Phenomenology 2014 Symposium

US/Eastern
University of Pittsburgh

University of Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh, PA 15260
Description
The 2014 Phenomenology Symposium will be held May 5-7, 2014 at the University of Pittsburgh.  It will cover the latest topics in particle phenomenology and theory plus related issues in astrophysics and cosmology.  Join us as we set a course for the next discovery!


Early registration ends April 13, 2014.

Talk submission ends April 20, 2014.

The tentative plenary program is now available.

The tentative full program is now available.

Tentative plenary topics and speakers:
  • Daniela Bortoletto (Purdue):  Measurements of the Higgs boson mass, width, and spin at the LHC
  • Steven Blusk (Syracuse):  Recent LHCb physics results
  • Keisuke Fujii (KEK):  Physics potential at the ILC
  • Yuri Gershtein (Rutgers):  Recent BSM results from ATLAS & CMS
  • Karen Gibson (Case Western Reserve):  Direct searches for WIMP dark matter
  • Garabed Halladjian (MSU):  Higgs boson production and coupling measurements at the LHC
  • Valentin Hirschi (SLAC):  Bridging theory and experiments
  • Joey Huston (MSU):  PDFs for Standard Model physics and beyond
  • Bhuv Jain (U Penn): Cosmology: dark energy and beyond
  • Chang Kee Jung (Stony Brook):  Neutrino Oscillations: Present and Future
  • Albrecht Karle (Wisconsin-Madison):  High energy astrophysical neutrinos - observations and implications
  • Alex Kusenko (UCLA):  Recent excitement in astro-particle physics
  • Andy Lankford (Irvine):  HEP in the LHC Era
  • Irina Mocioiu (Penn State):  Neutrino oscillations theory and phenomenology
  • Alexey Petrov (Wayne State):  Flavor physics in the LHC era
  • Clem Pryke (Univ. of Minnesota):  Evidence for Inflationary Gravitational Waves from BICEP2
  • Pearl Sandick (Utah):  Dark matter theory and searches
  • Martin Schmaltz (Boston):  Electroweak symmetry breaking after the Higgs
  • Jacob Searcy (Michigan):  Standard Model physics results from ATLAS and CMS
  • Ruth Van de Water (FNAL):  Modern lattice QCD: progress and prospects 
  • Nima Arkani-Hamed (IAS):  Future perspectives

Parallel session mini-reviews:
  • Mu-Chun Chen (UC Irvine):  Theory of lepton flavors
  • Jack Gunion (Davis):  News in two-Higgs doublet models
  • Arthur Kosowsky (Pitt): Theory of CMB polarization
  • Tilman Plehn (Heidelberg):  SM Higgs properties
  • Shufang Su (Arizona):  New physics under the Higgs lamp post
  • Xerxes Tata (Hawaii):  SUSY at the LHC
  • Lian-Tao Wang (Chicago):  Dark matter at colliders

Note: Particle Fever will be shown to all participants on Tuesday, from 8:00-10:00 PM in the Alumni Hall 7th floor Auditorium (the same location as the plenary sessions).

PITT PACC Travel Awards: With support from the NSF and DOE, there are a number of awards (up to $300 each) available to domestic graduate students for travel and accommodation to Pheno 14. A student applicant should send an updated CV and a statement of financial need, and arrange for a short recommendation letter sent from their thesis advisor, by email to pittpacc+award@pitt.edu. The decision will be based on the academic qualification, the talk submission to Pheno 14, and the financial need. The deadline for the application is the same as the talk submission April 20, and the winners will be notified by April 26.  (Each university may be limited to one awardee. Winners in the previous years may have lower priority for consideration.)


PHENO 2014 ORGANIZERS: Cindy Cercone, Neil Christensen, Ayres Freitas, Tao Han (chair), Adam Leibovich, Josh Sayre, Brock Tweedie, and Susanne Westhoff.

PHENO 2014 PROGRAM ADVISORS: Vernon Barger, Lisa Everett, Kaoru Hagiwara, JoAnne Hewett, Xerxes Tata, and Dieter Zeppenfeld.
Support
    • 07:30 08:40
      Registration & Breakfast 1h 10m Alumni Hall 7th Floor

      Alumni Hall 7th Floor

      University of Pittsburgh

    • 08:40 10:35
      Plenary I Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      University of Pittsburgh

      Pittsburgh, PA 15260
      Convener: Marc Sher (William and Mary College)
      • 08:40
        Welcome 5m
        Speaker: James Maher
      • 08:45
        Standard Model physics results from ATLAS and CMS 35m
        Speaker: Jacob Alexander Searcy (University of Michigan (US))
        Slides
      • 09:20
        Recent BSM results from ATLAS & CMS 35m
        Speaker: Yuri Gershtein (Rutgers, State Univ. of New Jersey (US))
        Slides
      • 09:55
        Higgs boson production and coupling measurements at the LHC 20m
        Speaker: Garabed Halladjian (Michigan State University (US))
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Measurements of the Higgs boson mass, width, and spin at the LHC 20m
        Speaker: Dr Daniela Bortoletto (Purdue University (US))
        Slides
    • 10:35 11:00
      Coffee Break 25m Alumni Hall 7th Floor

      Alumni Hall 7th Floor

      University of Pittsburgh

    • 11:00 12:45
      Plenary II Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      University of Pittsburgh

      Pittsburgh, PA 15260
      Convener: Prof. Stephen Martin (Northern Illinois University)
      • 11:00
        Electroweak symmetry breaking after the Higgs 35m
        Speaker: Martin Schmaltz
        Slides
      • 11:35
        PDF's for Standard Model physics and beyond 35m
        Speaker: Prof. Joey Huston (Michigan State University (US))
        Slides
      • 12:10
        Bridging theory and experiments 35m
        Speaker: Valentin Hirschi (Unknown-Unknown-Unknown)
        Slides
    • 12:45 14:00
      Lunch 1h 15m Oakland Area

      Oakland Area

    • 14:00 16:00
      BSM Higgs I Benedum Hall G30

      Benedum Hall G30

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Felix Yu (Fermilab)
      • 14:00
        New Physics under the Higgs Lamp Post 30m
        Speaker: Shufang Su (University of Arizona)
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Exotic Decays of the Higgs Boson 15m
        The discovery of the Higgs Boson presents us with a rich experimental program. In particular its unique sensitivity to the potential existence of new, light, weakly coupled particles can give rise to a large variety of exotic Higgs decays. The explicit search for those decays presents a largely untapped discovery opportunity of new physics for the LHC collaborations. I will describe the motivation and show examples of promising exotic Higgs decay channels based on arXiv:1312.4992.
        Speaker: Yi-Ming Zhong (YITP Stony Brook)
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Search for Non-SM Higgs Boson Decays to Boosted Dimuons at the LHC 15m
        Several BSM scenarios suggest the existence of new light bosons weakly coupled to most SM particles. Examples of such models are SUSY with "dark" sector or scenarios with extended Higgs sector, e.g. NMSSM. In these models, new bosons can be produced either in the Higgs decays or as part of SUSY cascades. Exotic decays of the Higgs can either hide the Higgs boson from standard searches or slightly alter measured cross-section of the SM Higgs boson candidate observed at the LHC, depending on the branching ratio. Therefore direct search for non-SM signatures provides the fastest path (accessible with limited amount of data) to understanding the nature of the Higgs boson by either confirming or rejecting large classes of BSM scenarios. We present status and results of a search, based on the LHC data collected by the CMS experiment, for a non-SM Higgs boson decaying to a pair of new light bosons, each of which subsequently decays into a boosted dimuon final state.
        Speaker: Alfredo Martin Castaneda Hernandez (Texas A & M University (US))
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Chasing light vector-like leptons from the SM Higgs to ZZ* search 15m
        The existence of a light vector-like lepton can contribute to the SM Higgs decays. In this talk we analyse its effect in the SM Higgs to ZZ* channel assuming the mixing of the vector-like lepton and the SM muon, motivated from the possible explanation of muon g-2 anomaly. We also show the bound from the current LHC result in terms of general parameters of the vector-like lepton.
        Speaker: Seodong Shin (Indiana University)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Higgs decays in gauge extensions of the standard model 15m
        The “Lonely higgs” picture has put considerable pressure on theories that aim to solve the hierarchy problem. The focus has now shifted to the determination of its detailed properties and in particular whether or not it possesses any anomalous couplings not predicted by the Standard Model by extensive analysis of the higgs production and decays. **The dominant contribution to the $H \to \gamma \gamma$ and $Z \gamma$ comes from the charged spin 1 states, specifically the W-bosons which can have different contribution to these channels in extensions of SM.** Moreover, in gauge extensions of SM, new spin 1 states appear which could modify higgs decay rates and in certain cases also yield a non-zero tree level S parameter. In this talk I will present the **loop contributions arising from a set of generic spin 1 states which exhibit the most generic gauge invariant vector interactions**. I will also explore the **interplay between the divergent structure of the loop amplitudes and the S parameter contributions**. I shall also discuss an example calculation in a four-site moose model that contains degrees of freedom that model the effects of vector and axial-vector resonances arising from TeV scale strong dynamics.
        Speaker: Ms Bithika Jain (Syracuse University)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Raising the Higgs Mass with t-t' Mixing 15m
        We show that the addition of a fourth generation with vector-like quarks to the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) can raise the predicted value of the physical Higgs mass by mixing with the top sector, a point not previously emphasized in the literature. In the presence of mixing, for A-terms and soft masses around 900 GeV, the Landau pole for the top Yukawa can be pushed above the GUT scale while retaining perturbativity of the gauge couplings, generating a Higgs mass of 125 GeV and evading constraints from electroweak precision measurements (EWPM) and recent LHC searches. Smaller soft terms ($\sim600$ GeV) can be accommodated if new physics appears at $\sim10^{10}$ GeV or perturbative unification is sacrificed. The model predicts new quarks and squarks discoverable at the LHC.
        Speaker: Mr Kevin Grizzard (Johns Hopkins)
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Higgs Portal Leptogenesis 15m
        The baryonic matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe is a well known fact, and measured to be $n_B-n_{\overline B}\sim6\cdot10^{-10}n_\gamma$. Standard Leptogenesis is among the simplest and most natural theories to explain the asymmetry, making use of the family of three heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos, already well motivated to explain the active neutrino masses, which puts the model at mass scales of the order $M\sim10^9$GeV and above. We enlarge the model with a hidden sector consisting of a singlet scalar $S$, coupled via the Higgs portal $\beta SHH$, and a RHN-scalar coupling $\alpha SNN$. These two interactions open up new sources of CP-asymmetry, with a scaling as $\epsilon\propto\alpha\beta/M$. The direct consequence is the possibility of lowering the RHN mass scale, yet keeping the CP-asymmetry at a level necessary to generate the baryon asymmetry. We explore the dynamics of this model, and show it allows for RHN mass scales as low as the Electroweak scale. Paper to appear shortly, "Leptogenesis and the Higgs Portal", Matthias Le Dall and Adam Ritz.
        Speaker: Matthias Le Dall (University of Victoria)
        Slides
    • 14:00 16:00
      Cosmology I Benedum Hall G26

      Benedum Hall G26

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Hiren Patel
      • 14:00
        Theory of CMB Polarization 30m
        Speaker: Arthur Kosowsky (University of Pittsburgh)
      • 14:30
        Higgs Inflation in Light of BICEP2 15m
        BICEP2 requires new physics to enter into the Higgs effective potential before its instability scale. A large scale for inflation means the Higgs, even if the Higgs isn't the inflaton, should have had fluctuations on order of the Hubble parameter during inflation, and using the ordinary standard model effective potential for the Higgs, this should have pushed the Higgs into it's higher scale minimum. It's interesting to see what new physics could be added that would not only stabilize the Higgs to fix this problem, but might also give a shape to the Higgs potential that would allow for Higgs inflation. Higgs inflation is traditionally done with a non-minimal gravitational coupling used to flatten out the Higgs effective potential at high scales, allowing for successful inflation, but normally the potential gets flattened out too much to produce large tensors. New physics necessitated already by the instability problem, could possibly produce Higgs inflation while avoiding the need for a non-minimal coupling.
        Speaker: Jessica Cook (Arizona State)
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Cosmological Consequences of Massive Gravity 15m
        The cosmological consequences of the deRham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity model will be discussed. In the framework of dRGT model the today accelerated expansion of the universe is governed by a non-zero mass of graviton that is determined by the today value of the Hubble parameter $m_g \sim H_)$. In order to recover the isotropic background solutions at the late stages of the universe expansion as well as the stability of perturbations the quasidilaton extensions of the dRGT model have been developed. In this talk I will be focused on gravittional waves dynamics in the dRGT model and the corresponding CMB signatures such as temperature and polarization anisotropies.
        Speaker: Dr Tina Kahniashvili (Carnegie Mellon University)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Heavy Gravitino and Split SUSY in the Light of BICEP2 15m
        **High-scale supersymmetry (SUSY) with a split spectrum has become increasingly interesting given the current experimental results. A SUSY scale above the weak scale could be naturally associated with a heavy unstable gravitino, whose decays populate the dark matter (DM) particles. In the mini-split scenario with gravitino at about the PeV scale and the lightest TeV scale neutralino being (a component of ) DM, the requirement that the DM relic abundance resulting from gravitino decays does not overclose the Universe and satisfies the indirect detection constraints demand the reheating temperature to be below** $\small 10^9$-$\small 10^{10}~\rm{GeV}$. **On the other hand, the BICEP2 result prefers a heavy inflaton with mass at around** $\small 10^{13}~\rm{GeV}$ **and a reheating temperature at or above $\small 10^9~\rm{GeV}$ with some general assumptions. The mild tension could be alleviated if SUSY scale is even higher with the gravitino mass above the** $\small~\rm{PeV}$ **scale. Intriguingly, in no-scale supergravity, gravitinos could be very heavy at about** $\small 10^{13}~\rm{GeV}$, **the inflaton mass scale, while gauginos could still be light at the $\small \rm{TeV}$ scale.**
        Speaker: Ogan Ozsoy (S)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Constraints on Supersymmetric Cosmological Inflation Model 15m
        Cosmological Inflation is a theory ad hoc from Particle Physics in Cosmology. It is a very important inclusion in early universe study and became one of the very important and open topic of research in last three decades. In my talk I will go through some of the well known models of cosmological inflation and what is the chance of survival of these models as we test them with observational results. With the recent data from Planck project, we get better idea about the CMB and thus can study these models in details. On the other hand different experimental bounds from different particle physics experiment effects this models too. In this presentation my special emphasis will be on those models which depend on SUSY when built and how they can be affected by the recent developments in observations.
        Speaker: Mayukh Gangopadhyay (University of Notre Dame du Lac)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Luminogenesis RG Flow 15m
        Using constraints from Planck and BICEP2 on inflation models, and renormalization-group flow, we present constraints on the mass of dark-matter particles in a unification model with the gauge group $SU(3) \times SU(6) \times U(1)$, which breaks to the standard model with an extra gauge group for dark matter when the inflaton rolls into the true vacuum. In this model, inflaton decay gives rise to dark matter, which in turn decays to luminous matter in the right proportion that agrees with cosmological data. Some attractive features of this model include self-interacting dark matter, which may resolve the problems of dwarf-galaxy structures and dark-matter cusps at the centers of galaxies, and the absence of proton decay, which has evaded experimental detection to this day.
        Speaker: Kevin Ludwick (U)
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Tensor to scalar ratio and large scale power suppression from pre-slow roll initial conditions 15m
        We study the corrections to the power spectra of curvature and tensor perturbations and the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ in single field slow roll inflation with standard kinetic term due to initial conditions imprinted by a ``fast-roll'' stage prior to slow roll. For a wide range of initial inflaton kinetic energy, this stage lasts only a few e-folds and merges smoothly with slow-roll thereby leading to non-Bunch-Davies initial conditions for modes that exit the Hubble radius during slow roll. We describe a program that yields the dynamics in the fast-roll stage while matching to the slow roll stage in a manner that is independent of the inflationary potentials. Corrections to the power spectra are encoded in a ``transfer function'' for initial conditions $\mathcal{T}_\alpha(k)$, $\mathcal{P}_{\alpha}(k)=P^{BD}_{\alpha}(k)\mathcal{T}_\alpha(k)$, implying a modification of the ``consistency condition'' for the tensor to scalar ratio at a pivot scale $k_0$: $r(k_0)= -8n_T(k_0)\,\big[ {\mathcal{T}_{T}(k_0)}/{\mathcal{T}_{\mathcal{R}}(k_0)} \big]$. We obtain $\mathcal{T}_\alpha(k)$ to leading order in a Born approximation valid for modes of observational relevance today. A fit yields $\mathcal{T}_\alpha(k) =1+ A_{\alpha}k^{-p}\cos[2\pi \omega k/H_{sr}+\varphi_\alpha]$, with $1.5 \lesssim p \lesssim 2$, $\omega \simeq 1$ and $H_{sr}$ the Hubble scale during slow roll inflation, where curvature and tensor perturbations feature the \emph{same} $p,\omega$ for a wide range of initial conditions. These corrections lead to both a suppression of the quadrupole and oscillatory features in both $P_R(k)$ and $r(k_0)$ with a period of the order of the Hubble scale during slow roll inflation. The results are quite general and independent of the specific inflationary potentials, depending solely on the ratio of kinetic to potential energy $\kappa$ and the slow roll parameters $\epsilon_V,\eta_V$ to leading order in slow roll. For a wide range of $\kappa$ and the values of $\epsilon_V;\eta_V$ corresponding to the upper bounds from Planck, we find that the low quadrupole is consistent with the results from Planck, and the oscillations in $r(k_0)$ as a function of $k_0$ \emph{could} be observable if the modes corresponding to the quadrupole and the pivot scale crossed the Hubble radius very few ($2-3$) e-folds after the onset of slow roll.
        Speaker: Louis Lello (University of Pittsburgh)
        Slides
    • 14:00 16:00
      Dark Matter I Benedum Hall G31

      Benedum Hall G31

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Linda Carpenter (Ohio State University)
      • 14:00
        Dark Matter and Complementarity 15m
        We present on the role which complementarity plays in dark matter modeling. Experimental dark matter results provide a wealth of information for dark matter modeling in terms of both positive and negative results. The utilization of input from a variety of complementary experimental probes can provide useful insight into the parameter space of the model by offering new bounds upon the parameter space or new channels for possible discovery. This talk will focus on the complementary phenomenology of three examples. The first is an effective theory of dark matter and quarks in the framework of isospin violation. The second is a simplified model to explain the CDMS signal. The final example is simplified model to explain the GeV galactic center excess from the Fermi satellite.
        Speaker: Alexander Wijangco (University of California Irvine)
        Slides
      • 14:15
        New Directions in Dark-Matter Complementarity: Inelastic Scattering and Constraints on Dark-Sector Instability 15m
        Dark-matter complementarity is a reflection of the fact that even in single-component theories of dark matter, a single Lagrangian operator often contributes to a variety of physical processes including production at colliders, elastic scattering at direct-detection experiments, and dark-matter annihilation. However, in multi-component theories of dark matter, a single such operator can also give rise to a complementarity between additional processes such as inelastic scattering at direct-detection experiments and dark-matter decay. In this talk, I examine the generic consequences of such additional complementarities. I also show that within the context of a two-component dark-matter model, direct and indirect detection together provide perfect coverage of the model parameter space for large couplings. By contrast, for smaller couplings there emerges a range of mass-splittings between the dark-matter components within which the dark sector evades detection. I also discuss the prospects future experimental results afford for covering this gap.
        Speaker: Dr Brooks Thomas (Carleton University)
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Effective WIMPs 15m
        Null results from collider and direct detection searches constrain dark matter candidates. We analyze these constraints in the context of minimal extensions to the standard model. The "WIMP miracle" for the relic abundance of thermal dark matter motivates models of weak scale dark matter with renormalizable couplings to standard model particles. We study minimal extensions to the standard model with such thermal relics. These models contain a singlet dark matter particle with cubic renormalizable couplings between standard model particles and "partner" particles with the same gauge quantum numbers as the standard model particle. We focus on the case of dark matter interactions with quarks or leptons. Within this framework, we consider six models where the dark matter is a scalar boson, fermion, or vector boson, and may or may not be its own antiparticle. We find that collider and direct detection searches are remarkably complementary for these models. The sensitivity of direct detection experiments varies greatly between models, from no bound to requiring dark matter masses to be in the multi-TeV range, where they are extremely difficult to probe in collider experiments. The limits are strongest in models with direct coupling to quarks and the cases where the dark matter is not its own antiparticle. Direct detection has enhanced sensitivity near the degenerate limit, complimenting the sensitivity of collider searches. Monojet and jets + MET searches at the LHC limit all models, in some cases up to partner masses greater than 1.2 TeV.
        Speaker: Mr Jeffrey Hutchinson (UC Davis)
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Complementary constraints on light dark matter from heavy meson decays 15m
        We investigate constraints on the properties of light dark matter which can be obtained from analysis of invisible quarkonium decays at high intensity electron-positron colliders in the framework of a low energy effective field theory. A matrix element analysis of all interaction structures pertinent for these bound state decays allows for a model independent calculation of associated dark matter-nucleon scattering and dark matter annihilation cross sections. Assuming dark matter couples universally to all quark flavors, we then obtain bounds on nucleon scattering which complement direct dark matter detection searches. In contrast to similar analyses of monojet searches at high energy colliders, B and charm factories are more suitable probes of light dark matter interactions with less massive mediators. Relevant bounds on dark matter annihilation arising from gamma ray searches of dwarf spheroidal galaxies are also presented.
        Speaker: Patrick Stengel (University of Hawaii)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Optimal Conservative bounds on DM with Fermi Telescope 15m
        The Fermi γ-ray Space Telescope has observed the sky since 2008. Dark matter annihilations or decays contribute to the measured diffuse gamma-ray background flux. We present conservative bounds on annihilation cross section or decay lifetime. We consider DM annihilation/decay into 12 different Standard Model final states, 3 DM density profiles and 2 GeV < m_{DM} < 10 TeV , performing no astrophysical foreground modeling.
        Speaker: Andrea Massari (S)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Exploring a Dark Sector Through the Higgs Portal at a Lepton Collider 15m
        We investigate the prospects for detecting a hidden sector at an e+ e− collider. The hidden sector is assumed to be composed of invisible particles that carry no charges under the Standard Model gauge interactions, and whose primary interactions with ordinary matter are through the Higgs portal. We consider both the cases when the decays of an on-shell Higgs into a pair of hidden sector particles are kinematically allowed, and the case when such decays are kinematically forbidden. We find that at collider energies below a TeV, the most sensitive channel involves production of an on-shell or off-shell Higgs in association with a Z boson, and the subsequent decay of the Higgs into invisible hidden sector states. Focusing on this channel, we find that with order a thousand inverse fb of data at 250 GeV, the decay branching fraction of an on-shell Higgs to invisible hidden sector states can be constrained to lie below half a percent. The corresponding limits on Higgs portal dark matter will be stronger than the bounds from current and upcoming direct detection experiments in much of parameter space. With the same amount of data at 500 GeV, assuming order one couplings, decays of an off-shell Higgs to hidden sector states with a total mass up to about 200 GeV can also be probed. Both the on-shell and off-shell cases represent a significant improvement in sensitivity when compared to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).
        Speaker: Mr Sungwoo Hong (University of Maryland-College Park)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        A New Method for the Spin Determination of Dark Matter 15m
        We will describe the construction of a new kinematical variable that can fully reconstruct the absolute value and partially reconstruct the sign of the angular distribution in the center of momentum system of a decaying mother particle. This will then be used to illustrate a method by which the spin of a pair produced dark matter candidate at the International Linear Collider (ILC) can be tested. We show that for a small intermediate width, perfect agreement between the true angular distribution and our method is found in the absence of initial state radiation. In the presence of initial state radiation, the effects are small and still permit one to distinguish between the various spin combinations in some cases.
        Speaker: Daniel Salmon
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Better Mass Measurements Using Many-body Phase Space in Cascade Decay 15m
        I will talk about the mass measurements for dark matter and its mother particles appearing in decay chains can be improved by determining the boundary of the available phase space in its full dimensionality rather than by using one-dimensional kinematic features for each stage of the cascade decay. This is demonstrated for the case of one particle decaying to three visible and one invisible particles in a two-stage cascade, but our methods also apply to a more general set of decay topologies. We show that not only mass differences, but also the overall scale of masses can be determined with high precision without having to rely on cross section information. The improvement arises from the properties of the higher dimensional phase space itself, independent of the matrix element for the decay, and it is not weakened by the presence of intermediate on-shell particles in the cascade. Our results are particularly significant for the case of low signal statistics, a distinct possibility for new physics searches in the near future.
        Speaker: Jianghao Yu (Univ. of Texas at Austin)
        Slides
    • 14:00 16:00
      Neutrinos I Benedum Hall G27

      Benedum Hall G27

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Sogee Spinner
      • 14:00
        Democratic Neutrino Theory 15m
        I will discuss the Democratic Neutrino Theory and its origin from the level of composed leptons. This Theory has only one free parameter, unlike to 7 (9) free parameters in the conventional model of light Dirac (Majorana) neutrinos. In addition to the agreement with the results of Super Kamiokande, SNO, MINOS and other neutrino experiments, the discussed Theory sets the absolute scale of the neutrino masses at 0.03 eV, and has significant predictive power.
        Speaker: Dmitry Zhuridov (Wayne State University)
        Slides
      • 14:15
        Predictive models of Dirac Neutrinos 15m
        In the first work, assuming lepton number conservation, hermiticity of the neutrino mass matrix and $\nu_{\mu} - \nu_{\tau}$ exchange symmetry, we show that we can determine the neutrino mass matrix completely from the existing data. This model predicts an inverted mass hierarchy (close to a degenerate pattern) with the three neutrino mass values, $8.91 \times 10^{-2}, 8.95 \times 10^{-2}, 7.50 \times 10^ {-2}$ eV, a large value for the CP violating phase , $\delta = 110^0$ and of course, the absence of neutrino-less $\beta \beta$ decay. Continuing in the same philosophy, in the second work, we assume only $\nu_{\mu_R} - \nu_{\tau_R}$ symmetry along with a symmetry under CP transformation of the Lagrangian. As a result, only with the assumption of hermiticity of the Dirac neutrino mass matrix, we can fit all the existing data only with four parameters in this model. Scanning over the parameter space, we observe that this model also prefers inverted mass hierarchy with three neutrino mass values of $4.89 \times 10^{-2}, 4.81 \times 10^{-2}, -1.1 \times 10^ {-3}$ eV, a CP violating phase $\delta = 90^0$. All of these predictions can be tested in the forthcoming or future precision neutrino experiments.
        Speaker: Ms Shreyashi Chakdar (Oklahoma State University)
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Origin of the Icecube TeV-PeV neutrino events. 15m
        Recently IceCube collaboration presented the evidence for high energy extraterrestrial neutrinos, the nature of these neutrinos is still unknown and opens the possibility to a new physics explanations. In this talk I will present a geometric analysis trying to discriminate between different explanations.
        Speaker: Jordi Salvado (W)
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Probing Radiative Neutrino Mass Generation through Monotop Production 15m
        We present a generalization of a model where the right-handed up-type quarks serve as messengers for neutrino mass generation and as a portal for dark matter. Within this framework the Standard Model is extended with a single Majorana neutrino, a coloured electroweak-singlet scalar and a coloured electroweak-triplet scalar. We calculate the relic abundance of dark matter and show that we can match the latest experimental results. Furthermore, the implications from the scattering between nuclei and the dark matter candidate are studied and we implement the latest experimental constraints arising from flavour changing interactions, Higgs production and decay and LHC collider searches for a single jet and jets plus missing energy. In addition, we implement constraints arising from scalar top quark pair-production. We also study the production of a single top in association with missing energy and calculate the sensitivity of the LHC to the top quark hadronic and semi-leptonic decay modes with the current 20 fb−1 data set at a centre of mass energy of s√=8 TeV and carry out the analysis to centre of mass energies of s√=14 TeV with 30 and 300 fb−1 of data.
        Speaker: Alejandro de la Puente (TRIUMF)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        LHC bounds on the inverse seesaw neutrino production 15m
        In the inverse seesaw scenario, pseudo-Dirac neutrinos with mass at the electroweak scale can have a sizable mixing with the Standard Model (SM) neutrinos, while providing the light neutrino masses through a small lepton number violation. We study the production of the heavy neutrinos through their mixing with the SM neutrinos at the Large Hadron collider (LHC). Utilizing the search result by the CMS collaboration for anomalous production of events with three leptons using 19.5/fb of $\sqrt{s}$=8 TeV LHC data, which is consistent with the SM prediction, we obtain the upper bound on the mixing between the heavy and SM neutrinos as a function of the heavy neutrino mass. For a heavy neutrino with mass $91.2$ GeV, the upper bound is found to be 0.0478, which is comparable to the one from the electroweak precision measuremen
        Speaker: Mr Arindam Das (University of Alabama)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        New Tests of Neutrino Mass-Generating Mechanisms at the LHC 15m
        We investigate the production of a heavy Majorana neutrino with jets that arise from the U(1)_EM radiative corrections to the Drell-Yan mechanism at the CERN LHC. Preliminary results will be shown.
        Speaker: Richard Ruiz (University of Pittsburgh)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        How well can LSST measure neutrino masses? 15m
        We show that baryonic effects can modify the matter power spectrum on small scales. These effects cause a damping in the matter power spectrum on intermediate scales due to thermal pressure, and a boost on very small scales due to adiabatic contraction of the halo. We compute the weak lensing shear power spectrum in the presence of baryonic feedback obtained from the OWLS simulation suite. We show that future experiments such as the LSST will have to take these feedback effects into account in order to obtain accurate neutrino mass measurements. Collaborators: Andrew Zentner, Hy Trac, Nick Battaglia.
        Speaker: Aravind Natarajan
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Right-Handed Neutrinos as the Origin of Fundamental Mass Scales 15m
        Starting from a scale-free electroweak sector at tree-level, we postulate that quantum effects of heavy right-handed neutrinos induce a mass term for a scalar weak doublet that contains the dark matter particle. In turn, below the scale of heavy neutrinos, the dark matter sector sets the scale of the Higgs potential. We show that this framework can lead to a Higgs mass that respects physical naturalness, while also providing a viable dark matter candidate, realistic light neutrino masses, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe via leptogenesis. The proposed scenario can remain perturbative and stable up to the Planck scale.
        Speaker: Ian Lewis (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
        Slides
    • 14:00 16:00
      SM Higgs I Benedum Hall G28

      Benedum Hall G28

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Mr Gabe Shaughnessy Shaughnessy (University of Wisconsin)
      • 14:00
        Measurement of properties of the Higgs boson in bosonic decay channels using the ATLAS detector 15m
        A detailed review will be given of the latest results from the ATLAS detector on the main properties of the Higgs boson in the diphoton, $ZZ$ (with subsequent decays to four leptons), $WW$ (with subsequent decays to $\ell\nu\ell\nu$), and Z$\gamma$ channels using approximately 25 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data collected at 7 TeV and 8 TeV in 2011 and 2012. The measurements discussed will be the mass and coupling properties in these channels through various production processes.
        Speaker: Kate Whalen (Carleton University (CA))
        Slides
      • 14:15
        Search for the Higgs boson in fermionic channels using the ATLAS detector 15m
        Since the discovery of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC, the emphasis has shifted towards measurements of its properties. Of particular importance is the direct observation of the coupling of the Higgs boson to fermions. In this presentation a comprehensive review of ATLAS results in the search for the Higgs boson in tau, muon, and b-quark pairs will be given.
        Speaker: Yuki Sakurai (Waseda University (JP))
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Combined Measurements of the properties of the Higgs boson using the ATLAS Detector 15m
        Properties of Higgs boson production are presented, as measured by the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2011 and 2012. Couplings and spin measurements are reviewed briefly. Limits on the invisible and unobserved branching fractions are presented, from direct searches and combined fits. Differential cross sections measured in the diphoton decay channel provide additional information about the production mechanism.
        Speaker: James Saxon (University of Pennsylvania (US))
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Probing the Higgs-vector coupling with same-sign W bosons 15m
        We explore the sensitivity of the $pp\rightarrow W^\pm W^\pm jj$ process to deviations of the Higgs-vector coupling from its SM value. Since the Higgs-mediated contribution does not depend on other Higgs couplings and is independent of the total Higgs width to a good approximation, we can probe the Higgs-vector coupling directly. In the standard model, the Higgs channel does not give a sizeable contribution to the pure electroweak process at $\sqrt{s}=14$ TeV. However, we show that a set of optimized cuts and kinematic observables would allow us to set a stringent upper bound on enhanced Higgs-vector couplings by the end of the High Luminosity LHC run with $\sim 3~\text{ab}^{-1}$ of data.
        Speaker: Fady Bishara (U. of Cincinnati & Fermilab)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Constraining anomalous HVV interactions at proton and lepton colliders 15m
        We study the extent to which CP parity of a Higgs boson, and more generally its anomalous couplings to gauge bosons, can be measured at the LHC and a future electron-positron collider. We consider several processes, including Higgs boson production in gluon and weak boson fusion and production of a Higgs boson in association with an electroweak gauge boson. We consider decays of a Higgs boson including $ZZ, WW, \gamma \gamma$, and $Z \gamma$. Matrix element approach to three production and decay topologies is developed and applied in the analysis. A complete Monte Carlo simulation of the above processes at proton and $e^+e^-$ colliders is performed and verified by comparing it to an analytic calculation. Prospects for measuring various tensor couplings at existing and proposed facilities are compared.
        Speaker: Mr Yaofu Zhou (JHU)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Properties of a Higgs Boson in the $H\to ZZ\to 4l$ Channel at CMS 15m
        The CMS results are presented for an analysis of the mass, width, and spin-parity properties of a Higgs boson candidate near 126 GeV in the $ZZ\to 4l$ channel, with $l=\mu,e$. The analysis utilizes the full dataset recorded by CMS of 5.1 $\text{fb}^{-1}$ and 19.7 $\text{fb}^{-1}$ of LHC $pp$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\sqrt{s} = 7$ and 8 TeV respectively. The mass is measured to be $125.6\pm 0.4 (\text{stat.})\pm 0.2(\text{syst.})$ GeV, and the total width $\le 3.4$ GeV at a 95% confidence level. The standard model scalar hypothesis is compared against twelve alternate spin-parity hypotheses. The spin-parity is found to be consistent with the standard model expectations.
        Speaker: Donald Austin Belknap (University of Wisconsin (US))
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying into a bottom quark pair with the CMS experiment 15m
        A search for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson decaying to bottom quark pairs is presented. Three different production mechanisms for the Higgs boson have been investigated: the vector boson fusion (VBF), the associated production with a W or Z boson decaying leptonically (VH) and the associated production with pair of top quarks (ttH). These searches are based on data collected with the CMS detector at LHC during 2011 and 2012, at 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy, corresponding to integrated luminosities of about 5.0 fb−1 and 19.0 fb−1 respectively. Based on the VBF and the VH analysis a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.79 (0.89) times the SM Higgs boson cross section has been observed (expected) for the Higgs mass hypothesis of 125 GeV. An excess of events has been observed with a local significance of 2.2 standard deviations and a signal strength of 0.97 +/- 0.48. The result is consistent with the expectation from the production of the SM Higgs boson. Results of the search for ttH with the Higgs boson decaying in a bottom quark pair are reported as well. Both lepton + jets channel (tt → ℓ±ν qq bb, H → bb), dilepton channel ((tt → ℓ+ν ℓ-νbb, H → bb) are considered. Assuming standard model Higgs boson branching fractions, a 95% C.L. upper limit on the ttH production cross section is presented.
        Speaker: Arnaud Pin (Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL) (BE))
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Search with the CMS detector for the SM Higgs boson decaying to a pair of hadronically decaying tau leptons, produced in association with a W boson 15m
        A search for the associated production of a W boson and the standard model Higgs boson, which decays into a pair of hadronically decaying tau leptons, is presented using data collected in 2011 and 2012 by the CMS experiment. The analysis uses 5 fb−1 and 19 fb−1 collision data collected at the center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV, respectively. The analysis motivation, procedure and results are described, and placed in context with the overall Higgs to tau tau searches at CMS.
        Speaker: Anthony Rose (Texas A & M University (US))
        Slides
    • 14:00 16:00
      SUSY I Benedum Hall G29

      Benedum Hall G29

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: James Gainer (University of Florida (US))
      • 14:15
        Searches for direct pair production of third generation squarks with the ATLAS detector 15m
        Naturalness arguments for weak-scale supersymmetry favour supersymmetric partners of the third generation quarks with masses not too far from those of their Standard Model counterparts. Top or bottom squarks with masses less than a few hundred GeV can also give rise to direct pair production rates at the LHC that can be observed in the data sample recorded by the ATLAS detector. The talk presents recent ATLAS results from searches for direct stop and sbottom pair production.
        Speaker: Alexandru Dafinca (University of Oxford (GB))
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Inclusive SUSY searches at CMS 15m
        In this talk, the latest results from CMS on inclusive searches for squark and gluino production at the LHC are reviewed. A variety of complementary final state signatures and methods are presented using 20/fb of data from the 8 TeV LHC run.
        Speaker: Azeddine Kasmi (Baylor University (US))
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Light Top Squark in Precision Top Quark Sample 15m
        The uncertainty of top pair production cross section measurement at LHC is at a few percent level, which still allows the stop pair production with identical final states 2b+l+nj+$E_T$. On the other hand, the prompt decay of top quark before hadronization provides opportunity to make its precision measurement possible. In this talk, we apply the ATLAS $χ^2$ method of W-polarization measurement in semileptonic top pair events to semileptonic stop pair events and study its prediction. We attempt to use the existing measurement of W-polarization in top quark decay to improve the distinction between stop and top quark states.
        Speaker: Dr Liucheng Wang (University of Delaware)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Inclusive searches for squarks and gluinos with the ATLAS detector 15m
        We present the latest results in the searches for the supersymmetric partners of quarks and gluons obtained by the ATLAS collaboration, using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of pp collisions data at $\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV collected in 2012.
        Speaker: Otilia Anamaria Ducu (IFIN-HH Bucharest (RO))
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Pseudo-Dirac Gluino Oscillations 15m
        In the existence of a slightly broken U(1) symmetry, two (2-component) Weyl spinor parts of a Dirac fermion is split by a small Majorana mass. These fermions are called pseudo-Dirac fermions. The mass splitting gives rise to oscillations between the charge eigenstates, much like neutral meson oscillations. Previously, these oscillations have been considered in mesino - anti-mesino systems. Here we consider pseudo-Dirac gluino oscillations. Pseudo-Dirac gluinos are a feature of some SUSY models with an approximate $U(1)_R$ symmetry. We show that there can be $\mathcal{O}(1)$ CP violation if the decay rate of gluinos are comparable to the oscillation rate. This CP violation can be observed as a like-sign dilepton asymmetry.
        Speaker: Seyda Ipek (University of Washington)
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Searches for electroweak production of supersymmetric gauginos and sleptons with the ATLAS detector 15m
        Many supersymmetry models feature gauginos and also sleptons with masses less than a few hundred GeV. These can give rise to direct pair production rates at the LHC that can be observed in the data sample recorded by the ATLAS detector. The talk presents results from searches for gaugino and slepton pair production in final states with leptons.
        Speaker: Michael Ughetto ((CPPM - CNRS/IN2P3 et Aix-Marseille Université (FR)))
        Transparents
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break Benedum Hall G

      Benedum Hall G

      University of Pittsburgh

      Pittsburgh, PA 15260
    • 16:30 18:30
      BSM Higgs II Benedum Hall G30

      Benedum Hall G30

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Natascia Vignaroli (Michigan State University)
      • 16:30
        Higgs mass from compositeness at a multi-TeV scale 15m
        Within composite Higgs models based on the top seesaw mechanism, we show that the Higgs field can arise as the pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson of some broken larger symmetry group. As a result, the lightest CP-even neutral state of the composite scalar sector is lighter than the top quark, and can be identified as the newly discovered Higgs boson. We present two such models. The first one has a U(3)_L chiral symmetry associated with a vector-like quark and the t-b doublet. Constraints on weak isospin violation push the chiral symmetry breaking scale above a few TeV, implying that other composite scalars are probably too heavy to be probed at the LHC, but may be within reach at a future hadron collider with center-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV. In the second model, we add in a pair of vector-like EW doublets, (X, T), and extend the symmetry group to embed the SU(2) custodial symmetry. As a result, the chiral symmetry breaking scale can be reduced to ~1TeV.
        Speaker: Jiayin Gu (UC Davis)
        Slides
      • 16:45
        Warped flavor, 126 GeV Scalar and the 100 TeV collider 15m
        The key question after the LHC discovery of the 126 GeV scalar will be addressed by using insight from a geometric theory of flavor. In this construction a new mechanism that simultaneously triggers EW symmetry breaking and stabilizes the 5th dimension through the use of a doublet (see arXiv:1312.3331) will be discussed. In this interpretation the observed scalar is actually a "Higgs-radion" and there is no separate radion. So in that sense its a minimal model and has significant differences from the properties of the SM Higgs. Connection to ~100 TeV collider will also be discussed
        Speaker: Amarjit Soni (BNL)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        The decoupling limit in the Georgi-Machacek model 15m
        We study the most general scalar potential of the Georgi-Machacek model, which adds isospin-triplet scalars to the Standard Model (SM). We show that this model possesses a decoupling limit, in which the predominantly-triplet states become heavy and degenerate while the couplings of the remaining light neutral scalar approach those of the SM Higgs boson. We find that the SM-like Higgs boson couplings to fermion pairs and gauge boson pairs can deviate from their SM values by corrections as large as $\mathcal{O}(v^2/M_{\rm new}^2)$, where $v$ is the SM Higgs vacuum expectation value and $M_{\rm new}$ is the mass scale of the predominantly-triplet states. In particular, the SM-like Higgs boson couplings to $W$ and $Z$ boson pairs can decouple much more slowly than in two Higgs doublet models. As such, precision measurements of these couplings may provide an effective method of distinguishing the Georgi-Machacek model from two Higgs doublet models.
        Speaker: Kathryn (Katy) Hartling (C)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Indirect effects of the triplet extension of the MSSM 15m
        The observation of the Higgs boson with a mass of 126 GeV is in tension with natural MSSM scenarios. Such a Higgs mass requires heavy third-generation squarks which reintroduces fine-tuning. Having a minimal model can be dropped in favor of naturalness. One such example is to add an $SU(2)_L$ triplet, hypercharge $Y=0$ chiral superfield to the MSSM. In this talk I will summarize recent work done on this model by looking at the ease of generating the observed Higgs mass, the Higgs to di-photon signal strength, and the decays of the stop squarks.
        Speaker: Bryan Ostdiek (University of Notre Dame)
        Slides
      • 17:45
        The bestest little Higgs model in a post-Higgs era 15m
        Little Higgs models are generally highly constrained by precision electroweak measurements, and the recent Higgs data does not appear to further constrain the parameter space. The bestest little Higgs model, with its tongue-in-cheek name, is designed to be less constrained by electroweak measurements, and thus may be sensitive to the Higgs results. I will discuss this model in light of the Higgs results, assuming both an ATLAS-like (diphoton excess) or CMS-like scenario (SM-like diphoton signal).
        Speaker: Dr Travis Martin (TRIUMF)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Electroweak-scale Right-handed Neutrino Model, 126 GeV Higgs boson and BSM scalars 15m
        A model of electroweak-scale right-handed neutrino (EW$\nu_R$) model was put forward a few years ago, in which the right-handed neutrinos are members of mirror fermion weak doublets and where the Majorana masses of the right-handed neutrinos are found to be naturally of the order of the electroweak scale [P.Q.Hung, Phys. Lett. B. 249 (2007)]. This model contains, in addition to the mirror quarks and leptons, extra scalars transforming as weak triplets. We have showed that this model does not contradict with the constraints from the electroweak precision parameters S, T, U [V.V.Hoang, P.Q.Hung, A.S.Kamat, Nucl. Phys. B. 877 (2013) 190]. In a simple extension of the EW$\nu_R$ model, a light CP-even neutral physical scalar (which we call $\tilde{H}_1^0$) arises, which can have mass 126 GeV and the decay properties ($\tilde{H}_1^0 \rightarrow ZZ, WW, \gamma\gamma, f\bar{f}$) in agreement with the data analyzed at CMS experiment. The measured properties of this scalar and the results of search for SM-like Higgs up to ~700 GeV constrain the masses of other neutral CP-even scalars in this model to be heavier than ~300 GeV. The constraints on the scalars also indirectly restrict the masses of the mirror quarks and leptons. We analyze these constraints on the masses and decay properties of these BSM scalars and mirror fermions and discuss mass ranges and signals to search for these BSM scalars.
        Speaker: AJINKYA KAMAT (University of Virginia)
        Slides
      • 18:15
        A $125$ GeV Higgs and the ${\mu}$-less MSSM 15m
        Low energy supersymmetry (SUSY) has long been one of the most elegant frameworks for solving the hierarchy problem and extending the Standard Model (SM) beyond the electroweak scale. However the LHC has found no evidence for the existence of SUSY pushing the bounds on squark and gluino masses above $1$TeV in the simplest models. Thus it becomes necessary to consider models beyond the minimal ones. Here we will consider the ${\mu}$-less MSSM proposed by Nelson et.al. which was first introduced as a way to address the $\mu-b_\mu$ problem in SUSY models. Models with Dirac gauginos necessarily require fields which transform as adjoints under the SM. These adjoint fields, specifically the $SU(2)$ adjoint, will then couple to the Higgs doublets with a trilinear coupling in the superpotential. The adjoint scalar field then adds additional loop contributions to the Higgs mass raising the upper bound on the Higgs in a manner similar to stop loop contributions in the MSSM. We will discuss the the implications of the Higgs sector for $\mu$-less MSSM models after the Higgs discovery. These models have viable $\mu$-terms, obey electroweak precision constraints, and most importantly have a Higgs mass of $125$GeV even in the absence of A-terms.
        Speaker: Jessica Goodman (The Ohio State University)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      Cosmology II Benedum Hall G26

      Benedum Hall G26

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Jay Hubisz (Syracuse University)
      • 16:30
        Cosmological Phase Transitions and their Properties in the NMSSM 15m
        In this talk, I will discuss cosmological phase transitions in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) in light of the Higgs discovery. I will focus on regions of the NMSSM with a viable neutralino dark matter candidate, > 1 TeV stops, and a Higgs sector compatible with current LHC results. I will show that the phase structure in the viable regions of parameter space can have a rich phenomenology, exhibiting one- or two-step strongly first order phase transitions in the singlet and/or SU(2) directions. Several parameters relevant for calculating the baryon asymmetry in the context of electroweak baryogenesis are computed for various benchmark points. Our study suggests that successful electroweak baryogenesis may indeed occur in regions of the NMSSM compatible with the Higgs discovery.
        Speaker: Jonathan Kozaczuk (TRIUMF)
        Slides
      • 16:45
        Generating the Observed Baryon Asymmetry from the Inflaton Field 15m
        We propose a mechanism by which the inflaton can generate baryogenesis, by taking the inflaton to be a complex scalar field with a weakly broken global symmetry and present a new version of the Affleck-Dine mechanism. The smallness of the breaking is motivated both by technical naturalness and a requirement for inflation. We study inflation driven by a quadratic potential for simplicity and discuss generalizations to other potentials. We compute the inflationary dynamics and find that a conserved particle number is obtained towards the end of inflation. We then explain in detail the later decay to baryons. We present two promising embeddings in particle physics: (i) using high dimension operators for a gauge singlet; we find this leads to the observed asymmetry for decay controlled by the ~GUT scale and this is precisely the regime where the EFT applies. (ii) using a colored inflaton, which requires small couplings. We also point out two observational consequences: a possible large scale dipole in the baryon density, and a striking prediction of isocurvature fluctuations whose amplitude is found to be just below current limits and potentially detectable in future data.
        Speaker: Mark Hertzberg (MIT)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        The Electroweak Vacuum Angle 15m
        I describe the electroweak vacuum angle (the SU(2) analog of the QCD vacuum angle), and discuss conditions under which it becomes a physical parameter. I explain how its CP-violating effect enters into low and high energy observables, and I highlight its potentially important role in baryogenesis. Talk based on arXiv:1402.6340 and ongoing work.
        Speaker: Dr Hiren Patel (Max Planck Institute fur Kernphysik)
      • 17:15
        Implementing MaVaNs Cosmology 15m
        It has been shown that mass varying neutrinos (MaVaNs) can act as a negative pressure and hence are a candidate for dark energy.However MaVaNs also allow for higher $\Sigma$m$_\nu$ than terrestrial bounds, giving late forming warm dark matter. In this paper we implement MaVaNs cosmology using CMBEASY to study the effect of MaVaNs cosmology on the CMB spectrum. The MaVaNs parameter space explored is one with a light acceleron. We find that the CMB spectrum is not aftected except at very low multipoles. Cosmic variance and large error bars for low l measurements allow for significant warm dark matter at late times. This implies that MaVaNs cosmology can give different results for $\sigma$$_8$ as determined by CMB vs structure formation. We find that we can reduce the tension between $\sigma$$_8$ as reported by Planck Collaboration XX without increasing the tension in Hubbles constant measured by Planck. We also put approximate upper bound on neutrino mass today for a MaVaNs theory, by comparing the quadropole mode in the temperature power spectrum with data.
        Speaker: Akshay Ghalsasi (University of Washington)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        On a singular solution in Higgs field (7) – The stiffness of candidate for dark energy, and the matter-antimatter consumption by candidate for dark matter 15m
        Recently we discussed the degenerates into the candidates for dark matter (DM) and for dark energy (DE) from ur-Higgs boson 1, and also a long time behavior of DE 2. In this talk we at first study the stiffness of DE, by which the disruption interval of DE (i.e., expansion interval of the universe) would be determined. After calculating a critical collision number by considering the saturated energy under local micro deformation of DE, we describe a formula for the disruption interval, the disruption timing, and so on. Finally we propose a scenario of matter-antimatter (M-A) consumption by DM, which has resulted to emit only matter in the early universe. Where some constituent parts of DM neighboring M-A would have interacted with the M-A through the interplay of reunion process between their light quarks for each flavor; hence finally washed out itself and M-A into certain matter whose content is to be in accordance with the result of Planck 2013. 1: PoS(EPS-HEP 2013)002 2: DPF2013(Santa Cruz)_75
        Speaker: Kazuyoshi Kitazawa (Risp Japan)
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Dark Matter Thermalization in Neutron Stars 15m
        There have been many experimental efforts to constrain the dark matter - nucleon cross section as a function of dark matter mass. By considering black hole formation in neutron stars due to dark matter accretion, one can constrain dark matter parameter space that is inaccessible to current direct detection experiments. We have studied how Pauli blocking, kinematic constraints, and superfluidity and superconductivity in the neutron star affect dark matter interactions inside the star. Our results show that previously calculated dark matter thermalization times need to be altered.
        Speaker: Bridget Bertoni (U)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Constraining Hidden Sectors with Light from Cosmic Strings 15m
        A compelling minimal extension of the Standard Model consists of a TeV scale hidden sector that, from a phenomenological perspective, arises in dark matter model building and to motivate Z’ searches. If the hidden sector contains a spontaneously broken Abelian gauge symmetry, then our universe is permeated by a network of cosmic “dark strings.” These strings are far too light to be exposed by the standard gravitational probes. However, with a coupling to the Standard Model fields, the strings can produce SM particles in abundance, and their decay products may be observed on Earth. Over the recent years, there has been significant success in constraining empirical models of cosmic strings via astrophysical probes, particularly the diffuse gamma ray flux. In this talk, I will focus on a >~ TeV-scale hidden sector that talks to the SM via gauge kinetic mixing and the Higgs portal. Via to these interactions, the cosmic string network can radiate SM Higgs bosons whose decay products would appear on Earth as a diffuse gamma ray flux. I investigate whether bounds on the flux provide complimentary constraints to laboratory tests.
        Speaker: Andrew Long (A)
        Slides
      • 18:15
        Icezones vs. Firewalls 15m
        We critically examine the assumptions made in the setup of the firewalls paradox. We point out several flaws which indicate that the paradox itself is not formulated in a self-consistent way. In particular, during the black hole evaporation, a mode of the late radiation is never simultaneously entangled with early radiation and a mode inside the horizon. We then go a step forward, and show that perturbative and non-perturbative interactions which generally modify the thermal density matrix of the Hawking radiation could unitarize the evolution of the black hole. There is no need for the non-standard physics whatsoever.
        Speaker: Dejan Stojkovic (SUNY at Buffalo)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      Dark Matter II Benedum Hall G31

      Benedum Hall G31

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Brooks Thomas (University of Hawaii)
      • 16:30
        Blind Spots for neutralino Dark Matter in the MSSM with an intermediate m_A 15m
        We study the spin-independent neutralino Dark Matter scattering off heavy nuclei in the MSSM. We identify analytically the blind spots in direct detection for intermediate values of $m_A$. In the region where $\mu$ and $M_{1,2}$ have opposite signs, there is not only a reduction of the lightest CP-even Higgs coupling to neutralinos, but also a destructive interference between the neutralino scattering through the exchange of the lightest CP-even Higgs and that through the exchange of the heaviest CP-even Higgs. At critical values of $m_A$, the tree-level contribution from the light Higgs exchange cancels the contribution from the heavy Higgs, so the scattering cross section vanishes. We denote these configurations as blind spots, since they provide a generalization of the ones previously discussed in the literature, which occur at very large values of $m_A$. We show that the generalized blind spots may occur in regions of parameter space that are consistent with the obtention of the proper neutralino relic density, and therefore may be very relevant for the MSSM phenomenology.
        Speaker: Peisi Huang (ANL/U. of Chicago)
        Slides
      • 16:45
        The Case of Light Neutralino Dark Matter 15m
        We study the light (<40 GeV) neutralino Dark Matter (DM) in the framework of Next-to-Minimal-Supersymmetric-Standard-Model (NMSSM). We focus on three types of light DM solutions that satisfying current collider constrains from the LEP, Tevatron, LHC, direct detections and relic density requirements. Type-i may take place in any theory with a light (pseudo-)scalar, while Type-ii and iii can occur in the framework of Miminal-Supersymmetric-Standard-Model (MSSM) as well. These possible solutions all have very distinctive features from the perspective of DM astrophysics and collider phenomenology. We present a comprehensive study on these solutions and focus on the observational implications of these solutions at colliders, including new phenomena in Higgs physics, missing energy searches and light sfermion searches. The signal becomes hard to observe at the LHC when the LSP mass is nearly degenerate with the parent, dubbed as the \compressed spectrum". We discuss possible probes at the ILC for such scenarios.
        Speaker: Zhen Liu (U of Pittsburgh)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Simplified Models of Mixed Dark Matter 15m
        I discuss models of WIMP dark matter in which the relic density is achieved through mixing of a Standard Model singlet state and a state charged under SU(2) X U(1). Such models provide a generalization of the "well-tempered neutralino" scenario in supersymmetric theories, and naturally lie within the range of the current generation of dark matter direct detection experiments due to their Higgs coupling. I explore the spin-independet direct detection bounds on three such models, with a focus on the features of the parameter space which survives LUX bounds and which lies beyond future XENON1T sensitivity.
        Speaker: Dr David Sanford (Caltech)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Exotic signals from NMSSM with RH sneutrino LSP 15m
        We have studied that the expected number of signal events of exotic processes, namely displaced vertcies by the right-handed (RH) neutrino decay and long-lived charged particle of stau decaying into RH sneutrino LSP and tau lepton in the extended next-to minimal supersymetric standard model introduing RH neutrino chiral superfield. We show that significant number of events would be detected in the next run of LHC.
        Speaker: Osamu Seto
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Radiatively-driven natural SUSY with mixed axion/WIMP dark matter 15m
        Radiatively-driven natural SUSY (RNS) is a model within the context of supergravity grand unified theories that realizes low electroweak fine-tuning while satisfying Higgs mass and LHC SUSY constraints. To realize low EWFT, the RNS model requires 1. a small mu parameter ~100-200 GeV, 2. up-Higgs soft mass driven to small negative values and 3. highly mixed TeV-scale top squarks. In RNS, the lightest neutralino is a higgsino-like WIMP with thermal relic density well below measured values. This leaves room for axions to function as co-dark matter particles. The local WIMP abundance is then expected to be below standard estimates, and direct and indirect detection rates must be accordingly rescaled. We find that ton-scale noble liquid detectors can probe the entire low fine-tuned higgsino-like WIMP parameter space, so that these experiments should either discover WIMPs or exclude the concept of electroweak naturalness in R-parity conserving natural SUSY models. Prospects for indirect detection of WIMPs via halo annihilations are more limited since then the rates depend on the square of the rescaled abundance. Prospects for IceCube are better since these rates depend on the solar equilibration time rather than on the local WIMP abundance.
        Speaker: Mickelson Dan (University of Oklahoma)
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Dark Matter in SUSY DFSZ axion model 15m
        Supersymmetric (SUSY) DFSZ axion model can solve both the gauge hierarchy problem and strong CP problem and explain the weak scale mu term via Kim-Nilles mechanism. It can also provide good candidates of dark matter (DM): axion and neutralino. In addition, the extended axion sector by SUSY can modify the evolution of the early universe and make non-trivial consequences. In this talk, I would like to present the impact of SUSY partners of axion: axino and saxion. The production and decay of axino and saxion modify the relic densities of the DM particles, and thus constrain the parameter space of Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry breaking scale, f_a. In the scenario in which the lightest SUSY particle (LSP) is Higgsino-like neutralino, 10^10 GeV < f_a < 10^12 GeV region is allowed from all cosmological constraints. In this case, DM consists of 90% axion and 10% neutralino. In the case of Bino-like neutralino LSP, f_a>10^15 GeV region is allowed. The ratio of axion density and neutralino density varies depending on other parameters. In the last part of the talk, I will also comment on the implication of BICEP2 result.
        Speaker: Dr Kyu Jung Bae (University of Oklahoma)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Displaced Axinos at LHC 15m
        SUSY models with a modified dark sector require constraints to be reinterpreted, which may allow for scenarios with low tuning. A modified dark sector can also change the phenomenology greatly. The addition of the QCD axion to the MSSM solves the strong CP problem and also modifies the dark sector with new dark matter candidates. This talk describes scenarios where the axion's superpartner, the axino may be detectable at the LHC in the decays of neutralinos displaced from the primary vertex. Distinguishing this scenario from other models with displaced decays to dark matter is discussed.
        Speaker: Christopher Redino (SUNY at Buffalo)
        Slides
      • 18:15
        Rescuing the Wino from Indirect Searches 15m
        Collider constraints on Standard Model superpartners point to a split spectrum with gauginos much lighter than the scalars. Such spectra are typical of Anomaly Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking (AMSB), which also predicts the lightest supersymmetric particle to be the wino. If stable, the wino can be an attractive dark matter candidate. Unfortunately, its self annihilation rate in the present universe is in severe conflict with observations from the Fermi-LAT and HESS experiments. Their constraints on gamma ray line and continuum fluxes rule out wino dark matter and therefore AMSB-type spectra for a wide range of parameters. We investigate extensions of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model that allow low scale supersymmetry accessible by direct searches, while being consistent with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The tension with indirect searches is most easily relieved by allowing the wino to decay into new stable states that play the role of dark matter. We demonstrate the viability of this scenario in models with light hidden sectors, and with asymmetric dark matter.
        Speaker: Nikita Blinov (TRIUMF)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      Neutrinos II Benedum Hall G27

      Benedum Hall G27

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Ian Lewis (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
      • 16:30
        Theory of Lepton Flavors 30m
        Speaker: Mu-Chun Chen (University of California at Irvine)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Non-Standard Neutrino Interactions in the mu tau sector 15m
        This research focuses on Non-Standard Interactions and their effects on neutrino oscillations. In particular, we focus on the effects of the parameter ϵµτ on muon neutrino survival probability and the number of muons measured in IceCube's DeepCore detector. These effects are found to be sign asymmetric and an analytic model is presented that predicts points of maximum sign asymmetry. Furthermore, we discuss the implications these sign asymmetric effects have on mass hierarchy determination.
        Speaker: Warren Wright (Penn State)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Majorana Physics in the Flavor Ring 15m
        In this talk, we introduce the idea of the "Flavor Ring", a framework in which the simultaneous consideration of ideas from Grand Unification and flavor observables allow one to constrain models of flavor. Focusing on the neutrino sector and assuming the seesaw mechanism, we show how relations from SO(10) and the assumption of a diagonal up-quark Yukawa matrix, natural in terms of a family symmetry, can lead to a special form for the Majorana matrix. This matrix is compelling and predictive, and can be naturally realized through the family symmmetry $Z_7 \rtimes Z_3$. We provide an underlying theory from which this matrix may be obtained.
        Speaker: Michael Perez (University of Florida)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Accommodating $\theta_{13}$ within $SU(5)$ 15m
        Tri-bimaximal, Golden Ratio or Bimaximal matrix has long been considered as a good leading order parametrization for the neutrino mixing matrix. However, the recent discovery of non-zero $\theta_{13}$ neutrino mixing angle requires corrections to these leading order parametrizations. Those corrections may come from the quark sector, as in Grand Unified Theories Yukawa couplings of quarks and leptons are closely related. To explore this possibility, we perform a numerical search with the guidance of $SU(5)$, and indeed find some solutions that can accommodate current neutrino data.
        Speaker: Jue Zhang (University of Florida)
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Obtaining a nonzero $\theta_{13}$ in lepton models based on $SO(3) \rightarrow A_4$ 15m
        The simplest lepton models based on $A_4$ symmetry predict $\theta_{13} = 0$ at tree level, which contradicts recent experimental data from Daya Bay and RENO. We study models where the $A_4$ symmetry arises as the unbroken subgroup of a spontaneous broken $SO(3)$ symmetry, and find that a nonzero $\theta_{13}$ arises naturally at tree level. Extra heavy fields required in the model mixes with the charged leptons, generating $\theta_{13}$ of order the ratio of the $A_4$-breaking and $SO(3)$-breaking scales.
        Speaker: Wee Hao Ng (C)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Tests of lepton universality and lepton flavour violation in B decays 15m
        Heavy flavour decays allow to test lepton universality and flavour conservation. We review recent LHCb results on B->emu, searches for Majorana neutrinos in B->pimumu and test of lepton universality in B->llK.
        Speaker: Nicola Anne Skidmore (STFC - Science & Technology Facilities Council (GB))
        Slides
      • 18:15
        Exploring lepton flavor violation at an electron-electron collider 15m
        Observation of flavor violation for charged leptons would be an unambiguous signal for physics beyond the standard model. Using existing low-energy constraints as a guide, we study charged lepton flavor violation at an electron-electron collider, a plausible option for the International Linear Collider. We demonstrate the complementarity of an observable for electron-electron collisions with electron-positron collision observables and lepton branching ratios. This approach is also demonstrated to probe exotic physics beyond 10 TeV at a next generation linear collider.
        Speaker: Brandon Murakami (Rhode Island College)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:45
      SM Higgs II Benedum Hall G28

      Benedum Hall G28

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Matthew Buckley (Fermilab)
      • 16:30
        SM Higgs Properties 30m
        Speaker: Tilman Plehn (Heidelberg University)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Constraint on Higgs boson total width using off-shell production in the ZZ decay 15m
        We constrain the total Higgs boson width using off-shell production and decay to four leptons, 4ℓ, or two leptons plus two neutrinos, 2ℓ2ν, with ℓ=e,μ. The analysis is based on the data collected in 2011 and 2012 by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of ${\cal L}=19.7fb^{−1}$ and ${\cal L}=5.1 fb^{-1}$ at center-of-mass energies of √s=8 TeV and √s=7 TeV respectively. The 4ℓ analysis uses the ZZ invariant mass distribution as well as a matrix element likelihood discriminant to separate the ZZ components originating from gluon- and quark-initiated processes. The 2ℓ2ν analysis relies on the transverse mass or missing transverse energy distributions in jet categories. An unbinned maximum-likelihood fit of the above distributions, combined with the 4ℓ measurement near the resonance peak, leads to an upper limit on the Higgs boson width of Γ<17 MeV at the 95% confidence level. This result considerably improves over previous experimental constraints from the measurement near the resonance peak.
        Speaker: Ian James Anderson (Johns Hopkins University (US))
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Constraints on CP-violating Higgs couplings 15m
        Discovering CP-violating effects in the Higgs sector would constitute an indisputable sign of physics beyond the Standard Model. I will discuss constraints on the CP-violating Higgs-boson couplings to top and bottom quarks as well as to tau leptons from low-energy bounds on electric dipole moments. In addition, I will provide present and future projections of the sensitivities and comparisons with LHC constraints.
        Speaker: Brod Joachim (University of Cincinnati)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Higgs pair production at the LHC 15m
        We simulate the measurement of the triscalar Higgs coupling at LHC(8,14) via pair production of h(125 GeV). We find that the most promising hh final state is bb + gamma gamma. We account for deviations of the triscalar coupling from its SM value and study the effects of this coupling on the hh cross-section and distributions with cut-based and multivariate methods. Our fit to the hh production matrix element at LHC(14) with 3 ab^−1 yields a 30% uncertainty on this coupling in the SM and a range of 20-60% uncertainties for non-SM values.
        Speaker: Mr Gabe Shaughnessy Shaughnessy (University of Wisconsin)
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Higgs pair production at the LHC with NLO and parton-shower effects 15m
        I will present predictions for the SM-Higgs-pair production channels at the LHC: gluon-gluon fusion, VBF, and top-pair, W, Z and single-top associated production. Results are at the NLO accuracy in QCD, and matched to parton showers by means of the MC@NLO method; hence, they are fully differential. With the exception of the gluon-gluon fusion process, for which a special treatment was needed in order to improve upon the infinite-top-mass limit, our predictions have been obtained in a fully automatic way within the publicly available MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework. I will show that for all channels in general, and for gluon-gluon fusion and top-pair associated production in particular, NLO corrections reduce the theoretical uncertainties, and are needed in order to provide reliable predictions for total rates as well as for distributions. Based on arXiv:1401.7340.
        Speaker: Dr Eleni Vryonidou (Universite catholique de Louvain)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Electroweak Effective Operators and Higgs Physics 15m
        We derive bounds from oblique parameters on the dimension-$6$ operators of an effective field theory of electroweak gauge bosons and the Higgs doublet. The loop- induced contributions to the $\Delta S$, $\Delta T$, and $\Delta U$ oblique parameters are sensitive to these contributions and we pay particular attention to the role of renormalization when computing loop corrections in the effective theory. Limits on the coefficients of the effective theory from loop contributions to oblique parameters yield complementary information to direct Higgs production measurements.
        Speaker: Chien-Yi Chen (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 18:15
        Taming the Goldstone contributions to the Standard Model Higgs effective potential 15m
        The vacuum expectation value of the Standard Model Higgs field can be computed in terms of the Lagrangian parameters using the effective potential. However, the perturbative calculation of the effective potential at any finite loop order contains problematic contributions from Goldstone bosons with small but non-zero field-dependent masses. As the field-dependent Goldstone boson mass approaches zero, these contributions to the effective potential minimization condition give a logarithmic divergence already at 2-loop order, and have power-law singularities at higher loop orders. I show how to resum these contributions to the effective potential to all orders in perturbation theory to obtain a simple, well-behaved result. I will also discuss the impact on the Standard Model Higgs effective potential minimization and the Higgs mass calculation.
        Speaker: Prof. Stephen Martin (Northern Illinois University)
        Slides
      • 18:30
        Resummation effects on WW fiducial cross section. 15m
        WW production in the Standard Model is an important channel on its own and also a critical background to Higgs studies at the LHC. In all public LHC measurements thus far this channel and has had excesses compared to the SM prediction. We explore transverse momentum resummation effects on the the shape of the pp->W+W-> dileptonic differential cross section, which translates into changes in fiducial cross section. We find that there are non-negligible resummation effects on the existing theory prediction.
        Speaker: Harikrishnan Ramani (Yang Institute Of Theoretical Physics)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      SUSY II Benedum Hall G29

      Benedum Hall G29

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Jamie Tattersall (University of Heidelberg)
      • 16:30
        LHC Phenomenology of SO(10) Models with Yukawa Unification 15m
        We study Yukawa-unified SO(10) SUSY GUTs with two types of SO(10) boundary conditions: (i) universal gaugino masses and (ii) non-universal gaugino masses with "effective mirage" mediation. With these boundary conditions, we perform a global $\chi^2$ analysis to obtain the parameters consistent with 11 low energy observables, including the top, bottom, and tau masses. Both boundary conditions have universal scalar masses and "just so" splitting for the up- and down-type Higgs masses. In these models, the third family scalars are lighter than the first two families and the gauginos are lighter than all the scalars. We therefore focus on the gluino phenomenology in these models. In particular, we estimate the lowest allowed gluino mass in our models coming from the most recent LHC data and compare these to limits obtained using simplified models.
        Speaker: Brandon Bryant (The Ohio State University)
        Slides
      • 16:45
        Effects of Inverse Seesaw Mechanism on the Sparticle Sprectrum 15m
        We study the implications of the inverse seesaw mechanism (ISS) on the sparticle spectrum in the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) and Non-Universal Higgs Model (NUHM2). Employing the maximal value of the Dirac Yukawa coupling involving the up type Higgs doublet provides a 2-3 GeV enhancement of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass. This effect permits one to have lighter colored sparticles in the CMSSM and NUHM2 scenarios with LSP neutralino, which can be tested at LHC14. We present a variety of LHC testable benchmark points with the desired LSP neutralino dark matter relic abundance.
        Speaker: Bin He (University of Delaware)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Weighing Neutrinos at the LHC through Stop LSP Decays 15m
        An appealing framework for suppressing proton decay in supersymmetry is by considering models with gauged B-L symmetries. This is because R-parity is a subgroup of B-L. The minimal supersymmetric B-L model must violate B-L in such a way to spontaneous break R-parity, but keeps the proton safe. In this context, R-parity violation both generates neutrino masses and allows for the decay of the LSP. This suggests that one can potentially learn about the neutrino sector from collider observations of LSP decays. I will briefly introduce this minimal model and discuss how stop LSP decays can reveal information about the neutrino hierarchy and therefore determine neutrino masses.
        Speaker: Dr Sogee Spinner (University of Pennsylvania)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        R-parity Conserving Minimal B-L Model 15m
        We propose a simple gauged U(1)B−L extension of the minimal supersymmetric Stan- dard Model (MSSM), where R-parity is conserved as usual in the MSSM. The global B − L (baryon minus lepton number) symmetry in the MSSM is gauged and three MSSM gauge-singlet chiral multiplets with a unit B − L charge are introduced, ensuring the model free from gauge and gravi- tational anomalies. We assign an odd R-parity for two of the new chiral multiplets and hence they are identified with the right-handed neutrino superfields, while an even R-parity is assigned to the other one. The scalar component of the R-parity even superfield plays the role of a Higgs field and the U(1)B−L symmetry is radiatively broken by a negative mass squared of the scalar generated by the renormalization group running of soft supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking parameters. Therefore, the scale of the U(1)B−L symmetry breaking is controlled by the SUSY breaking parameters and naturally be at the TeV scale. Because of our novel R-parity assignment, three light neutrinos are Dirac particles with one massless state. Since R-parity is conserved, the lightest superpartner (LSP) neutralino is a prime candidate of the cosmological dark matter. Depending on its mass, the lighter Majorana mass eigenstate of a mixture of the B − L gaugino and the fermionic component of the R-parity even superfield appears as a new dark matter candidate. We also discuss collider phenomenology of our model. In particular, the B − L gauge boson (Z ), once discovered at the Large Hadron Collider, will be a novel probe of the Dirac nature of the light neutrinos since its invisible decay processes include the final states with one massless (left-handed) neutrino and two Dirac neutrinos, in sharp contrast with usual B − L extension of the SM or MSSM, where the right-handed neutrinos are heavy Majorana particles and decay to the SM leptons.
        Speaker: Nathan Papapietro (University of Alabama)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Perturbative Unitarity Constraints on the NMSSM SUSY Breaking Scales 15m
        We place unitarity constraints on the SUSY breaking parameters in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM). To illustrate this analysis, we focus on a simple scenario where all of the SUSY breaking parameters originate from a common scale and the singlino and/or higgsino form the neutralino dark matter.
        Speaker: sonia el hedri (SLAC)
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Mirage Models Confront the LHC: Flux-Stabilized Type IIB String Theory 15m
        We continue the study of a class of string-motivated effective supergravity theories in light of current data from the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this installment we consider Type IIB string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau orientifold in the presence of fluxes, in the manner originally formulated by Kachru, et al. We allow for a variety of potential uplift mechanisms and embeddings of the Standard Model field content into D3 and D7 brane configurations. We find that an uplift sector independent of the Kahler moduli, as is the case with anti-D3 branes, is inconsistent with data unless the matter and Higgs sectors are localized on D7 branes exclusively, or are confined to twisted sectors between D3 and D7 branes. We identify regions of parameter space for all possible D-brane configurations that remain consistent with PLANCK observations on the dark matter relic density and measurements of the CP-even Higgs mass at the LHC. Constraints arising from LHC searches at 8 TeV center-of-mass energies, and the LUX dark matter detection experiment, are discussed. The discovery prospects for the remaining parameter space at dark matter direct detection experiments are described, and signatures for detection of superpartners at the LHC, with center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV, are analyzed.
        Speaker: Bryan Kaufman (Northeastern University)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        A-terms at tree level and composite sectors 15m
        In the MSSM, a Higgs mass of 126[GeV] requires either heavy stops, leading to a little hierarchy problem, or maximal mixing. The latter alternative requieres models that generate sizable A-terms. On the other hand, a mechanism for SUSY breaking is required in the MSSM. Gauge mediation is one of the most popular mechanisms, since it is both very general and it does not introduce flavor problems. However, gauge mediation only generates small A-terms through two loop diagrams. One of the simplest ways to solve this problem is to generate A-terms by directly coupling messengers with the MSSM fields in the superpotential. These models suffer from the little A/mh problem, namely, if an A-term is generated in this way, a similar contribution is induced for the soft mass of the Higgs field, leading to large tuning. In this work we present a bound that quantifies the tree level A/mh problem in the most general case. The results indicate that the problem is alleviated by considering large superpotential Yukawa couplings. These couplings lead to Landau poles at a low energy scale, which we explain in terms of a composite, Fat Higgs like theory. The resulting model alleviates the tuning problems of similar models, does not introduce large flavor violation, and shares some of the nice features of Fat Higgs models, including a natural explanation for the large size of the top yukawa coupling.
        Speaker: Daniel Egana (R)
        Slides
      • 18:15
        Messenger Yukawa Alignment and Misalignment in Flavored Gauge Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking Models with Higgs-Messenger Multiplets 15m
        We explore flavored gauge mediation models in which the electroweak Higgs fields and the $SU(2)$ doublet messengers of gauge mediation are embedded in multiplets of a non-Abelian discrete group (the Higgs-messenger group), as motivated by earlier work of Perez, Ramond, and Zhang. The Higgs-messenger group is part of a larger structure that includes a family symmetry group for the Standard Model (SM) matter fields. A subset of the flavon fields that break these symmetries also break supersymmetry, resulting in gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with nontrivial messenger Yukawa couplings. %These couplings are governed not only by the (model-dependent) details of the family symmetry breaking, but also by the mixing of the Higgs fields and the messengers. The framework allows not only for the possibility of concrete examples of messenger Yukawa alignment with the SM Yukawa couplings, but also the possibility that these couplings are misaligned in a specific way that may be consistent with the bounds on flavor-changing processes, depending on the details of the flavor model. We present examples of each type, taking a relatively model-independent approach for the family symmetry structure but specifying for concreteness a $\mathcal{S}_3$ Higgs-messenger group. We also point out that such flavored gauge mediation models in which the Higgs fields and the doublet messengers are part of a larger non-Abelian multiplet are subject to a severe $\mu/B_\mu$ problem, and comment on methods to alleviate this difficulty.
        Speaker: Todd Garon (UW-Madison)
        Slides
    • 19:00 22:00
      Banquet Phipps Conservatory

      Phipps Conservatory

      700 Frank Curto Drive Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    • 08:00 08:45
      Breakfast 45m Alumni Hall 7th Floor

      Alumni Hall 7th Floor

      University of Pittsburgh

    • 08:45 10:30
      Plenary III Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      University of Pittsburgh

      Pittsburgh, PA 15260
      Convener: Amarjit Soni (BNL)
      • 08:45
        Recent LHCb physics results 35m
        Speaker: Steven R. Blusk (Syracuse University (US))
        Slides
      • 09:20
        Flavor physics in the LHC era 35m
        Speaker: Alexey Petrov (Wayne State University)
        Slides
      • 09:55
        Modern lattice QCD: progress and prospects 35m
        Speaker: Ruth Van de Water (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
        Slides
    • 10:30 11:00
      Coffee Break 30m Alumni Hall 7th Floor

      Alumni Hall 7th Floor

      University of Pittsburgh

    • 11:00 12:45
      Plenary IV Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Chris Carone
      • 11:00
        Direct searches for WIMP dark matter 35m
        Speaker: Karen Gibson (Case Western Reserve University)
        Slides
      • 11:35
        Dark matter theory and searches 35m
        Speaker: Ms Pearl Sandick (University of Minnesota)
        Slides
      • 12:10
        Recent excitement in astro-particle physics 35m
        Speaker: Alexander Kusenko (UCLA)
        Slides
    • 12:45 14:00
      Lunch 1h 15m Oakland Area

      Oakland Area

    • 14:00 16:00
      B Physics I Benedum Hall G27

      Benedum Hall G27

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Prof. Gil Paz (Wayne State University)
      • 14:00
        Charm mixing and CP violation 15m
        LHCb has collected the world's largest sample of charmed hadrons. This sample is used to search for direct and indirect CP violation in charm, and to measure $D^0$ mixing parameters. New updated measurements from several decay modes are presented, with complementary time-dependent and time-integrated analyses.
        Speaker: Adam Davis (University of Cincinnati (US))
        Slides
      • 14:15
        Measurement of CP violation in the Bs system 15m
        The study of CP violation in Bs oscillations is one of the key goals of the LHCb experiment. Effects are predicted to be very small in the Standard Model but can be significantly enhanced in many models of new physics. We present the world’s best measurement of the CP-violating phase φs using B0s → J/ψφ and B0s → J/ψππ decays, B0s → φφ and B->hh (h=K,pi).
        Speaker: Mirco Dorigo (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (CH))
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Studies of charmless B decays 15m
        Decays of b-hadrons without charmed particles in the final state offer rich opportunities to test the Standard Model. For example, CP violation in charmless charged two-body and three-body B decays provides ways to measure the CKM angle $\gamma$ and to search for New Physics. The angular distributions of decays to vector-vector final states provide additional interesting observables. We present the latest results on hadronic charmless B decays from LHCb.
        Speaker: Jessica Prisciandaro (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (CH))
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Physics with B to open charm decays 15m
        B->DX decays provide a tree-diagram only determination of the angle γ of the CKM unitarity triangle, which remains the least precisely measured parameter of the CKM mixing matrix. While several new results provide updated measurements of this angle, some decay channels with sensitivity to gamma have only recently been observed. Other measurements in the rich B to open charm phenomenology are also presented.
        Speaker: Ms Charlotte Wallace (University of Warwick (GB))
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Physics with the Bc meson 15m
        The Bc meson is the only weakly decaying doubly heavy meson, which makes it an very interesting system to study. LHCb has recently measured its lifetime, mass and many decay channels, including for the first time a decay of the c-quark.
        Speaker: Mr Jacco de Vries (on behalf of the LHCb Collaboration) (Nikhef)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Beauty in ATLAS: New physics searches, spectroscopy and decay properties of B-hadrons 15m
        This talk will begin with an overview of the ATLAS detector with emphasis on B-physics. A selection of recently approved ATLAS B-physics analyses, including a measurement of parity violation asymmetry parameter $\alpha_b$ and helicity amplitudes for the decay $\Lambda^0_b \rightarrow J/\psi \Lambda^0$ using 4.6 fb$^{−1}$ of proton-proton collision data in 2011, will be presented.
        Speaker: Hok Chuen Cheng (University of Michigan (US))
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Radiative decays at LHCb 15m
        Radiative decays allow the measurement of the photon polarisation and thus test the left-handed couplings in weak interactions. Recent LHCb measurements have shown a non-zero polarisation. The interpretation of this result in terms of right-handed couplings requires more theoretical input.
        Speaker: Mostafa on behalf of the LHCb collaboration HOBALLAH (LPC)
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Semileptonic decay of $B_s$ into $D_s$ mesons near zero recoil from LQCD. 15m
        We study the hadronic matrix elements describing the $B_s \to D_s\ell \bar\nu_\ell$ decay in and beyond the Standard Model. By using the twisted mass QCD on the lattice with $N_f=2$ dynamical flavors we compute the normalization $\mathscr G_s(1)$ of the form factor dominating $B_s\to D_s \ell \bar\nu_\ell$ in the SM. We also make the first lattice determination of $F_0(q^2)/F_+(q^2)$ and $F_T(q^2)/F_+(q^2)$ near zero recoil (near $q^2_{\rm max}$).
        Speaker: Mrs Mariam Atoui (LPC)
        Slides
    • 14:00 16:00
      BSM Higgs III Benedum Hall G30

      Benedum Hall G30

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Seong Youl Choi (Chonbuk National University)
      • 14:00
        News in Two-Higgs Doublet Models 30m
        Speaker: Jack Gunion (University of California Davis (US))
        Slides
      • 14:30
        2HDM Fate after LHC 8 15m
        As well known, the LHC8 data clearly favors a fairly Standard Model (SM)-like Higgs boson with mass of 125.5 \pm 2.5 GeV, however, a natural curiosity whether more than one Higgs boson, particularly the charged Higgs, are existed in Nature motivates us to probe new physics beyond the SM (BSM). As the simplest extension in the BSM, Two-Higgs-Doublet Models (2HDM) is the focus of our great interest. In the talk I first present that both Type I and Type II 2HDM is able to provide a consistent description with the LHC Higgs signal. The current status and implications for future collider experiments for both the observed 125.5 GeV Higgs boson and for other Higgs bosons will be also presented. In addition, I will illustrate the possible importance of producing the lighter Higgs boson from certain heavier Higgs bosons through feed down mechanism.
        Speaker: YUN JIANG (UC Davis)
        Slides
      • 14:45
        MSSM Corrections to Higgs Self-Couplings 15m
        We analyze corrections to the minimal supersymmetric Higgs self-couplings within the effective potential approach.
        Speaker: Ryan Gavin (Paul Scherrer Institut)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Measuring the 2HDM Scalar Potential: hH Associated Production 15m
        We explore the possibility of probing the scalar potential of the CP-conserving Two Higgs Doublet Model through the production of a light-heavy Higgs boson pair. The $hH$ process is complementary to $hh$ production in providing information about the triscalar couplings. Using multivariate analysis, we determine the LHC14 discovery reach in the $b\bar{b}\gamma \gamma$ and $h h\gamma \gamma \rightarrow b\bar{b}b\bar{b} \gamma \gamma$ channels. The combination of these two channels extends the reach in $M_H$, with $H\rightarrow b\bar{b}$ sensitive in the low mass range and $H \rightarrow h h$ providing sensitivity for $M_H > 2 M_h$.
        Speaker: Andrea Peterson (University of Wisconsin - Madison)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        A Higgs Discovery via Exotic Higgs Decays 15m
        Models of electroweak symmetry breaking, with an extended Higgs sector, are theoretically well motivated. In this study, we focus on the Two Higgs Doublet Model, with a low energy spectrum containing scalars $H$, a pseudoscalar $A$ and charged scalars $H^{\pm}$. We look at exotic decays of those extra Higgses into a light Higgs and a gauge boson: $A/H \rightarrow HZ/AZ$ and $H^{\pm} \rightarrow HW/AW$. With detailed collider analyses, we obtain the exclusion bounds as well as the discovery reach at the 14 TeV LHC and interpret these bounds in the context of the Type II Two Higgs Doublet Model.
        Speaker: Felix Kling (University of Arizona)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Flavor violating decays of the Neutral Higgs bosons at the LHC 15m
        The next step in understanding the mechanism behind electroweak symmetry breaking is to look for signs of a second Higgs doublet which is required by some of the well motivated extensions of the Standard Model. In a general two Higgs doublet model (2HDM) there are flavor changing neutral currents at tree level. Experimental results limit the size of these off-diagonal Yukawa couplings but $\lambda_{tc}$ is not strongly constrained by data. Coupling measurements of the 126 GeV Higgs boson point towards the "alignment" limit where the gauge boson and diagonal fermion couplings of the light neutral Higgs state approach the SM values. In this limit flavor changing couplings of the light neutral Higgs are naturally suppressed by a small $\cos(\beta-\alpha)$ while the off-diagonal couplings of the heavier neutral Higgs bosons are not. We study the prospects of observing the flavor changing decays of the heavier neutral Higgs bosons ($H,A \rightarrow t\bar{c} + \bar{t}c$) at the LHC in a general 2HDM.
        Speaker: Baris Altunkaynak (University of Oklahoma)
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Higgcision in the two-Higgs doubelt models 15m
        We perform global fits to the general two-Higgs doublet models (2HDMs) with generalized couplings using the most updated data from ATLAS, CMS, and Tevatron. We include both scenarios with CP-conserving and CP-violating couplings. By relaxing the requirement on the discrete symmetries that are often imposed on the Yukawa couplings in order to prohibit the tree-level flavour changing neutral current (FCNC), we try to see which of the 2HDMs is preferred.
        Speaker: Dr Po-Yen Tseng (NTHU)
        Slides
    • 14:00 16:00
      Dark Matter III Benedum Hall G31

      Benedum Hall G31

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Jennifer Kile (U)
      • 14:00
        Dark Matter at Colliders 30m
        Speaker: LianTao Wang (University of Chicago)
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Collider Searches for Dark Matter in the Mono-Everything Search Channels 15m
        Searches for dark matter at colliders typically involve signatures with energetic initial-state radiation without visible recoil particles. Searches for mono-jet or mono-photon signatures have yielded powerful constraints on dark matter interactions with Standard Model particles. I extend this to the mono-Z, W, and Higgs signatures and reinterpret ATLAS analyses of events with missing transverse momentum to derive constraints on the dark matter interaction mass scale and nucleon cross sections. Dark matter models are explored in the context of effective field theories describing interacts via weak scale mediator particles, and are compared to existing space-based searches for DM scenarios
        Speaker: Linda Carpenter (Ohio State University)
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Mono-Higgs Detection of Dark Matter at the LHC 15m
        Motivated by the recent discovery of the Higgs boson, we investigate the possibility that a missing energy plus Higgs final state is the dominant signal channel for dark matter at the LHC. We consider examples of higher-dimension operators where a Higgs and dark matter pair are produced through an off-shell Z or photon, finding potential sensitivity at the LHC to cutoff scales of around a few hundred GeV. We generalize this production mechanism to a simplified model by introducing a Z' as well as a second Higgs doublet, where the pseudoscalar couples to dark matter. Resonant production of the Z' which decays to a Higgs plus invisible particles gives rise to a potential mono-Higgs signal. This may be observable at the 14 TeV LHC at low tan beta and when the Z' mass is roughly in the range 600 GeV to 1.3 TeV.
        Speaker: Asher Berlin (University of Chicago)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        A Probe of Dark Sector Dynamics at the LHC 15m
        The production cross section of dark matter at the LHC is constrained to be in order of picobarn assuming a minimal, SM singlet dark matter. However the dark sector generically can be non minimal that it might have new dark gauge interactions. The dark gauge boson can decay to SM particles via kinetic mixing. In this scenario, the dark gauge boson is produced at the LHC in association with the dark matter. Therefore the search for this particular final state is well motivated. In this talk I will discuss the current and future LHC reach for this scenario of a non minimal dark sector. I will show that the LHC at 8 TeV com energy can provide a powerful bound for the production of dark sector in this scenario.
        Speaker: Reinard Primulando (Johns Hopkins University)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Looking for a Light Nonthermal Dark Matter at the LHC 15m
        This talk discusses the collider phenomenolgy of a nonthermal dark matter model with a 1-GeV dark matter candidate. Together with additional colored states, the dark matter also explains baryongensis. Since the light dark matter is not parity-protected, it can be singly produced at the LHC. This leads to large missing energy associated with an energetic jet whose transverse momentum distribution is featured by a Jacobian-like shape. Currently available LHC data can offer significant bounds on this model. I will also comment on the model's indication to the recently observed 3.5 keV photon emission from galaxy clusters.
        Speaker: Yu Gao (University of Texas A & M)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Loop Effects of an Effective Dark Matter Model on Dilepton Production 15m
        One of the cleanest channels to look for New Physics at the LHC is the neutral-current Drell Yan process. While there's an ongoing search for new resonance states (Z' models) in this channel, it is also important to probe the effects of hidden sector TeV-scale states running in loop amplitudes that interfere with the Standard Model process. To this end, I will motivate an effective theory with a hidden sector that provides a dark matter candidate, and discuss the role of dispersion relations in producing our signals on the Drell-Yan process. I will conclude with constraints from the dark matter relic abundance, and direct detection and collider experiments.
        Speaker: Nirmal Raj (U)
        Slides
      • 15:45
        The Dark Z' Portal: Direct, Indirect and Collider Searches 15m
        We perform a detailed study of the dark Z' portal using a generic parametrization of the Z'-quarks couplings. We present a comprehensive study of the collider phenomenology and Dark Matter observables. We highlight the importance of complementary searches for dark matter, and outline the excluded versus still viable parameter space regions of the dark Z' portal.
        Speaker: Dr Farinaldo Queiroz (University of California Santa Cruz)
        Slides
    • 14:00 16:00
      Electroweak + Benedum Hall G28

      Benedum Hall G28

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Matthew Baumgart (Carnegie Mellon University)
      • 14:00
        W+jets and Z+jets cross-section measurements at CMS. 15m
        Measurements are presented of the production of the W and Z boson in association with one or more jets, using 4.9-5.0/fb of CMS data collected at sqrt(s)=7TeV. Differential cross-section measurements are calculated as a function of several variables, including jet multiplicity, the transverse momentum and pseudorapidity of the jets, and the scalar sum of jet transverse momenta. Measurements of the W+jets process are performed in events with a muon in the final state, and Z+jets measurements are performed in the dimuon and dielectron final states. Measured results are compared with predictions from monte-carlo generators including MadGraph+Pythia, Sherpa1.4 and Sherpa2, and Powheg Box. Comparisons to NLO predictions from BlackHat+Sherpa are presented for W+jets measurements.
        Speaker: Darin Carl Baumgartel (Northeastern University (US), The CMS Collaboration)
        Slides
      • 14:15
        Neutral vector boson production in pp and pA collisions at hadron colliders 15m
        I discuss the $Z/\gamma^*$ gauge boson production in $pp$ and $p\bar{p}$ collisions with the focus on non-perturbative contributions to the transverse momentum distribution based on the Collins-Soper-Sterman (CSS) resummation formalism. The dependence of the CSS resumed cross section on resummation scales and other factors is estimated. I also present a study of $Z/\gamma^*$ production in proton-lead and lead-lead collisions, where the small-$x$ shadowing and moderate-$x$ antishadowing effects are shown in transverse momentum and rapidity distributions.
        Speaker: Mr Bowen Wang (myself)
        Slides
      • 14:30
        ATLAS measurements of vector boson production 15m
        Vector boson production in $pp$ collisions at 7 TeV has been extensively studied by ATLAS. Recent results include the measurement of Drell-Yan differential production cross section and of jets and heavy flavours production in association with vector bosons. The Drell-Yan cross-section measurements are compared to NNLO QCD predictions corrected for NLO EW effects calculated using various PDF sets. Measurement of $W+c$ production cross section probes the strange quark density. An overview of these results is given.
        Speaker: Christian Gutschow (University College London (UK))
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Recent electroweak results from ATLAS 15m
        ATLAS measurements of diboson production processes involving combinations of W/Z, vector boson scattering (VBS), as well as single Z->4l are summarized. Measurements using data at 7 TeV and new results at 8 TeV are presented. The measurements are performed using leptonic decay modes for di-boson production, including Z->nunu for ZZ with semileptonic channels. VBS measurement is performed using final states with leptons plus two forward jets. Differential and total visible cross sections are presented and are used to place constraints on anomalous triple-gauge boson couplings. An overview of these results is given.
        Speaker: Haolu Feng (University of Michigan (US))
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Nuclear corrections to Vector Boson production at the LHC 15m
        High Energy proton-proton collisions at the LHC are capable of producing many electroweak bosons (W/Z) at high rapidity. Measurements of properties of these particles are essential standard candles used to calibrate detectors such as ATLAS. The collision of heavy nuclei can show significant modifications to the distribution of these bosons. We will present an analysis of electroweak boson production in lead-lead collisions at the LHC using the nCTEQ nuclear Parton Distribution Functions. Comparison to the proton-proton predictions will be provided.
        Speaker: Mr David Clark (SMU)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Exclusive W decay in Effective Field Theory 15m
        We examine exclusive W decays, such as $W^{\pm} \rightarrow \pi^{\pm} + \gamma$. The mass of the W boson is predicted by the standard Weinberg-Salam model for weak interactions. Detection of its radiative decay along with the measurement of the photon energy can be used to obtain a precise determination of this mass. So a good theoretical calculation of these rare decay modes is significant and can provide an important test of the standard model. We estimate the branching ratio for these processes in the context of perturbative QCD as well as effective field theories such as soft collinear effective theory (SCET) which would be quite relevant as a playground for understanding these decays which involve the emission of an energetic photon and a meson which is a collinear bound state of the quarks.
        Speaker: Aditya Yechan Gunja (Wayne State University)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Collider signature and Astrophysics Constraint of Goldstone Bosons. 15m
        Goldstone bosons arising from the spontaneous breakdown of some global hidden symmetries can interact weakly in the early Universe and account for a fraction of the effective number of neutrino species $N_{eff}$, which has been reported persistently 1 $\sigma$ away from its expected value of three. In this work, we study in some details a number of experimental constraints on this interesting idea based on the simplest possibility of a global $U(1)$, as studied by Weinberg. We work out the decay branching ratios of the associated light scalar field σ and suggest a possible collider signature at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In some corners of the parameter space, the scalar field \sigma can decay into a pair of pions with a branching ratio of order O(1)% while the rest is mostly a pair of Goldstone bosons. The collider signature would be gluon fusion into the standard model Higgs boson $gg \to H$ or associated production with a $W$ gauge boson $q \bar{q}'\to H W$, followed by $H \to \sigma \sigma \to (\pi\pi) (\alpha\alpha)$, where $\alpha$ is the Goldstone boson. We calculate the energy loss rates through the emission of these Goldstone bosons in a post-collapse supernova core. Invoking the well established emissivity bound from the Supernova 1987A observations and simulations, we find that nuclear bremsstrahlung processes can notably impose a bound on the Goldstone boson coupling to the Standard Model Higgs, g, dependent on the mass of the associated radial field, mr. For mr large enough compared with the temperature in the post-collapse supernova core, our bound is $|g|≲0.011(m_r/500 {\rm\ MeV})^2$, very competitive to that derived from collider experiments.
        Speaker: Prof. Wai-Yee Keung (University of Illinois at Chicago)
        Slides
      • 15:45
        BSM Higgs Decoupling Scenarios in light of Unitarity Constraints 15m
        Unitarity limits from $2 \rightarrow 2$ scattering processes constrain the $hVV$, $hhVV$, $h\bar{f}f$ couplings to deviate from the SM values by up to $\mathcal{O}(v^2/s)$, $\mathcal{O}(v^2/s)$ and $\mathcal{O}(v/\sqrt{s})$ respectively. These bounds are not always ``saturated" in NP models, for e.g. in Type-II 2HDM the decoupling of $hVV$ has a steeper power law behaviour of $\mathcal{O}(v^4/M_{\text{new}}^4)$. We study the power law behavior of decoupling in scalar, fermion and gauge boson extensions of the SM and note features that allow saturation. In addition, we note features that always cause enhancement or suppression of the Higgs couplings. Precision measurements of these couplings would thus help discriminate between SM extensions and point to the scale at which we could expect new particles.
        Speaker: Kunal Kumar (Carleton University)
        Slides
    • 14:00 16:00
      SUSY III & Tools Benedum Hall G29

      Benedum Hall G29

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Arjun Menon (University of Oregon)
      • 14:00
        Supersymmetric Crevices: Missing Signatures of RPV at the LHC 15m
        Supersymmetry is under pressure from LHC searches requiring colored superpartners to be heavy. We demonstrate R-parity violating spectra for which the dominant signatures are not currently well searched for at the LHC. In such cases, the bounds can be as low as 800 GeV on both squarks and gluinos. We demonstrate that there are nontrivial constraints on squark and gluino masses with baryonic RPV (UDD operators) and show that in fact leptonic RPV can allow comparable or even lighter superpartners. We find that the constraints from many searches are weakened if the LSP is significantly lighter than the colored superpartners, such that it is produced with high boost. The least constrained models can have SUSY production cross-sections of ~pb or larger, implying tens of thousands of SUSY events in the 8 TeV data. We suggest novel searches for these signatures of RPV, which would also improve the search for general new physics at the LHC. This work is presented in arXiv:1403.7197.
        Speaker: Prashant Saraswat (University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University)
        Slides
      • 14:15
        Searches for supersymmetry in resonance production, R-parity violating signatures and events with long-lived particles with the ATLAS detector 15m
        An extended QCD sector beyond the minimal supersymmetric standard model or the admission of R-parity violation introduces new signatures to the search for supersymmetry at the LHC. Strongly interacting resonances may decay to jets, sleptons may decay via lepton-flavour violating processes and lightest supersymmetric particles may decay into many leptons with or without missing transverse momentum. Several supersymmetric models also predict massive long-lived supersymmetric particles. Such particles may be detected through abnormal specific energy loss, appearing or disappearing tracks, displaced vertices, long time-of-flight or late calorimetric energy deposits. The talk presents recent results from searches supersymmetry in resonance production, R-parity violating signatures and events with long-lived particles with the ATLAS detector.
        Speaker: Allan Kenneth Lehan (University of Liverpool (GB))
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Simultaneous B and L-Violation in the MSSM 15m
        It is commonly stated that in R-parity violating supersymmetric models, the simultaneous presence of renormalizable B and L-violating interactions is heavily constrained as they induce 2-body proton decay. In this talk, I will point out that certain LLE couplings which are anti-symmetric in flavor indices will instead induce 4-body proton decay when combined with UDD couplings. The resulting 4-body phase space suppression significantly weakens proton decay bounds, allowing both the LLE and UDD couplings to be simultaneously non-negligible and relevant for collider phenomenology. I present a simple model which can potentially account for such a flavor structure in the L-violating couplings. I also discuss implications for LHC phenomenology, and highlight qualitative differences from the usual R-parity violating scenarios.
        Speaker: Bob Zheng (University of Michigan)
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Search for 3rd generation LQs and RPV stops 15m
        We present the search for 3rd generation leptoquark pair production, with decays to pairs of b+tau as well as pairs of top+tau. The searches are also re-interpreted in terms of R-parity violating stop squark decays with LQD couplings.
        Speaker: Kevin Pedro (University of Maryland (US))
        Slides
      • 15:00
        CheckMATE: Confronting your Favourite New Physics Model with LHC Data 15m
        In the first three years of running, the LHC has delivered a wealth of new data that is now being analysed. With over 20 $fb^{−1}$ of integrated luminosity, both ATLAS and CMS have performed many searches for new physics that theorists are eager to test their model against. However, tuning the detector simulations, understanding the particular analysis details and interpreting the results can be a tedious task. We present CheckMATE (Check Models At Terascale Energies) as a tool for theorists to help with these problems. The program accepts simulated events in many formats for any model that a theorist can invent. The program then determines whether the model is excluded or not at 95% CLs by comparing to many recent experimental analyses. Furthermore the program can calculate confidence limits and provide detailed information about signal regions of interest. It is simple to use and the program structure allows for easy extensions to upcoming LHC results in the future.
        Speaker: Jamie Tattersall (University of Heidelberg)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        MadMax - tracking regions of significance 15m
        The Neyman-Pearson lemma states that the likelihood-ratio is the most powerful estimator for hyposthesis testing. Given a signal and a background model our tool MadMax computes the log-likelihood distributions of the signal and background hypotheses for a given luminosity at the LHC. From these we calculate the corresponding gaussian significance to quantify the distance of the two hypotheses. The computation is fully differential which allows to plot the significance as function of any observable. This turns MadMax into a powerfull tool which can guide analysis strategies and the development of specialized search tools like Higgs or Top-taggers. Finally, our tool is implemented into the MadGraph5 framework which allows easy usage.
        Speaker: Peter Schichtel (Heidelberg University)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Optimized Model-Independent Searches Using Matrix Element Ranking 15m
        The Matrix Element Method (MEM) has become an important tool in experimental particle physics, as it provides optimal sensitivity in using data to distinguish between models that could explain that data. However, it has generally required some concrete model to describe the potential signal. Motivated by the possibility of surprises at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), we develop a MEM-based method for determining the presence of new physics without assumptions about the signal process responsible for the new physics, using the “ranking” of background matrix elements.
        Speaker: James Gainer (University of Florida (US))
        Slides
      • 15:45
        AEACuS (Algorithmic Event Arbiter and Cut Selector) : A Universal Meta Language for Specifying Event Selection Cuts 15m
        The AEACuS (Algorithmic Event Arbiter and Cut Selector) computer program has been developed as a lightweight consumer-level tool for implementing generic collider data selection cuts in the search for new physics. The compact and powerful meta language invented to control the operation of this program is suggested as a potential standard for the unambiguous communication of various event selection strategies, facilitating the rapid, uniform, and reproducible reinterpretation of experimental (or Monte Carlo) results in the context of a wide variety of specific models.
        Speaker: Prof. Joel Walker (Sam Houston State University)
        Slides
    • 14:00 16:00
      Top Physics Benedum Hall G26

      Benedum Hall G26

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Jared Evans
      • 14:00
        Measurement of top quark pair production cross section with the ATLAS detector at LHC 15m
        The top quark pair production cross-section is a strong test of the Standard Model. Measurements of both the total and differential cross section with the ATLAS detector at the LHC performed using data with center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are presented. The analyses were with on final states featuring no, one or two high-$p_T$ electrons or muons. Additionally analyses with $\tau$-leptons in the final states are presented.
        Speaker: Lukas Alexander Heinrich (New York University (US))
        Slides
      • 14:15
        Measurement of single top quark production with the ATLAS detector at LHC 15m
        Single Top production with ATLAS detector at LHC @7TeV 8TeV summary.
        Speaker: Mr Jun Su (PITT)
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Single top quark production with CMS 15m
        Measurements of single top quark production are presented, performed using CMS data collected in 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The cross sections for the electroweak production of single top quarks in the t-channel and in association with W-bosons are measured and the results are used to place constraints on the CKM matrix element Vtb. In the t-channel the ratio of top and anti-top production cross sections is determined and compared with predictions from different parton density distribution functions. Measurements of top quark properties in single top quark production are also presented. The results include the W-helicity in top quark decay and the searches for s-channel production and for anomalous couplings.
        Speaker: Daniel Noonan (University of Kansas (US))
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Top Properties (including mass) at CMS 15m
        Measurements of several top-quark properties are presented, obtained from the CMS data collected in 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The results include measurements of the top pair charge asymmetry, the W helicity in top decays, the top quark charge, and of the ttbar spin correlation and the search for anomalous couplings. The results are compared with predictions from the standard model as well as new physics models. The cross section of ttbar events produced in association with a W, Z boson or a photon is also measured. The mass of the top quark is measured using several methods and channels, including the reconstructed invariant mass distribution of the top quark, an analysis of endpoint spectra as well as measurements from shapes of top quark decay distributions. The dependence of the mass measurement on the kinematic phase space is investigated. The results of the various channels are combined and compared to the world average. The top mass and also alpha_s are extracted from the top pair cross section measured at CMS.
        Speaker: Yanjun Tu (Univ. of California San Diego (US))
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Measurement of properties of the top quark with the ATLAS detector at LHC 15m
        The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle and the only quark that decays before hadronizing. Properties of the top quark constitute important tests of the Standard Model and constrain models of new physics. Measurements of top quark properties by ATLAS using proton-proton collisions in the LHC at sqrt s = 7 TeV are presented, as well as combinations of results by ATLAS, CMS and the Tevatron. Here the top quark mass, polarization, electric charge, charge asymmetry and the spin correlation in ttbar pairs are discussed. The results are compared to the standard model prediction and to predictions from different models for new physics.
        Speaker: Olga Bylund (Stockholm University)
        Slides
      • 15:15
        Effective field theory for top quark physics at NLO accuracy 15m
        Top quark processes potentially suffer from a large uncertainty at leading order in QCD. To search for new physics in top quark processes, it is desirable to have a model-independent approach at the NLO accuracy. Effective field theory provides a framework in which the radiative corrections to new interactions can be consistently included, but the analysis can be complicated due to operator mixing effects. I will discuss the effective field theory approach to top-quark physics, with a focus on NLO calculation. In particular, our work aims at providing NLO results for top-quark decay processes, as well as automatic tool for top-quark FCNC production processes, in the presence of dimension-six operators.
        Speaker: Cen Zhang (CP3 Université catholique de Louvain)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        Searches for BSM physics involving top quarks at the CMS experiment 15m
        In many models of physics beyond the Standard Model the coupling of new physics to third generation quarks is enhanced and signatures are expected that mimic top production. We present a review of non-MSSM based searches for new physics beyond the standard model in final states containing top quarks and/or bottom quarks. This includes searches for heavy gauge bosons, excited quarks, chiral and vector-like top quark partners. The searches span a range of final states, from multi-leptonic to entirely hadronic, and many results use novel analysis techniques to reconstruct the highly boosted final states that are created in these topologies. The searches are performed on data collected with the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV.
        Speaker: Eleni Petrakou (National Taiwan University (TW))
        Slides
      • 15:45
        Angular Distributions as Lifetime Probes 15m
        If new TeV scale particles are discovered, it will be important to determine their lifetimes. There is, however, a 12 order of magnitude range, where we cannot measure particle lifetimes. For a heavy quark with a long lifetime, hadronization depolarizes the particle and thus, in principle, the amount of depolarization can be used to probe the lifetime in the problematic region. In this talk I will apply this idea to a realistic scenario of a single top-like particle, produced at the Large Hadron Collider.
        Speaker: Jeff Dror (Cornell University)
        Slides
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m Benedum Hall G

      Benedum Hall G

      University of Pittsburgh

    • 16:30 18:30
      B Physics II & BSM Benedum Hall G27

      Benedum Hall G27

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Joachim Brod (TU Munich)
      • 16:30
        Mass and lifetime measurements of heavy flavour hadrons 15m
        LHCb has performed many world-best mass and lifetime measurements of baryons and mesons containing b and c quarks. I will present a number of the more recent of these measurements and how they can be interpreted, along with how they compare to standard model predictions.
        Speaker: Adrian Andrew Pritchard (University of Liverpool (GB))
        Slides
      • 16:45
        Physics with b-baryons at LHCb 15m
        The amount of b-baryons produced at the LHC is unprecedented. Studies of decays of b-baryons allow searches for non-SM CP asymmetries or rare phenomena. While many measurements have now been published by the LHCb collaboration, the theoretical understanding of these decays is still very limited.
        Speaker: James Mccarthy (University of Birmingham (GB))
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Isospin violation in the yield of S-wave heavy meson pairs near threshold 15m
        Recent experimental data have revealed existence of a considerable number of peaks near the thresholds for pairs of mesons containing heavy $c$ or $b$ quarks. Such are $Z_b(10610)$, $Z_b(10650)$, $Z_c(3900)$, $Z_c(3885)$, $Z_c(4020)$ and $Z_c(4025)$. The nature of those peaks are not all clear. Some of them result from the strong-interaction dynamics in the $S$-wave of a heavy meson-antimeson pair. We consider production of overall neutral pairs consisting of heavy charmed or bottom meson and antimeson in the processes, where the pair can be created in an $S$-wave, such as the production of the pairs with a photon or a neutral Pion emitted in $e^+e^-$ collision. The ratio $R^{c/n}$ of the yield of pairs of charged mesons to that of neutral mesons near the threshold for the heavy pair is strongly affected by the isospin breaking due to the isotopic mass differences and due to the Coulomb interaction between the charged mesons. The actual behavior of the isospin breaking in $R^{c/n}$ is also sensitive to the strong interaction between the heavy mesons, so that experimental measurement of this ratio can be used as a probe of this strong interaction. We calculate $R^{c/n}$ at and very near the threshold in terms of the isotopic scattering lengths for the meson pairs. In particular we find that the yield of pairs of charged mesons does not go to zero at exactly the threshold, but rather starts with a finite step, whose height depends on the value of the scattering length in a particular channel.
        Speaker: Mr Xin Li (School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Electroweak penguin decays to leptons at LHCb 15m
        Rare flavour violating decays of beauty and charm hadrons test the flavour structure of the underlying theory at the level of quantum corrections. They provide information on the couplings and masses of heavy virtual particles appearing as intermediate states. A review of recent results obtained by LHCb on these topics will be presented.
        Speaker: Peter Noel Griffith (University of Birmingham (GB))
        Slides
      • 17:30
        A Swarm of Bs 15m
        New physics signals containing five or more $b$-tagged jets, but without missing $E_T$ or leptons, could realistically be sitting within the current 8 TeV LHC data set without receiving meaningful constraints from any of the existing LHC searches at either ATLAS or CMS. In this talk, several examples of simple, motivated models that yield final states containing many $b$-jets, and a specific study that can patch these holes in LHC coverage will be presented. In particular, the potential sensitivity of this study to a signal from MFV-motivated, $R$-parity violating natural SUSY, which gives rise to an eight-jet final state containing six $b$-quarks, will be discussed in detail.
        Speaker: Jared Evans
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Difficult BSM Signatures at the LHC 15m
        The LHC experiments have performed very wide-ranging and exhaustive searches for many new physics scenarios considered theoretically well-motivated in the pre-LHC era. However, gaps remain in the experimental coverage of possible new particles, which should be covered as we move into the Higgs Era. I discuss several improvements to search techniques that will increase our sensitivity to new physics involving 3rd generation fermions, electroweak particles, and exotic Higgs decays.
        Speaker: Matthew Buckley (Fermilab)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Model independent extraction of the proton magnetic radius from electron scattering 15m
        For several years now, we are facing the proton electric radius puzzle, namely, the 5 standard deviation difference between the electric radius as extracted from muonic hydrogen and the electric radius as extracted from regular hydrogen. The origin of the discrepancy is unknown, and could possibly point towards new interactions that do not respect lepton universality. An equally fundamental property of the proton is its magnetic radius. The magnetic radius of the proton can be extracted from electron-proton scattering data. Surprisingly, different extractions are not consistent either. The particle data book lists three extractions that range from 0.78 fm to 0.88 fm with an uncertainty of 0.02 fm. Are we facing also a proton magnetic radius puzzle? A major problem in extracting the radius from scattering data is how to avoid model-dependent assumptions about the functional form of the magnetic form factor. In this talk I will describe a model-independent analysis of scattering data aimed at extracting a reliable value of the magnetic radius of the proton.
        Speaker: Prof. Gil Paz (Wayne State University)
        Slides
      • 18:15
        New Limits on Light Hidden Sectors from Fixed-Target Experiments 15m
        New physics can be light if it is hidden, coupling very weakly to the Standard Model. In this work we investigate the discovery prospects of Abelian hidden sectors in lower-energy fixed-target and high-precision experiments. We focus on a minimal supersymmetric realization consisting of an Abelian vector multiplet, coupled to hypercharge by kinetic mixing, and a pair of chiral Higgs multiplets. This simple theory can give rise to a broad range of experimental signals, including both commonly-studied patterns of hidden vector decay as well as new and distinctive hidden sector cascades. We find limits from the production of hidden states other than the vector itself. In particular, we show that if the hidden Abelian symmetry is higgsed, and the corresponding hidden Higgs boson has visible decays, it severely restricts the ability of the hidden sector to explain the anomalous muon magnetic moment.
        Speaker: Andrew Spray (CoEPP, University of Melbourne)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      BSM Benedum Hall G28

      Benedum Hall G28

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Jessica Goodman (T)
      • 16:30
        Search for heavy resonances with the ATLAS detector 15m
        Searches for new physics in the form of resonances are sensitive over a great range of energies and produce a wide variety of experimental signatures. Within ATLAS, resonance searches are particularly popular in exotic analyses because of their relative model independence. This talk will examine a variety of recent results in \sqrt{s}=8 TeV data which span boson, lepton, and jet-based final states. Exclusion limits from these analyses will be shown and include heavy boson, excited quark, QBH, and graviton models in addition to a variety of generic resonance signals designed for reinterpretation. The talk will thus provide a brief but thorough overview of the state of ATLAS resonance results at the end of LHC Run I.
        Speaker: Katherine Pachal (University of Oxford (GB))
        Slides
      • 16:45
        Distinguishing Flavor Non-universal Color-singlet and Color-octet Vector Resonances at the LHC 15m
        Electrically-neutral massive color-singlet and color-octet vector bosons, common predictions of beyond the standard model physics, have the potential to be discovered as a resonance in a dijet channel at the LHC. A color-singlet resonance that has leptophobic couplings needs further investigation to be distinguished from the color-octet one. In previous work, we introduced a method for discriminating between the two kinds of resonance in the situation where their couplings are flavor-universal, using measurements of the dijet resonance mass, total decay width and production cross-section. Here, we describe an extension of that method to cover a more general and realistic scenario, in which the vector resonances could have flavor non-universal couplings, by incorporating measurements of the heavy-flavor decays of the resonance into the analysis. We present our analysis in a model-independent manner for a dijet resonance with mass $2.5-6.0 \,\mathrm{TeV}$ at the LHC with $\sqrt{s}=14\,\mathrm{TeV}$ and integrated luminosities $30,\,100,\,300$ and $1000\,\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$, where we found that our method is applicable in most scenarios.
        Speaker: Pawin Ittisamai (Michigan State University)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Search for massive resonances decaying to charged lepton pairs at CMS 15m
        At the LHC, the production of resonances decaying into pairs of charged leptons can be probed at unprecedented centre-of-mass energies. Results from searches for dilepton resonances at high invariant mass with muons and electrons based on the full dataset of 20/fb taken by the CMS detector in 2012 in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV are presented. The signatures under study arise in theories beyond the Standard Model (SM), such as grand unified theories. In absence of a significant deviation from the expected SM background 95% CL limits are set on model parameters of the theories under study.
        Speaker: Andreas Guth (Rheinisch-Westfaelische Tech. Hoch. (DE))
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Searches for vector-like quarks, tt and tb resonances with the ATLAS detector 15m
        With the discovery of the Higgs boson the experiments are now looking with renewed interest for BSM scenarios that would help resolve the hierarchy problem. We will report on searches for vector-like quarks and new heavy bosons that preferentially mix with and couple to $3^{\mathrm{rd}}$ generation quarks, using the 8 TeV data collected by the ATLAS experiment.
        Speaker: Nicolas Gilberto Gutierrez Ortiz (University of Glasgow (GB))
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Constraints on cosmological parameters from Planck and BICEP2 data 15m
        I will introduce S-dual inflationary potentials that explain the recent measurement of low-multipole B-mode polarization anisotropies by the BICEP2 experiment as arising from primordial tensor fluctuations.
        Speaker: Luis Anchordoqui (U)
        Slides
      • 17:45
        New W-prime signals at the LHC 15m
        We study the $W^{'}$ phenomenology in composite Higgs / warped extra dimensional models focusing on the effect of fermionic resonances at the TeV scale. After deriving the existing bounds from the current LHC-8 analyses, we highlight the most promising signatures for $W^{'}$ discovery at the 14 TeV LHC. In particular, we find very promising the study of $W^{'}$ decay modes into vector-like top partners.
        Speaker: Natascia Vignaroli (Michigan State University)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Searches for New Physics in Events with Multiple Leptons with the ATLAS Detector 15m
        Speaker: Anthony David Hawkins (Lunds Universitet)
        Slides
      • 18:15
        Effective operators for coupling adjoint scalar fields to SM gauge bosons 15m
        We study novel decay topologies for adjoint scalar fields. Such fields appear in many models, such as Minimal Flavor Violating and R-symmetric versions of supersymmetry. We study effective operators where the adjoint scalars couple to pairs of SM gauge bosons. In particular we focus on gluon-photon and gluon-Z decays of colored adjoint scalars. We present sensitivity studies in new channels as well as recast previous searches.
        Speaker: Russell Colburn (O)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      BSM Higgs IV Benedum Hall G30

      Benedum Hall G30

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Ryan Gavin (Paul Scherrer Institut)
      • 16:30
        Beyond-the-Standard Model Higgs Physics using the ATLAS Experiment 15m
        The discovery of a Higgs-like boson with a mass of about 125 GeV has prompted the question of whether or not this particle is part of a much larger and more complex Higgs sector than that envisioned in the Standard Model. In this talk, the current results from the ATLAS Experiment regarding Beyond-the-Standard Model (BSM) Higgs hypothesis tests are outlined. Searches for additional Higgs bosons are presented and interpreted in well-motivated BSM Higgs frameworks, such as two-Higgs-doublet Models and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.
        Speaker: Daniel Pelikan (Uppsala University (SE))
        Slides
      • 16:45
        LHC search for di-Higgs decays of stoponium and other scalars in events with two photons and two bottom jets 15m
        We study the prospects for LHC discovery of a narrow resonance that decays to two Higgs bosons, using the final state of two photons and two bottom jets. Our work is motivated in part by a scenario in which two-body flavor-preserving decays of the top squark are kinematically forbidden. Stoponium, a hadronic bound state of the top squark and its anti-particle, will then form, and may have a large branching fraction into the two Higgs boson final state. We estimate the cross-section needed for a 5-sigma discovery at the 14 TeV LHC for such a narrow di-Higgs resonance, using the invariant mass distributions of the final state bottom jets and photons, as a function of the integrated luminosity. The results are also applicable to any other di-Higgs resonance produced by gluon fusion.
        Speaker: Ms Nilanjana Kumar (Ph.D student)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Effective Lagrangians for Higgs Physics 15m
        A discussion of the role of Effective Lagrangians in current Higgs Physics. The talk will follow the publications: arXiv:1311.1823, 1304.1151, 1211.4580, and 1207.1344
        Speaker: Mr Tyler Corbett (YITP Stony Brook)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Anatomizing Exotic Production of the Higgs Boson 15m
        We discuss exotic production modes of the Higgs boson and how their phenomenology can be probed in current Higgs analyses. We highlight the importance of differential distributions in disentangling standard production mechanisms from exotic modes. We present two model benchmarks for exotic Higgs production arising from chargino-neutralino production and study their impact on the current Higgs dataset. As a corollary, we emphasize that current Higgs coupling fits do not fully explore the space of new physics deviations possible in Higgs data.
        Speaker: Felix Yu (Fermilab)
        Paper
        Slides
      • 17:30
        OPE Methods for the Holomorphic Higgs Portal 15m
        We develop a systematic and general approach to study the effective Higgs Lagrangian in a supersymmetric framework in which the Higgs fields in the visible sector couple weakly to another sector. The extra sector may be strongly coupled in general. It is assumed to be superconformal in the ultraviolet, but develop a mass-gap with supersymmetry breaking in the infrared. The main technique used in our approach is that of the operator product expansion (OPE). By using OPE methods we are able to compute the parameters in the Higgs Lagrangian to quadratic order and make general statements that are applicable to many classes of models. Not only does this approach allow us to understand the traditional problems plaguing simple models from a different perspective, it also reveals new possibilities for solutions of these problems. The methods and results of our work should be useful in constructing a viable and natural model of physics beyond the Standard Model.
        Speaker: Dr Piyush Kumar (Yale University)
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Catching a Bouncing Higgs With Tops 15m
        After the Higgs discovery at the LHC, it is important to keep a sharp eye on potential alterations to the Higgs-top Yukawa coupling. As the most puissant contributor to negative running of the Higgs potential in the UV, the Higgs-top coupling is crucial to notions of naturalness and calculations of electroweak vacuum stability. This talk will focus on the two dimension six effective couplings of the Higgs which can be detected via non-SM kinematic distributions of ttbarH final states at the LHC. Some simple angular variables will be identified which can improve existing ttbarH LHC searches and extend their reach to this new physics kinematic regime.
        Speaker: Joseph Bramante (University of Notre Dame)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Seeking Lorentz violation from the Higgs 15m
        The recently discovered Higgs particle with a mass near 126 GeV presents new opportunities to explore Lorentz violation. Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays are one of the most sensitive testing grounds for Lorentz symmetry, and can be used to seek for and limit departures from Lorentz invariance in the Higgs sector. If the Higgs were to have a super- or sub-luminal maximal speed both Higgs and weak interaction physics would be modified. Consideration of such modifications allow us to constrain the Higgs maximal velocity to agree with that of other Standard Model particles to parts in $10^{14}$.
        Speaker: Gustavo Marques Tavares (Boston University)
        Slides
      • 18:15
        Phenomenology of the minimal classically scale invariant Higgs sector 15m
        We construct a minimal viable extension of the standard model (SM) with classical scale symmetry. Its scalar sector contains a complex singlet in addition to the SM Higgs doublet. The scale-invariant and CP- symmetric Higgs potential generates radiative electroweak symmetry breaking à la Coleman–Weinberg. Besides the 125 GeV SM-like Higgs particle, it predicts an additional CP-even Higgs and a CP-odd scalar singlet (providing the dark matter candidate) at weak scale. We systematically analyze theoretical and experimental constraints and demonstrate the viable parameter space.
        Speaker: Dr Arsham Farzinnia (Tsinghua University)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      Dark Matter IV Benedum Hall G31

      Benedum Hall G31

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Reinard Primulando (Johns Hopkins University)
      • 16:30
        Leptonically-flavored Dark Matter 15m
        We consider the possibility that dark matter and the SM leptons share a common flavor interaction mediated by heavy flavor gauge bosons. Constraints on this scenario are then obtained from both dark matter and flavor observables, such as the DM relic density, direct detection, collider constraints, and g-2 of the muon. We then consider the consequences for future experiments, including LHC.
        Speaker: Jennifer Kile (U)
        Slides
      • 16:45
        Leptophilic Dark Matter and the Magnetic Moment of the Muon 15m
        We consider renormalizable theories such that the scattering of dark matter off leptons arises at tree level, but scattering off nuclei only arises at loop. In this framework, the various dark matter candidates can be classified by their spins and by the forms of their interactions with leptons. We determine the corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon that arise from these interactions. We then consider the implications of these results for a set of simplified models of leptophilic dark matter. When a dark matter candidate reduces the existing tension between the standard model prediction of the anomalous magnetic moment and the experimental measurement, the region of parameter space favored to completely remove the discrepancy is highlighted. Conversely, when agreement is worsened, we place limits on the parameters of the corresponding simplified model. These bounds and favored regions are compared against the experimental constraints on the simplified model from direct detection and from collider searches. Although these constraints are severe, we find there do exist limited regions of parameter space in these simple theories that can explain the observed anomaly in the muon magnetic moment while remaining consistent with all experimental bounds.
        Speaker: Christopher Verhaaren (U)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Searching for Sub-GeV Dark Matter at Fixed Target Neutrino Experiments 15m
        Low mass dark matter theories, if produced as a thermal relic in the early universe, must be accompanied by light mediators in order to obtain the dark matter abundance observed in the present day universe. These light mediators in turn provide a channel for the production of dark matter at high intensity fixed target neutrino experiments, producing a relativistic dark matter beam, which could then be detected by neutral-current-like interactions in neutrino detectors. The MiniBooNE experiment is now applying this technique by collecting data in beam dump mode for a period of several months (see arXiv.org/1211.2258 for more details). We present updated results from previous work on the sensitivity of fixed target experiments neutrino experiments to a dark sector possessing a vector mediator that is kinetically mixed with the photon (see arXiv.org/1107.4580 and arXiv.org/1205.3499), and show preliminary sensitivity of these experiments to a baryonically coupled dark sector (paper in preparation with B. Batell, D. McKeen, M. Pospelov and A. Ritz), which escapes many of the limits .
        Speaker: Mr Patrick deNiverville (University of Victoria)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Decaying Dark Matter and IceCube TeV-PeV neutrinos 15m
        I will talk about the IceCube TeV-PeV neutrino excess and theoretical proposals postdict the observation, emphasis on potential connection with dark matter.
        Speaker: Ran Lu
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Predicting the Mass of the Dark Matter Particle 15m
        Asymmetric dark matter and baryonic matter can be "co-generated" by non-Standard-Model sphaleron processes in grand unified models. Such models can give precise predictions of the number density and thus mass of the dark matter particle.
        Speaker: Prof. Stephen Barr (University of Delaware)
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Parallel Universe, Dark Matter and Invisible Higgs Decays 15m
        The existence of the dark matter with amount about five times the ordinary matter is now well established. There are now many candidates for this dark matter. However, dark matter could be just like the ordinary matter in a parallel universe. If both universes are described by a non-abelian gauge symmetries, then there will be no kinetic mixing between the ordinary photon and the dark photon, and the dark proton, dark electron and the corresponding dark nuclei, belonging to the parallel universe, will be stable. If the (lamda_QCD)_dark in the parallel universe is five times that of (lamda_QCD), then the dark proton will be about five times heavier, explaining why the dark matter is five times the ordinary matter. However, the two sectors will still interact via the Higgs boson of the two sectors. This will lead to the existence of a second light Higss boson, just like the Standard Model Higgs boson. This gives rise to the invisible decay modes of the Higgs boson which can be tested at the LHC, and the proposed ILC.
        Speaker: Prof. S. Nandi (Oklahoma State University)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Dark Sector Mass Relations from RG Focusing 15m
        Dark sector mass relations, such as those which permit near-threshold or near-resonance annihilation in the early universe, could arise due to IR-attractive ratios in renormalization group equations. Achieving a particular ratio requires specific dark matter gauge charges or interactions, leading to predictions about the dark matter properties. Furthermore, additional states with masses comparable to the dark matter mass may be necessary, potentially giving rise to novel phenomenology. We discuss this idea in the context of dark matter charged under a new gauged $U(1)_X$ that kinetically mixes with the Standard Model hypercharge.
        Speaker: Jack Kearney (University of Michigan)
        Slides
      • 18:15
        Searches for dark matter and extra dimensions with the ATLAS detector 15m
        Different approaches to finding evidence for dark matter at the LHC are presented. These include searches for events with large missing transverse momentum and a single jet, photon or W/Z boson. Searches for hidden sectors in events with long-lived particles resulting in displaced hadronic vertices or lepton-jet signatures are also reported. Finally, studies sensitive to the presence of extra spatial dimensions are described, as for example classical and quantum black holes and other non-resonant phenomena. Results from sqrt(s) = 8 TeV data taking are presented.
        Speaker: Mr Chase Shimmin (UC Irvine)
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      QCD Benedum Hall G26

      Benedum Hall G26

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Gregory Mahlon
      • 16:30
        Recent QCD results from ATLAS 15m
        The ATLAS collaboration has performed studies of a wide range of QCD phenomena, from soft particle to hard photon and jet production. Recent soft-QCD measurements include studies of underlying event, vector meson production. Differential measurements of inclusive and dijet production provide stringent tests of high-order QCD predictions and provide input for determination of parton density functions. Measurements of isolated inclusive and di-photons cross sections for high p_T photons test various theoretical predictions and constrain parton density functions. An overview of these results is given.
        Speaker: Houry Keoshkerian (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (FR))
        Slides
      • 16:45
        Jet Radiation Radius 15m
        In this talk, I will introduce the concept of jet radiation radius which quantifies how the jet radiation is distributed around the jet axes. I discuss the color and momentum dependence of the jet radiation radius, and two applications: quark-gluon discrimination and W jet tagging. In both cases, smaller (sub)jet radii are preferred for jets with higher PTs, albeit due to different mechanisms: the running of the QCD coupling constant and the boost to a color singlet system. A shrinking cone W jet tagging algorithm is proposed to achieve better discrimination than previous methods.
        Speaker: Zhenyu Han (University of Oregon)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        A new tool for jet definitions at high luminosity 15m
        When the LHC turns back on, the amount of overlapping events will be significantly higher than anywhere seen to date. This fact, coupled with the higher energy for each event, will lead to an almost uniform spray of energy from underlying events, which will cloud any interesting physics events. In this talk we demonstrate why this is a large issue for physics moving forwards, and a potential solution. This solution will be a framework for a jet algorithm, which will be refined in the future.
        Speaker: Daniel Duffty (Illinois Institute of Technology)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        HERAFITTER: an open source QCD fit program. 15m
        We present the HERAFITTER project which provides a framework for QCD analyses related to the proton structure in the context of multi-processes and multi-experiments. Based on the concept of factorisable nature of the cross sections into universal parton distribution functions (PDFs) and process dependent partonic scattering cross sections, HERAFitter allows determination of PDFs from the various hard scattering measurements. Here we report a set of parton distribution functions determined with the HERAFitter program using HERA data and preserving correlations between uncertainties for the LO, NLO and NNLO sets. The sets are used to study uncertainties for ratios of cross sections calculated at different order in QCD. A reduction of overall theoretical uncertainty is observed in this case.
        Speaker: Alexander Glazov (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
        Slides
      • 17:30
        QCD measurements in the forward region 15m
        Due to its unique pseudorapidity coverage and the possibility of extending measurements to low transverse momenta LHCb provides important input to the understanding of particle production in a kinematical range where models have large uncertainties. We present charged particle multiplicity measurements, different with respect to transverse momentum and pseudorapidity, as well as strange and charmed particle production.
        Speaker: Marco Meissner (Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg (DE))
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Quarkonia production at LHCb 15m
        Studies of quarkonia production in the forward region provide important tests of NRQCD. The LHCb experiment has collected a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 3/fb in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)= 2.76, 7 and 8 TeV. We present studies of the production and polarisation of the J/psi, psi(2S) and chi_c charmonium states as well as those of Upsilon and chi_b bottomonia. Absolute and relative production cross-sections are presented and compared to the most recent theoretical predictions when available.
        Speaker: Maddalena Frosini (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Production of Quarkonium States at the ATLAS Experiment 15m
        Latest measurements of quarkonium production from the ATLAS experiment in proton-proton collisions are presented. The first measurements of W+prompt J/$\psi$ production are presented, offering unique opportunities for testing quarkonium production models and providing new avenues for study of double parton scattering dynamics. Measurements of the absolute production cross-sections of $\chi_{c}$ charmonium states are presented for the first time, as well as detailed double-differential cross-section measurements of the $\psi$(2S) for both prompt and non-prompt production.
        Speaker: Benjamin Weinert (Indiana University (US))
        Slides
      • 18:15
        Quarkonia and quarkonia-like spectroscopy at LHCb 15m
        The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations by Belle and CDF. Using the data collected at pp collisions at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment we present studies of the X(3872) properties including its decay rate to Psi(2S)gamma, as well as studies of putative states such as the Z(4430)+.
        Speaker: Maddalena Frosini (Universita e INFN (IT))
        Slides
    • 16:30 18:30
      SUSY IV Benedum Hall G29

      Benedum Hall G29

      University of Pittsburgh

      Convener: Peisi Huang
      • 16:30
        SUSY at the LHC 30m
        Speaker: Prof. Xerxes Tata (University of Hawaii)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        The LHC confronts the pMSSM 15m
        We explore the impact of current (7+8 TeV) and future (14 TeV) LHC searches on the range of viable sparticle spectra within the 19/20 – dimensional pMSSM. Considering both neutralino and gravitino LSPs, we compare our results with simplified model exclusion limits and describe important cases where the pMSSM results differ significantly from the simplified model descriptions. We also consider models that are poorly constrained by LHC data because of unusual decay topologies and/or displaced decays, and discuss ways to improve the LHC sensitivity in these scenarios. Finally, motivated by naturalness, we examine the sensitivity of current searches to models with light stops and to a specialized set of models with fine-tuning better than 1%. We show that a surprising variety of searches are sensitive to light stops, and that the 14 TeV LHC will be a very powerful probe of natural pMSSM models.
        Speaker: Matthew Cahill-Rowley (S)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Searching for the Compressed Spectrum of Natural Supersymmetry 15m
        In this talk I will outline the regions of Natural Supersymmetry that are still viable after the 8~TeV LHC. In these regions of parameter space the Higgsinos are the lightest supersymmetric states with GeV scale mass splittings. I will show that such compressed states can be probed at the LHC in the j+dilepton+MET channel.
        Speaker: Arjun Menon (University of Oregon)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        LHC signatures of Natural SUSY 15m
        Naturalness, or fine-tuning, is one of the primary motivations for the weak-scale supersymmetry (SUSY). We argue that the presence of light higgsinos, rather than often-cited light stops, is the most basic consequence of SUSY naturalness. We'll discuss capabilities of LHC14 to probe light higgsinos in existing search channels and introduce novel, more efficient, signatures.
        Speaker: Azar Mustafayev (University of Hawaii)
        Slides
      • 17:45
        Searches for associated Higgs production 15m
        The recently discovered Higgs Boson allows for novel search strategies for "natural" supersymmetric particles whose decay produces Higgs bosons. In particular, searches for associated higgs production provides significant limits on stops, chargino, and neutralino masses. Various accessible final states can result, notably the di-photon channel where the narrow Higgs resonance provides a clean signal channel and a robust background estimation method. Results for various relevant searches are presented and their results combined and interpreted.
        Speaker: Anthony Barker (Rutgers, State Univ. of New Jersey (US))
        Slides
      • 18:00
        PQ Symmetric Pure Gravity Mediation 15m
        Successful models of Pure Gravity Mediation (PGM) with radiative electroweak symmetry breaking can be expressed with as few as two free parameters which can be taken as the gravitino mass and tan β. These models easily support a 125-126 GeV Higgs mass at the expense of a scalar spectrum in the multi-TeV range and a much lighter wino as the lightest supersymmetric particle. In these models, it is also quite generic that the Higgs mixing mass parameter, μ, which is determined by the minimization of the Higgs potential is also in the multi-TeV range. For μ > 0, the thermal relic density of winos is too small to account for the dark matter. The same is true for μ < 0 unless the gravitino mass is of order 500 TeV. Here, we consider the origin of a multi-TeV μ parameter arising from the breakdown of a Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry. A coupling of the PQ-symmetry breaking field, P , to the MSSM Higgs doublets, naturally leads to a value of μ ∼ P^2 /MP ∼ O(100) TeV and of order that is required in PGM models. In this case, axions make up the dark matter or some fraction of the dark matter with the remainder made up from thermal or non-thermal winos. We also provide solutions to the problem of isocurvature fluctuations with axion dark matter in this context.
        Speaker: Dr Jason Evans (University of Minnesota/FTPI)
        Slides
      • 18:15
        Beyond Simplified Models: Constraining Supersymmetry on Triangles 15m
        I will discuss an approach for the presentation of experimental constraints on supersymmetric scenarios. It is a triangle based visualization that extends the status quo wherein LHC results are reported in terms of simplified models under the assumption of 100% branching ratios. I will show that the (re)interpretation of LHC data on triangles allows the extraction of accurate exclusion limits for a multitude of more realistic models with arbitrary branching ratios. I will demonstrate the utility of this approach using the example of gluino production and decay in several common supersymmetric scenarios.
        Speaker: Archana Anandakrishnan (The Ohio state University)
        Slides
    • 20:00 22:00
      Particle Fever Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      University of Pittsburgh

      Pittsburgh, PA 15260

      We will show the movie Particle Fever to all participants.

    • 08:00 08:45
      Breakfast 45m Alumni Hall 7th Floor

      Alumni Hall 7th Floor

      University of Pittsburgh

    • 08:45 10:30
      Plenary V Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      University of Pittsburgh

      Pittsburgh, PA 15260
      Convener: Stephen Barr (University of Delaware)
      • 08:45
        Neutrino Oscillations: Present and Future 35m
        Speaker: Chang Kee Jung (Unknown)
        Slides
      • 09:20
        Neutrino oscillations theory and phenomenology 35m
        Speaker: Irina Mocioiu (Pennsylvania State University)
        Slides
      • 09:55
        High energy astrophysical neutrinos - observations and implications 35m
        Speaker: Albrecht Karle (University of Wisconsin - Madison)
        Slides
    • 10:30 11:00
      Coffee Break & Symposium Photo 30m Alumni Hall 7th Floor

      Alumni Hall 7th Floor

      University of Pittsburgh

    • 11:00 13:30
      Plenary VI Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium

      University of Pittsburgh

      Pittsburgh, PA 15260
      Convener: Keith Dienes (University of Arizona)
      • 11:00
        Evidence for Inflationary Gravitational Waves from BICEP2 30m
        Speaker: Clem Pryke (Univ. of Minnesota)
        Slides
      • 11:30
        Cosmology: dark energy and beyond 30m
        Speaker: Bhuv Jain (University of Pennsylvania)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Physics potential at the ILC 30m
        Speaker: Keisuke Fujii (KEK)
        Slides
      • 12:30
        HEP in the LHC Era 30m
        Speaker: Andrew James Lankford (University of California Irvine (US))
        Slides
      • 13:00
        Future perspectives 30m
        Speaker: Nima Arkani-Hamed (IAS)
        Slides
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