recent results from the LUX dark matter search experiment 25m
        The LUX dark matter search experiment, the world's largest dual-phase xenon time projection chamber, is installed 1478 m underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD, USA. In this talk I will present the results from the first WIMP search run of LUX: from a total exposure of 85 live-days, we found no evidence of signal above expected background, constraining the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section above 7.6x10^-46 cm^2 at 33 GeV/c^2 WIMP mass (90% C.L.) - three times more sensitive than any competing experiment. The improvement in sensitivity is more significant at low energies, and is in conflict with low-mass WIMP signal interpretations of other results.
        Speaker: Alexandre Lindote (L)
        Slides
      • 14:55
        Limits on Light WIMPs: LUX, lite and beyond 20m
        This talk will present a reexamination of the current direct dark matter data including the recent CDMSlite, LUX, and SuperCDMS data, assuming that the dark matter consists of light WIMPs, with mass close to 10 GeV/$c^2$ with spin-independent and isospin-conserving or isospin-violating interactions. We have compared the data with a standard model for the dark halo of our galaxy and also in a halo-independent manner. In our standard-halo analysis, we found that for isospin-conserving couplings, CDMSlite and LUX together exclude the DAMA, CoGeNT, CDMS-II-Si, and CRESST-II possible WIMP signal regions. For isospin-violating couplings, we found that the SuperCDMS data allow for only a tiny portion of the CDMS-II-Si region. In our halo-independent analysis, we found that for isospin-conserving couplings, the situation is of strong tension between the positive and negative results, as it was before the LUX, CDMSlite, and SuperCDMS bounds. For isospin-violating couplings, we found that LUX and CDMS-II-Si bounds together exclude or severely constrain the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST-II possible WIMP signals.
        Speaker: Paolo Gondolo (University of Utah)
      • 15:15
        The XMASS experiment 20m
        The XMASS project is a multi-purpose low-background experiment using liquid xenon. The current stage with a 835kg LXe detector was started in 2010. After the commissioning data-taking, we have refurbished the detector to reduce surface backgrounds and resumed data-taking in the autumn of 2013. In this talk, latest results and future prospects of the experiment will be presented.
        Speaker: Katsuki Hiraide (t)
        Slides
      • 15:35
        Complementarity in direct dark matter searches 20m
        In the last decade experiments aiming at the direct detection of dark matter (DM) have increased significantly their sensitivity. In fact, ton-scale setups have been proposed, especially using Germanium and Xenon targets, which raises the hope of a detection in the near future. In light of this situation, it is necessary to study how well the DM parameters (mass, spin-dependent (SD) and spin-independent (SI) cross section off nucleons) can be reconstructed. In this talk we emphasize the need for the combination of different target materials in order to unambiguously reconstruct these parameters. By combining the results of such experiments, part of the degeneracy between these parameters can be removed, providing an excellent tool for DM identification. We also discuss the impact of uncertainties in the astrophysical and nuclear parameters (SD structure functions).
        Speaker: Miguel Peiró
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Dark Matter: Indirect Detection: Neutrinos, Radio and 'Cosmology' Room 6 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 6

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Dr Laura Lopez-Honorez (VUB)
      • 14:30
        PeV neutrino events in IceCube: are they related to Dark Matter? 25m
        Recent observations by IceCube, notably two PeV cascades accompanied by events at energies $\sim (30-400)$ TeV, are clearly in excess over atmospheric background fluxes and beg for an astroparticle physics explanation. In this talk I will discuss the possibility to interpret the IceCube data by PeV mass scale decaying Dark Matter. I discuss generic signatures of this scenario, including its unique energy spectrum distortion with respect to the benchmark $E_\nu^{-2}$ expectation for astrophysical sources, as well as peculiar anisotropies. A direct comparison with the data show a good match with the above-mentioned features. I further discuss possible future checks of this scenario.
        Speaker: Arman Esmaili Taklimi
        Slides
      • 14:55
        Status and perspectives of particle dark matter searches with radio observations 25m
        Annihilations or decays of WIMPs in dark-matter (DM) halos can produce high-energy electrons and positrons, which in turn give raise to synchrotron radiation via their interaction with the interstellar magnetic field. The emission typically peaks in the radio band, which is thus a promising range of photon wavelengths for indirect DM searches. I will discuss recent results in the search for DM-induced radio signals in dwarf spheroidal galaxies and in the intensity and anisotropies of the extragalactic radio background.
        Speaker: Dr Marco Regis (University of Turin and INFN)
        Slides
      • 15:20
        Search for Light Dark Matter with X-rays and Implications of a Possible Detection 20m
        After briefly summarizing previous constraints on dark matter candidates that produce X-ray emission lines via radiative decay, with an emphasis on the sterile neutrino and moduli dark matter, I present the recent detection by our team of a candidate dark matter feature at ~3.56 keV. This weak unidentified emission line was discovered by stacking XMM-Newton spectrum of 73 galaxy clusters -- a method that minimizes statistical and systematic uncertainties. The implications for identifying the dark matter particle and for physics beyond the Standard Model are discussed. I also indicate the uncertainties and caveats that remain with respect to the significance of the line and its interpretation as originating from dark matter decay. I look forward to future work that can narrow down the possible interpretations -- focusing on the prospects of observations with the high energy resolution Soft X-ray Spectrometer, the featured detector aboard the Astro-H X-ray Observatory scheduled for a 2015 launch.
        Speaker: Dr Michael Loewenstein (University of Maryland/CRESST/NASA-GSFC)
        Slides
      • 15:40
        Decaying dark matter in X-rays? 20m
        Recently two groups have reported an unidentified line-like feature in the X-ray spectra of dark matter-dominated objects (galaxies and galaxy clusters) [Bulbul et al.][1] and [Boyarsky et al.][2]. We discuss the signal and consistency of its interpretation in terms of dark matter decay. [1]: http://arxiv.org/abs/1402.2301 [2]: http://arxiv.org/abs/1402.4119
        Speaker: Oleg Ruchayskiy (EPFL)
    • 14:30 16:00
      Neutrinos: Neutrino Physics, Atmospheric Neutrinos Room 5 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 5

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Walter Winter (Wurzburg University)
      • 14:30
        Global status of neutrino oscillations 20m
        I will present the current status of the global neutrino data analysis, pointing out its unique role in constraining the two crucial (still) unknown parameters: the CP-violating phase delta and the theta_23 octant. In this context, I will discuss the slight overall preference for theta_23 in the first octant and for non-zero CP violation with sin delta < 0. The (in-)stability of such intriguing indications within different combinations of data sets will be considered in detail.
        Speaker: Dr Antonio Palazzo (MPI)
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Neutrino Physics with Super-Kamiokande 15m
        I will review the latest results in neutrino physics from the Super-Kamiokande experiment, on behalf of the collaboration. Super-Kamiokande is a 50-kton water Cherenkov detector located in Kamioka Japan, operational since 1996. The Super-K collaboration studies atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, and neutrinos from possible dark matter annihilation.
        Speaker: Edward Kearns (Boston University)
        Slides
      • 15:05
        Latest results from the OPERA experiment 15m
        The OPERA experiment is designed to search for $ \nu_\mu \rightarrow \nu_\tau $ oscillations in appearance mode through the direct observation of the $ \tau $ lepton in $ \nu_\tau $ Charged Current interactions. The $ \nu_\tau $ CC interaction is identified through the detection of the $ \tau $ lepton decay topology in the so called Emulsion Cloud Chamber (ECC), passive lead plates constituting the target mass interleaved with nuclear emulsion films providing the high spatial resolution. Electronic detectors complement the ECCs. The experiment recorded data for five years, since 2008, with the CNGS, a quasi-pure $ \nu_\mu $ beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso laboratory LNGS in Italy, collecting $ 1.8 \times 10^{20} $ protons on target. The running of the detector and the data collection from the emulsions films by means of fast automatic optical microscopes will be described, together with the special procedures used to locate the interactions vertices and to detect short decay topologies. Methods for background reduction, especially a new analysis to improve the charge sign measurement, will also be discussed. The latest results on oscillations with the increased statistics, including the fourth tau neutrino candidate event, will be presented.
        Speaker: Benjamin Büttner (University of Hamburg)
        Slides
      • 15:20
        Models for atmospheric neutrinos and muons, prompt component 20m
        Atmospheric neutrinos and muons are produced in interactions of cosmic rays with Earth's atmosphere. At very high energy, the contribution from semi-leptonic decays of charmed hadrons, known as the prompt flux, dominates over the conventional flux from pion and kaon decays. This is due to the very short lifetime of the charmed hadrons, which therefore do not lose energy before they decay. The calculation of this process is difficult because the Bjorken-x at which the parton distribution functions are evaluated is very small. This is a region where QCD is not well understood, and large logarithms must be resummed. Available parton distribution functions are not known at such small x and extrapolations must be made. Theoretically, the fast rise of the structure functions for small x ultimately leads to parton saturation. In this talk I will describe calculations of the prompt neutrino flux. In particular I will describe the ERS flux, which includes parton saturation effects in the QCD cross section for charm quarks. This flux prediction is used by e.g. IceCube and Antares as a benchmark background. I will also describe our update of this calculation, using both a fixed-order NLO calculation and an improved saturation calculation, taking into account the recent LHC data on the charm cross section, as well as recent theoretical developments in QCD. We will also provide a newer estimate of the theoretical uncertainties.
        Speaker: Rikard Enberg (Uppsala University)
        Slides
      • 15:40
        Oscillation physics with atmospheric neutrinos 20m
        In this talk we will discuss the physics reach of present and future atmospheric neutrino experiments, both in the context of the standard three-neutrino oscillations scenario and in the presence of New Physics. A particular attention will be devoted to the impact on the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy.
        Speaker: Prof. Michele Maltoni (Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC)
        Slides
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:05 16:30
      Coffee Break 25m
    • 16:30 18:00
      Dark Matter: Direct Detection Room 3 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 3

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Jeter Hall (Fermilab)
      • 16:30
        XENON100, XENON1T, and beyond: Status of the XENON Dark Matter Search 25m
        The XENON Dark Matter program developed the dual-phase liquid xenon TPC into the world-leading detector type for direct WIMP Dark Matter searches with the experiments XENON10 and XENON100. This talk discusses recent results from XENON100, and reports on the status of its successor under construction, XENON1T. With a sensitive volume of about 2.2 tons, XENON1T aims at a sensitivity improvement of a factor 100 over its predecessor. As time permits, we will discuss some of the challenges to be met as we think ahead to the multi-ton scale.
        Speaker: Uwe Oberlack (R)
        Slides
      • 16:55
        Scintillation efficiency and effect of electric field in liquid argon 20m
        The scintillation efficiency for low energy recoil ions in liquid argon has been evaluated for WIMP searches. the track structure and the excitation density for recoil ions are calculated then the prescribed diffusion equation for biexcitonic quenching has been solved and the total quenching factor qT for 5-240 keV recoil ions in liquid Ar at zero electric field are obtained. All the constants necessary for the calculation are carefully determined and the quenching model include no free fitting parameters. The result slows that qT is nearly constant and agrees well with experimental values by WARP and micro-CLEAN, except at very low energy where the measured values have large error bars. It has been observed that quenching can be influenced by the external electric filed. The scintillation efficiency, e.g., for 30 MeV/n O and Ar ions increases more than 15 percent at a few kV/cm. This phenomenon is explained as the reduction of the high-excitation-density quenching by the electronic field. The amount of increase very much depend on the kind of ions and energy. The possibility of the increase in the scintillation efficiency for recoil ions in liquid Ar and Xe due to the electric field will be discussed.
        Speaker: Akira Hitachi (Kochi Medical School)
      • 17:15
        Probing the intrinsic electron recoil rejection power in liquid xenon for dark matter searches 20m
        Liquid xenon is one of the best detection mediums for dark matter direct detection, as demonstrated by the XENON100 and LUX experiments. Rejecting the electron recoil background from material radioactivity of the detector system and even solar and atmospheric neutrinos remains as the most challenging task for future dark matter detectors based on liquid xenon. Here we will present an experimental study to probe the near-intrinsic electron recoil rejection power of liquid xenon, which indicates the potential of background-free dark matter detection in future liquid xenon based experiments.
        Speaker: Prof. Kaixuan Ni (Shanghai Jiao Tong University)
        Slides
      • 17:35
        A maximum likelihood analysis of the CoGeNT public dataset 20m
        The CoGeNT collaboration has released more than 3 years of data including the spectrum and time variation of the nuclear candidate events in their germanium detector. We perform an unbinned, maximum likelihood fit to the data, accounting for known backgrounds and systematic effects to search for dark matter interactions with the detector. Background and possible signals are characterized by two dimension probability distribution functions that account for energy and possible temporal variation. Additionally, we utilize the pulse rise time to model the “surface events” which are a known contamination of the bulk events where a dark matter signal should appear. We test several possible dark matter velocity distributions including the standard halo model employed by most direct detection experiments as well as more directional streams. The current status of this analysis will be presented.
        Speaker: Chris Kelso (University of Utah)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:05
      Dark Matter: Indirect Detection: Future Gamma and Model bdg Room 6 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 6

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Oleg Ruchayskiy (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (CH))
      • 16:30
        Dark matter searches with the Cherenkov Telescope Array 25m
        Dark matter searches with the Cherenkov Telescope Array Christian Farnier (Oskar Klein Centre - Stokckholm University) for the CTA Consortium The current paradigm of the Universe states that more than 80% of its mass content consists of dark matter of unknown origin. Since its discovery more than eighty years ago, the quest for dark matter identification is one of the most important questions in physics. Strongly motivated candidates in form of weakly interactive massive particles could give rise to detectable signatures in gamma rays. The Cherenkov Telescope Array, the next generation of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, will possess incomparable sensitivity to gamma-ray signal from few tens of GeV to few hundreds of TeV rendering possible to test a wide range a dark matter scenarios. In this presentation, I will review CTA prospects to detect dark matter from different target observations, including the galactic centre, dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters.
        Speaker: Dr Christian Farnier (Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University)
        Slides
      • 16:55
        Searches of Dark Matter with the GAMMA-400 Space Mission 25m
        GAMMA-400 is a Russian space mission with an international contribution, primarily devoted to the study of gamma-rays in the MeV – TeV energy range. One of the main topic addressed by GAMMA-400 will be the search of possible hint of Dark Matter signal with observation firstly towards the Galactic Center and Dwarf Galaxies. Thanks to a deep calorimeter of novel concept and a state-of-the-art Silicon tracker it will be able to achieve an optimal angular and energy resolution. Thanks to its configuration GAMMA-400 will be able to study not only gamma-rays but also cosmic-rays, protons and nuclei, with energies up to the knee ($10 ^{14}$ - $10^{15}$ eV). The latest simulation and test beam results and an overview of the mission configuration and scientific objectives will be presented.
        Speaker: Mr Paolo Cumani (University of Trieste / INFN Trieste)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Sensitivity of CTA to Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilations 15m
        The nature of Dark Matter (DM) is a pressing question, and can be investigated through the detection of gamma rays produced by annihilating DM. The upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will provide increased sensitivity to high energy gamma rays and hence higher mass DM particles. When conducting analyses of the capability of CTA it is important to study the effects of backgrounds. Previous analyses of CTA sensitivity to DM have neglected the effects of the diffuse gamma ray background. We present sensitivity limits which include the effects of this background, using both a standard two region On-Off method and a multi-region On-Off morphological analysis. The addition of the diffuse gamma ray background degrades the sensitivity limits, and we investigate methods to mitigate this.
        Speaker: Hamish Silverwood (University of Amsterdam)
      • 17:35
        On gamma ray spectral features from scalar dark matter 15m
        In this talk I will discuss some recent results regarding the gamma ray spectral features from the annihilation of a scalar dark matter particle interacting through a charged particle in the t-channel. In particular I will discuss the relative enhancement of the Bremsstrahlung signal and will present a new calculation of the annihilation in gamma ray lines. I will also present some preliminary results regarding direct detection.
        Speaker: Michel Tytgat (U)
        Slides
      • 17:50
        Indirect searches of Dark Matter from gamma-ray line signatures with the H.E.S.S. experiment 15m
        Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are currently one of the most popular hypotheses to answer the question of the nature of Dark Matter. Gamma-ray line signatures from self-annihilation of WIMPs can be detected at very-high energies by the H.E.S.S. imaging air Cherenkov telescope in observations of the Galactic Center (GC) region. In 2012, phase II of H.E.S.S. started with the addition of a 28 m Cherenkov telescope, lowering significantly the energy threshold and giving the possibility to cross-check recent claims of line-like features in Fermi/LAT data. In this contribution, results on line-like feature searches using a 112 h exposure of the GC obtained with the higher threshold phase I of H.E.S.S. will be reviewed, and analysis procedures and sensitivity estimates for line searches with H.E.S.S. phase II will be discussed.
        Speaker: Mr Matthieu Kieffer (LPNHE Paris)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:05
      Gamma-Ray Astrophysics: Galactic Room 4 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 4

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Dr Nepomuk Otte
    • 16:30 18:00
      Neutrinos: Future Prospects Room 5 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 5

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Carlos de los Heros (Uppsala University)
      • 16:30
        Results and future prospects of Borexino 20m
        The Borexino experiment is a 300 t liquid scintillator detector located at the LNGS in Italy. The main task of the experiment is the real time detection of solar neutrinos. This talk will give an overview of the recent results from the first phase of the experimental program including the measurement of solar neutrinos as well as geoneutrinos. Furthermore an overview of the SOX project is given. This project is designed to test the observed anomalies in the neutrino sector that could be explained by a fourth (sterile) neutrino. With the expected squared mass difference in the order of 1 eV², this hypothesis can be tested with a MCi neutrino or a kCi antineutrino source deployed near or inside the Borexino detector.
        Speaker: Mikko Meyer (University of Hamburg)
        Slides
      • 16:50
        Hyper-Kamiokande project 20m
        Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K) will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with the total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, which is approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-K is the study of CP asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. With a total exposure of 7.5 MW $\times$ 10$^7$ sec integrated proton beam power (corresponding to 1.56 $\times$ 10 $^{22}$ protons on target with a 30 GeV proton beam) to a 2.5-degree off-axis neutrino beam produced by the J-PARC proton synchrotron, it is expected that the CP phase $\delta_{\rm CP}$ can be determined to better than 19 degrees for all possible values of $\delta_{\rm CP}$, and CP violation can be established with a statistical significance of 3$\sigma$ for 76$\%$ of the $\delta_{\rm CP}$ parameter space. Hyper-K’s high statistics data sample of atmospheric neutrinos will allow us to extract the information on the mass hierarchy and the octant of $\theta_{23}$. With a full 10 year duration of data taking, the significance for the mass hierarchy determination is expected to reach 3$\sigma$ or greater if $\sin^2\theta_{23} > 0.4$. The scope of studies at Hyper-K also covers high precision measurements of solar neutrinos, observation of supernova neutrinos, and dark matter searches.
        Speaker: Hiroyuki Sekiya (University of Tokyo)
        Slides
      • 17:10
        Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Radio Frequency Detectors 20m
        The cosmic ray flux cut off above primary energies of $10^{19.5}$ eV leads us to expect an ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrino flux due to the GZK effect. The detection of these UHE cosmic neutrinos will add to the understanding of the sources and physics of UHE cosmic rays. On interacting within a dense medium, a UHE neutrino will produce an extended particle shower, which in turn produces a coherent radio frequency pulse via the Askaryan effect. Several radio detectors have been and are being developed to search for these signals in Arctic and Antarctic ice, including the ANITA, ARA, ARIANNA, and EVA experiments. This talk will present the status and development plans of these UHE neutrino radio frequency detectors and their current results.
        Speaker: Dr Carl Gilbert Pfendner (Ohio State University (USA))
      • 17:30
        The prospects and development of the third ANITA flight 20m
        The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) is a balloon-borne ultra-high-energy particle observatory. At a cruising altitude of $\sim$36 km, it provides a panoramic view of the Antarctic ice sheet in the 200-1200 MHz band. ANITA has been designed to detect Askaryan radiation from ultra-high-energy ($>10^{18}$ eV) neutrino interactions in the ice. Two successful flights have led to stringent limits on the neutrino flux above $10^{18}$ eV and observations of radiation from atmospheric particle showers induced by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. The third ANITA payload is currently under construction and will be launched during the coming austral summer (2014-2015). In this talk, I will highlight the instrumental innovations and discuss the physics prospects of the third ANITA flight.
        Speaker: Dr Harm Schoorlemmer (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
    • 18:30 21:00
      Conference Dinner - Scheepvaart Museum 2h 30m Atrium

      Atrium

      Amsterdam

      Kattenburgerplein 1 1018 KK Amsterdam

      The conference organisers invite you to join them for a very special conference dinner at Het Scheepvaart Museum, Amsterdam. The dinner will be preceded by a reception and chance to visit the exhibition hall.

    • 09:00 10:30
      Plenary Talks Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 09:00
        Invited Talk: Global Fits of Supersymmetry 30m
        I review the present status of Global Fits of Supersymmetry.
        Speaker: Roberto Ruiz De Austri (IFIC)
        Slides
      • 09:30
        Invited Talk: Heavy neutral leptons in cosmology 30m
        Heavy neutral leptons may play an important role in particle physics and cosmology, explaining neutrino masses, dark matter and baryon asymmetry of the universe. The prospects for their experimental searches will be discussed.
        Speaker: Mikhail Shaposhnikov (EPFL)
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Invited Talk: Still life: the Standard Model Higgs boson and beyond 30m
        With the discovery of the long sought-after Higgs boson at CERN in July 2012, a new state of matter and a new dynamical principle have been revealed as essential building blocks of the fundamental laws of physics. The Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism also provides a solution to the half-century-old mass conundrum, i.e. the apparent incompatibility between the mass spectrum of the elementary particles and their fundamental interactions. Moreover, the Higgs boson is an open door to the uncharted New Physics territory soon-to-be explored during the upcoming operation of the LHC and later at various possible future colliders.
        Speaker: Christophe Grojean (ICREA - Institucio catalana de recerca estudis avancats (ES))
        Slides
    • 10:30 11:00
      Coffee Break 30m Main Foyer (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Main Foyer

      Tuschinski Theatre

    • 11:00 12:30
      Plenary Talks Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 11:00
        Invited Talk: Astroparticle physics in the next decade 45m
        Astroparticle physics is by now a mature field of physics, bridging astrophysics, cosmology, nuclear and particle physics. This talk will deal with what has been accomplished and what the outstanding questions are. An overview is given, containing some thoughts about how to best obtain the answers to the unsolved questions, given realistic technological advancements and financial resources.
        Speaker: Lars Bergstrom (Stockholm University)
        Slides
      • 11:45
        Invited Talk: CERN, Update and Perspectives 45m
        The talk will present the ongoing scientific program at CERN and will give an outlook towards possible future projects. Particular emphasis will be given to the European Strategy for Particle Physics and its implications for the particle physics program at CERN and worldwide.
        Speaker: Rolf Heuer (CERN)
        Slides
    • 12:30 13:00
      Special Screening: Dark Universe
    • 13:00 14:30
      Lunch Break 1h 30m
    • 13:00 14:30
      Lunch Break 1h 30m Foyer (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Foyer

      Tuschinski Theatre

    • 13:00 14:30
      Lunch Break 1h 30m
    • 13:00 13:45
      Lunch Break 45m Foyer (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Foyer

      Tuschinski Theatre

    • 13:45 16:00
      Gamma-Ray Astrophysics: Special Session - Gamma Rays from the Galactic Centre Room 5 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 5

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Christoph Weniger (University of Amsterdam)
      • 13:45
        Fermi Bubbles from the Galactic Bar and Spiral Arms 15m
        A survey of the diffuse gamma-ray sky revealed 'bubbles' of emission above and below the Galactic disc symmetric around the centre of the Milky Way, so they are presumed to be from the centre with a height of 10 kpc. They have been proposed to be blown by cosmic rays originating from the star formation in the Galactic Centre, or jet activity from the supermassive black hole in the GC, or even more speculatively, explained as decay products from the expected annihilation of the elusive dark matter particles. At present there is no favoured explanation. Using a novel template fit, which allows to determine the background and Fermi bubble signal in every direction, we find that the bubbles originate from shock wave accelerated cosmic rays interacting with the gas in the Galactic bar and spiral arms. The observation of the bubbles from the tangent point of the Centaurus arm uniquely proves that the bubbles do not originate from the GC, but are connected to outflows from star-formation regions. Using the bubbles as tracers for star-formation regions we find for the bar an angle between the bar and the line connecting the Sun and the GC of 12.3$ \pm 2.1^\circ$ and a half length of the bar of 5.9$\pm$0.1 kpc. These unprecedented precision of the bar morphology is possible, because the gamma-rays are not affected by extinction from the dust.
        Speaker: Wim De Boer (KIT - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (DE))
      • 14:00
        The Spectrum, Morphology and Luminosity of Galactic Gamma-Ray Pulsars 15m
        Gamma-Ray observations by the Fermi-LAT have uncovered a substantial population of gamma-ray bright pulsars in our galaxy. Using 5.5 years of Fermi data, we measure the spectrum and morphology of both the young and recycled pulsars, and show current data allows for a direct measurement of the gamma-ray luminosity function of the pulsar population. We apply the results of our analysis to the population of observed globular clusters, which are expected to be gamma-ray bright due to their significant pulsar population, and produce strong constraints on the gamma-ray emission which could be produced by a hidden population of under-luminous pulsars. Finally, we show that a population of millisecond pulsars is unable to provide the required intensity and spectral signature necessary to explain the observed emission.
        Speaker: Tim Linden (U)
      • 14:15
        Characterizing the gamma-ray excess observed in the inner galaxy 10m
        Recent work has confirmed the presence of a gamma-ray excess in data from the Fermi Space Telescope extending at least 10 degrees from the Galactic Center. I will describe recent progress in characterizing this signal by using photons with the highest quality angular reconstruction, with an emphasis on the extended "inner galaxy" region. I will focus on cross-checks we have performed to distinguish this signal from a mismodelled background, and the spatial properties of the signal including its high degree of sphericity.
        Speaker: Nicholas Rodd (M)
        Slides
      • 14:25
        Improving Fermi-LAT Angular Resolution with CTBCORE 15m
        The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has a point spread function with large tails, consisting of events affected by tracker inefficiencies, inactive volumes, and hard scattering; these tails can make source confusion a limiting factor. The parameter CTBCORE, available in the publicly available Extended Fermi-LAT data, estimates the quality of each event's direction reconstruction; by implementing a cut in this parameter, the tails of the point spread function can be suppressed. We implement cuts on CTBCORE and present updated instrument response functions derived from the Fermi-LAT data itself, along with all-sky maps generated with these cuts. Having shown the effectiveness of these cuts, especially at low energies, we encourage their use in analyses where source confusion is important.
        Speaker: Stephen Portillo (Harvard University)
        Slides
      • 14:40
        Scrutinizing the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission in the Inner Galaxy 15m
        The recently discovered gamma-ray excess in the inner galaxy has important implications either for astrophysics or dark matter. Regardless of its origin, studies on the anomalous emission suffer from poor astrophysical modeling and large uncertainties in background emission in the region of interest. Therefore understanding of the gamma-ray background components in the inner galaxy is essential for scrutinizing the excess and determining its origin. Towards this purpose, using the CTBCORE core cuts that improve the PSF of the Fermi-LAT telescope, the two dominant diffuse gamma-ray components in the region of interest are scrutinized. By spectral restriction of the Bremsstrahlung and the pion-decay components, a better assessment of their morphologies can be made. A refined diffuse emission model can be helpful in distinguishing a dark matter annihilation signal from emission due to an unresolved population of MSPs in the inner galaxy.
        Speaker: Tansu Daylan (H)
        Slides
      • 14:55
        The GeV excess in the inner Galaxy: Discussion of background systematics 10m
        Recently, a spatially extended excess of gamma rays compatible with a DM signal from the inner region of the Milky Way has been claimed by different and independent groups, using Fermi LAT data. Yet, final statements about the morphology and spectral properties of such an extended diffuse emission are under debate, given the high complexity of this sky region. In this talk I will present an analysis of Fermi-LAT gamma rays from the inner 50x50 region around the Galactic Center. The goal is to put under scrutiny the systematic uncertainties affecting the determination of a gamma-ray excess. I will present results for the morphology and the spectral energy distribution of such an extended emission and discuss what can be said about its interpretation in terms of dark matter.
        Speaker: Francesca Calore (University of Amsterdam)
      • 15:05
        Fitting the Fermi-LAT GeV excess: on the importance of the propagation of electrons from dark matter 10m
        An excess of gamma rays at GeV energies has been detected in the Fermi-LAT data. This signal comes from a narrow region around the Galactic Center and has been interpreted as possible evidence for light (10-30 GeV) dark matter particles annihilating either into a mixture of leptons-antileptons and $b\bar{b}$ or into $b\bar{b}$ only. Focussing on the prompt gamma-ray emission, previous work found that the best fit to the data corresponds to annihilations proceeding predominantly into $b\bar{b}$, with a dark matter profile $\propto r^{-1.2}$. In this talk, I will show that it is essential to take into account the diffuse gamma-ray emission (due to inverse Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung) from electrons produced in dark matter annihilations and undergoing diffusion through the Galactic magnetic field. I will first describe the technique I used to solve the transport equation of electrons in the context of a cuspy dark matter profile. Then I will present the different contributions to the gamma-ray spectrum at GeV energies. More specifically, I will show how including the additional contributions of inverse Compton and bremsstrahlung from electrons after diffusion modifies the spectrum, in particular when the final state corresponds to a combination of leptonic annihilations containing the $e^+e^-$ and $\mu^+\mu^-$ channels.
        Speaker: Mr Thomas Lacroix (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris (IAP))
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Updated antiproton, positron and radio limits on light dark matter 10m
        In this brief presentation, I will discuss how cosmic-ray and radio observations impose stringent constraints on dark matter (DM) candidates with masses in the ~1-50 GeV range. We find strong bounds on DM annihilating into light leptons, or democratically into all leptons from cosmic ray positron data, while complementarily, cosmic ray antiproton and radio data show considerable tension with DM annihilation into any combination of quark final states and tau lepton pairs respectively. Taken together, these bounds present a significant challenge for a DM interpretation of the GeV excess in gamma rays that has been observed in the inner Galaxy.
        Speaker: Martin Vollmann
        Slides
      • 15:25
        Results from dark matter searches in dwarf galaxies 10m
        I will present the latest results from a search for dark matter annihilation in a large sample of Milky Way dwarf galaxies. Nearly 6 years of data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope are analyzed by weighting individual photons based on their spatial and spectral properties. Such searches are powerful enough to probe the relic abundance cross section for some dark matter masses. I will discuss the observational requirements necessary to discover annihilation in nearby dwarf galaxies.
        Speaker: Dr Alex Geringer-Sameth
      • 15:35
        Panel discussion: The GeV excess 25m
        Speaker: Lars Bergstrom (Stockholm University)
    • 14:30 16:00
      Cosmic Rays Room 4 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 4

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Kumiko Kotera (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris)
      • 14:30
        Results from the Pierre Auger Observatory: spectrum and composition 25m
        Cosmic rays have now been observed for over a century. The nature and origins of the ultra high energy cosmic rays are questions that have yet to be definitively answered. The southern Pierre Auger Observatory, located in Argentina, is currently the world's largest detector of ultra high energy cosmic rays. With unprecedented amount of data collected, it is shedding light to questions on the what these energetic particles are and where they come from, by its spectrum and composition determination. We report on the recent results on spectrum and composition from the Auger experiment.
        Speaker: Eun-Joo Ahn (F)
        Slides
      • 14:55
        Telescope Array Experiment : Recent Results and Future Plans 25m
        The Telescope Array (TA) is the largest ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) detector in the northern hemisphere, which consists of 507 surface detector covering a total 700 km^2 and three fluorescence detector stations. The TA has been fully operating at Millard Country, Utah, USA, since 2008. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent results on the UHECR energy spectrum, mass composition and anisotropy based on the 5-year dataset collected by the Telescope Array experiment. Finally, we will introduce current efforts and our future plans (the TAx4 project and other related projects).
        Speaker: Kazumasa Kawata
        Slides
      • 15:20
        Studies of the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays at the Pierre Auger Observatory 15m
        The Pierre Auger Observatory has been in operation since January 2004, detecting cosmic rays with energies from few 10 PeV to more than 100 EeV. We present the results of anisotropy studies of the arrival directions at different angular scales and energies using both the data recorded by the 1500 m grid array, covering 3000 km^2 and fully efficient above 3 EeV, and the 750 m grid array, covering 25 km^2 and fully efficient above 0.3 EeV. The large scale analysis of the right ascension distribution using the 1500 m array data shows interesting hints of an equatorial dipolar component. Also a tridimensional reconstruction of the dipolar and quadrupolar components is presented, leading to upper limits that put bounds on models with a galactic component at energies above 1 EeV. Results from a blind search of overdensities at various angular scales and energy ranges above 1 EeV are also presented, as well as those of the search for galactic neutron sources. At the highest energies, the results of the study of the correlation with AGN directions are presented.
        Speaker: Silvia Mollerach
        Slides
      • 15:35
        Acceleration to ultra-high energies 25m
        The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays with energy >~ 10^{18}eV is a rather intricate puzzle, with a central question: how to accelerate particles to extreme energies ~10^{20}eV or more, and in which astrophysical source? Other questions arise as well, such as: are these cosmic rays protons or nuclei? Why is there no powerful source in the arrival directions of the highest energy cosmic rays? This talk will discuss constraints on the possible nature of these particles and of their sources, putting strong emphasis on the physics of acceleration to extreme energies.
        Speaker: Dr Martin Lemoine (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris)
    • 14:30 16:00
      Dark Matter: Direct Detection Room 3 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 3

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Carsten Krauss (U)
      • 14:30
        Recent Results of SuperCDMS 25m
        The SuperCDMS experiment has operated a 9kg array of cryogenic detectors to search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the Soudan Underground Lab since early 2012. We have recently finished analyzing 600 kg-d of low-energy data on a subset of detectors with an energy threshold of 1.6 keVnr. The use of the athermal phonon measurement provides position sensitivity, and therefore signal/background discrimination, near the energy threshold of the experiment. We perform an analysis using boosted decision trees and a full detector simulation to optimize our background discrimination and sensitivity to light WIMPs. This allows us to probe recent signal hints from CDMSII-Si and CoGeNT. This talk will present the results of this SuperCDMS low-energy analysis as well as the detector performances at higher energies that will be of particular interest for searching for heavier WIMPs.
        Speaker: Dr Julien Billard (MIT)
      • 14:55
        Analysis of 3.4 years of CoGeNT Data 20m
        The CoGeNT dark matter detector has been taking data at the Soudan mine since December 2009. The data have been analyzed for a possible WIMP signal using multi-dimensional PDFs in energy, time, and pulse rise-time. The bulk event (fast rise-time pulses) and surface (slow rise-time) event fractions are determined through this analysis. We have also done extensive simulations of backgrounds for the CoGeNT detector, and these backgrounds are compared to the CoGeNT data. The current plans for the next generation detector, C4, are also outlined. We will detail specific improvements in background reduction and energy resolution. Finally, our results are compared to other experiments in the context of low-mass dark matter.
        Speaker: Marek Kos (P)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        A CoGeNT Analysis: Is there evidence for a Dark Matter signal? 20m
        Data from the CoGeNT experiment has been claimed to be compatible with a light Dark Matter particle scattering off nucleons, to a significance of approximately 2.5 sigma. I will critically assess this possibility, using the methods introduced in arXiv:1405.0495. I present a Bayesian and frequentist analysis of CoGeNT data, with particular focus on the removal of surface events. By marginalising over the uncertainty in the surface event background, I find less than one sigma evidence for Dark Matter recoils in CoGeNT data.
        Speaker: Jonathan Davis (IPPP, Durham University)
        Slides
      • 15:35
        The Majorana Low-Background Experiment at KURF (MALBEK) 20m
        The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is an array of natural and enriched high purity germanium detectors that will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of germanium-76 and perform a search for WIMPs with masses below 10 GeV. As part of the MAJORANA research and development efforts, we have deployed a modified, low-background broad energy germanium detector at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility. With its sub-keV energy threshold, this detector is sensitive to potential non-Standard Model physics, including interactions with weakly interacting massive particles. This presentation will present studies of background in this detector and how they affect light WIMP searches in this and similar experiments.
        Speaker: Reyco Henning (UNC Chapel Hill)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Particle Physics Room 6 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 6

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Herbi Dreiner (Bonn University)
      • 14:30
        SM Higgs results at the LHC 20m
        Results of studies at the LHC collider by the CMS and ATLAS experiments of the recently discovered Higgs boson are presented. The measured properties of the new particle are consistent with the predictions of the Standard Model.
        Speaker: Prof. Guenakh Mitselmakher (University of Florida)
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Searches for invisible Higgs at the LHC 20m
        The results from searching for invisible decay of Higgs bosons at LHC are presented. No significant excess is found beyond the Standard Model prediction, and new limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, using a combination of data collected in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV by the ATLAS and CMS detectors. Assuming the Standard Model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the upper limits on the invisible branching fraction are found at CMS at $m_{\rm H}$ = 125 GeV by combing vector boson fusion, associated $Z(\ell^+\ell^-)H$ and $Z(b\bar{b})H$ production modes and at ATLAS at $m_{\rm H}$ = 125.5 GeV using $Z(\ell^+\ell^-)H$ production. An interpreted upper limit is also presented on the allowed dark matter-nucleon scattering cross section in Higgs-portal dark matter scenarios.
        Speaker: Renjie Wang (Northeastern University (US))
        Slides
      • 15:10
        Searches for beyond the standard model Higgs in ATLAS & CMS 20m
        The discovery of a Higgs boson, consistent with the Standard Model, has heralded a new era in which fundamental scalar fields may be safely called to play a central rôle to solve long-lasting physics questions : grand unification of forces, supersymmetry, dark matter, cosmic inflation... To express it in other words, if the sophisticated Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism really works as we believe it should, it would be very strange that Nature has used it only once to break the U(1) x SU(2) symmetry ! Searching for the existence of extra Higgs (scalar) bosons - be they neutral or charged – has then become one of the research lines that could plausibly deliver fruitful results in the coming years. On behalf of the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, I will present the most striking results and the best limits obtained up to now at LHC in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. I will conclude my presentation by a few words on the LHC discovery potential – with respect to new Higgses – in the coming 3 to 4 years.
        Speaker: Johann Collot (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (FR))
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Higgs Implications for Dark Matter 20m
        We investigate the impact of hypothetical new neutral light particles on the tiny width of a light Higgs boson. Reviewing the possible signatures in the Higgs decay modes with missing energy, in many cases simply preventing these modes from being dominant suffices to set tight model-independent constraints on the masses and couplings of the new light states. We then apply this analysis to Higgs portal models of DM, where DM is light enough to contribute to invisible Higgs decays. Using effective field theory we show that DM can be a thermal relic only if there are additional light particles present with masses below a few 100 GeV. We give concrete examples of viable Higgs portal models of light DM, where the Br(h to invisible) constraint is not too restrictive, because it is governed by different parameters than the relic abundance.
        Speaker: Jernej F. Kamenik (Jozef Stefan Institute)
        Slides
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:30 18:30
      Cosmic Rays Room 4 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 4

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Kumiko Kotera (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris)
      • 16:30
        Constraints on Sources and Composition of UHECRs 15m
        - A simple and well-motivated modification of QCD at ultrahigh energy naturally explains the observed Xmax distribution above 10^18 eV, with a purely protonic composition. This removes the need for a fine-tuned source composition and very hard injection spectrum as required if UHECRs have a mixed composition, and eliminates the need to postulate an additional population of extragalactic protons filling in the spectrum below the ankle. (Time permitting, new stronger limits on a light Galactic component in the 10^17.5-18 eV range will be presented.) - It is shown that if UHECRs are protons, their sources must be transient. - Tidal Disruption Jets are shown to satisfy the three essential requirements for being the source of all UHECRs. Multi-wavelength observations and modeling of Swift J1644, a TDE jet observed in blazar mode, show that the product of field strength and characteristic size of the jet satisfies BR >~ 3 10^17 G-cm, the Hillas criterion for accelerating protons to 10^20 eV. The total UHECR energy injection rate from TDE jets and the number of contributing sources within the GZK volume, can be estimated from the recently-measured TDE rate; both are ample to explain UHECR requirements. Thus TDE jets are a strong candidate for being the sources of all or most UHECRs.
        Speaker: Glennys Farrar (NYU)
      • 16:45
        Multi-Messenger Signatures of UHE CRs 25m
        The origin of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CRs) is an unsolved puzzle. Multi-messenger obervations in the form of gamma-rays and neutrinos can help to constrain the cosmic evolution and emission spectra of UHE CR candidate sources. I will discuss the production of cosmogenic gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes from the propagation of UHE CRs through the cosmic radiation background. These diffuse fluxes contribute to the observed gamma-ray background in the GeV-TeV range and can be tested by neutrino observatories at EeV energies. I will review the latest status of these observations and comment on possible relations of UHE CRs to the recent observation of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos in the TeV-PeV range.
        Speaker: Markus Ahlers
        Slides
      • 17:10
        An explanation to the diffuse gamma-ray emission. 25m
        We evaluate the contribution to the high latitude gamma-ray emission in the GeV-TeV energy range as due to various AGN populations. We give an estimation of the unresolved energy spectrum and compare our results to the data collected by the Fermi-LAT. We also briefly discuss the relevant anisotropy in the IGRB. Finally, we give some hints to the possibility left to dark matter searches in the high latitude gamma-ray sky.
        Speaker: Fiorenza Donato
        Slides
      • 17:35
        JEM-EUSO and the future of the UHECR field 25m
        Thanks to giant extensive air-showers observatories, such as the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array, we now know that the sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are extragalactic. We also know that either they interact with the CMB as predicted or they run out of energy at the same energy scale of the CMB interactions! Their composition is either surprising (dominated by heavier nuclei at the highest energies) or the hadronic interactions at 100 TeV are not a standard extrapolation of LHC interaction energies. Hints of anisotropies, including a hotspot in the TA sky, begin to appear as energies reach 60 EeV, just when statistics become very limited. Basic questions remain unanswered: What generates such extremely energetic particles that reach above 10^20 eV (100 EeV)? Where do they come from? How do they reach these energies? What are they? How do they interact on their way to Earth and with the Earth’s atmosphere? To answer these questions larger statistics at the highest energies is necessary. Space-based observatories can significantly improve the exposure to these extremely energetic particles. The first step to answer these questions is to place a wide field UV telescope at the International State Station to monitor the Earth’s atmosphere from above. This is the goal of the JEM-EUSO mission: the Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) at the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM).
        Speaker: Angela Olinto (The University of Chicago)
      • 18:00
        Cosmic ray mass composition measurements with LOFAR 15m
        It is generally believed that ultra-high-energy cosmic rays are produced in extragalactic sources like gamma-ray bursts or active galactic nuclei, while the lower energy cosmic rays come from our own Galaxy. At what energy the transition from Galactic to extragalactic origin takes place is still a mystery, but most models place it somewhere between $10^{17}$ and $10^{19}$ eV. With LOFAR we can measure the mass composition of cosmic rays in this important regime and disentangle the Galactic and extragalactic components. LOFAR detects the radio signals of cosmic rays while running astronomical observations at the same time. In the dense core individual air showers are detected by hundreds of dipole antennas. The raw electromagnetic waveform as detected by each antenna is stored in a five-second ring buffer, which is read out when a trigger is issued by the LORA particle detector array. Hundreds of showers with energies above 10$^17$ eV have been measured in two frequency regimes: low band (10-90 MHz) and high band (110-250 MHz). The complicated radio pattern on the ground can be accurately reproduced by modern radio simulation codes and contains information about the longitudinal shower development. With a hybrid reconstruction technique, we can accurately reconstruct the interaction depth of cosmic rays, and infer their mass composition. We present an analysis based on the first results, revealing a strong proton component below 10$^{18}$ eV.
        Speaker: Stijn Buitink (Radboud University Nijmegen)
      • 18:15
        Radio measurements of air showers with AERA 15m
        High-energy cosmic rays impinging onto the atmosphere of the Earth initiate cascades of secondary particles: extensive air showers. The electrons and positrons in air showers interact with the geomagnetic field and emit radiation, which we record in the tens-of-MHz regime. Radio emission from air showers is measured with the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) at the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. Objective of our investigations is to clarify the emission processes in the atmosphere and to use the radio measurements as a tool to determine the properties of cosmic rays, namely their energy, their (particle) type, and their arrival direction. We will give an overview on the radio measurements of extensive air showers and discuss recent results.
        Speaker: Prof. Jörg Hörandel (Radboud University Nijmegen/Nikhef)
    • 16:30 18:30
      Dark Matter: Cosmological Aspects Room 5 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 5

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Mark Lovell (Universiteit van Amsterdam)
      • 16:30
        Inferences about Dark Matter in the Smallest Galaxies 20m
        The Local Group's dwarf galaxies represent the lower limit of galaxy formation. Inferences about the amount and spatial distribution of dark matter within these objects has can provide tests of cosmological models and predictions for indirect detection experiments. I will summarize current observational constraints and discuss prospects for improvement.
        Speaker: Prof. Matthew Walker (CMU)
      • 16:50
        Dark matter particle constraints from dwarf spheroidals 20m
        Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the faintest galaxies in the Universe and as such play a fundamental role in galaxy formation models. In addition, their internal kinematics suggest the presence of large amounts of non-baryonic matter on very small scales. In models where dark matter (DM) consists of exotic particles formed shortly after the Big Bang, the high phase-space densities inferred in dwarf spheroidals can put strong bounds on the microscopic properties of several particle candidates. However, definite tests of dark matter models require a better understanding of the effects of baryons on the DM distribution in these galaxies. In this talk I will show that baryonic feedback is limited by inefficient star formation in low-mass haloes. I will also discuss how the current constraints on DM particle masses based on phase-space arguments suffer from the large range of halo models allowed by the data.
        Speaker: Dr Jorge Penarrubia (Royal Observatory Edinburgh)
        Slides
      • 17:10
        Probing dark matter in dwarf galaxies with non-parametric mass models 20m
        We propose a new non-parametric method to determine the mass distribution in spherical systems. A high dimensional parameter space encoding tracer density, line of sight velocity anisotropy and total mass density is sampled using MultiNest. Without assumptions on the functional form of any of these profiles, we can reproduce reliably the total mass density and velocity anisotropy profile of mock dwarf galaxies. We show applications to observed dwarf galaxies, and point out what data quality is required to measure the central density profile.
        Speaker: Pascal Steger (E)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Cold plus warm dark matter models 20m
        Analyses of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and of galaxy survey data allow for the possibility that dark matter particles were born relativistic yet became non-relativistic well before matter-radiation equality. Such "warm" or "cold plus warm" dark matter models may still have observable signatures at sub-Mpc scales, e.g. modifying the structure of galactic halos and their abundance. I will summarize these signatures and discuss particle physics models that provide such candidates. Although these dark matter particles have interaction strengths much weaker than neutrinos, I will argue that the combination of data from astrophysics, cosmology, and forthcoming particle physics experiments will enable us to constrain these models and learn about the properties of these candidates.
        Speaker: Dr Oleg Ruchayskiy (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne)
      • 17:50
        Impact of the nature of the dark matter on structure formation 20m
        I will discuss the key difference between warm dark matter and cold dark matter on the formation of Milky Way-like galaxies, demonstrating that a generic aspect of WDM is the formation of stars in filaments that connect to the forming galaxy. Such dense filaments also appear as Lyman Limit systems (LLSs) in the spectra of background QSOs, and the correlation function of LLSs could potentially constrain WDM models. Finally I will show that the dynamics of the even denser HI absorbers- so-called Damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs) - is a also affected by the nature of the dark matter.
        Speaker: tom theuns (d)
      • 18:10
        The assembly history and structure of cold dark matter halos 20m
        I will discuss the relation between the accretion history and mass profile of cold dark matter (CDM) haloes, emphasizing how an appropriate definition of their formation times can be used to determine their characteristic radii. This result is based on the finding that the average mass accretion history, expressed in terms of the critical density of the Universe, resembles the enclosed density profile, at any redshift: both follow closely the Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) profile. This suggests that the self-similarity of halo mass profiles results from the mass-independence of their accretion histories, an interpretation which is supported by outliers whose mass profiles differ substantially from the NFW form. Using these results I will present a simple algorithm that can be used to predict the mass and redshift dependence of dark matter halo concentrations for various cosmological models
        Speaker: Aaron Ludlow (Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie)
    • 16:30 18:30
      Dark Matter: Direct Detection Room 3 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 3

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Kaixuan Ni (S)
      • 16:30
        Status of the ANAIS Dark Matter project 20m
        The ANAIS (Annual Modulation with NaI(Tl) Scintillators) experiment aims at the confirmation of the DAMA/LIBRA signal using the same target and technique at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. 250 kg of ultrapure NaI(Tl) crystals will be used as a target, divided into 20 modules, each coupled to two photomultipliers. Two NaI(Tl) crystals of 12.5 kg each, grown by Alpha Spectra from a powder having a potassium level under the limit of the analytical techniques, form the ANAIS-25 set-up. A detailed study of ANAIS-25 background is underway, based on data taken in different configurations combined with Monte Carlo simulation, and its results will be presented. The bulk content in the crystals of potassium as well as of uranium and thorium radioactive chains has been quantifed and their cosmogenic activation evaluated. Finally, background simulations for the set-up with 250 kg will be shown and the status of the full ANAIS experiment will be reviewed.
        Speaker: Ms Patricia Villar (PhD Fellow)
        Slides
      • 16:50
        The PICO Dark Matter Search Programme 20m
        Superheated liquids, such as CF$_3$I have been shown to have excellent properties when operated in large scale bubble chambers for the detection of dark matter. The PICO collaboration is currently operating a new detector at SNOLAB to demonstrate that a large scale chamber with superheated C$_3$F$_8$ can be operated stably. The this paper will present the latest status and results from the PICO 2L chamber using C$_3$F$_8$ and will report on the operation of the COUPP 60 detector using CF$_3$I. The PICO collaboration is also planning to construct a 250l volume chamber to extend the sensitivity towards lower limits in the spin dependent direct dark matter search. The status of the design work for this upcoming experiment will be discussed.
        Speaker: Carsten Krauss (U)
        Slides
      • 17:10
        Explaining galactic structure and direct detection experiments with mirror dark matter 20m
        A duplicate set of particles and forces (mirror particles) are required if nature obeys an exact parity symmetry. Mirror baryons are a candidate for the inferred dark matter of the Universe. The only new parameter postulated is photon - mirror photon kinetic mixing of strength $\epsilon \sim 10^{-9}$. Recent work indicates that such a theory might be capable of explaining galactic structure and the direct detection experiments (DAMA, CoGeNT, CRESST-II and CDMS/Si).
        Speaker: Dr Foot Robert (School of Physics, University of Melbourne)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter searches with CUORE-0 and CUORE 20m
        The CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) experiment, currently under construction at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), will operate 988 TeO$_2$ bolometers at a temperature of around 10 mK, adding up a total mass of 750 kg. CUORE-$0$, a 52 TeO$_2$ bolometers array built using the same protocols developed for CUORE, is currently in operation at LNGS and has recently released the first data, showing a very promising background reduction with respect to its predecessor CUORICINO. Although the primary goal of the experiment is to look for neutrinoless double beta decay ($0\nu$DBD) of $^{130}$Te, the ultra-low radioactive background, large exposure and projected stability on working conditions over several annual cycles make it suitable for a search for annual modulation in the dark matter (DM) detection rate, provided a low energy threshold is achieved. Encouraging results have been obtained with CUORE-like bolometers thanks to a new low-energy triggering method, resulting in a $\sim$3 keV energy threshold. In this talk, the status of the experiment, as well as the projected sensitivity to $0\nu$DBD and DM annual modulation of CUORE-$0$ and CUORE, are presented.
        Speaker: Mrs Martinez Maria (Universidad de Zaragoza)
        Slides
      • 17:50
        Tests on the first crystals for KIMS-NaI experiment 20m
        KIMS-NaI is a dark matter search experiment using NaI(Tl) as a scintillating crystal at the Yangyang underground laboratory to verify the DAMA experiment. Two NaI(Tl) crystals grown from different powders and with different sizes are used in a test experiment. The crystals coupled to two PMTs that have high quantum efficiency were surrounded by twelve CsI(Tl) crystal used for KIMS-CsI experiment. Data from the first two months is analyzed with multiple parameterizations. Identification of the various kinds of backgrounds and future perspective of the experiment will be presented.
        Speaker: Ms Kyungwon Kim (Center for Underground Physics (IBS))
        Slides
      • 18:10
        First Data from DM-Ice17, Prospects for DM-Ice 20m
        Astrophysical observations and cosmological data give overwhelming evidence that the majority of the mass of the Universe is comprised of dark matter. For over 15 years, the DAMA collaboration has asserted that they observe a dark matter-induced annual modulation in their data. Several alternative hypotheses have been proposed as explanations for the observation of an annual modulation however none can give the phase and amplitude observed in DAMA. In addition, several experiments using different technology and target material exclude WIMP-nucleon cross sections observed by DAMA for a wide range of WIMP models and distribution. I will describe the world-wide effort to resolve these seemingly contradicting results directly by using the same target material, NaI(Tl).
        Speaker: Neil Spooner (University of Sheffield)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      Particle Physics Room 6 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 6

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Oliver Buchmueller (Imperial College Sci., Tech. & Med. (GB))
      • 16:30
        Measuring the Effectiveness of Effective Field Theories of Dark Matter 20m
        As beyond-standard-model physics continues to elude discovery at the LHC, it becomes increasingly important to ask what we can learn about dark matter in a model-independent way. Effective Field Theories have become popular as a way construct model-independent constraints on dark matter, but at LHC energies it is crucial to understand their significance and limitations. I will present ways to measure the validity of the EFT approximation in a range of scenarios, and the consequences of the breakdown of the EFT approximation.
        Speaker: Thomas David Jacques (Universite de Geneve (CH))
        Slides
      • 16:50
        Beyond EFT for DM@LHC 20m
        I discuss alternatives to Effective Field Theory to pursue dark matter searches at the LHC, and propose some benchmark scenarios for fairly model-independent strategies that LHC experiments can follow in the investigation of DM.
        Speakers: Andrea De Simone (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (CH)), Andrea De Simone (CERN)
        Slides
      • 17:10
        QCD effects in mono-jet searches for dark matter 20m
        I will discuss theoretical uncertainties in predictions for "mono-jet" signals, and show how these predictions can be affected by extra radiation due to QCD emissions. I'll present results obtained by matching parton showers with NLO corrections, as implemented in the publicly-available MC program POWHEG-BOX, that I will quickly overview. Time permitting, I'll also show how further informations on the precise structure of the interaction between dark matter and the standard model can be extracted from "MET + 2 jets" events.
        Speaker: Dr Emanuele Re (University of Oxford)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Mono-jet searches in ATLAS and CMS 20m
        We present results by the ATLAS and CMS experiments on a search for new phenomena in pp collision events with one high momentum jet and large missing transverse energy. The data are compared to the SM prediction of the background, dominated by the W/Z+jets production with neutrinos and mis-reconstructed charged leptons in the final state. The results are interpreted in the context of different Beyond the Standard Model scenarios: Large Extra Dimensions, generic WIMP pair production, Gauge Mediated SUSY Breaking with production of light gravitinos, and Un-particle production in association with a jet.
        Speaker: Valerio Rossetti (Stockholm University (SE))
        Slides
      • 17:50
        Mono-W/Z searches in ATLAS and CMS 20m
        Searches for mono-W and Z bosons are presented in the hadronic+MET and dileptonic+MET channels using the ATLAS experiment and the mono-lepton+MET channel using CMS at the Large Hadron Collider. The full 2012 data set produced at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV is used comprising 20 fb-1. No statistically significant deviation from the Standard Model is observed. Limits are set on the mass scale using novel effective field theory approaches which consider constructive interference in the mono-W final state as well as scenarios in which dark matter couples to the Standard Model sector through the electroweak bosons. Limits are also set on the invisible Higgs width and a UV complete model.
        Speaker: Andy Nelson (University of California Irvine (US))
        Slides
      • 18:10
        Dark Matter at a Linear Collider 20m
        Dark Matter at a Linear Collider
        Speaker: Herbi Dreiner (Bonn University)
    • 09:00 10:30
      Plenary Talks Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 09:00
        Invited Talk: WISPy Dark Matter 30m
        Very light bosons, produced non-thermally in the early Universe are an intriguing possibility for the cold dark matter of the Universe. Particularly interesting candidates are axions, axion-like particles and hidden photons. This talk will discuss the current status of such light dark matter with a particular emphasis towards opportunities for its detection.
        Speaker: Prof. Joerg Jaeckel
      • 09:30
        Invited Talk: Dark Messages from the LHC 30m
        I will review the impact of the LHC program on our understanding of particle dark matter.
        Speaker: Tim Tait (University of California, Irvine)
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Invited Talk: The Dark Sector 30m
        The idea that dark matter resides in a dark sector, accompanied by other dark particles and forces, has many realizations. I will discuss a number of these, focusing on several motivated by recent experiments, observations, and simulations.
        Speaker: Prof. Jonathan Feng (UC Irvine)
        Slides
    • 10:30 11:00
      Coffee Break 30m Main Foyer (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Main Foyer

      Tuschinski Theatre

    • 11:00 12:40
      Plenary Talks Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 11:00
        Invited Talk: Indirect Searches for Particle Dark Matter 30m
        One of the main strategies to probe the particle nature of dark matter is the identification of possible contributions from the annihilation or decay of these particles in the spectrum of cosmic rays and radiation. A wealth of observational data, both existing and upcoming, makes this a very timely and active approach that starts to rule out the most popular models in a way that is complementary to direct and collider searches. I briefly review current status and prospects of the field, highlighting the respective strengths of the various cosmic messengers. Some emphasis will be on recent signal hints that are intensely discussed in the community.
        Speaker: Torsten Bringmann (Hamburg University)
      • 11:30
        Invited Talk: The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station 30m
        The AMS-02 detector is a wide acceptance high-energy physics experiment operating since May 2011 onboard of the International Space Station. It consists of six complementary sub-detectors providing measurement on the energy, the mass and the charge leading to an unambiguous identification of the cosmic rays. To date, more than 40 billion cosmic ray events have been collected. Performance of AMS in space will be overviewed as well as the first results based on data collected during the first two years of operations in space. Preliminary results on Proton, Helium fluxes and Boron-to-Carbon fluxes ratio will be presented. More details will be given on the published results on the positron fraction, individual fluxes of cosmic-ray electrons-positrons and positron anisotropy measurements.
        Speaker: Valerio Vagelli (KIT - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (DE))
      • 12:00
        New physics searches in ATLAS and relation to astroparticle physics 20m
        The existence of Dark Matter (DM) is by now well established, and the fit of the cosmological model parameters to various measurements lead to a density of the cold non-baryoninc matter representing 26.5% of the critical density. Despite this relatively large density, the nature of the DM remains unknown. Amongst the preferred candidates for DM are the Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with a mass roughly between 10 GeV and a few TeV. An intensive search program for DM in solar system has been going on for the last decades, providing limits on the WIMP mass and cross-section, as well as hints of potential signal. The search of direct production of DM at LHC is complementary to the one performed by astrophysics experiments, providing an independent measurement. The ATLAS detector operating at LHC collected data from proton-proton collisions corresponding by now to a total integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 with 8 TeV energy in the center of mass. This high energy and luminosity allows to check the validity of Standard Model and to put challenging constraints on new physics. In this talk the most recent results on DM candidates search at ATLAS will be presented. These searches are focused on WIMP, and on Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP) as a DM candidate.
        Speaker: Vincent Francois Giangiobbe (IFAE-Barcelona (ES))
        Slides
      • 12:20
        New physics searches in CMS 20m
        Searches for a wide range of physics beyond the Standard Model have been performed using CMS at the LHC. Final results from the 7 and 8 TeV datasets will be presented. The presentation will cover results on Supersymmetry, direct production of dark matter, new resonances, large extra dimensions, long lived particles and other exotic new physics. Some prospects of the future discovery potential with the 13 TeV data due to start in 2015 will also be discussed.
        Speaker: Jim Brooke (University of Bristol (GB))
        Slides
    • 12:40 14:30
      Lunch Break 1h 50m
    • 12:40 14:30
      Lunch Break 1h 50m
    • 12:40 14:30
      Lunch Break 1h 50m
    • 12:40 14:30
      Lunch Break 1h 50m
    • 12:40 14:00
      Lunch Break 1h 20m
    • 14:00 16:00
      Dark Matter: Cosmological Aspects Room 5 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 5

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: matteo viel
      • 14:00
        The Universal Rotation Curve and Dark Matter Halos around Galaxies 20m
        Recent observations have revealed the structural properties of the dark and luminous mass distribution in spirals. These results led to the vision of a new and amazing scenario. The investigation of single and coadded objects has unanimously shown that the rotation curves of spirals follow, from their centres out to their virial radii, a universal profile. This profile implies a tuned combination of their stellar-gaseous disk and dark halo mass distributions. This, alongside with accurate mass modelling of individual galaxies, poses important challenges to the presently favoured Λ\LambdaCDM Cosmology. The effective circular velocities in large Ellipticals and dwarf spheroidals show similar characteristics. The structural properties of dark matter and its shallow distribution indicates that there is smaller power in the matter fluctuation spectrum at galactic scales than the usual we derive in the framework of a cold collisionless particle. It is interesting to notice that the observed structure of spirals, in the framework of a warm dark matter, points to a particles with 2-3 keV mass.
        Speaker: Dr Paolo Salucci (SISSA)
      • 14:20
        Dark matter in the Milky Way: new dynamical constraints 20m
        The distribution of dark matter in the Milky Way is poorly constrained at present and represents a major uncertainty for both direct and indirect dark matter searches. In this talk, I shall present new constraints on the dark matter distribution based on photometric and dynamical observations of our Galaxy. First, state-of-the-art models for the distribution of baryons are calibrated against the latest data, paying special attention to the morphology of the bulge, stellar disk and gas. Second, a new up-to-date compilation of galactic rotation curve measurements is set up in order to pinpoint the total gravitation potential. I will then show how the combination of these two ingredients provides interesting constraints not only on the dark matter local density but also on its profile across the Galaxy.
        Speaker: Miguel Pato (TU Munich)
        Slides
      • 14:40
        Dark Matter in the Milky Way: model-independent determination. 20m
        We use a new compilation of data for the Rotation Curve of our own Galaxy in order to assess evidence for a Dark component of matter. We construct the rotation curve expected from a large sample of models of the baryonic (star and gas) component of the Milky Way, and infer the missing component with high statistical evidence. This model-independent approach shows evidence for a dark component without any explicit dependence neither on the shape of the DM profile, nor on the properties of stellar population dynamics, typically affecting this sort of analysis.
        Speaker: fabio iocco (Instituto de Fisica Teorica)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Baryonic and dark matter distribution features in cosmological simulations of spiral galaxies 20m
        We study three high resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of Milky Way-sized halos including a comparison with the corresponding DM-only runs performed with the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. We analyse the stellar and gas distribution and find one of our simulated galaxies with interesting Milky Way like features with regard to several observational tests. Thanks to consistently tuned star formation rate and supernovae feedback, we manage to obtain an extended disk and a flat rotation curve with the circular velocity and the dark matter density in the solar neighbourhood in agreement with observations. With a careful look at the derivation of the stellar-to-halo mass ratio, we also obtain competitive values for this criterion. Concerning the dark matter distribution, we explicitly show the interaction with the baryons and show how the dark matter is first contracted by star formation and then cored by feedback processes. Analysing the clump spectrum, we find a shift in mass with regard to DM-only run and obtain a high mass satellite distribution comparable with the Milky Way spheroidal dwarf galaxies. This work will be very soon on arxiv. In this consistent framework, we may also comment on dark matter detection phenomenology which will be the subject of subsequent papers.
        Speaker: Pol Mollitor (L)
        Slides
      • 15:20
        The dark matter density profile in spherical systems: A simple way to get more information from the Jeans equation 20m
        Detailed measurements of the dark matter density profile in systems such as dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters would allows us to test predictions from N-body simulations of cold dark matter and how complex astrophysical effects and interactions with baryons may have reshaped dark matter halos. Traditionally, the Jeans equation is used to constrain the dark matter density profile in spherical systems by fitting to the line-of-sight velocity dispersion of visible tracers such as stars or galaxies that are gravitationally bound in the dark matter halo. Unfortunately due to a degeneracy with the velocity anisotropy of the tracers, the Jeans equation only constrains the mass of the dark matter halo at one radius. We propose a very simple extension to the Jeans equation that adds two new constraints from the fourth moment of the line-of-sight velocity distribution. Without adding any new parameters to the fit or making additional assumptions, we show that in the case of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies these new constraints can dramatically reduce the space of possible density profiles. If the shape of the density profile is fixed (to say a cosmologically motivated NFW profile), we find that the new constraints can give much stronger predictions for the concentration of the halo and the velocity anisotropy of the tracers.
        Speaker: Mr Tom Richardson (King's College London)
        Slides
      • 15:40
        Sterile neutrino dark matter: from production to halo formation 20m
        I will discuss the scenario of sterile neutrino dark matter produced by decays of heavy scalars. This is an ideal toy example to illustrate how the production of dark matter influences the formation of structures in the universe.
        Speaker: Dr Aurel Schneider (University of Sussex)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:10
      Dark Matter: Direct Detection Room 3 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 3

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Jocelyn Monroe (MIT)
      • 14:30
        The EDELWEISS III Experiment 20m
        EDELWEISS is a direct dark matter search situated in the low radioactivity environment of the Modane Underground Laboratory. The experiment uses Ge detectors operated at 20 mK in a dilution refrigerator in order to identify eventual rare nuclear recoils induced by elastic scattering of WIMPs from our Galactic halo. I will describe the current EDELWEISS-III program, including improvements of the background, data-acquisition and the installation of a subset of thirty-six 800-g FID detectors. FID detector background rejection capabilities and performances will be also presented. 
The FID detector technology is not limited to EDELWEISS-III but can be further employed in the next generation of cryogenic detector experiments.
        Speaker: Silvia Scorza (KIT)
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Hypercharged Dark Matter and Direct Detection as a Probe of Reheating 20m
        Abstract: I will discuss the implications of hypercharged dark matter, which is a generic possibility which leads to very large scattering cross sections at direct detection experiments. In fact, current and planned experiments are probing masses for such particles up to an amazing $10^8-10^{10}$ GeV. If a detection were made, then the scattering rate would reveal the dark matter mass, and in turn an indirect measurement of the reheating temperature of the universe through its impact on the non-thermal dark matter relic abundance. Evidence that hypercharged dark matter were responsible for a signal could be obtained by comparing spectra at several experiments, without requiring any assumptions about the dark matter halo velocity distribution.
        Speaker: Dr Brian Feldstein (University of Oxford)
        Slides
      • 15:10
        Latest results from the CDEX experiment at China Jinping Underground Laboratory 20m
        We present the latest results on light Dark Matter WIMP searches at China Jinping Underground Laboratory from a p-type point-contact germanium detector enclosed by a NaI(Tl) anti-Compton detector. An order of magnitude improvement in the sensitivities for low-mass WIMP searches over our previous results is achieved. The analysis procedures of our results as well as the status and perspectives of the CDEX experiment will be discussed.
        Speaker: Shin-Ted LIN (Sichuan University)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Light WIMP searches with Germanium Detectors of sub-keV Sensitivitie 20m
        Hau-Bin Li, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan. (On behalf of the TEXONO Collaboration) Germanium detectors with sub-keV sensitivities can probe low-mass WIMP Dark Matter. This experimental approach is pursued at the Kuo-Sheng Neutrino Laboratory (KSNL) in Taiwan and at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL) in China via the TEXONO and CDEX programs, respectively. The highlights of R&D efforts on point-contact germanium detectors and in particular the differentiation of surface and bulk events by pulse shape analysis [1] will be described. The latest results on WIMP-nucleon scattering cross-sections[2] will be presented. Some of the allowed parameter space implied by other experiments are probed and excluded. Future prospects will be discussed. 1. H.B. Li et al., Astropart. Phys. 56, 1 (2014) 2. H.B. Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 261301 (2013) ; W. Zhao et al. Phys. Rev. D 88, 052004 (2013).
        Speaker: Hau-Bin Li (Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan)
        Slides
      • 15:50
        A dark matter search using CCDs 20m
        DAMIC is a novel dark matter search experiment that has a unique sensitivity to hypothetic dark matter particles with masses below 10 GeV. Due to the CCD's low electronic readout noise (R.M.S. ~ 3 electrons), this instrument is able to reach a detection threshold of 60 eV, suitable for the search in the low mass range. The excellent energy response and high spatial resolution of a CCD image allow a powerful background characterization. Early DAMIC runs determined the world's best cross-section limits for WIMPs with masses below 4 GeV. Here we report on DAMIC100, a fully funded dark matter search detector with a target mass of 100 grams of silicon that will be installed at Snolab during the Summer of 2014. We also discuss the challenges associated with the scale-up of the experiment, the calibration efforts for low energy nuclear recoils in silicon, and the prospects for the first physics results after a one year run.
        Speaker: Federico Izraelevitch (Fermilab)
        Slides
    • 14:30 15:50
      Gamma-Ray Astrophysics: Galactic (rescheduled)
      • 14:30
        Unprecedented results on the Crab nebula and pulsar with the MAGIC telescopes. 15m
        MAGIC is a system of two atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes located in the Canary island of La Palma. MAGIC has low energy threshold, down to 50 Gev, well suited to study the still poorly explored energy band below 100 GeV. Although the space-borne gamma-ray telescope Fermi/LAT is sensitive up to 300 GeV, gamma-ray rates drop fast with increasing energy, and statistics are scarce above few GeV. Therefore, only recently the combination of MAGIC and Fermi/LAT observations have allowed to bridge the missing gap in the high-energy component of astrophysical spectra of several kind of sources, e.g., flat spectrum radio quasars, distant BL Lac objects, pulsar wind nebulae and pulsars. In addition, it has allowed the discovery of a high-energy tail, up to 400 GeV, in the spectrum of the Crab pulsar, challenging all existing pulsar models which were predicting spectral cut offs at around few GeV. In this talk we focus on the recent results on the Crab nebula and pulsar obtained with the stereoscopic MAGIC system. We will present a differential energy spectrum of the Crab nebula spanning from 50 GeV up to almost 30 TeV with an unprecedented statistical precision below 100 GeV. In this latter energy range, MAGIC results, combined with Fermi/LAT ones, provided the most precise measurement of the inverse Compton peak position so far, (52.5 +- 2.6) GeV. We also consider two state-of-the-art theoretical models to describe the available multiwavelength energy data, and we conclude that none of them can satisfactorily reproduce the comprehensive picture of the Crab nebula, given the available measurements at all wavelengths. We will also report new, and more precise, measurements of the Crab pulsar profile obtained with a larger data sample. Among other findings, we will present the discovery of the bridge emission, between the two peaks, above 50 GeV. The overall picture of the Crab pulsar at high energies, as shown by the MAGIC results, is challenging even the most recent pulsar models.
        Speaker: Daniela Hadasch (University of Innsbruck)
      • 14:45
        The Galactic Center region at very-high energies with H.E.S.S. 15m
        The Galactic Centre region has been observed by the complete H.E.S.S.-I array of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes since 2004 leading to the detection of the very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV)gamma-ray source HESS J1745-290 coincident in position with the supermassive black hole Sgr A*. A TeV gamma-ray diffuse emission has been detected along the Galactic ridge, very likely to be related to cosmic-ray interactions in giant molecular clouds of the Central Molecular Zone. We report here a study of the inner 50 pc of the Galactic Centre region using the full data set of 2004-2013 observations. In the light the morphological and spectral analyses of the unprecedented high quality H.E.S.S. data, we discuss the implication of the observed emissions to the understanding of the Galactic cosmic-ray population.
        Speaker: Aion Viana (M)
      • 15:00
        The Spectrum and Morphology of the Fermi Bubbles 20m
        The Fermi bubbles are two large structures in the gamma-ray sky extending up to 55 deg above and below the Galactic center. We present our analysis of 50 months of Fermi-LAT pass7 reprocessed data from 100 MeV to 500 GeV above 10 deg in Galactic latitude to derive the spectrum and morphology of the Fermi bubbles. We perform a detailed study of the systematic uncertainties due to the modeling of the Galactic diffuse emission. We find a cutoff in the energy spectrum around 110 GeV with more than 7 sigma significance, an excess of the emission in the south-east side of the bubbles, but no evidence for the existence of a jet and no spectral variations as a function of latitude within the systematic uncertainties. The width of the bubble boundary is estimated to be around 3 deg. Both inverse Compton (IC) models and hadronic models including IC emission from secondary leptons fit the gamma-ray data well. In the IC scenario, the synchrotron emission from the same population of electrons can also explain the WMAP and Planck microwave haze with a magnetic field between 5 and $20\mu$G.
        Speaker: Anna Franckowiak (SLAC/KIPAC)
        Slides
      • 15:20
        Towards an Improved Model of Diffuse Gamma-ray Emission from the Milky Way: mapping the dust, gas, and radiation field. 15m
        The strongest WIMP annihilation signals are expected from the inner Milky Way, but foreground contribution from cosmic-ray interactions with the gas and radiation field are strongest there as well. Therefore, indirect detection has been hampered by insufficient knowledge of the diffuse gamma-ray foregrounds. Improved modeling requires a 3D map of gas and dust (for $\pi^0$ and brem photons) and a 6D map of the radiation field (for inverse Compton), along with models of cosmic-ray density in both protons/nuclei and electrons. Using observations of 650,000,000 stars from the Pan-STARRS1 survey, we are currently making a 3D map of the interstellar material and the stellar luminosity density. I will show our progress so far, and speculate about what could be done with future data to better understand the diffuse gamma-ray emission in our galaxy.
        Speaker: Douglas Finkbeiner (Harvard University)
        Slides
      • 15:35
        PANGU: a High Resolution Gamma-Ray Space Telescope 15m
        We propose a high angular resolution telescope dedicated to the sub-GeV gamma-ray astronomy as a candidate for the CAS-ESA joint small mission. This mission, called PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit), will open up a unique window of electromagnetic spectrum that has never been explored with great precision. A wide range of topics of both astronomy and fundamental physics can be attacked with a telescope that has an angular resolution about one order of magnitude better than the currently operating Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) in the sub-GeV range, covering galactic and extragalactic cosmic-ray physics, extreme physics of a variety of extended (e.g. supernova remnants, galaxies, galaxy clusters) and compact (e.g. black holes, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts) objects, solar and terrestrial gamma-ray phenomena, and searching for Dark Matter (DM) decay and/or annihilation signature etc. The unprecedented resolution can be achieved with a pair-production telescope that, instead of the high-Z converter commonly used, relies on a large number of thin active tracking layers to increase the photon conversion probability, and to precisely reconstruct the pair-produced electron and positron tracks. Scintillating fibers or thin silicon micro-strip detectors are suitable technology for such a tracker. The energy measurement is achieved by measuring the momentum of the electrons and positrons through a magnetic field. The innovated spectrometer approach provides superior photon conversion identification and photon pointing resolution, and is particular suitable in the sub-GeV range, where the opening angle between the electron and positron is relatively large. The level of tracking precision makes it possible to measure the polarization of gamma rays, which would open up a new frontier in gamma-ray astronomy. The sub-GeV full sky survey by PANGU would provides crucial link with GeV to TeV maps from current/future missions including Fermi, DAMPE, HERD, and CTA.
        Speaker: Dr Meng Su (MIT, USA)
    • 14:30 16:00
      Neutrinos: Sterile Neutrinos Room 4 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 4

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Carsten Rott (Sungkyunkwan University)
      • 14:30
        Are there sterile neutrinos at the eV scale? 20m
        I will discuss the status of several hints for sterile neutrinos at the eV scale. While those hints point towards a similar neutrino mass scale various constraints on the mixing angles make it difficult to obtain a good description of all data simultaneously. I will review the situation from oscillation experiments and mention briefly additional constraints from cosmology.
        Speaker: Thomas Schwetz-Mangold (Stockholm University (SE))
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Constraining light sterile neutrinos with cosmological data 20m
        In the last few years the imprint of light sterile neutrinos on cosmological data sets has been deeply investigated within the framework of different theoretical scenarios. Nevertheless the question whether cosmology can accommodate the existence of additional neutrinos is still open. The strong dependence of the results on the underlined cosmological model and on the included data sets contributes to a puzzling scenario. Recently the discovery of B-modes in the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background has reopened the debate, providing new life to light sterile neutrinos and their unique imprinting on CMB as a dark radiation component. I will review the status of the cosmological constraints on light sterile neutrinos, focussing the discussion on the consistency with neutrino oscillation experiments.
        Speaker: Maria Archidiacono (Aarhus University)
        Slides
      • 15:10
        Sterile neutrinos at neutrino telescopes 20m
        Atmospheric neutrino data collected by huge neutrino telescopes, such as IceCube, provide the opportunity to probe new physics unprecedentedly, both due to high statistics and the high energy range. In this talk I discuss the effect of sterile neutrinos on atmospheric neutrino flux. I present the current constraints on active-sterile mixing obtained from IC-40 and IC-79 data sets. Also the sensitivity prospect of the IceCube/DeepCore will be discussed for both muon-track and cascade events.
        Speaker: Arman Esmaili Taklimi
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Search for sterile neutrinos with the STEREO experiment 15m
        All previous neutrino oscillation experiments at short distance from reactors have measured a small deficit of neutrinos with respect to predictions. This deficit could be explained either by a systematic error on the flux prediction, either by the existence of a new neutrino state, a light sterile neutrino. This new neutrino with no ordinary weak interaction would not be directly detected but could mix with the three ordinary neutrinos. If proven, the existence of this particle would be a major discovery, with deep impact in particle physics and cosmology. The goal of the Stereo experiment is to answer the existence of a sterile neutrino with a detector located at ten meters from the ILL reactor. The design of the detector with six independent cells will allow to measure the neutrino energy spectrum as a function of the distance from the reactor. Currently under construction, the detector will start the data-taking at the beginning of 2015. Physical motivations for the existence of a sterile neutrino will be first introduced. Then, the STEREO experiment will be described in details, particularly the systematic errors and background problematics. Finally, expected sensitivities on the neutrino parameters, the mixing angle and the squared mass difference, will be presented.
        Speaker: Jacob Lamblin (U)
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Effects of sterile states on lepton dipole moments 15m
        We investigate the contribution of sterile states to the anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments of charged leptons. Furthermore, as a specific example, we study this effect in a low-scale seesaw model. We perform a complete numerical study scanning the relevant parameter space of the models.
        Speaker: Valentina De Romeri (CNRS)
        Slides
    • 14:30 16:00
      Particle Physics Room 6 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 6

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Christoph Weniger (University of Amsterdam)
      • 14:30
        Interplay of direct, indirect and collider searches 20m
        Interplay of direct, indirect and collider searches
        Speaker: Christopher McCabe
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Impact of Semi-annihilation of Z3 Symmetric Dark Matter with Radiative Neutrino Masses 15m
        We investigate a Z3 symmetric model with radiative neutrino masses at two loop level. A particle which can be Dark Matter in the model is either of a Dirac fermion or a complex scalar as a result of unbroken Z3 symmetry. In addition to typical annihilation processes of Dark Matter, semi-annihilation processes give an important effect when the relic density is calculated together with some experimental restrictions. A different Dark Matter phenomenology from Z2 radiative neutrino models is expected. Interesting signatures in Dark Matter searches are also discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Takashi Toma (Durham University)
        Slides
      • 15:05
        Performance of LHC searches with MET for models with compressed spectra 20m
        Searches for events with Missing Transverse Energy at the LHC are among the most powerful methods for the identification of Dark Matter candidates. For this purpose, selection and kinematic cuts have often been designed assuming that the mass hierarchies between the Dark Matter candidate and strongly-interacting states of the model are large, as it is generally the case in supersymmetric scenarios. However, Dark Matter is also predicted in different model of new physics, such as Universal Extra Dimensions, where physical properties may be different: the Dark Matter candidate may have a different spin and spectra may be compressed, thus affecting the kinematic features of the signal. The performance of experimental searches in testing such different scenarios will be analysed to identify possible yet unexplored regions where signals of Dark Matter may be found.
        Speaker: Luca Panizzi (University of Southampton)
      • 15:25
        Can AMS-02 discriminate the origin of an anti-proton signal? 15m
        Indirect searches can be used to test dark matter models against expected signals in various channels, in particular antiprotons. With antiproton data available soon at higher and higher energies, it is important to test the dark matter hypothesis against alternative astrophysical sources, {\it e.g. } secondaries accelerated in supernova remnants. We investigate the degeneracy of the two signals from different dark models and different supernova remnant parameters as forecasted for the AMS-02 and show that the two signals may not be disantagled.
        Speaker: Giorgio Busoni (SISSA, Trieste)
      • 15:40
        Gamma-rays from the Inert Doublet Model at the TeV scale. 15m
        The Inert Doublet Model contains a neutral stable particle which is a viable dark matter candidate. I will discuss the indirect signatures of this model in gamma-rays when the dark matter mass is at the TeV scale. In particular, I will consider the interplay between the annihilation process into two photons and the internal bremsstrahlung process $DM DM \to W^+W^- \gamma$. I will show that non-perturbative effects - the so-called Sommerfeld enhancement- should be taken into account in order to satisfy the requirements from unitarity. I will illustrate all this with some benchmark points, compatible with the observed relic density and all other direct and indirect detection experiments.
        Speaker: Mr Camilo Garcia Cely (Technical University Munich)
        Slides
    • 15:50 16:30
      Coffee Break 40m
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 16:10 16:30
      Coffee Break 20m
    • 16:30 18:30
      Dark Matter: Cosmological Aspects Room 5 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 5

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 16:30
        Cosmology Falling in Love with Sterile Neutrinos 20m
        Despite the astonishing success of standard $\Lambda$CDM cosmology, there is mounting evidence for a tension with observations at small and intermediate scales (missing satellites, cusp vs. core and too big to fail problems). We introduce a simple model where both cold dark matter (DM) and sterile neutrinos are charged under a new $U(1)_X$ gauge interaction. The resulting DM self-interactions resolve the tension with the observed abundances and internal density structures of dwarf galaxies. At the same time, the sterile neutrinos can account for both the small hot DM component favored by cosmological observations and the neutrino anomalies found in short-baseline experiments.
        Speaker: Joern Kersten (University of Bergen)
        Slides
      • 16:50
        Warm Dark Matter from the Large Scale Structure 20m
        Warm Dark Matter (WDM) is a generalisation of the standard Cold Dark Matter model in the sense that it does not assume dark matter particles to be absolutely cold. In the simplest models all dark matter is made of the same particles, which started out in thermal equilibrium and cooled to effectively become cold today. If such particles have masses of the order of a keV or less, they leave an observable imprint on the dark matter density field. At late times, the perturbations in the matter density field become non-linear. This means that they cannot be described perturbatively any longer. For this reason, N-body simulations are a good way to understand the formation of non-linear structure. Simulating WDM can be a challenge, because unlike CDM, it’s relatively large thermal velocities can introduce unwanted Poisson noise on small scales. With better computing resources nowadays it has become possible to examine WDM cosmologies with simulations. This talk will present results of such simulations together with the halo model and discuss how to calculate non-linear corrections to the matter power spectrum, which describes the matter density field today. It will also discuss the possibility of constraining the dark matter particle mass using measurements of large scale structure, like cosmic shear or galaxy clustering.
        Speaker: Dr Katarina Markovic (University of Manchester)
      • 17:10
        Dark-matter distributions around massive black holes: A general relativistic Analysis 20m
        The cold dark matter at the center of a galaxy will be redistributed by the presence of a massive black hole. We apply the adiabatic growth framework in a fully relativistic setting to obtain the final dark-matter density for both cored and cusped initial distributions. Besides the implications for indirect detection estimates, we show that the gravitational effects of such a dark-matter spike are smaller than the relativistic effects of the black hole for stars orbiting close to the black hole that might be candidates for testing the black-hole no-hair theorems.
        Speaker: Francesc Ferrer (W)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        eV sterile neutrinos as hot dark matter 20m
        Light sterile neutrinos with masses of order 1 eV have been suggested to resolve anomalies in various neutrino oscillation experiments. In a cosmological context, these sterile neutrinos would act as a (hot) dark matter component. I will review their impact on cosmological observables and discuss the observational status following the recent measurements of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies by Planck.
        Speaker: Dr Jan Hamann (CERN)
      • 17:50
        The status of late-time decays of dark matter 20m
        The simplest phenomenological model for cosmological dark matter is the “cold dark matter” (CDM) model. This model assumes that dark matter is cold, collisionless, and stable. Recently, these three tenets of CDM have been challenged on both observational and theoretical grounds. In this talk, I present a review of recent work on investigations into the stability of dark matter. I consider both the cases in which dark matter decays into Standard-Model or “hidden sector” particles.
        Speaker: Prof. Annika Peter (The Ohio State University)
      • 18:10
        Using Cosmological Data to study Dark Matter Interactions with Radiation 20m
        Despite the large number of dedicated experiments, an understanding of the particle nature of dark matter and direct evidence for its existence have remained elusive. However, detection methods generally assume that dark matter consists of cold, massive particles. In this talk, I will discuss how cosmological data from the CMB and Large-Scale Structure can be used to study dark matter interactions with radiation in a model-independent framework.
        Speaker: Mr Ryan Wilkinson (IPPP, Durham University)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      Dark Matter: Direct Detection Room 3 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 3

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Marek Kos (Syracuse University)
      • 16:30
        Direction-Sensitive Dark Matter Detection with the DMTPC Experiment 20m
        The Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC) collaboration is developing a low-pressure TPC with optical and charge readout for direction-sensitive dark matter detection, in order to correlate a dark matter candidate nuclear recoil signal, in a detector deep underground, with the earth's motion through the galactic dark matter halo. The unique angular signature of the dark matter wind, which is distinct from all known backgrounds, has potential to make a definitive identification of dark matter. The design strategy of directional detectors emphasizes tracking at energies below 100 keV, in order to reconstruct WIMP-induced nuclear recoil tracks, and thereby determine the direction of incident dark matter particles. This talk will report on recent progress on demonstrating direction-sensitivity in data from prototype DMTPC detectors, on scaling the DMTPC detector technology, and on new work exploring the potential for directional detection experimental sensitivity to exceed the neutrino bound.
        Speaker: Prof. Jocelyn Monroe (Royal Holloway University of London)
        Slides
      • 16:50
        The DRIFT directional WIMP detectors - improved limits and progress to scale-up 20m
        The DRIFT (directional recoil identification from tracks) concept is currently the most sensitive technique being developed with capability to observe a galactic signature for WIMP dark matter by measuring the direction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils in a gas. The collaboration is well advanced in the design and testing of a next generation experiment, DRIFT III, comprising up to 24 m3 target volume using CF4/CS2/O2 gas, planned for installation in a large new underground laboratory complex currently being built at the Boulby underground site, UK. DRIFT III aims for a directional spin dependent sensitivity increase of >x100 compared to current DRIFT published values. We review technical progress in the development of DRIFT III, including use of O2 minority carrier gas for fiducialisation. We outline the status of the new Boulby facility laboratories and upgrades.
        Speaker: Neil Spooner (University of Sheffield)
        Slides
      • 17:10
        Model Independent Bounds in Direct Dark Matter Searches 20m
        Direct searches for Dark Matter (DM) aim at detecting the nuclear recoils arising from a scattering between DM particles and target nuclei in underground detectors. Since the physics that describes the collision between DM particles and target nuclei is deeply non-relativistic, in this presentation I’ll review a different and more general approach to study signal in direct DM searches based on the formalism of non-relativistic operators. Then I’ll present the main observables pointing out all the uncertainties that enter in this field. Finally, since the underlying relativistic theory that describes both the DM and the standard model fields is unknown, in the last part of this presentation I’ll present a new method and a self-contained set of numerical tools to the derive the bounds from some current direct detection experiments on virtually any arbitrary model of DM elastically scattering on target nuclei.
        Speaker: Paolo Panci (Institute d'Astrophysique de Paris (IAP))
      • 17:30
        Bayesian Reconstruction of the WIMP Velocity Distribution Function from Direct Dark Matter Detection Data 20m
        In this talk, I present our recent work on the introduction of Bayesian analysis to our model-independent reconstruction of the one-dimensional velocity distribution function of Galactic WIMPs. In this process, the (rough) velocity distribution reconstructed by using raw data from direct Dark Matter detection experiments directly has been used as "reconstructed-input" information. By assuming a fitting (theoretical) velocity distribution function and scanning the parameter space based on the Bayesian analysis, the astronomical characteristic parameters, e.g. the Solar and Earth's Galactic velocities, will be pinned down as the output results. I will first describe the use of this recently developed technique for our newest announced work and then discuss numerical results of our Monte-Carlo simulations.
        Speaker: Chung-Lin SHAN (N)
        Slides
      • 17:50
        NEWAGE - direction-sensitive dark matter search 20m
        NEWAGE is a direction sensitive WIMP search experiment using micro pixel chamber. After our first underground measurement at Kamioka (PLB686(2010)11), we constructed new detector, NEWAGE-0.3b'. NEWAGE-0.3b' was designed to have a twice larger target volume with low background material, a lowered threshold of $50\,\rm keV$, an improved data acquisition system, and a gas circulation system with cooled charcoal. A direction-sensitive dark matter search in Kamioka underground laboratory with NEWAGE-0.3b’ was performed from July 17th, 2013 to November 12th, 2013. With an exposure of $0.327\,\rm kg\cdot days$, a new direction-sensitive SD cross section limit $557\,\rm pb$ for WIMP mass of $200\,\rm GeV/c^2$ was obtained. This result improved the limit by about 10 times from previous measurement, and marks the best direction-sensitive limit. From the detail study on the remaining background, alpha particles from the substrate of $\mu$-PIC was found to be the dominant background, and prospects for future improvements will be reported.
        Speaker: Kiseki Nakamura (Kyoto University)
        Slides
      • 18:10
        Low Mass WIMP Directional Detection 20m
        Can directional detection provide any input to the low mass WIMP region? We will show results from measurements of low energy recoils using a low pressure optical TPC which demonstrates the capabilities of a realistic directional detector. Results from those measurements are extrapolated to find the detector characteristics most suitable for low mass WIMP searches. Finally, some preliminary directional measurements of low energy nuclear recoils in the pressure regime required for those searches will be presented.
        Speaker: Mr Nguyen Phan (University of New Mexico)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      Neutrinos: Neutrino Properties Room 4 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 4

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Carsten Rott (Sungkyunkwan University)
      • 16:30
        PINGU and the Neutrino Mass Hierarchy 20m
        The Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade (PINGU) is a proposed IceCube in-fill array designed to measure the neutrino mass hierarchy using atmospheric neutrino interactions in the ice cap at the South Pole. PINGU will have a neutrino energy threshold of a few GeV with a multi-megaton effective volume. We present PINGU's expected sensitivity to the hierarchy with optimized geometry and with consideration of a full complement of systematic uncertainties. We also present PINGU sensitivity to other topics in neutrino oscillations, as well as to low-mass dark matter and earth core composition.
        Speaker: Douglas Cowen (Pennsylvania State University)
        Slides
      • 16:50
        Origin of Neutrino Mass and the LHC 20m
        To unravel the mystery of neutrino masses and mixing angles, we adopt a bottom-up approach based on effective operators which violate lepton number by two units. By opening the effective operators, we can find the corresponding minimal UV completions. We discuss how the minimal UV completions of the dimension-7 operators can be tested at the LHC as well as one example based on a dimension-9 operator.
        Speaker: Michael Schmidt (The University of Melbourne)
      • 17:10
        The Majorana nature of massive neutrinos as a possible hint for new physics 20m
        Determining the nature - Dirac or Majorana - of massive neutrinos, possibly related to a New Physics scale beyond that predicted by the Standard Model is a fundamental problem under study. Significant experimental efforts have been made to unveil the possible Majorana nature of massive neutrinos by searching for neutrinoless double beta decay with increasing sensitivity. These constraints, together with the results from beta-decay experiments and in light of the recent (and future) cosmological observations can be combined in order to extract information on new possible couplings in the Lagrangian of particle interactions, changing the total lepton charge $L=L_e + L_\mu + L_\tau$ by two units. Further if it will be experimentally established the Majorana nature of massive neutrinos, via the observation of the $2\beta0\nu$-decay, it will be possible to test the compatibility of the usual 3-neutrino scenario with the possible existence of 1 or 2 additional sterile neutrino states with masses at the eV scale (the so called 3+1 and 3+2 schemes) and to study the implications of all this on the general properties of the neutrino mass matrix.
        Speaker: Aurora Meroni (Università Roma Tre/LNF)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Towards a common origin of neutrino and dark matter 20m
        Sterile neutrino is the most straightforward example connecting neutrino physics and DM. But there are different possibilities. For instance if neutrino masses are generated radiatively then new fields must be assumed and they could be good DM candidates. Another example is in the context of flavor symmetries. Spontaneous breaking of flavor symmetries can give an explanation for the stability of the DM giving a new framework where neutrino and DM could be related. However the question is how deep is the connection between neutrino and DM physics from the phenomenological point of view. In this talk I give a short review of different possibilities.
        Speaker: Stefano Morisi
        Slides
      • 17:50
        Probation of flavor transition mechanism with cosmogenic neutrinos 20m
        The determination of neutrino flavor transition mechanism by neutrino telescopes is presented. With a model-independent parametrization, we are able to classify flavor transitions (such as standard three-flavor oscillations, neutrino decays or others) of astrophysical neutrinos propagating from their sources to the Earth. We demonstrate how one can constrain parameters of the above parametrization by performing flavor identifications in neutrino telescopes. Given the anticipated flavor discrimination capability in the future radio-wave based neutrino telescope and the expected cosmogenic neutrino events, we work out the corresponding allowed ranges for flavor transition parameters. The possibility of distinguishing neutrino decay models from the standard three-flavor oscillations in the future neutrino telescope as mentioned is discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Kwang-Chang Lai (Chang Gung University)
        Slides
      • 18:10
        Determination of (sterile/active) neutrino absolute masses in Hyper-K by detecting SN neutrinos 20m
        TBD
        Speaker: Kazunori Kohri (K)
    • 16:30 18:50
      Particle Physics Room 6 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 6

      Tuschinski Theatre

      Convener: Christopher McCabe
      • 16:30
        The H-dibaryon: possible dark matter particle within QCD 15m
        The H dibaryon is a potentially very deeply-bound 6-quark state — uuddss -- with a mass of ~1.5 GeV. It is a spin-0, flavor-singlet, scalar carrying baryon-number of 2. As will be reviewed, such a particle would have evaded detection in accelerator and other searches. (Preliminary lattice simulations show it is deeply bound compared to other 6-quark states, but they are not yet good enough to provide a reliable mass determination.) Although the H’s interactions are gluon-mediated, it is expected to be very compact and to interact only modestly with itself and with ordinary matter. Its low energy scattering cross section on nucleons is ~ 10^{-30} cm^-2 or less, causing it to fall into a regime of DM properties which has not yet been probed by direct detection experiments. Recent calculations of its relic abundance will be reported, showing that under reasonable assumptions, H-dibaryons would naturally account for the observed DM density. The H is inert with respect to nuclear interaction and thus does not affect primordial nucleosynthesis. An H cannot annihilate with either ordinary matter or another H, so constraints based on heating do not apply. Whether H-dark matter could affect helioseismology remains to be determined. Its modestly-interacting character means its interaction with ordinary matter or with itself are probably insignificant cosmologically. Thus the only way to detect H-dibaryon-DM is likely to be through dedicated direct detection experiments. Strategies to detect H-dibaryon-DM, using a sensitive torsion balance or quantum calorimetry, will be described.
        Speaker: Glennys Farrar (NYU)
      • 16:45
        Asymmetric dark matter and $2 \leftrightarrow 2$ interactions 15m
        Common mechanisms invoked to explain particle antiparticle asymmetries involve the out-of-equilibrium and CP violating decay of a heavy particle. In this talk I discuss the role CP violating $2 \leftrightarrow 2$ annihilations can play -- together with the usual $1 \leftrightarrow 2$ decays and inverse decays -- in determining the final asymmetry. I will present a simple toy model to point out the salient features of such a scenario and to illustrate how an asymmetry can arise while respecting CPT and S-matrix unitarity. Annihilations may actually dominate over decays in determining the final asymmetry in certain areas of parameter space. In this scenario related asymmetries are created in two distinct low-energy sectors. Such a mechanism could explain asymmetric dark matter.
        Speaker: Iason Baldes (University of Melbourne)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        FIMP realization of the scotogenic model 15m
        The scotogenic model is one of the simplest scenarios for physics beyond the Standard Model that can account for neutrino masses and dark matter at the TeV scale. It contains another scalar doublet and three additional singlet fermions (Ni), all odd under a Z2 symmetry. We examine the possibility that the dark matter candidate, N1, does not reach thermal equilibrium in the early Universe so that it behaves as a Feebly Interacting Massive Particle (FIMP). In that case, it is found that the freeze-in production of dark matter is entirely dominated by the decays of the odd scalars. We compute the resulting dark matter abundance and study its dependence with the parameters of the model. The freeze-in mechanism is shown to be able to account for the observed relic density over a wide range of dark matter masses, from the keV to the TeV scale. In addition to freeze-in, the N1 relic density receives a further contribution from the late decay of the next-to-lightest odd particle, which we also analyze. Finally, we consider the possibility that the dark matter particle is a WIMP but receives an extra contribution to its relic density from the decay of the FIMP (N1). In this case, important signals at direct and indirect detection experiments are generally expected.
        Speaker: Dr Emiliano Molinaro (TUM)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Thermal dark matter implies new physics not far above TeV 15m
        I present a model independent analysis of thermal dark matter constraining its mass and interaction strengths with data from astro- and particle physics experiments. Using effective field theory to describe interactions of dark matter particles I cover real and complex scalar, Dirac and Majorana fermion, and vector boson dark matter candidates. I show posterior probability distributions for the mass and interaction strengths for the various spin cases. The observationally favored dark matter particle mass region is 10-100 GeV with effective interactions that have a cut-off at 0.1-1 TeV. This is mainly the result of the requirement that the thermal abundance of dark matter does not exceed the observed value. Thus thermal dark matter coupled with present data implies new physics most likely under 10 TeV.
        Speaker: Csaba Balazs (Monash University)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        An open window for high reheating temperatures in supersymmetry 15m
        Supersymmetric scenarios where the lightest superparticle (LSP) is the gravitino are an attractive alternative to the widely studied case of a neutralino LSP. A strong motivation for a gravitino LSP arises from the possibility of allowing higher reheating temperatures which are required by thermal leptogenesis and can be considered more likely in the light of the recently reported BICEP2 data. The predictions for the primordial abundances of light elements in the presence of a late decaying next-to-LSP (NSLP) as well as the currently measured dark matter abundance allow us to probe the cosmological viability of such a scenario. Here we consider a gravitino-stau scenario. Utilizing a pMSSM scan we work out the implications of the 7 and 8 TeV LHC results as well as other experimental and theoretical constraints on the highest reheating temperatures that are cosmologically allowed. Our analysis shows that points with $T_R>10^9$ GeV survive only in a very particular corner of the SUSY parameter space. Those spectra feature a distinct signature at colliders that can be tested in the upcoming LHC run.
        Speaker: Dr Jan Heisig (RWTH Aachen University)
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Co-annihilating dark matter and effective operator analysis 15m
        We study dark matter (DM) models in which there are two dark sector particles, $\chi_1$ and $\chi_2$, of near mass. In such models, co-annihilation of $\chi_1$ and $\chi_2$ may be the dominant process controlling the DM relic density during freezeout in the early universe. In this scenario, there is no significant contribution to direct and indirect detection signals, unless there exists an extreme degeneracy in the masses of the lightest dark sector particles. Therefore, relic density constraints and collider searches provide the most relevant information about these models. We consider Dirac fermion dark matter which couples to standard model (SM) particles via an effective operator. For the collider phenomenology, where an effective field theory may not be valid, we adopt a simple Z' model to provide an appropriate UV completion. We explore the interesting LHC signals that arise from the dark matter production process $pp \rightarrow \overline{\chi_1} + \chi_2 + \textrm{ jet}$, followed by the decay $\chi_2 \rightarrow \chi_1 + SM$.
        Speaker: Yi Cai
      • 18:00
        Gaugino annihilation and co-annihilation with DM@NLO 15m
        A powerful method to constrain the MSSM parameter space is to compare the predicted dark matter relic density with cosmological precision measurements, in particular the Planck data. On the particle physics side, the main uncertainty for a given spectrum arises from the (co-)annihilation cross sections of the dark matter particle. After a motivation for including higher order corrections in the prediction of the relic density, recent results on the impact of gaugino (co)-annihilation on neutralino dark matter calculated at NLO in SUSY QCD will be discussed.
        Speaker: Patrick Steppeler (WWU Münster)
        Slides
      • 18:15
        Strong thermal leptogenesis and the $N_2$-dominated scenario 15m
        I will briefly review the main aims and concepts of leptogenesis, analysing different possible realisations. Particular attention will be devoted to the so-called $N_2$-dominated scenario, both in its unflavoured and flavoured versions. Its main features will be pointed out, as well as the impact of possible relevant corrections. I will then consider the conditions required by strong thermal leptogenesis, where the final asymmetry is fully independent of the initial conditions. Barring strong cancellations in the seesaw formula and in the flavoured decay parameters, I will show that strong thermal leptogenesis favours a lightest neutrino mass $m_1>\sim 10$ meV for normal ordering and $m_1>\sim3$ meV for inverted ordering. Finally, I will comment on the power of absolute neutrino mass scale experiments to either support or severely corner strong thermal leptogenesis. This work is mainly based on [arXiv:1401.6185][1] [1]: http://arxiv.org/abs/1401.6185
        Speaker: Mr Michele Re Fiorentin (University of Southampton)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:30
      Plenary Talks Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 09:00
        Invited Talk: Neutrino Astronomy: No Longer a Dream 30m
        The great promise of neutrino astronomy has been known for decades, though it seemed impossibly out of reach. With neutrinos, we would reveal the insides of astrophysical objects, the high particle energies in the engines that power them, and the original timescales on which those engines evolve. In contrast, with photons, we see just the outsides of these objects, with spectra downgraded by thermalization, and time profiles smoothed by diffusion. Finally, the age in which neutrino astronomy becomes an observational science instead of a theorist's dream is here. What have we learned already? What might we learn soon? And what are the long-term prospects?
        Speaker: John Beacom (Ohio State University)
        Slides
      • 09:30
        Invited Talk: The next generation neutrino telescope 30m
        KM3NeT is a new research infrastructure consisting of a cabled network of deep-sea neutrino telescopes in the Mediterranean Sea. The main objective of KM3NeT is the discovery and subsequent observation of high-energy neutrino sources in the Universe. Three suitable deep-sea sites have been identified, namely off-shore Toulon (France), Capo Passero (Italy) and Pylos (Greece). The list of design features of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope includes an optical module with 31 3-inch photo-multiplier tubes, an integrated data-transmission and clock system and a high-efficiency power network. All data are sent from the deep sea to the shore where they are processed in real-time by a farm of commodity PCs. The filtered data are sent to various computer centers around Europe for offline analyses. The remote operation of the deep-sea facility and the fast access to these computer centers make it possible to take and analyse data from anywhere in the world. The angular resolution, the geographical location and the size make KM3NeT an ideal instrument to observe neutrinos from Galactic sources. The neutrino signal recently reported by IceCube has led KM3NeT to consider an intermediate phase to measure the IceCube signal with different methodology, improved resolution and complementary field of view. Furthermore, a study was launched to find out whether a measurement of the mass hierarchy of neutrinos using the same technology but a different detector layout is feasible. The KM3NeT infrastructure will also host a network of cabled observatories with a wide array of dedicated instruments for oceanographic, geophysical and marine biological research. The status and future prospects of the KM3NeT project will be presented, with emphasis on the discovery potential of neutrino point sources. The synergy with other sciences will be highlighted.
        Speaker: Maarten De Jong (NIKHEF (NL))
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Invited Talk: High energy neutrinos from the Cosmos: observations and scenarios 30m
        The neutrino observatory IceCube is opening a new observational window to the Universe. IceCube, which has been fully constructed in the icecap at the South Pole, is taking data since Spring 2011 in full configuration. The first years of data reveled the existence of extremely high-energy neutrinos at the hundreds of TeV up to the PeV scale, which are of astrophysical origin. In this talk, I will summarize the recent observation and discuss some of the astrophysical scenarios.
        Speaker: Prof. Elisa Resconi
        Slides
    • 10:30 11:00
      Coffee Break 30m Main Foyer (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Main Foyer

      Tuschinski Theatre

    • 11:00 12:30
      Plenary Talks Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 11:00
        Invited Talk: Status of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays 30m
        I will review the present results on Ultra-High energy cosmic rays and discuss the Astrophysical scenarios that could account for them as well as the possible connections to lower energy results and the prospects for the future.
        Speaker: Esteban Roulet (C)
        Slides
      • 11:30
        Invited Talk: Radio Measurements of Cosmic Ray Properties and Composition with LOFAR 30m
        Speaker: Dr Heino Falcke
      • 12:00
        Invited Talk: Learning about black holes and neutron stars using ground-based gravitational-wave detectors 30m
        In the next 5 years, ground-based interferometers such as advanced LIGO, Virgo and KAGRA, are likely to provide the first direct detections of gravitational waves. This will constitute a major scientific discovery, as it will permit a new kind of observation of the cosmos, quite different from today's electromagnetic and particle observations. In this talk I will review the current effort at developing accurate waveform models, so that we can take full advantage of the sensitivity of the detectors and extract unique information upon detection of gravitational waves from coalescing binary systems composed of black holes and/or neutron stars.
        Speaker: Prof. Alessandra Buonanno
    • 12:30 13:10
      Closing Room 1 (Tuschinski Theatre)

      Room 1

      Tuschinski Theatre

      • 12:30
        Summary Talk 30m
        Speaker: Dr dan hooper (fermilab)
      • 13:00
        Closing Remarks 10m
        Speaker: Gianfranco Bertone