EPS HEP 2015

Europe/Vienna
Description

Welcome to the EPS-HEP 2015 conference!

The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics (EPS-HEP) is one of the major international conferences that review every second year since 1971 organized by the High Energy and Particle Physics Divison of the European Physical Society. The latest conferences in this series were held in Stockholm, Grenoble, Krakow, Manchester, Lisabon and Aachen.

In 2015 the EPS-HEP will take place in Vienna, Austria between 22 to 29 July. The conference 2015 is organized by the Institute of High Energy Physics (HEPHY) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Vienna, Vienna University of Technology and the Stefan-Meyer Institute (SMI) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

    • 16:00 21:00
      Registration & Welcome Reception Aula and Arcades (University of Vienna)

      Aula and Arcades

      University of Vienna

    • 09:00 11:00
      Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology, Gravitation HS33

      HS33

      • 09:00
        HESS-II: gamma-ray astronomy from tens of GeV to hundreds of TeV energies 30m
        Since the commissioning of the fifth, large telescope in December 2012, H.E.S.S. II is the only array of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes operating telescope of different sizes. Recent years have seen a tremendous effort in the design, implementation and optimisation of analysis techniques as well as improvements to the entire data acquisition scheme to allow for a very fast response to external triggers. With its excellent sensitivity, broad energy coverage, and fast reaction time, H.E.S.S. II provides an unprecedented view of the Universe at very high energies, in a multi-wavelength and multi-messenger approach. In this contribution we will present some highlights of the first data taken with H.E.S.S. II on key Galactic sources such as supernova remnants, gamma-ray binary systems and the Galactic Centre. Additionally, we will also show highlights from ten years of H.E.S.S. phase I observations like the legacy data release of the H.E.S.S. Galactic Plane Survey or the source gamma-ray source population found in the Large Magellanic Cloud.
      • 09:30
        The HAWC Gamma Ray Observatory 15m
        The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory was completed this year at a 4100-meter site on the flank of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico. HAWC is a water Cherenkov ground array with the capability to distinguish 100 GeV - 100 TeV gamma rays from the hadronic cosmic-ray background. HAWC is uniquely suited to study extremely high energy cosmic-ray sources, search for regions of extended gamma-ray emission, and to identify transient phenomena. HAWC will play a key role in triggering multi-wavelength and multi-messenger studies of active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. Observation of TeV photons also provide unique tests for a number of fundamental physics phenomena including dark matter annihilation and primordial black hole evaporation. Operation began mid-2013 with the partially-completed detector. Multi-TeV emission from the Galactic Plane is clearly seen in the first year of operation, confirming a number of known TeV sources, and a number of AGN have been observed. This talk will discuss the science of HAWC, summarize the status of the experiment, and highlight first results from analysis of the data.
        Speaker: Andres Sandoval (Instituto de Fisica, UNAM)
      • 09:45
        Investigation of the Galactic Magnetic Field using Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays 15m
        We present a new method of investigating the galactic magnetic field using public data of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. In comparisons of expected and measured arrival directions of the cosmic rays we evaluate the directional characteristics and magnitude of the field. Our analysis provides first experimental verification of the deflection of ultra-high cosmic rays in the galactic magnetic field. It also reveals directions with increased probability for sources of cosmic rays, and therefore opens new possibilities for investigating cosmic particle origin and acceleration.
        Speaker: Martin Erdmann (Rheinisch-Westfaelische Tech. Hoch. (DE))
      • 10:00
        Measurement of Feynman-x Spectra of Photons and Neutrons in the Very Forward Direction in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA 15m
        Measurements of normalised cross sections for the production of photons and neutrons at very small angles with respect to the proton beam direction in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA are presented as a function of the Feynman variable $x_F$ and of the centre-of-mass energy of the virtual photon-proton system $W$. The data are taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 131 pb$^{−1}$. The measurement is restricted to photons and neutrons in the pseudorapidity range $\eta > 7.9$ and covers the range of negative four momentum transfer squared at the positron vertex $6< Q^2< 100$ GeV², of inelasticity $0.05< y< 0.6$ and of $70< W< 245$ GeV. To test the Feynman scaling hypothesis the $W$ dependence of the $x_F$ dependent cross sections is investigated. Predictions of deep-inelastic scattering models and of models for hadronic interactions of high energy cosmic rays are compared to the measured cross sections.
        Speaker: Collaboration H1 (DESY)
      • 10:15
        Observation of a knee in the cosmic ray p+He energy spectrum below 1 PeV with the ARGO-YBJ experiment 15m
        The CR spectrum has been studied by the ARGO-YBJ experiment in a wide energy range (TeV → PeV). This study is particularly interesting since it allows a better understanding of the so called "knee" of the energy spectrum and its origin, and also provides a powerful cross-check among very different experimental techniques. The unique detector features (full coverage, time resolution, large dynamic range) and location (4300 m above sea level) allowed both lowering the energy threshold down to the region covered by direct measurements and reaching the all-particle spectrum knee. In addition, the possibility of a detailed study of the particle distribution in the first few meters from the shower core provided a new and efficient way of selecting events initiated by light mass primaries (p and He nuclei) and could give new inputs, in the very forward region, to the hadronic interaction models currently used for the highest energies CR studies. The all-particle spectrum (measured in the range 100 TeV - 10 PeV) is in good agreement with theoretical models and previous measurements, thus validating the selection and reconstruction procedures. The light-component (p + He) spectrum, measured in the range 30 TeV - 5 PeV, while being consistent with highest energy direct measurements, shows a clear indication of a bending below 1 PeV. This is in agreement with other independent analysis of ARGO-YBJ data and provides new important inputs to acceleration models for galactic cosmic rays.
        Speaker: Dr. Antonio Surdo (INFN - Sezione di Lecce (IT))
      • 10:30
        High-energy interactions at the Pierre Auger Observatory 15m
        The interaction of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays with the atoms of the atmosphere can occur at center-of-mass energies that surpass the 100 TeV, while present man made accelerators go up to 13 TeV. Therefore it provides a unique opportunity to explore hadronic interactions at the highest energies. However, the extraction of hadronic interaction properties from the Extensive Air Showers (EAS) characteristics, which are induced by the UHECR, is intrinsically related to the nature of the primary cosmic ray. As such, to break the degeneracy between hadronic interactions and primary mass composition, a consistent description of the shower observables must be achieved. Such detailed studies have been conducted in the last years at the Pierre Auger Observatory, the largest UHECRs detector in the world. It combines two complementary techniques to measure the EAS characteristics. In this talk, we will present the latest measurements on shower observables, both on the electromagnetic and muonic shower components, and its interpretation in terms of the primary mass composition. Its impact in regarding particle physics will be discussed, in particular the measurement of the proton-air cross section. Finally, through the joint analysis of the different measurements, it will be shown that none of the post-LHC high-energy hadronic interaction models can satisfactorily describe the data.
        Speaker: Ruben Mauricio Da Silva Conceicao (LIP Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Part)
      • 10:45
        Global dark matter limits from a combined analysis of MAGIC and Fermi-LAT data 15m
        Gamma-ray instruments like the Fermi-LAT (in space) and the MAGIC telescopes (on the ground) are sensitive to overlapping and complementary ranges of dark matter particle mass, and have dedicated programs to look for dark matter signals coming from the Galactic Center, galaxy clusters, dwarf satellite galaxies and others. The universality of dark matter properties allows the combination of data from different experiments and/or observational targets into a global and sensitive-optimized search. For a given dark matter particle model, a joint likelihood function can be written as the product of the particular likelihood functions for each of the measurements/instruments -- the advantage of such an approach is that the details of each experiment do not need to be combined or averaged. We have implemented this analysis framework and applied it to the MAGIC and Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf satellite galaxies. Here we present the analysis method and the obtained results: the most constraining bounds to dark matter properties for masses between 10 GeV and 100 TeV from dwarf galaxies observations. The approach is completely generic and could be used in the future to merge our results with those from other instruments (H.E.S.S., VERITAS, CTA and/or HAWK), sensitive to the same region of the dark matter parameter space.
        Speaker: Javier Rico (IFAE)
    • 09:00 11:00
      Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries HS21

      HS21

      • 09:00
        Electroweak penguins at LHCb 15m
        Electroweak penguin b-hadron and c-hadron decays are very sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model. Recent LHCb measurements have shown indications of large unexpected asymmetries in B→K*μμ and hints of lepton universality violation. Latest results involving new decay modes are presented.
        Speaker: Samuel Coquereau (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (FR))
      • 09:15
        Angular analysis of the decay B0 --> K*0 mu mu with CMS 15m
        The Flavour Changing Neutral Current decay, B0 -> K*0 mu+mu-, is very sensitive to New Physics through its observables like A_FB (muon forward backward asymmetry), F_L (longitudinal polarisation of K*), and differential branching fraction. So far, these parameters are consistent with the Standard Model prediction. We will report the recent results from CMS on these parameters using the 20 fb^-1 data collected during 2012.
        Speaker: Dr. Mauro Dinardo (Universita & INFN, Milano-Bicocca (IT))
      • 09:30
        B to K* l+l- decays in the Standard Model: a theoretical reappraisal 15m
        The rare semileptonic B_d → K∗μ+μ− decay has been extensively studied within the Standard Model (SM) and beyond. In the last two releases, measurements provided by the LHCb experiment suggested a discrepancy found between the theoretical SM prediction and the experimental value of the angular observable P′5 at low q^2. We critically reassess the theoretical uncertainties in the Standard Model calculation of the B_d → K∗l+l− angular observables, focusing on this kinematic region. We point out that even optimized observables are affected by sizable uncertainties coming from several sources. First, departures from the infinite mass limit are numerically sizable and cannot be reduced by redefining the soft functions. Second, hadronic contributions generated by current-current operators with charm are difficult to estimate, especially for q^2 ~ 4 mc^2. Finally, charmonium contributions are not power suppressed and are expected to increase the uncertainties close to the hadronic resonances. Taking these uncertainties into account, we perform a detailed numerical analysis and present both predictions and fit results obtained using different sets of data, showing agreement between theory and experiment.
        Speaker: Ayan Paul (INFN, Sezione di Roma)
      • 09:45
        Violation of lepton flavour universality in composite Higgs models 15m
        We investigate whether the $2.6\sigma$ deviation from lepton flavour universality in $B^+\to K^+\ell^+\ell^-$ decays recently observed at the LHCb experiment can be explained in minimal composite Higgs models. We show that a visible departure from universality is indeed possible if left-handed muons have a sizable degree of compositeness. Constraints from $Z$-pole observables are avoided by a custodial protection of the muon coupling.
        Speaker: Peter Stangl (Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich)
      • 10:00
        A class of Z' models with non-universal couplings and protected flavor-changing interactions 15m
        Motivated by the $b\to s\ell^+\ell^-$ anomalies recently reported by the LHCb collaboration, I will present a class of flavored $\mathrm{U(1)}^\prime$ gauge extensions of the Standard Model that naturally accommodate them and present a rich phenomenology. This class of models is characterized by the presence of tree-level flavor-changing $Z'$ couplings in the down-quark sector, protected by the off-diagonal quark-mixing matrix elements. Anomaly cancellation fixes the extension of the symmetry to the lepton sector in a very specific way, giving rise to flavor-conserving family-non-universal Z' couplings. The fermion sector of these models is the same as in the Standard Model while the scalar sector is extended with an extra Higgs doublet and a scalar singlet. These models will be tested in the next run of LHC and present specific correlations in certain flavor observables that allow to clearly discriminate among them and with other new physics signals.
        Speaker: Javier Fuentes-Martin (IFIC, Universitat de València-CSIC)
      • 10:15
        Leptonic and Radiative B meson decays at Belle 15m
        We will present new results on leptonic and radiative leptonic decays. Purely leptonic B meson decays, $B \to \ell \nu$, are helicity-suppressed in the Standard Model (SM), and while more challenging for the extraction of the CKM matrix element $|V_{ub}|$, they are excellent probes of models beyond the SM. The decay $B \to \ell \nu\gamma$ is not affected by this suppression and gives access to $\lambda_B$, a parameter used to describe charmless hadronic B decays into two mesons in the QCD factorization (QCDF) scheme. We also report new results on exclusive radiative decays, $B_s \to \gamma\gamma$, $B_s \to \phi\gamma$, and $B_d \to \phi\gamma$, which proceed via flavour-changing-neutral-current transitions $b \to s \gamma \gamma$, $b \to s\gamma$ and $b \to d\gamma$, respectively. These modes are highly sensitive to new physics. All results presented are based on the full data sample accumulated by the Belle experiment at the KEKB asymmetric energy e+e− collider at KEK, Japan.
        Speaker: Paoti Chang (National Taiwan University)
    • 09:00 11:05
      Heavy Ion Physics HS42

      HS42

      • 09:00
        Understanding the J/Psi and Y suppression (and enhancement) at LHC and RHIC 25m
        In nucleus-nucleus collisions, quarkonium production is expected to be significantly suppressed as a consequence of the colour screening of the force that binds the ccbar (bb) state. In this scenario, quarkonium suppression should occur sequentially, according to the binding energy of each state. As a consequence, the in-medium dissociation probability of these states can provide an estimate of the initial temperature reached in the hot and dense strongly-interacting Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) expected to be formed in these collisions. Moreover, at high energy, a new production mechanism could, to some extent, contrast this suppression in the case of charmonium: the abundance of c and cbar quarks might lead to charmonium production by (re)combination of these quarks. Furthermore, disentangling the hot medium effects requires an accurate study of the so-called cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects, which can be measured in proton-nucleus interactions. Studies performed for thirty years, first at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at 20 GeV and then at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at 200 GeV, have indeed shown a reduction of the J/psi yield beyond the expectations from cold nuclear matter effects. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with unprecedented centre-of-mass energies of the order of the TeV in p+Pb and Pb+Pb collisions offers an excellent opportunity to extricate the different effects on J/psi and Y production.
        Speaker: Elena Gonzalez Ferreiro (Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (ES))
      • 09:25
        Quarkonia results in heavy ions from CMS 20m
        Quarkonia are important probes of the quark-gluon plasma since they are produced at early times and propagate through the medium, mapping its evolution. In this talk we present the latest results on quarkonium production in pPb and PbPb collisions from CMS. Selected results from measurements of nuclear modification factors, excited-to-ground state ratios, elliptic flow and forward-backward asymmetries will be shown for the J/psi, Psi(2S) and/or the Upsilon 1S, 2S and 3S.
        Speaker: Lamia Benhabib (CERN)
      • 09:45
        Study of J/Psi and Y production in association with leading hadron at RHIC and LHC energies 20m
        We discuss possible experimental tests of the Color-Singlet model (CSM) in associated J/psi or Y plus leading hadron production in pp collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. Using color dipole approach we calculate several different observables of leading hadron and rapidity/azimuth difference between produced J/psi or Y and the leading hadron in the CSM approach. As a very promising measurement we suggest to study correlations between forward high-pT pion and J/psi or Y produced at mid-rapidity at RHIC energies. Such forward-midrapidity correlations test higher order pQCD in pp collisions at modest energies and also may shed more light on forward high-pT particle production in pA collisions. All suggested variables have a strong potential for better constraining CSM contribution to the J/psi and Y production at RHIC and LHC.
        Speaker: Michal Sumbera (Acad. of Sciences of the Czech Rep. (CZ))
      • 10:05
        Heavy quarkonium production at the STAR experiment 20m
        In the collisions of heavy ions the nuclear matter can undergo a phase transition from hadrons to a state of deconfined quarks and gluons, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Suppression of heavy quarkonia due to Debye-like screening of the quark-antiquark potential, has been predicted to be a sensitive indicator of the thermodynamical properties of the created QGP. However, cold nuclear effects and secondary production in the QGP via heavy quark recombination could also alter the observed suppression picture. Measurements of $J/\psi$ production at different collision energies, collision systems, and centralities can shed new light on the interplay of these effects on $J/\psi$ production and medium properties. Moreover, $\Upsilon$ production is expected to be less affected by $b-\bar{b}$ recombination and interactions with hadrons in the final state. It hence provides a cleaner probe for studying the interaction of heavy quarkonia with the partonic medium. In this talk I will present recent results from the STAR experiment on $J/\psi$ and $\Upsilon$ production in heavy-ion collisions at various energies. I will discuss the energy dependence of $J/\psi$ production in Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=39, 62.4 and 200 GeV and in U+U collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 193 GeV. I will report $\Upsilon$ production in Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 and in U+U collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 193 GeV.
        Speaker: Petr Chaloupka (Czech Technical University in Prague)
      • 10:25
        Results on J/psi and psi(2S) in p-Pb Collisions at 5.02 TeV with ATLAS Abstract 20m
        The production rates of heavy quarkonia states in A-A collisions provide sensitive probes to the hot and dense QGP. However, a reference for understanding the dissociation in the hot medium is necessary; p-A collisions open the possibility to study heavy quarkonia states in a smaller system. This is an important step in forming a baseline for understanding A-A collisions, as well as an investigation into the nature of modifications of the parton distributions in the nucleus. Using data collected at the LHC in 2013, the ATLAS experiment will show results on the prompt J/psi and psi(2S) nuclear modification factors and the double ratio, psi(2S) divided by J/Psi in p-Pb divided by the same in p-p, in p-Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. The charmonia states were reconstructed via the dimuon decay channel and the yield will be differentially presented in bins of transverse momentum, rapidity, and event activity.
        Speaker: Ryan Mackenzie White (Federico Santa Maria Technical University (CL))
      • 10:45
        Thermalization of a boost-invariant non Abelian plasma with boundary sourcing 20m
        The relaxation towards the hydrodynamic regime of a boost-invariant non Abelian plasma taken out-of-equilibrium is investigated using a holographic approach. In the dual description, the system is driven out-of-equilibrium by boundary sourcing, a deformation of the boundary metric, as proposed by Chesler and Yaffe. The corresponding Einstein equations in the bulk are solved, and the times of restoration of the hydrodynamic regime and of the pressure isotropy are determined. The possible connections with the QGP phenomenology are discussed.
        Speaker: Fulvia De Fazio (INFN Bari)
    • 09:00 11:00
      Higgs and New Physics Großer Festsaal

      Großer Festsaal

      • 09:00
        Update of the electroweak precision fit, interplay with Higgs-boson signal strengths and model-independent constraints on new physics 15m
        The available information on the properties of the observed Higgs signal is assessed in view of the current experimental accuracy and the employed theoretical assumptions. Possible interpretations of the observed signal in scenarios of physics beyond the Standard Model are discussed in view of their phenomenological implications, and the experimental sensitivity for discriminating between different models is investigated. In extended Higgs sectors it is often possible to interpret the observed signal not only in terms of the lightest but also in terms of the second-lightest state of the Higgs sector. The latter scenarios generically predict a light Higgs boson with heavily suppressed couplings to gauge bosons. The current limits and future prospects for accessing such scenarios will be discussed. We also present results of a bayesian fit to the Wilson coefficients of the Standard Model gauge invariant dimension-6 operators involving one or more Higgs fields.
        Speaker: Laura Reina (Florida State University (US))
      • 09:15
        The Standard Model as an Effective Field Theory 25m
        Particle physics in the last century can be described as a series of effective theories, each predicting its own range of validity beyond which a more fundamental theory must take over. This program culminated in the Standard Model (SM), with all its constituent particles now experimentally established following the 2012 discovery of a Higgs boson. The SM is a renormalizable theory valid to arbitrarily high scales but there is evidence new degrees of freedom must exist. If this new physics is decoupled at higher energies, as suggested by null experimental searches so far, then the SM must also be considered as an effective field theory with higher-dimensional operators suppressed by a cut-off scale. The sensitivity to this scale is quantified by the effects of operator coefficients on Higgs physics, triple-gauge couplings, and electroweak precision tests. Limits on these Wilson coefficients can be translated to a particular UV theory by integrating out heavy particles. As an example we illustrate this for a stop in the MSSM using the path integral method to obtain the one-loop effective Lagrangian. A universality in the result facilitates matching to any other model.
        Speaker: Mr. Tevong You (King's College London)
      • 09:40
        What we have learned about the Higgs boson from the bosonic decay channels and more inclusive combinations of data 30m
        This talk will review the status of what has been learned from LHC run-1 about the properties of the observed Higgs boson mostly from the bosonic decay channels, but also from latest/final inclusive analyses of the coupling structure. As far as considered relevant updates on the analyses in individual bosonic decay channels can be touched, but these discussions should be concise. The focus of the talk should be the measurement of the Higgs boson mass (with focus on the combination of ATLAS and CMS), the status of the spin and CP properties and the analysis of the coupling structure. The talk is aimed to present the final LHC run-1 results from ATLAS and CMS.
        Speaker: Li Yuan (Kobe University (JP))
      • 10:10
        Off-shell effects in Higgs processes at a linear collider and the LHC 15m
        We discuss the importance of off-shell Higgs contributions for a SM-like Higgs boson at a linear collider and the LHC. Possible constraints on the total Higgs width are investigated, the involved theoretical assumptions are analysed, and it is shown that the interference between signal and background limits the sensitivity for a SM-like width. Off-shell contributions and signal-background interference can potentially enhance the sensitivity to an additional heavier Higgs boson with suppressed couplings to gauge bosons. This issue is investigated in the context of a Two-Higgs-Doublet model.
        Speakers: Prof. Georg Ralf Weiglein (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE)) , Prof. Gudrid Moortgat-Pick (University of Hamburg / Desy)
      • 10:25
        Constraining new physics in the Higgs sector using differential and fiducial cross section measurements from the LHC 15m
        In 2014 ATLAS published a first set of $H \to \gamma\gamma$ and $H \to 4 \ell$ differential fiducial cross sections and CMS is finalizing similar results. These measurements are carried out close to the experimental fiducial region and have minimal underlying model dependencies and can be used to constrain beyond the Standard Model physics scenarios coupling to the Higgs sector. Using these published measurements and associated covariances, we characterize possible deviations from the SM with the so-called kappa framework and compare the sensitivity to the official ATLAS results. We then present limits on a range of Spin 2 Higgs impostor scenarios and carry out a reinterpretation of the measured cross sections as production mechanism coupling strengths.
        Speakers: Andrew Pilkington (University Of Manchester) , Bob Kowalewski (University of Victoria (CA)) , Dag Gillberg (CERN) , Dr. Florian Urs Bernlochner (Universitaet Bonn (DE)) , Holger Schulz (Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (DE)) , Michaela Queitsch-Maitland (University of Manchester (GB)) , Yanping Huang (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
      • 10:40
        Effects of Beyond Standard Model physics on Higgs' p_T spectra in Effective Field Theory approach 15m
        The first run of the LHC has successfully discovered a Higgs boson, however no signs of New Physics were found. This may suggest that the New Physics is beyond reach of current experiments, and may be accessed just by measuring small deviations from SM predictions. Effective Field Theory (EFT) offers a consistent bottom-up approach to parametrise such deviations. In our work we apply the EFT to shed light on the effects of high-scale BSM physics on the Higgs' p_T spectrum, which will become important for the experimental measurements. The SM predictions for Higgs boson production were augmented by three new dimension 6 operators, leading to the modification of the top and bottom Yukawa coupling, and the ggH point-like coupling. We present p_T spectra including these operators at NLO+NLL level and show how BSM effective operators affect them.
        Speaker: Agnieszka Ilnicka (University of Warsaw)
    • 09:00 11:00
      Neutrino Physics HS7

      HS7

      • 09:00
        Global fits to neutrino oscillations: status and prospects 15m
        We review the status of the neutrino oscillation parameters, as determined from a global analysis of all available neutrino data, in a the standard three-neutrino mass-mixing framework. We analyse the correlations between the oscillation parameters and we discuss the current status and the prospects for a near future determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and of the CP-violating phase delta.
        Speaker: Antonio Marrone (Univ. of Bari)
      • 09:15
        Status of Double Chooz experiment 15m
        Double Chooz aims to measure the last neutrino mixing angle theta13 with a 10 % precision through the disappearance of reactor electronic anti-neutrinos. The experiment relies on the measurement of neutrino flux and spectrum with two identical detectors at different location: one at 1 km of reactor cores to observe the disappearance of neutrinos around the first minimum, and one around 400 m to measure the flux before any significant oscillation. Neutrinos are detected by inverse beta decay on free proton in a 8.3 tons liquid scintillator target, providing two signal with coincidence in time and space: scintillation and annihilation of positron for the prompt signal and gamma ray following neutron capture on Gd as delayed signal. Double Chooz has been running since 2011 with the far detector only, providing on the scene novel analysis like independent measurement using neutron capture on Hydrogen as delayed signal, reactor rate modulation study providing a background independent measurement of theta13, and new background vetos techniques. Data taking with the near detector has finally started early 2015. The talk will review the most recent measurement of theta13 using Gd and H data set with the far detector only, and discuss first data obtained with the near detector.
        Speaker: Dr. Emmanuel Chauveau (RCNS Tohoku University)
      • 09:30
        Recent progress from Daya Bay 15m
        Precise determination of the neutrino mixing angle $\theta_{13}$ is important for searches of CP violation in the lepton sector. The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment (Daya Bay) observed electron antineutrino disappearance and measured a nonzero value of $\theta_{13}$ with a significance greater than 5 standard deviations in early 2012. With the final two detectors installed, Daya Bay resumed recording data in its full 8-detector configuration in late 2012. More than 1,000,000 (150,000) electron antineutrino candidates had been collected with the near (far) site detectors by the end of 2013, significantly improving the precision of the $\theta_{13}$ measurement. In addition to the precise determination of $\theta_{13}$, Daya Bay is also capable of exploring other neutrino research. In this talk, I will present our recent progress in the measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters $\sin^2 2\theta_{13}$ and |$\Delta m^2_{ee}$| using neutron capture on gadolinium, the measurement of $\sin^2 2\theta_{13}$ using neutron capture on hydrogen, the search for a light sterile neutrino, and the measurement of the reactor neutrino flux and spectrum.
        Speaker: Xiangpan Ji (Tsinghua University)
      • 09:45
        Observation of energy dependent disappearance of reactor neutrinos from RENO & Future RENO-50 15m
        RENO has been taking reactor neutrino data to measure neutrino mixing angle theta_13 since Aug. 2011 using two identical detectors located in Near and Far sites in Yonggwang, Korea. The data taking has gone smoothly to collect data more than 1 M (0.1 M) neutrino events in the Near (Far) detector as of May 2015. Currently we are at the stage of finalizing our new results based on spectral shape analysis using roughly 800 live days of data. In this talk we will present an updated value of theta13 and our first measurement of oscillation frequency, |dm_ee^2|. Our future RENO-50 experiment will be briefly mentioned.
        Speaker: Seon-Hee Seo (Seoul National University)
      • 10:00
        Antineutrino oscillations with T2K 22m
        T2K is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, in which a muon neutrino beam is produced at J-PARC and detected 295 km away at the Super-Kamiokande detector. The T2K experiment observed electron-neutrino appearance in 2012. This observation enables T2K to explore CP violation in the lepton sector by comparing electron-neutrino appearance and electron-antineutrino appearance. Indeed, the number of observed electron neutrino events up to 2012 is, though within statistical fluctuation, larger than the expectation, which suggests maximal CP violation. Since 2013, T2K has been accumulating data with a muon antineutrino beam. If the suggested maximal CP violation is true, electron-antineutrino appearance would be suppressed. The signal is further suppressed by the smaller cross section for antineutrinos compared to neutrinos. Hence the observation of electron-antineutrino appearance is an important next step. Furthermore, the CPT theorem imposes that the muon disappearance rate must be the same for muon neutrinos and muon antineutrinos; therefore the comparison between neutrinos and antineutrinos is a good test of the CPT theorem, or else a probe for new non-standard interactions of neutrinos with matter. We will report the result of the first search for electron-antineutrino appearance in T2K, as well as a new measurement of muon-antineutrino disappearance to compare with muon-neutrino disappearance measurements.
        Speaker: Melody Ravonel (Universite de Geneve (CH))
      • 10:22
        Results from the OPERA experiment at the CNGS beam 23m
        The OPERA experiment at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory has been designed to study the nu_mu -> nu_tau oscillation in appearance mode in the CNGS neutrino beam. Four nu_tau candidate events have been confirmed so far, using a sub-sample of data from the 2008-2012 runs. Given the number of analysed events and the low background, nu_mu -> nu_tau oscillations have been established with a significance of 4.2 sigma. In the talk we will present results based on an increased sample of scanned emulsion target units (bricks). The nu_tau data analysis will be updated and discussed, with emphasis on the background constraints obtained by using dedicated data-driven control samples. The analysis of the collected electron neutrino sample and the analysis of the muon charge ratio in the cosmic ray sample will also be covered.
        Speaker: Gabriele Sirri (Universita e INFN, Bologna (IT))
      • 10:45
        The NOvA Experiment 15m
        NOvA is an off-axis long-baseline neutrino experiment, looking for $\nu_e$ appearance in an upgraded NuMI beam of $\nu_\mu$ to precisely measure the recently discovered $\theta_{13}$ acting in subdominant $\nu_\mu\rightarrow\nu_e$ transitions. As an appearance experiment, NOvA might also be sensitive to CP-violating $\delta$ and the neutrino mass hierarchy. To maximize sensitivity to the resulting $\sim$GeV electromagnetic showers, the 14~kton Far Detector is ``totally active'', comprised of liquid scintillator contained in 15.7~m long extruded PVC cells, with the scintillation light piped out in wavelength shifting fibers then digitized by avalanche photodiodes. Both near and far detectors were fully completed last fall and have been taking ever more intense NuMI beam data. This talk will highlight progress towards the first NOvA results.
        Speaker: Alec Habig (University of Minnesota)
    • 09:00 11:00
      QCD and Hadronic Physics
      • 09:00
        Quarkonium and heavy flavour production in Run-1 and first results with 13 TeV data at CMS 15m
        This talk presents the CMS quarkonium production results in pp collisions, placing emphasis on the most recent measurements, which include the S-wave Psi(nS) and Y(nS) cross sections up to transverse momenta exceeding 100 GeV with the Run-1 dataset, and reports on the prospects for B physics measurements with high statistics data at CMS, and presents preliminary results obtained with 13 TeV data.
        Speaker: Ilse Kratschmer (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 09:15
        Quarkonium and heavy flavour production measurements at ATLAS 15m
        We present a large number of detailed measurements of the production of various open and hidden charm (D meson, J/psi, psi(2s), chi_c) states at the ATLAS experiment at centre- of-mass energies of 2.76 TeV, 7 TeV, and 8 TeV. The total charm production cross-section at the LHC is also determined. These measurements extend in reach and precision beyond those currently available, and we compare these measurements to a variety of the latest theoretical predictions. We also present new measurements of the associated production of quarkonium with a vector boson or an additional quarkonium state using the ATLAS Run-1 dataset. These rare processes provide new insight into QCD models of quarkonium production, but also provide new opportunities to study double parton scattering, including cross-section measurements in single and double parton scattering dominated regimes and a precise assessment of the sigma_eff parameter governing the effective spatial area of parton-parton interactions at a variety of energy scales.
        Speaker: Stefanos Leontsinis (National Technical Univ. of Athens (GR))
      • 09:30
        J/psi polarization measurements in p+p collisions at sqrt{s} = 200 and 500 GeV with the STAR experiment 15m
        Despite extensive studies, the J/$\psi$ production mechanism in hadron collisions is not yet exactly known. For many years, mostly J/$\psi$ differential cross-section measurements have been used to test different J/$\psi$ production models. While many models can reasonably well describe the experimental data on the J/$\psi$ cross-section in $p+p$ collisions, they have different predictions for the J/$\psi$ polarization. Therefore, measurements of the J/$\psi$ polarization may allow to discriminate among different models and provide new insight into the J/$\psi$ production mechanism. In this talk, measurements of J/$\psi$ polarization in $p+p$ collisions at $\sqrt{s}$ = 200 and 500 GeV via the dielectron decay channel at mid-rapidity with the STAR experiment will be discussed. At $\sqrt{s}$ = 200 GeV the polarization parameter, $\lambda_{\theta}$, related to the polar anisotropy was obtained in the helicity frame as a function of transverse momentum, 2 $< p_{T} <$ 6 GeV/$c$ and compared to different model predictions. A new J/$\psi$ polarization measurement at $\sqrt{s}$ = 500 GeV has extended the previous analysis to a wide transverse momentum range of 5 $< p_{T} <$ 16 GeV/$c$. Also, the polarization parameter related to the azimuthal anisotropy, $\lambda_{\phi}$, was extracted in addition to $\lambda_{\theta}$, in two reference frames: helicity and Collins-Soper. This allowed for the frame invariant parameter calculation vs $p_{T}$ in these two frames.
        Speaker: Barbara Trzeciak (Czech Technical University in Prague)
      • 09:45
        Recent results on exotic quarkonium states from Belle 15m
        Recent observations of charged charmonium-like states have opened an interesting landscape in the field of hadron spectroscopy. Continuing with its tradition, Belle recently observed a new charged charmonium-like state Zc(4200) and obtained an evidence for Zc(4430) → J/ψπ+ in B → J/ψπK decays. Belle also found the first evidence for a new charged state Zc(4020)+ in their updated study of ISR decay, e+e− → ππψ(2S). Along with this, we also present the first observation of B0 → X(3872)K+π− decay mode, the search for X(3872)/χc1(2P) in B+ → χc1π+π−K+, and the search for X(3872)-like states, Zc(3900)0, X(3915) and Zc(4020)0 in the final states with ηc meson in the B decays. We also report recent results on the spectroscopy of charged and vector bottomonium-like states at Belle. These include new decay channels of the Zb bottomonium-like resonances in the dataset taken at the Υ(10860), studies of resonant substructure in three-body decays at the Υ(11020), and the observation of η transitions from Υ(4S) and Υ(10860) to Υ(1S,2S) and hb(1P,2P) states, as well as Υ(10860) → η/π+π−Υ(1D). We also investigate the dependence of production rates on the center-of-mass energy in the regions of Υ(10860) and Υ(11020) for several types of b ̄b events, both with bottomonia and open-b states, and consider the implications for the masses and widths of Υ(10860) and Υ(11020).
        Speaker: Alexei Garmash (Princeton)
      • 10:00
        Exotic and Charmonium(-like) states at BESIII 15m
        The BESIII Experiment at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPCII) has accumulated the world's largest samples of $e^+e^-$ collisions in the tau-charm region. From the collected samples, which include $e^+e^-$ annihilations at J/psi, psi(2S), psi(3770) peaks and in the region from 4 GeV to 4.6 GeV, BESIII has produced many new results in the spectroscopy, transitions, and decays of charmonium(-like) states. This talk will review the current status of these analyses, which cover a wide range of topics from radiative and hadronic transitions among charmonium states, the productions and decays of the $XYZ$ states. Especially, the analysis of these samples has resulted in a number of surprising discoveries of the electrically charged "Zc" structures, which, if resonant, cannot be accommodated in the traditional charm quark and anti-charm quark picture of charmonium. In this talk, we will review the current status of the analyses of the Zc structures, as well as a number of other interesting features in the new BESIII data samples.
        Speaker: Yutie Liang (Giessen University)
      • 10:15
        Pentaquarks and Tetraquarks at LHCb 15m
        Observations of exotic structures in the $J/\psi p$ channel, that we refer to as pentaquark-charmonium states, in $\Lambda_b^0 \to J/\psi p K^-$ decays are presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $3~fb^{-1}$ acquired with the LHCb detector from 7 and 8~TeV $pp$ collisions. An amplitude analysis is performed on the three-body final state that reproduces all the angular and two-body mass distributions in the decay chain. To obtain a satisfactory fit of the structures seen in the $J/\psi p$ mass spectrum, it is necessary to include two Breit-Wigner amplitudes that each describe a resonant state. We also discuss the related amplitude analysis that measured unambiguously the spin-parity of the $Z_c(4430)^+$ state that decays into $\psi$'$\pi^+$
        Speaker: Sheldon Stone (Syracuse University (US))
      • 10:30
        Measurements of production and decay of exotic mesons at the ATLAS and CMS experiments 15m
        Hadronic spectroscopy has experienced a renaissance in the last decade thanks to experiments at B-factories and Tevatron and recently at the LHC. A wide zoology of quarkonium-like states still needs to be understood within a possibly consistent framework that the LHC experiments are now contributing to enrich. The latest results on the production and decay properties of exotic mesons in the charm and beauty sectors at ATLAS and CMS are presented.
        Speaker: James William Walder (Lancaster University (GB))
      • 10:45
        [Cancelled] Measurement of low pT D+ meson production cross section at CDF 15m
        We present a measurement of the production cross section of the D+ mesons in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy, using the full data set collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider during Run II. The measurement is performed in a yet unexplored low transverse momentum range, down to 1.5 GeV/c, using events collected with the "zero bias" and "minimum bias" triggers. The actual QCD theory cannot predict the behavior of the strong interactions in the low transferred 4-momentum region because in these kinematic conditions the strong coupling constant is of the order of the unity. Thus, a perturbative expansion is no longer permitted. At present, several phenomenological models have been proposed, but they are able to describe only few aspects of the observed physical quantities and not their whole complexity. Experimental results in this conditions are then crucial to predict new QCD models. The measurement of the differential cross section at low pT plays an important role in this context allowing to refine the actual knowledge. After the shutdown of the Tevatron, this is very likely going to remain a unique measurement because of the initial state (proton-antiproton) and center-of-mass energy.
    • 09:00 11:00
      Top and Electroweak Physics HS31

      HS31

      • 09:00
        Improved prediction for the mass of the W boson in the SM, the MSSM and the NMSSM 25m
        The relation between the mass of the W boson, the Z boson, the fine structure constant and the Fermi constant is one of the most important precision observables, which provides access to the quantum structure of the underlying theory and has a high sensitivity for discriminating between different models. Updated predictions for the W-boson mass in the Standard Model (SM) as well as its minimal and next-to-minimal supersymmetric extensions (MSSM, NMSSM) are presented. In the SM the incorporation of the latest higher-order corrections and the remaining theoretical uncertainties are discussed. In the supersymmetric extensions all available higher-order corrections from SM- and SUSY-type are taken into account. The predictions in the three models are obtained in a coherent framework, so that differences in the prediction for the W-boson mass can directly be related to the different structure and particle content of the three models. The phenomenological consequences of confronting the predictions in the three models with the present experimental result are discussed, and the impact of possible future improvements is investigated.
        Speaker: Prof. Georg Weiglein (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
      • 09:25
        Measurements of $W$ charge asymmetry 18m
        We present $W$ boson and lepton charge asymmetry measurements from $W$ decays in the electron channel, with 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of RunII data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The electron charge asymmetry is presented as a function of the electron transverse momentum and pseudo-rapidity out to $|\eta|\leq 3.2$; we also give the $W$ charge asymmetry as a function of $W$ boson rapidity. The asymmetries are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. These charge asymmetry measurements will allow more accurate determinations of the proton parton distribution functions.
        Speaker: Jenny Lyn Holzbauer (Mississippi University (US))
      • 09:43
        Precision measurements of Standard Model parameters with the ATLAS detector 18m
        The ATLAS Collaboration is engaged in precision measurement of fundamental Standard Model parameters, e.g. the weak-mixing angle and the complete set of coefficients that describe the angular distributions of Drell-Yan production. A measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry for the neutral current Drell Yan process is presented and the results are then used to extract a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle. This measurement shows significant sensitivity to the uncertainties of the parton density functions of the proton. The angular distributions of the Drell-Yan lepton pairs around the Z-boson mass peak probe the underlying QCD dynamic of the Z-boson production mechanisms. We present a measurement of the complete set of angular coefficients describing these distributions using 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy. The measurement is compared with the theoretical predictions and shows discrimination power between different approaches of the QCD modeling.
        Speaker: Aleksandra Dimitrievska (Institute of Physics Belgrade (RS))
      • 10:01
        W/Z results from CMS 18m
        The production of W and Z bosons is studied in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV using data collected in the CMS experiment. W events are selected containing an isolated, energetic electron or muon. Z events are selected containing a pair of isolated, energetic electrons or muons. Data-driven methods are used to estimate reconstruction and triggering efficiencies, and well as the main backgrounds. We present recent results on W/Z production cross sections, discuss the measurements of the lepton charge asymmetry in W events, forward-backward asymmetry in the Drell-Yan process.
        Speaker: Rajdeep Mohan Chatterjee (Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research (IN))
      • 10:19
        Measurements of $Z$ production distribution and decay asymmetry 18m
        We present measurements of the $Z\gamma$* rapidity and $\phi$* production distributions and the weak mixing angle from $Z$ boson decays, with all RunII data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement of $\phi*$ probes the same physical effects as the $Z/\gamma$* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. Both $\phi$* and rapidity are measured with unprecedented precision. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry distribution as a function of dielectron invariant mass around the $Z$ pole. The measured value of the weak mixing angle is the most precise from light quark interactions, and comparable to the best LEP and SLD results.
        Speaker: Aran Garcia-Bellido (University of Rochester)
    • 11:00 11:30
      Coffee Break 30m Arcades

      Arcades

    • 11:30 13:00
      Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology, Gravitation
      • 11:30
        Status of the Advanced Virgo project and near term perspectives 30m
        Since fall 2011 the Virgo collaboration has undertaken a major detector upgrade aiming to make the sensitivity of the Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave interferometer a factor 10 better than that of initial Virgo. 2015 should mark the completion of the Advanced Virgo construction and the restart of an intense commissioning activity. This talk will present the status and outlook of Advanced Virgo.
        Speaker: Nicolas Arnaud (LAL (CNRS-IN2P3))
      • 12:00
        Neutrons test Gravity, Dark Matter and Dark Energy: Snapshots of a Quantum Bouncing Ball & Gravity Resonance Spectroscopy 15m
        This talk focuses on two different kinds of gravity tests at short distances using ultracold neutrons within the qBounce experiments. One class of gravity experiments focuses on the realization of a Quantum Bouncing Ball, i.e. a measurement of the time evolution of a neutron bouncing above a horizontal plane. In 2014, the spatial probability distribution of this Schrödinger wave packet has been measured for different observation times with a spatial resolution of about 1.5μm. Here, we illustrate the role of interference weaving the quantum carpet of several quantum states. The second type of experiments deals with the control and understanding of a gravitationally interacting elementary quantum system using the techniques of resonance spectroscopy. It offers a new way of looking at gravitation based on quantum interference. The ultra-cold neutron reflects from a mirror in well-defined quantum states in the gravity potential of the earth allowing to apply the concept of gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS). GRS relies on frequency measurements, which provide a spectacular sensitivity. We present limits on dark energy and dark matter candidates.
        Speaker: Tobias JENKE (Atominstitut TU Wien)
      • 12:15
        Dark matter, neutrino masses and LFV processes in the scotogenic model 15m
        We study the impact that future lepton flavor violating experiments will have on the viable parameter space of the scotogenic model. Within this model, the dark matter particle is assumed to be the lightest singlet fermion and two cases are considered depending on how its relic density is obtained: via self-annihilations or via coannihilations with the scalars. For each case, a scan over the parameter space of the model is used to obtain a large sample of viable points, which we subsequently analyze. We find that future lepton flavor violating experiments, in particular those searching for μ→3e and μ-e conversion in nuclei, will probe the parameter space of the scotogenic model in a significant way. They may exclude a large fraction of the models where the dark matter density is determined by coannihilations, and could rule out all the models where it is determined by annihilations.
        Speaker: Dr. carlos yaguna (MPIK, Heidelberg)
      • 12:30
        Prospects for SUSY dark matter after the LHC Run 1 15m
        We present the prospects for searches for dark matter after Run 1 of the LHC, based on a global fit in the phenomenological MSSM with 10 parameters (pMSSM10). Particular care has been taken regarding the implementation of the most important limits obtained from the SUSY searches at Run 1 of the LHC. The information from the observed Higgs signal, limits from Higgs searches, as well as constraints from electroweak precision data, flavour physics, cosmological data and direct searches for dark matter are also taken into account. The prospects for dark matter searches at the upcoming Run 2 of the LHC, at a future $e^+e^-$ collider, and at direct detection experiments. The talk will be based on arXiv:1504.03260 and updates thereof. This talk is submitted on behalf of the MasterCode collaboration. It is not clear yet who will actually give the talk.
        Speaker: Emanuele Angelo Bagnaschi (DESY Hamburg)
    • 11:30 13:00
      Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries HS21

      HS21

      • 11:30
        Measurements of the photon polarisation in b→γs decays 15m
        LHCb recently reported the first observation of a non-zero photon polarisation in b→γs decays. The interpretation of this result in terms of potential right-handed currents is still open. New results from the decays Bs→φγ and B0→K0ee are presented.
        Speaker: Pablo Ruiz Valls (Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (ES))
      • 11:45
        Charmless B decays 15m
        Charmless B meson decays proceed via suppressed b→u tree and b→s,d penguin diagrams and are thus sensitive to New Physics. We present recent results on angular analyses of B→VV decays and searches for very suppressed decay modes.
        Speaker: Brais Sanmartin Sedes (Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (ES))
      • 12:00
        Origin of a large CP asymmetry in B+- --> K+- K+ K- decays 15m
        Large CP-violating asymmetry effects in the B+- --> K+- K+ K- decays have been predicted in the QCD factorization model [1]. The model includes strong K+ K- final-state long-distance interactions in the S-, P-, and also (in the recent analysis) D- wave two-body states. The S-wave two-body unitarity conditions involve interchannel couplings of the kaon-kaon states with the intermediate states of two pions and four pions. As a result the pion-pion to kaon-kaon rescattering effects are included in the model. It is shown how the weak phase differences together with the existence of two different strong phases of the S-wave decay amplitudes (related to the phases of the kaon scalar strange and non-strange form factors) contribute to the CP-asymmetry in question. The theoretical results are compared with recent experimental data of the LHCb and BABAR Collaborations [2]. References: [1] A. Furman, R. Kaminski, L. Lesniak, P. Zenczykowski, Phys. Lett. B 699 (2011) 102. [2] L. Lesniak, P. Zenczykowski, Phys. Lett. B 737 (2014) 201.
        Speaker: Prof. Leonard Lesniak (Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAS, Krakow, Poland)
      • 12:15
        Investigation of 3-body Hadronic decays at Belle 15m
        We present recent measurements of B mesons to 3-body hadronic final states. These measurements test factorization predictions, search for final-state interactions and measure strong interaction amplitudes using Dalitz-plot analysis techniques. The results employ the full Belle dataset and are our final measurements for these modes.
        Speaker: Min-Zu Wang (National Taiwan Univ.)
      • 12:30
        Charmless Two-body Baryonic $B_{u,d,s}$ Decays 15m
        We study charmless two-body baryonic $B$ decays using the topological amplitude approach. We extend a previous work to include all ground state octet and decuplet final states with full topological amplitudes. Relations on rates and CP asymmetries are obtained. With the long awaited $\overline B^0\to p\bar p$ data, we can finally extract information on the topological amplitudes and predict rates of other modes. We point out some modes that will cascadely decay to all charged final states and have large decay rates. We find that the $\overline B^0\to p\bar p$ mode is the most accessible one among octet-anti-octet final states in the $\Delta S=0$ transition. The predicted $\overline B^0_s\to p\bar p$ rate is several order smaller than the present experimental result. The analysis presented in this work can be systematically improved when more measurements on decay rates become available. The smallness of the $\overline B^0\to p\bar p$ rate is studied as well. We point out that for a given tree operator $O_i$, the contribution from its Fiertz transformed operator, tends to cancel the internal $W$-emission amplitude induced from $O_i$. This explains why most previous model calculations predicted too large rates as the above consideration was not taken into account.
        Speaker: Chun-Khiang Chua
      • 12:45
        Searches for $B^0 \to \eta \pi^0$ and $B_s \to K^0 K^0$ at Belle 15m
        Charmless decays of $B$ and $B_s$ mesons provide nice testing ground for the Standard Model (SM) and excellent probes for physics beyond the SM. The Belle experiment has produced many results in this subject by analyzing the high-statistics event sample of $B$ and $B_s$ meson decays. We present the searches for the two-body charmless rare decays $B^0\to \eta \pi^0$ and $B_s \to K^0 K^0$ using the data samples of $694 {\rm fb}^{-1}$ and $121.4 {\rm fb}^{-1}$ collected at the $\Upsilon(4S)$ and $\Upsilon(5S)$ resonances, respectively, with the Belle detector at the KEKB $e^+ e^-$ asymmetric-energy collider.
        Speaker: MING-CHUAN CHANG (FU JEN CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY)
    • 11:30 13:00
      Heavy Ion Physics HS42

      HS42

      • 11:30
        Measurements of leptons from open heavy-flavour decays in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC 20m
        Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) predicts that at high energy density, ordinary nuclear matter undergoes a phase transition towards a new state of matter called Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) that is characterized by deconfined quarks and gluons. High-energy Pb-Pb collisions are used to reach the thermodynamical conditions to create the QGP. As heavy quarks (charm and beauty) are produced in the initial hard scatterings of partons in the collision, they can be used as probes to investigate the properties of the QGP. Measurements in p-Pb collisions are useful to study the cold nuclear matter effects that can affect the particle production by initial or final-state interactions. Also, a precise measurement of open heavy-flavour production cross sections in pp collisions is essential to assess the accuracy of Next to Leading Order perturbative QCD calculations that suffer from large uncertainties. Besides this, open heavy-flavour studies in pp collisions are an essential baseline for the corresponding measurements in p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions. ALICE is one of the large experiments at the LHC and was designed to study and characterize the QGP. In ALICE, open heavy-flavour hadrons are measured via their hadronic decay at mid rapidity and via their semileptonic decay both at mid (electrons) and forward (muons) rapidity. In this talk the latest results on open heavy-flavour decay leptons in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions with the ALICE experiment will be presented.
        Speaker: Lizardo Valencia Palomo (Univ. Blaise Pascal Clermont-Fe. II (FR))
      • 11:50
        LHCb results in proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC 20m
        LHCb's unique forward acceptance and particle-ID capabilities allow for complementary measurements in proton-ion interactions. Latest results are shown and prospects for ion-ion and ion-gas collisions are presented.
        Speaker: Marco Meissner (Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg (DE))
      • 12:10
        Measurements of Non-Photonic Electron Production with STAR Experiment 20m
        The properties of the strongly interacting Quark-Gluon Plasma, created in high energy heavy-ion collisions, can be studied using heavy quarks, such as charm and bottom. Heavy quarks may interact with the medium differently than light quarks. For example, energy losses of the heavy quarks through gluon radiation are expected to be smaller due to the dead cone effect. Therefore, measurements of heavy quarks can improve our understanding of how partons interact with the medium and the QGP properties. Hot and cold nuclear matter effects, which affect the heavy quark production in heavy ion collisions, could be quantified with the nuclear modification factor, $R_{AA}$, and azimuthal anisotropy parameter, $v_2$. Results from p+p collisions can serve as a baseline for $R_{AA}$ as well as to test of the validity of perturbative QCD. At RHIC, heavy quarks could be studied by measuring non-photonic electrons (NPE) which are produced from semi-leptonic heavy flavor D and B meson decays. In this talk, we will present the measurement of NPE production in p+p collisions at $\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV in a wide transverse momentum range (0.4< $p_{T}$ < 12 GeV/c). We will discuss the energy dependence of $v_2$ in Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ =39, 62.4 and 200 GeV. The nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ in Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV and in U+U collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}}=193$ GeV will also be presented and compared with different model predictions.
        Speaker: Mrs. Olga Rusnakova (CTU Prague)
      • 12:30
        review of heavy flavour production in AA collisions 25m
        Heavy-flavour hadrons are effective probes of the Quark-Gluon Plasma which is produced in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Heavy quarks (charm and beauty) are produced in the hard scattering processes at the initial stages of the collision and they subsequently traverse the medium, losing energy in the interaction with its constituents. Heavy-flavour measurements are hence sensitive to the mechanisms of transport and energy loss of the heavy-quark in the medium. In this talk, the heavy-flavour measurements performed by experiments at RHIC and at the LHC will be reviewed, and their role in the characterisation of the medium will be discussed.
        Speaker: Diego Stocco (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associe)
    • 11:30 13:00
      Higgs and New Physics Großer Festsaal

      Großer Festsaal

      • 11:30
        EFT-naturalness: an effective field theory analysis of Higgs naturalness 15m
        Assuming the presence of physics beyond the Standard Model with a characteristic scale $M \sim O(10 ~ TeV)$, we investigate the naturalness of the Higgs sector at scales below $M$ using an effective field theory (EFT) approach. We obtain the leading 1-loop EFT contributions to the Higgs mass with a Wilsonian-like hard cutoff, and determine the constraints on the corresponding operator coefficients for these effects to alleviate the ***little hierarchy problem*** up to the scale of the effective action $ \Lambda < M $; a condition we denote by ***``EFT-naturalness''***. We also discuss the types of physics that can lead to ***EFT-naturalness*** and obtain the current experimental constraints on the relevant operator coefficients; it is shown that these types of new physics are best probed in vector-boson and multiple-Higgs production.
        Speaker: Dr. Shaouly Bar-Shalom (Technion, Israel)
      • 11:45
        Differential distributions of Higgs boson in the two-photon channel at the LHC within $k_{t}$-factorization approach 15m
        We present differential cross sections for Higgs boson and/or two-photon production from (virtual) Higgs boson within the formalism of $k_t$-factorization. The off-shell $g^* g^* \to H$ matrix elements are used. We compare results obtained with infinite top fermion (quark) mass and with finite mass taken into account. The latter effect is rather small. We compare results with different unintegrated gluon distributions. Two methods are used. In the first method first Higgs boson is produced in the $2 \to 1$ $g g \to H$ $k_t$-factorization approach and then isotropic decay with the Standard Model branching fraction is performed. In the second method we calculate directly two photons coupled to the virtual Higgs boson. The results of the two methods are compared and differences are discussed. The leading order $g g \to H$ contribution is rather small compared to the ATLAS experimental data for all unintegrated gluon distributions. We include also higher-order contribution $g g \to H (\to \gamma \gamma) g$, $g g \to g H g$ and the contribution of the $W^+ W^-$ and $Z^0 Z^0$. The $gg\to Hg$ mechanism gives similar cross section as the $gg\to H$ mechanism. We argue that there is almost no double counting when adding $gg\to H$ and $gg\to Hg$ contributions due to different topology of Feynman diagrams. The final sum is comparable with the ATLAS two-photon data. We discuss related uncertainties.
        Speaker: Antoni Szczurek (Institute of Nuclear Physics)
      • 12:00
        What we have learned about the Higgs boson coupling to fermions (in decay and production) 30m
        This talk will review the status of what has been learned from LHC run-1 about the coupling of the observed Higgs boson to fermions. The presentation will cover the couplings from the analyses of final states and initial states like production in association with top quark pairs or single top quarks. It may also highlight the role of the fermion analyses in latest coupling fits. The talk is aimed to present the final LHC run-1 results from ATLAS and CMS.
        Speaker: Andrew Gilbert (KIT - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (DE))
      • 12:30
        Search for Higgs bosons beyond the Standard Model in b-quark final states at CMS 15m
        While the existence of a Higgs boson with a mass near 125 GeV has been clearly established, the detailed structure of the entire Higgs sector is yet unclear. Besides the Standard Model interpretation, well-motivated models with extended Higgs sectors are being considered. Such options include the minimal and next-to-minimal supersymmetric extensions (MSSM and NMSSM) of the Standard Model, as well as more generic Two-Higgs Doublet models (2HDM). Direct searches for additional Higgs bosons in b-quark final states are a promising way to address this question. The talk presents recent results from the CMS experiment.
        Speaker: Rainer Mankel (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Hamburg and Zeuthen (DE))
      • 12:45
        Searches for Higgs boson like high mass resonances in the bosonic decay channels with ATLAS and CMS 15m
        In this talk the searches of the ATLAS and CMS experiment for additional Higgs boson like resonances in the WW, ZZ and $\gamma\gamma$ final state, for high masses beyond 125 GeV are summarized. The searches are based on the full LHC run-1 dataset of each experiment. Upper limits are presented in the context of an electro-weak singlet extension of the standard model.
        Speaker: Francesco Lo Sterzo (Academia Sinica (TW))
    • 11:30 13:00
      Neutrino Physics HS7

      HS7

      • 11:30
        Theoretical models of neutrino-nucleus cross sections 15m
        In the present and future accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments nuclear targets (such as C, O, Ar and Fe) are involved. Hence the knowledge of neutrino-nucleus scattering is very important. In particular it is crucial for the determination of the neutrino energy which enters the expression of the oscillation probability, since this energy is reconstructed from the final states of the neutrino-nucleus reaction. The status of the different theoretical approaches treating the open channels in the few-GeV region, i.e. the quasielastic, the pion production and the multinucleon emission, is reviewed. Special emphasis will be devoted to the multinucleon emission channel, which turned to be crucial to explain the unexpected behavior of the charged current quasielastic measurement performed by MiniBooNE. Up to last year, this channel was not included in the generators used for the analyses of the neutrino cross sections and oscillations experiments. The theoretical and experimental interest towards these multinucleon excitations continues to increase.
        Speaker: Marco Martini (University of Ghent)
      • 11:45
        Flux and Neutrino interaction model constraints using the T2K near detectors 15m
        Since 2014, the T2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in Japan has been running with reversed horn current to produce a beam enhanced in muon antineutrinos. Near detectors located 280 meters from the target study the neutrino interactions prior to the onset of neutrino oscillations. By selecting muon (anti)-neutrino charged current interactions in various channels of pion multiplicity, the neutrino flux and interaction model uncertainties are greatly reduced. In particular, the large contamination of neutrino interactions in the antineutrino mode can measured and constrained, a critical handle in the study of antineutrino oscillations at T2K. We present the results of a combined analysis of data from both neutrino-enhanced and antineutrino-enhanced running using an updated neutrino interaction model to incorporate multi-nucleon and other nuclear effects.
        Speaker: Laura Amelie Zambelli (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (JP))
      • 12:00
        Neutrino – Nucleus Interaction Measurements at MINERvA 15m
        MINERvA (Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A) is a neutrino scattering experiment using the high intensity neutrino beam produced by the Main Injector (NuMI) at Fermilab. MINERvA is making precision cross-section measurements of neutrino interactions with various nuclear targets (C, CH, Fe, Pb) at low and medium energy to study nuclear medium effects with a weak probe. This talk will present MINERvA's measurements of charged current (CC) quasi-elastic and CC pion production cross sections with neutrino and antineutrino beams, and measurements of ratios of neutrino CC scattering cross sections on different nuclei. Various methods to estimate the neutrino flux will be also discussed. Future MINERvA measurements will also be presented.
        Speaker: Sandro Bravar (Universite de Geneve (CH))
      • 12:15
        Hadron production measurements from NA61/SHINE for LBL neutrino experiments 15m
        A precise prediction of the expected neutrino flux is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. Review of recent results of the NA61/SHINE experiment on determination of charged hadron yields in proton-carbon interactions is presented. Values of differential cross sections of $\pi^\pm$, K$^\pm$, p, K$^0_s$ and $\Lambda$ provided by NA61/SHINE are presently used in the T2K $\nu$ beam simulation program to reweight hadron yields. They allowed to reduce the flux uncertainty at the neutrino peak energy down to 9%. At the same time, NA61/SHINE results obtained with the T2K replica target, which are used to constrain hadron yields at the surface of the target, will reduce significantly a model dependence of the neutrino beam prediction. Prospects of further improvement of precision of NA61/SHINE measurements in view of the forthcoming runs for energies of the main injector neutrino beamline at FNAL are reviewed.
        Speaker: Alexander Korzenev (Universite de Geneve (CH))
      • 12:30
        Bimaximal Neutrino Mixing and GUT's 15m
        In this talk I will briefly discuss the present status of models of neutrino mixing, in particular comparing the virtues of Bimaximal Mixing, corrected by terms arising from the charged lepton mass diagonalization in SU(5) and SO(10) contexts, to models based on chance, like Anarchy or U(1)_FN.
        Speaker: Dr. Davide Meloni (Dipartimento Matematica e Fisica, Universita' Roma Tre)
      • 12:45
        Non-Zero $\theta_{13}$ and $\delta_{CP}$ in a Neutrino Mass Model with $A_4$ Symmetry 15m
        We consider a neutrino mass model based on $A_4$ symmetry. The spontaneous symmetry breaking in this model is chosen to obtain tribimaximal mixing in the neutrino sector. We introduce $Z_2 \times Z_2$ invariant perturbations in this model which can give rise to acceptable values of $\theta_{13}$ and $\delta_{CP}$. Perturbation in the charged lepton sector alone can lead to viable values of $\theta_{13}$, but cannot generate $\delta_{CP}$. Perturbation in the neutrino sector alone can lead to acceptable $\theta_{13}$ and maximal CP violation. By adjusting the magnitudes of perturbations in both sectors, it is possible to obtain any value of $\delta_{CP}$.
        Speaker: Prof. Sankagiri Umasankar (Indian Institute of Technology Bombay)
    • 11:30 13:00
      QCD and Hadronic Physics HS32

      HS32

      • 11:30
        Measurement of Vector boson + heavy flavor jet production rates by D0 15m
        We present recent results on heavy flavor jet production in association with weak vector bosons using proton-antiproton collision data collected with the D0 detector at center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Studies of these processes provide tests of perturbative QCD predictions and non-perturbative effects. They are also important backgrounds to many precision SM measurements as well as searches for new physics. Measurements of W+b/c-jet production cross-sections and the ratio of cross-sections, $\sigma$(Z+2b-jet)/$\sigma$(Z+2jets), are presented.
        Speaker: Darren Price (University of Manchester (GB))
      • 11:45
        Heavy flavour production in the forward acceptance at the LHC 15m
        Its forward acceptance puts the LHCb in a unique position at the LHC to measure QCD phenomena at large rapidities and low transverse momenta, where theoretical models often fail to describe the data accurately. We present new studies of the production of the ϒ meson of the Λb baryon.
        Speaker: Ivan Polyakov (ITEP Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (RU))
      • 12:00
        Measurements of open heavy-flavour production in pp collisions with ALICE at the LHC 15m
        Heavy quarks, i.e. charm and beauty, are produced in hard parton scatterings in the initial stages of hadronic collisions. The study of their production in pp collisions at LHC energies provides, therefore, a test of perturbative QCD calculations at the highest collision energies available. In addition to the heavy-flavour production cross sections, more differential measurements provide further information about the particle-production mechanisms. In particular, the study of heavy-flavour production as a function of charged-particle multiplicity probes the interrelation of hard and soft mechanisms in particle production and the role of multi-parton interactions in charm production. The measurement of angular correlations between heavy-flavour hadrons and charged particles provides information on the heavy-quark fragmentation. Furthermore, the study of the angular correlations between heavy-flavour decay electrons and charged hadrons allows for a statistical separation of the charm and beauty contributions to the yield of heavy-flavour decay electrons. In this contribution, an overview of the most recent ALICE results on the open heavy-flavour production in pp collisions will be given. The open heavy-flavour production cross sections and their dependence on charged-particle multiplicity in pp collisions will be presented. The azimuthal correlations of D mesons and heavy-flavour decay electrons with charged hadrons in pp collisions will be discussed.
        Speaker: Grazia Luparello (Universita e INFN, Trieste (IT))
      • 12:15
        Heavy flavour production and asymmetry measurements from the D0 experiment 15m
        We present a first study of the inclusive production of the X(4140) state in hadronic collisions. We report the X(4140) production rate and a new measurement of its mass and width. The results of searches for the Zb(10610) and the Zb(10650) using the decay Zb → Υ(nS)π± where Upsilon(nS) → μμ are also presented. Sensitivity to the production of Zb is demonstrated. We present a measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in the production of B± mesons, Λb baryons and Λ baryons. Nonzero asymmetries would indicate a preference for a particular flavor, e.g., b quark or b antiquark, to be produced in the direction of the proton beam. These measurements provide important constraints on the production mechanisms of heavy quarks at hadron colliders. These studies are based on 10.4 fb−1 of pp~ collision data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.
        Speaker: Iain Bertram (Lancaster University)
      • 12:30
        Central exclusive meson production at LHCb 15m
        Its forward acceptance puts the LHCb in a unique position at the LHC to measure QCD phenomena at large rapidities and low transverse momenta, where theoretical models often fail to describe the data accurately. We present new exclusive production studies of ϒ mesons. A first look at the new Run II data and the performance of the new HERSCHEL forward counters may be presented.
        Speaker: Paolo Gandini (University of Oxford (GB))
      • 12:45
        Measurement of the charged-pion polarisability at COMPASS 15m
        The electric (${\alpha}_{\pi}$) and the magnetic (${\beta}_{\pi}$) polarisabilities are fundamental properties of the pion characterising the rigidity of its internal structure as a complex QCD system. They have been precisely measured at the COMPASS experiment at CERN with a ${\pi}^{-}$ beam of 190~GeV/c assuming ${\alpha}_{\pi}+{\beta}_{\pi}=0$. Muons of the same momentum were used for controlling of systematic effects. The obtained result ${\alpha}_{\pi}=-{\beta}_{\pi}=(2.0\pm 0.6_{stat.}\pm 0.7_{syst.})\times 10^{-4} fm^3$ is in agreement with the prediction of the Chiral Perturbation Theory.
        Speaker: Alexey Guskov (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (RU))
    • 11:30 13:00
      Top and Electroweak Physics HS31

      HS31

      • 11:30
        Electroweak physics at LHCb 18m
        LHCb's unique forward acceptance allow for complementary measurements of electroweak boson production. Thanks to the precise vertex detector and the gas injection system LHCb has the most precise luminosity calibration at the LHC. New precision W and Z cross-section measurements at 7 and 8 TeV are presented.
        Speaker: William James Barter (CERN)
      • 11:48
        Light-by-light scattering with intact protons at the LHC: from Standard Model to New Physics 18m
        The scheduled installation of forward proton detectors at the LHC nearby the CMS and ATLAS experiments will provide a -- somewhat surprising -- opportunity to measure the light-by-light scattering with unprecedented precision by taking advantage of the coherent photon flux emitted by the protons. The detection of the intact protons allows to reconstruct the full kinematic of the event which is very powerful to reject background. It is then possible to probe anomalous photon quartic couplings (4$\gamma$) with an excellent accuracy whereas very few constraints on those couplings exist at the moment. A large variety of extra-dimension models predicts a significant rise of the 4$\gamma$ coupling through new productions at tree level and any new electrically charged particle contributes to it through loops. The full 4$\gamma$ amplitudes generated by any electrically charged particles of spins $1/2$ and $1$, including the Standard Model processes are implemented in the Forward Physics Monte Carlo generator. First, a possible measurement of the Standard Model production is examined and then model-independent bounds on massive charged particles, only parametrized by the spin, mass and their "effective charge'' $Q_{\rm eff}$ are derived. We also discuss the sensitivities to neutral particles such as a strongly-interacting heavy dilaton and warped Kaluza-Klein gravitons using an effective field theory approach and claim they could be discovered for masses in the multi-TeV range.
        Speaker: Matthias Saimpert (CEA/IRFU,Centre d'etude de Saclay Gif-sur-Yvette (FR))
      • 12:06
        Measurement of exclusive gamma+gamma -> ll production in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector 18m
        The measurement of the exclusive gamma+gamma -> ll production cross-section in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV has been carried out by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, based on an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb-1. The ratios to the pure QED cross-section predictions are measured in the electron and muon channels and are found to be consistent
 with the previous measurements at the LHC. When proton absorptive 
effects due to finite proton size are taken into account in the theory calculation 
the measured cross-sections are found to be consistent with 
the prediction.
        Speakers: Mariusz Przybycien (AGH Univesity of Science and Technology (PL)) , Mariusz Przybycien (AGH University of Science and Technology (PL))
      • 12:24
        Exclusive W+W- production measured with the CMS experiment and constraints on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings 18m
        A search for exclusive or quasi-exclusive W+W- production induced by photon-photon exchange in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=8 TeV is reported using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7/fb. Events are selected by requiring the presence of an electron-muon pair with large transverse momentum pT > 30 GeV and no associated charged particles detected from the same vertex. The observed yields and kinematic distributions are compatible with the Standard Model prediction for exclusive and quasi-exclusive W+W- production. The di-lepton transverse momentum spectrum is studied for deviations from the Standard Model, and the resulting upper limits are compared to predictions assuming anomalous quartic gauge couplings.
        Speaker: Manfred Jeitler (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 12:42
        Measurements of Vector Boson Fusion and Scattering and Multiboson production with the ATLAS detector 18m
        The ATLAS collaboration has carried a set of measurements to test self-interactions of the electroweak gauge bosons. Among these measurements are the production of W or Z bosons in the vector-boson fusion channel and two same-charge W bosons in the vector-boson scattering channel. Furthermore, the first evidence for the production of three gauge bosons has been obtained. Cross sections are compared with Standard Model predictions in various fiducial phase spaces, and limits on anomalous couplings between gauge bosons are set, which provide model-independent constraints on new physics.
        Speaker: Narei Lorenzo Martinez (Indiana University (US))
    • 13:00 14:30
      Lunch 1h 30m
    • 14:30 16:00
      Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology, Gravitation HS33

      HS33

      • 14:30
        Precise Prediction of the Dark Matter Relic Density within the MSSM 15m
        With the latest Planck results the dark matter relic density is determined to an unprecedented precision. In order to reduce current theoretical uncertainties in the dark matter relic density prediction, we have calculated next-to-leading order SUSY-QCD corrections to neutralino (co)annihilation processes including Coulomb enhancement effects. We demonstrate that these corrections can have significant impact on the cosmologically favoured MSSM parameter space and is thus of general interest for parameter studies and global fits.
        Speaker: Julia Harz (University College London)
      • 14:45
        Dulition of axion dark radiation 15m
        Coherently generated PQ scalar fields could dominate the energy density in the early Universe and decay into relativistic axions, which would confront with the current dark radiation constraints. We study the condition that a thermal inflation driven by a U(1) gauged Higgs field dilutes such axions, in particular, for the case of gauged B-L symetry.
        Speaker: Osamu Seto (Hokkai-Gakuen University)
      • 15:00
        Axino and gravitino dark matter with low reheating temperature 15m
        Possible discovery of supersymmetric particles in the second run of the LHC accompanied by lack of observation of a dark matter particle in direct searches may point towards dark matter candidates being extremely weakly interacting particles with supersymmetric origin. In this talk I will focus on two such candidates that are well motivated theoretically, namely the axino and the gravitino. In particular I will discuss the upper limit on the axino mass assuming that it is the dark matter particle. This issue can be properly treated when low reheating temperature of the Universe after a period of cosmological inflation is taken into account. I will discuss how both thermal and non-thermal production of axino is modified in this regime and how this influences the aforementioned upper limit on the axino mass. I will also discuss constraints on such scenario that could be derived from a possible detection of supersymmetric particles at the LHC and from the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and Large Scale Structure formation. Similar analysis in the case of gravitino dark matter leads to a lower limit on the reheating temperature in this scenario as will be shown.
        Speaker: Sebastian Trojanowski (National Centre for Nuclear Research, Poland)
      • 15:15
        Leptogenesis in natural low-scale seesaw mechanisms 15m
        We consider the possibility of simultaneously explaining Dark Matter and the Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe using different low-scale seesaw realisations involving sterile fermion states (such as right-handed neutrinos), among them minimal realisations of the Inverse seesaw and/or the Linear seesaw. In particular, we discuss the possibility of obtaining a successful leptogenesis in the presence of pseudo-Dirac neutrino pairs, while accommodating all experimental and observational constraints (dark matter, neutrino data, laboratory constraints, etc).
        Speaker: Michele Lucente (LPT Orsay)
      • 15:30
        Dark Matter Self-Interactions via Collisionless Shocks in Cluster Mergers 15m
        While dark matter self-interactions may solve several problems with structure formation, so far only the effects of two-body scatterings of dark matter particles have been considered. We show that, if a subdominant component of dark matter is charged under an unbroken U(1) gauge group, collective dark plasma effects need to be taken into account to understand its dynamics. Plasma instabilities can lead to collisionless dark matter shocks in galaxy cluster mergers which might have been already observed in the Abell 3827 and 520 clusters. As a concrete model we propose a thermally produced dark pair plasma of vectorlike fermions. In this scenario the interacting dark matter component is expected to be separated from the stars and the non-interacting dark matter halos in cluster collisions. In addition, the missing satellite problem is softened, while constraints from all other astrophysical and cosmological observations are avoided.
        Speaker: Christian Spethmann
      • 15:45
        Cosmological models with QGP: DM, DE and scalar perturbations 15m
        The background evolution problem is resolved for the Universe endowed with relic colored objects – quarks and gluons – that survived hadronization either as isolated islands of quark-gluon “nuggets” (QNs), or as a uniform fluid. In the first scenario, QNs can play the role of dark matter. In the second scenario, uniform colored objects can play the role of dark energy providing the late-time acceleration. In addition, we investigate scalar perturbations of the FLRW metric due to inhomogeneities of dustlike matter as well as fluctuations of QNs. The nonrelativistic gravitational potential is determined by the distribution of inhomogeneities of both dustlike matter and QNs. Consequently, QNs can have an influence on the galaxy rotation curves, replacing (at least partially) the dark matter for the solution of the corresponding problem of their flatness.
        Speaker: Maxim Eingorn (urn:Facebook)
    • 14:30 16:00
      Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries HS21

      HS21

      • 14:30
        Searches for low mass dark bosons 15m
        Many models extending the SM to account for dark matter or explain inflation predict the existence of O(1) GeV mass particles with long lifetimes. LHCb's detection capabilities for detached vertices are exploited to search for particles decaying to muon pairs. New results are presented.
        Speaker: Andrea Mauri (UZH)
      • 14:45
        Search for the dark photon in $\pi^0$ decays 15m
        A sample of 17 million fully reconstructed $\pi^0$ Dalitz decays produced in charged kaon decays in flight collected by the NA48/2 experiment at CERN in 2003-04 is analysed to search for the dark photon ($A$) via the decay chain $\pi^0 \rightarrow \gamma A$, $A \rightarrow e^+ e^-$. No dark photon signal is observed, and the most stringent limits on the dark photon mixing parameter in the mass range 9-70 MeV are established. Limitations of the method and possible future directions are discussed.
        Speaker: Riccardo Fantechi
      • 15:00
        Measurements of CP violation in $B^0_{d/s}$ mixing through $B \to J/\Psi X$ decays 20m
        B mesons provides an ideal laboratory for measurements of CP violation and searches for CPV beyond the Standard Model. Recent measurements of the mixing phases of the $B_s$ and $B_d$ mesons, $\phi_s$ and $\sin{2 \beta}$, using decays to $J\Psi$X final states are presented. In view of future improved measurements, a good understanding of pollution from sub-leading penguin topologies in these decays is needed. Those can be probed using suppressed decays like $B_s \to J/\Psi K_S$ and $B_s \to J/\Psi K^*$. Recent results on these decay modes are presented.
        Speaker: Greig Cowan (University of Edinburgh (GB))
      • 15:20
        Phi_s and Delta Gamma_s measurement in B->J/psi Phi using CMS data 15m
        The study of CP violation in the decay channel Bs->Jpsi Phi is very important to explore physics beyond Standard Model in the quark flavour sector. The measurements of Phi_s and the decay width difference (Delta Gamma_s) are key parameters to look for BSM physics. We will report the recent results on these parameters using the 20 fb-1 data set collected in 2012.
        Speaker: Paula Eerola (Dept of Physical Sciences, Univ. of Helsinki)
      • 15:35
        New physics searches with heavy flavour observables at ATLAS 15m
        The large amount of Heavy Flavour data collected by the ATLAS experiment is potentially sensitive to New Physics, which may be found in the mixing of B meson states, or through processes that are naturally suppressed in the Standard Model. We present the new results on the measurement of the decay of the Bs into J/psi phi based on full data collected in LHC Run-1 and with updated flavour tagging techniques improving the accuracy in the CP-violating phase phi_s. We also present the measurement of the decay time difference in the Bd system. ATLAS Run-1 results on the search for the rare decay Bs (B0)->mu+mu- are presented as well as results on the angular distribution parameters AFB and FL describing the decay Bd -> K*mu+mu- -> K+pi-mu+mu-.
        Speaker: Cristiano Alpigiani (University of Washington, Seattle)
    • 14:30 16:05
      Heavy Ion Physics HS42

      HS42

      • 14:30
        Inclusive and Semi-Inclusive Jet measurements in Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt(s_{NN})$ = 200 GeV at STAR 20m
        Jets represent an important tool to explore the properties of the hot and dense nuclear matter created in heavy-ion collisions. However, their reconstruction presents a challenging task due to the extremely large and fluctuating background that overwhelm the true hard jet population. We present recent measurements of charged jets in Au+Au collisions, by the STAR collaboration at RHIC, where the background is suppressed via a new technique based on event mixing and via a cut on leading hadron transverse momentum. The measured observables are the inclusive jet yield and the semi-inclusive yield of recoil jets from a high pT hadron trigger. These jet measurements allow a direct comparison of jet quenching at RHIC and the LHC and provide new constraints on theoretical calculations of jet quenching.
        Speaker: Jan Rusnak (Nuclear Physics Institute Prague)
      • 14:50
        Jet results in heavy ion collisions with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC 25m
        In relativistic collisions of heavy ions, a hot medium with a high density of unscreened color charges is produced, and jets propagating through this medium are known to suffer energy loss. This results in several distinct effects seen in central heavy ion collisions: the yield of inclusive jets measured via the nuclear modification factor is observed to be strongly suppressed; the yield of events with highly asymmetric dijet pairs is observed to be increased; the jet fragmentation is modified. In proton-lead collisions, the production of hard processes is expected to be modified via a modification of nuclear parton distribution functions. While the theory predicts rather small effects to be observed, the data show interesting unexpected features: the nuclear modification factor exhibits a strong centrality dependence; charged particle spectra show an enhancement at large transverse momenta with respect to the proton-proton reference. In this talk, we will summarize the most recent results by ATLAS involving these striking phenomena.
        Speaker: Dennis Vadimovich Perepelitsa (Brookhaven National Laboratory (US))
      • 15:15
        Jet results in heavy ions with CMS 25m
        Collisions of high-energy nuclei create the hottest and densest matter ever produced in laboratory, and it is a ground for studies of QCD in extreme conditions. When compared to collisions of protons, the contrasts of the jets and hadrons observed in PbPb collisions provide signatures of phenomena that appear in such conditions. One such phenomenon is called ‘jet quenching’ which refers to the energy loss of high-momentum partons in dense medium, exhibiting itself in modified jet and hadron cross-sections and correlations. CMS has attained a set of measurements that paint a multidimensional picture of this effect, and has further improved this understanding by adding in the studies of initial-state nuclear effects through studies of pPb collisions. This talk will present selected recent jet results from the CMS heavy-ion program.
        Speaker: Yue Shi Lai (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (US))
      • 15:40
        Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles and identified hadrons in p-Pb collisions at the LHC 25m
        Recent results on particle production in p--Pb collisions at the LHC exhibit features that are similar to those observed in Pb-Pb collisions. This indicates that final-state collective effects might also be present in small collision systems. In order to quantify the effects, the transverse momentum spectra (pT) of charged particles, identified hadrons and jets measured in different multiplicity/centrality intervals in p-Pb collisions at sqrt(sNN)=5.02 TeV are compared with results from pp and Pb-Pb collisions, all measured in the ALICE experiment. The obtained results are compared with theoretical models. Charged-particle tracks are reconstructed at mid-rapidity over a large momentum range 0.15 < pT < 50 GeV/c. Light-flavor hadrons and resonances are identified in the broad momentum range from 0.15 GeV/c up to 15 GeV/c using several particle identification techniques. Jets are reconstructed at mid-rapidity in the momentum range 20 < pT < 120 GeV/c by the anti-kT algorithm with resolution parameter R=0.2--0.4.
        Speakers: Jacek Tomasz Otwinowski (Polish Academy of Sciences (PL)) , Jacek Tomasz Otwinowski (Polish Academy of Sciences (PL))
    • 14:30 16:00
      Higgs and New Physics Großer Festsaal

      Großer Festsaal

      • 14:30
        Prospects for SUSY discovery after the LHC Run 1 12m
        We present the prospects for SUSY searches after Run 1 of the LHC, based on a global fit in the phenomenological MSSM with 10 parameters (pMSSM10). Particular care has been taken regarding the implementation of the most important limits obtained from the SUSY searches at Run 1 of the LHC. The information from the observed Higgs signal, limits from Higgs searches, as well as constraints from electroweak precision data, flavour physics, cosmological data and direct searches for dark matter are also taken into account. The best-fit region indicates good prospects for SUSY searches at the upcoming Run 2 of the LHC and at a future $e^+e^-$ colliders. The talk will be based on arXiv:1504.03260 and updates thereof. This talk is submitted on behalf of the MasterCode collaboration. It is not clear yet who will actually give the talk.
        Speaker: Emanuele Angelo Bagnaschi (DESY Hamburg)
      • 14:45
        Searches for squarks and gluinos in ATLAS and CMS 12m
        Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS and CMS results on inclusive searches for promptly decaying supersymmetric squarks and gluinos in events containing jets, missing transverse momentum with and without light leptons. The results presented utilise 20/fb of 8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC, and prospects for 13 TeV Run-2 data are also included.
        Speaker: Teng Jian Khoo (University of Cambridge (GB))
      • 15:00
        Searches for 3rd generation SUSY partners in ATLAS and CMS 12m
        Naturalness arguments for weak-scale supersymmetry favour supersymmetric partners of the third generation quarks with masses not too far from those of their Standard Model counterparts. Top or bottom squarks with masses of a few hundred GeV can also give rise to large direct pair production rates at the LHC. The talk presents recent ATLAS and CMS results from searches for direct stop and sbottom pair production, using 20/fb of 8 TeV pp collision data, and prospects for 13 TeV Run-2 data are also included.
        Speaker: Martin Tripiana (IFAE (ES))
      • 15:15
        SUSY searches with leptons, photons and taus in ATLAS and CMS 12m
        The talk presents searches for the prompt decay of supersymmetric particles in events containing leptons, photons or taus and large transverse missing momentum, performed by the ATLAS and CMS experiment. The final states considered are particularly motivated in gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking models with a light gravitino as the lightest supersymmetric particle.
        Speaker: Cristina Botta (CERN)
      • 15:30
        Searches for R-Parity Violating SUSY at ATLAS and CMS 12m
        The violation of R-parity allows new signatures to be pursued in the search for supersymmetry at the LHC. This talk presents the latest results from the ATLAS and CMS experiment using 20/fb of pp LHC collision data of searches for R-parity violating SUSY scenarios with baryon and lepton number violation. The results presented are for dedicated searches for resonances, as well as a systematic analysis of the constraints placed on R-parity violating models with lepton flavour violation, and in terms of production of squarks, gluinos, charginos, neutralinos, and sleptons within R-parity violating SUSY models.
        Speaker: David Michael Morse (Northeastern University (US))
      • 15:45
        Compressed and long-lived SUSY searches at ATLAS and CMS 12m
        This talk presents searches for SUSY models that require specific analysis techniques, such as in the case of compressed scenarios. The talk presents recent results from such searches performed with the ATLAS and CMS detector.
        Speaker: Nick Barlow (University of Cambridge (GB))
    • 14:30 16:00
      Neutrino Physics HS7

      HS7

      • 14:30
        Status of Light Sterile Neutrinos 15m
        I review the experimental indications in favor of short-baseline neutrino oscillations. I discuss their interpretation in the framework of neutrino mixing schemes with one or more sterile neutrinos which have masses around the eV scale. I present arguments in favor of 3+1 neutrino mixing with one sterile neutrino at the eV scale. I discuss the implications for neutrinoless double-beta decay and cosmology.
        Speaker: Carlo Giunti (INFN - National Institute for Nuclear Physics)
      • 14:45
        Search for sterile neutrinos at Long Baselines 15m
        The OPERA experiment has observed muon neutrino to tau neutrino oscillations in the atmospheric sector. Based on this result new limits on the mixing parameters of a massive sterile neutrino have been set. In this talk the analysis performed in the 3+1 neutrino model is presented. The status of the searches for sterile neutrinos performed on LBL experiments is also recalled and perspectives discussed.
        Speaker: Luca Stanco (Universita e INFN, Padova (IT))
      • 15:00
        STEREO: search for a sterile neutrino at the ILL Grenoble reactor 15m
        Interest in light sterile neutrinos has been recently revived by the so-called Gallium and reactor neutrino anomalies. In both of them, a deficit of detected neutrinos was observed with respect to the expectations. Both anomalies could be explained by the oscillations of a sterile neutrino introducing an additional $\Delta m^2$ around 1 eV$^2$. Such oscillations should cause a tell-tale distortion of the neutrino energy spectrum, with the known L/E dependence of neutrino oscillations. The STEREO experiment has been designed to exploit such a signature at short baselines, thus confirming or refuting the $\Delta m^2 \simeq$ 1 eV$^2$ sterile neutrino hypothesis. The STEREO detector consists of six optically separated cells filled with Gd-loaded liquid scintillator, where reactor anti-neutrinos are detected through their inverse beta decay, surrounded by an external blanket of non-loaded liquid scintillator. The experiment will be placed in early 2016 at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) at Grenoble, next to one of the most compact nuclear reactors in operation, with detector commissioning and data taking starting soon afterwards. We present the experiment design, which has been finalised, its sensitivity, and the status of its preparation.
        Speaker: Pablo del Amo Sanchez (LAPP-IN2P3-CNRS / Université Savoie Mont Blanc)
      • 15:15
        First results of the deployment of a SoLid detector module at the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor 15m
        The SoLid experiment intends to search for active-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillation at very short baseline of the SCK•CEN BR2 research reactor and provide a precise measurement of a high enriched Uranium core, a key ingredient in the calculation of reactor antineutrino flux. It utilises a novel approach to anti-neutrino detection based on a highly segmented detector design. High experimental sensitivity can be achieved using a combination of high granularity, high neutron-gamma discrimination using 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) and precise localisation of the Inverse Beta Decay products. This relatively compact detector system requires limited passive shielding as it rely on spatial topology to determine the different class of backgrounds. We will describe the principle of detection, detector design with a focus on the performance of the first full scale SoLid module (SM1) that was deployed successfully at BR2 in November 2014. We will conclude on the physics reach of the next phase that will start in the second half of 2016.
        Speaker: Nick Ryder (University of Oxford (GB))
      • 15:30
        SOX : Short Distance Neutrino Oscillations with Borexino 15m
        The Borexino detector has convincingly shown its outstanding performances in the low energy regime through its accomplishments in the solar and geo neutrinos detection. These performances make it the ideal tool to accomplish a state-of-the-art, source based experiment able to test the long-standing issue of the existence of a sterile neutrino, as suggested by the several anomalous results accumulated over the past two decades, i.e. the outputs of the LSND and Miniboone experiments, the results of the source calibration of the two Gallium experiments, and the recently hinted reactor anomaly. The SOX project can exploit two sources, based on Chromium and Cerium, respectively, which deployed under the experiment, in a location foreseen on purpose at the time of the construction of the detector, will emit two intense beams of neutrinos (Cr) and anti-neutrinos (Ce). Interacting in the active volume of the liquid scintillator, each beam would create an unmistakable spatial wave pattern in case of oscillation of the nu-e (or anti nu-e) into the sterile state: such a pattern would be the smoking gun proving the presence of the new sterile member of the neutrino family. Otherwise, its absence will allow setting very stringent limit on the existence of the hypothesized sterile state. The talk will outline the project, discuss the sensitivity of both Cerium and Chromium measurements and update about the status of the realization of the first planned measurement based on Cerium.
        Speaker: Dr. Matteo Agostini (Technische Universität München & Gran Sasso Science Institute)
      • 15:45
        nuMSM: the model, its predictions and experimental tests 15m
        Supplemented with three right-handed sterile neutrinos the Standard Model can explain neutrino oscillations (active neutrino masses via seesaw type-I mechanism), baryon asymmetry of the Universe (via leptogenesis by sterile-active neutrino oscillations in the primordial plasma) and dark matter phenomenon (by a population of the lightest sufficiently long-lived sterile neutrino). This seems to be the minimal extension of the SM capable of addressing all the major phenomenological issues we have. The lightest sterile neutrino (the dark matter candidate) mass is in 1-50 keV range and the mass scale of the heavier two sterile neutrinos is 0.1-50 GeV. The model predictions for neutrino physics (e.g. low neutrinoless double beta decay rate), particle physics (direct production and decay of heavy sterile neutrinos at beam-dump experiments like SHiP and colliders like ee-FCC) and astophysics (cosmic X-rays due to dark matter sterile neutrino radiative decay) can be tested at the ongoing and future experiments.
        Speakers: Dmitry Gorbunov (Russian Academy of Sciences (RU)) , Dmitry Gorbunov (Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences / Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology)
    • 14:30 16:00
      QCD and Hadronic Physics HS32

      HS32

      • 14:30
        Colour Reconnection - Models and Tests 15m
        Recent progress on colour reconnection within the PYTHIA framework is presented. A new model is introduced, based on the SU(3) structure of QCD and a minimization of the potential string energy. The inclusion of the epsilon structure of SU(3) gives a new baryon production mechanism and makes it possible simultaneously to describe hyperon production at both ee and pp colliders. Further comparisons with soft QCD measurements are also presented, as well as a study of the effects on the top mass uncertainty. Here additional toy models are also considered. Finally, predictions for ee colliders, both past and potential future ones, are presented.
        Speaker: Jesper Roy Christiansen (Lund University (SE))
      • 14:45
        Measurement of observables sensitive to coherence effects in hadronic Z decays with the OPAL detector at LEP 15m
        A study of QCD coherence is presented based on a sample of about 397.000 e$^+$e$^-$ hadronic annihilation events collected at $\sqrt{s}=91$ GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The study is based on four recently proposed observables that are sensitive to coherence effects in the perturbative regime. The measurement of these observables is presented, along with a comparison with the predictions of different parton shower models. The models include both conventional parton shower models and dipole antenna models. Different ordering variables are used to investigate their influence on the predictions.
        Speakers: Nadine Fischer (KIT - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (DE)) , Peter Skands (Monash University (AU)) , Simon Plaetzer (ITP, Universitaet Karlsruhe) , Stefan Gieseke , Stefan Kluth (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (D)
      • 15:00
        Measurements of particle production, Bose-Einstein correlations and Underlying Event properties with the ATLAS detector 15m
        The ATLAS collaboration has carried out several measurements of particle production properties and correlations at different pp collisions centre-of-mass energies. The production properties of mesons and baryons at sqrt(s)=7 TeV are presented and compared to predictions. The effects of space-time geometry in the hadronization phase has been studied in the context of Bose-Einstein correlations between charged particles, for determining the size and shape of the source from which particles are emitted and for interpreting of quark confinement effects. Bose-Einstein correlation parameters are investigated in p-p collisions at 900 GeV and 7 TeV, up to very high charged-particle multiplicities. In addition, particle distributions sensitive to the underlying event in proton-proton collisions have also been measured at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy in different final-state processes.
        Speaker: Thorsten Kuhl (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Campus Zeuthen (DE))
      • 15:15
        Small-x QCD and forward physics results from CMS 15m
        The CMS Collaboration has a comprehensive program of small-x QCD and forward physics measurements, which is supported by an excellent experimental coverage into the very forward phase space. Some of the highlights in terms of testing QCD at low-pt and at high pseudorapidities with jets and charged particles are summarized. Also extremely rare processes, as the measurement of exclusive W-pair production in photon-photon collisions in pp data are discussed. The range of physics results is complemented with studies of diffractive collisions, as well as of multi-parton interaction and soft-QCD phenomena. The measurement of the underlying event at different center-of-mass energies is another core result that will be presented. An outlook to the prospects at 13 TeV is given.
        Speaker: Gabor Veres (CERN)
      • 15:30
        Charged-particle multiplicities at different pp interaction centre-of-mass energies measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC 15m
        Measurements are presented from proton-proton collisions at different centre-of-mass energies in the range of 0.9 to 13 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The charged-particle multiplicity, its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity, and the relationship between the mean transverse momentum and charged-particle multiplicity are measured. The results are corrected for detector effects and are presented at the particle-level. The results are compared to various Monte Carlo event generator models.
        Speaker: Anthony Morley (University of Sydney (AU))
      • 15:45
        Testing QCD with CMS using jets and diffraction 15m
        Several measurements of jet final states are presented performed at different center-of-mass energies and down to very low pt. The simultaneous observation of several jets in the same event is exploited to study for example the angular correlations of Mueller Navelet jet topologies in order to search for the signature of BFKL parton dynamics. But multi-jet measurements are also used to test higher-order QCD effects, and by lowering the jet pt to the smallest possible values the minijet production close to the factorization limit is studied. Futhermore, diffractive final states are studied identified either by the presence of rapidity gaps or the general feature of central exclusive production. The single- and double-diffractive cross section,. jet-gap-jet events as well as exclusive pi+pi- production are presented.
        Speaker: Hans Van Haevermaet (University of Antwerp (BE))
    • 14:30 16:00
      Top and Electroweak Physics HS31

      HS31

      • 14:30
        Measurement of t-channel single top quark production in pp collisions 18m
        Measurements are presented of t-channel single top quark production in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 !TeV, using data collected with the CMS experiment during the years 2011 and 2012. The analyses consider decay channels where the W from the top decays into electron-neutrino or muon-neutrino, and makes use of kinematic characteristics of electroweak single top production for the separation of signal from backgrounds using multivariate methods. The results are compared with the most precise standard model theory predictions. Measurements of top/antitop cross section ratio and of various differential single top quark production cross sections are also presented.
        Speaker: Francesco Fabozzi (Universita e INFN, Napoli (IT))
      • 14:48
        Measurement of single top production in the tW-channel and search for s-channel in pp collisions 18m
        Measurements of single top quark production in the tW-channel in pp collisions are presented. In the tW-channel a top quark is produced in association with a W boson. The data were collected in the years 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 !TeV. The experimental signature is similar to top pair production, and there is interference at higher orders between the two processes. The measurements are perfomed using final states in which the associated W boson as well as the one originating from the top quark decay leptonically. Multivariate methods are used to extract the cross section. The result is compared with current standard model theory predictions. Furthermore, a search for s-channel single top production at 8 TeV is presented.
        Speaker: Mario Merola (Universita e INFN, Napoli (IT))
      • 15:06
        Tevatron combined single top production cross sections 18m
        We present measurements of the cross sections for the two main production modes of single top quarks in ppbar collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV in the Run II data collected with the CDF and D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. For this measurement the full data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ per experiment is used. We report the first observation of single top quark production in the s-channel with a significance of 6.3 standard deviations. We also present a simultaneous measurement of the production cross section of t- and s+t-channels. Using these measurements we set a lower limit on the CKM matrix element |Vtb| > 0.92 at 95% C.L., assuming mt = 172.5 GeV.
        Speaker: Manfredi Ronzani (Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg (DE))
      • 15:24
        Measurement of ttbar production cross section 18m
        We present the most recent measurements of the cross section for pair and single production of the top quark with the D0 detector at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. Measurements use the full D0 Run II data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb^-1. We also discuss the measurements of differential cross section distributions of top quark pairs in the lepton plus jets channel.
        Speaker: Reinhild Peters (University of Manchester (GB))
      • 15:42
        Top-quark pair production at hadron colliders: differential cross section and phenomenological applications with DiffTop 18m
        The results of phenomenological studies of top-quark pair production in proton-proton collisions are presented. Differential cross sections are calculated in perturbative QCD at approximate next-to-next-to-leading order ($\alpha_s^4$) by using methods of threshold resummation beyond the leading logarithmic accuracy. Predictions for the single-particle inclusive kinematics are presented for transverse momentum and rapidity distributions of final-state top quarks. Uncertainties related to the description of proton structure, top-quark mass and strong coupling constant are investigated in detail. The results are compared to the recent measurements by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the LHC at the center of mass energy of 7 TeV. The calculation presented here is implemented in the computer code Difftop and can be applied to the general case of heavy-quark pair production at hadron-hadron colliders. For the first time, a fit of parton distribution functions at NNLO is performed by using the differential cross sections of top-quark pair production together with other data sets. The impact of the top-pair production on the precision of the gluon distribution at high scales is illustrated.
        Speaker: Katerina Lipka (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee Break 30m Arcades

      Arcades

    • 16:30 18:30
      Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology, Gravitation HS33

      HS33

      • 16:30
        The Dark Energy Survey: Status and First Science Results 15m
        The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a next-generation large galaxy survey designed to study the origin of the accelerating Universe and the nature of dark energy. These goals are to be achieved through combination of four distinct probes: baryon acoustic oscillations, abundance and spatial distribution of clusters, weak gravitational lensing, and Type Ia supernovae. The main instrument of the survey is DECam - a state-of-the-art 570 mega-pixel CCD camera, with a large, 3 sq. deg. field of view, built by the DES Collaboration and installed at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4-meter telescope in CTIO, Chile. Over the period of five years, DECam will survey 5000 sq. deg. of the southern sky with unprecedented depth, measuring positions, redshift and shape of almost 300 million galaxies, as well as thousands of clusters and supernovae. Here are presented the status and some of the first DES science results, such as the discovery of new Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies and the mapping of the dark matter distribution across large areas of the sky.
        Speaker: Jelena Aleksic (IFAE)
      • 16:45
        Investigating Dark Energy and Gravitation at cosmological scales 15m
        The acceleration of the expansion of the universe is now a well demonstrated feature of the universe which is almost impossible to bypassed. This leads to a very surprising question: why is gravity repulsive on large scales. By now, it is fair to say that we have no hint about the very reason for the origin of this phenomena (named hereafter dark energy) which can be regarded as one of the major surprises in modern physics. Tightening down the properties of dark energy is therefore a major objective of modern science in order to clarify its very nature. The simplest model of dark energy is a cosmological constant, as introduced by Einstein, equivalent to a (quantum) vacuum contribution to the energy budget of the universe. Alternative options are on one side the existence of a scalar field minimally coupled, named quintessence or with more complexity and on the other side the possibility that gravity is actually not driven by general relativity (GR) but by some modified gravity, which behaves like GR on small scales, but would be different on large scale. Possible test of such theories relies mainly on the behavior of gravity on large scales, beyond galactic scales. These scales are precisely the target of ongoing projects dedicated to dark energy investigation like the ESA space mission EUCLID. Several probes used in combination will allow to constrain dark energy properties with a high accuracy, allowing to test the theory of general relativity on cosmological scales.
        Speaker: Alain Blanchard (IRAP)
      • 17:00
        Holographic reconstruction of scalar field models of dark energy in the background of Brans Dicke cosmology 15m
        Motivated by the work of Yang et al., *Mod. Phys. Lett. A*, **26**, 191 (2011), the present paper reports a study on reconstruction of scalar field dark energy models, namely, quintessence, DBI-essence and tachyon in the framework of chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology. Firstly, we have reconstructed the Hubble parameter and consequently the density of the new holographic dark energy $\rho_D=\frac{3\phi^2}{4\omega}(\mu H^2+\nu \dot{H})$ in chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology. We have tested the weak and strong energy conditions for this reconstruction. Afterwards, considering a correspondence between the reconstructed new holographic dark energy and the said scalar field models we have reconstructed the corresponding potentials and scalar fields.
        Speaker: Dr. Surajit Chattopadhyay (Pailan College of Management and Technology, Kolkata)
      • 17:15
        Dynamically Induced Planck Scale and Inflation 15m
        We present a minimal model of inflation where the Planck scale is dynamically generated from dimensionless interactions. The inflaton field $\phi$ gets a vacuum expectation value via dimensional transmutation. The Planck scale is generated via its non-minimal coupling to gravity $\xi\phi^2 R$. To generate the minimum of the inflaton potential, one needs a singlet scalar and new fermion(s) which can provide a dark matter candidate. The spectral index is predicted to be $n_s \approx 0.96$. The tensor-to-scalar ratio can vary from $r \approx 0.13$ down to $r \approx 0.04$ in presence of large couplings or $r \approx 0.003$ if the Lagrangian contains an $R^2$ term, interpolating between the quadratic and Starobinsky inflation. These theories relate the smallness of the weak scale to the smallness of inflationary perturbations: both arise naturally because of small couplings, implying a reheating temperature of $10^{7-9}$ GeV. A measurement of $r$ by Keck/Bicep3 would give us information on quantum gravity in the dimensionless scenario.
        Speaker: Kristjan Kannike (Nat. Inst. of Chem.Phys. & Biophys. (EE))
      • 17:30
        On the smallness of the cosmological constant in SUGRA models with Planck scale SUSY breaking and degenerate vacua 15m
        In $N=1$ supergravity (SUGRA) supersymmetric (SUSY) and non-supersymmetric Minkowski vacua originating in the hidden sector can be degenerate. This allows for consistent implementation of the multiple point principle (MPP) assumption. We present no--scale inspired SUGRA model where the MPP assumption is realised at the tree--level without extra fine-tuning. In the supersymmetric phase in flat Minkowski space SUSY may be broken dynamically inducing tiny vacuum energy density which can be assigned, by virtue of MPP, to all other phases including the one in which we live. We argue that the measured value of the cosmological constant, as well as the small values of quartic Higgs self--coupling and the corresponding beta function at the Planck scale, which can be obtained by extrapolating the Standard Model (SM) couplings to high energies, can originate from supergravity (SUGRA) models with degenerate vacua. This scenario is realised if there are at least three exactly degenerate vacua. In the first vacuum, associated with the physical one, local supersymmetry (SUSY) is broken near the Planck scale while the breakdown of the $SU(2)_W\times U(1)_Y$ symmetry takes place at the electroweak (EW) scale. In the second vacuum local SUSY breaking is induced by gaugino condensation at a scale which is just slightly lower than $\Lambda_{QCD}$ in the physical vacuum. Finally, in the third vacuum local SUSY and EW symmetry are broken near the Planck scale.
        Speaker: Dr. Roman Nevzorov (University of Adelaide & ITEP)
    • 16:30 18:00
      Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries HS21

      HS21

      • 16:30
        The Precision of the CKM Angles $\beta$ and $\beta_s$ 15m
        The CKM angle $\beta$ ($\beta_s$) is one of the key $CP$-violation parameters in the SM. It is best determined by the mixing-induced $CP$ asymmetry in the decay $B_d\to J/\psi K_S$ ($B_s \to J/\psi \phi$). However, the theoretical precision of this determination has been under discussion for a long time and the estimated uncertainties ranged from negligible to sizable. The possible corrections are due to penguin diagrams that are suppressed parametrically by CKM elements. Nonetheless, QCD long-distance effects may enhance these corrections considerably. In the past, mostly data-driven methods that exploit the $SU(3)$ flavor symmetry have been used to estimate the theoretical corrections. In contrast, we present a genuine first-principles calculation of the penguin pollution. Our approach is based on an operator product expansion (OPE) that exploits the heaviness of charmonia. We show that it is possible to separate long and short-distance effects in decays of $B$ mesons to charmonia. With our simplified Hamiltonian the number of non-perturbative matrix elements is small at leading order in the OPE, we then use $1/N_c$ counting to order these matrix elements. We conclude with predictions for the theoretical precision of $\beta$ and $\beta_s$ and the $CP$ violation observables $C_f$ and $S_f$ for various final states $f$ that consist of a charmonium and a light meson e.g. $J/\psi \pi^0,$ $J/\psi K_S,$ $J/\psi \rho$, or $J/\psi \phi$.
        Speaker: Philipp Frings (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology)
      • 16:45
        Precision measurement of Δmd using semi-leptonic decays at LHCb 15m
        The Bd meson oscillation frequency sets strong contraints on the CKM matrix. A precision measurement using semileptonic decays is presented.
        Speaker: Basem Khanji (Universita & INFN, Milano-Bicocca (IT))
      • 17:00
        Re-examining $\sin 2 \beta$ and $\Delta m_d$ from evolution of $B^0_d$ mesons with decoherence 15m
        In the time evolution of neutral meson systems, a perfect quantum coherence is usually assumed. The important quantities of the $B^0_d$ system, such as $\sin 2 \beta$ and $\Delta m_d$, are determined under this assumption. However, the meson system interacts with its environment. This interaction can lead to decoherence in the entangled mesons even before they decay. In our formalism this decoherence is modelled by a single parameter $\lambda$. It is desirable to re-examine the procedures of determination of $\sin 2 \beta$ and $\Delta m_d$ in meson systems with decoherence. We find that the present values of these two quantities are modulated by $\lambda$. Re-analysis of $B^0_d$ data from B-factories and LHCb can lead to a clean determination of $\lambda$, $\sin 2 \beta$ and $\Delta m_d$.
        Speaker: Prof. Sankagiri Umasankar (Indian Institute of Technology Bombay)
      • 17:15
        Study of CP asymmetry in B0-B0bar mixing using inclusive dilepton samples obtained with the BABAR detector 15m
        The asymmetry between same sign inclusive dilepton samples (l^+l^+ and l^-l^-) from semileptonic B decays in Upsilon(4S) -> B0 B0bar events allows us to compare the B0 mixing probabilities P(B0bar -> B0) and P(B0 -> B0bar), and hence to test T and CP invariance. We present a measurement of CP asymmetry in inclusive dilepton samples using the full BABAR dataset near the Upsilon(4S) resonance, which corresponds to 471 million BBbar pairs.
        Speaker: Tomonari Miyashita (Caltech)
      • 17:30
        Observation of CP violation in B0->D_CP($\star$)h0 decays in a combined analysis using BABAR and Belle data 15m
        We report on a time-dependent CP violation measurement of B0->D_CP($\star$)h0 decays, where the light neutral hadron h0 is a pi0, eta, or omega meson, and the neutral D meson is reconstructed in decays to two-body CP eigenstates K+ K-, K_S pi0, or K_S omega. The measurement is performed by combining the final data samples of 471 million BBbar pairs collected by the BABAR experiment and 772 million BBbar pairs collected by the Belle experiment. A first observation of CP violation in B0->D_CP(*)h0 decays governed by mixing-induced CP violation in terms of sin(2beta) [sin(2phi_1)] is presented.
        Speaker: Markus Roehrken (California Institute of Technology)
      • 17:45
        Search for Violation of CPT and Lorentz invariance in $B_s^0$ meson oscillations 15m
        We present the first search for exclusive CPT-violating effects in the mixing of $B_s^0$ mesons using the full Run II data set with an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-antiproton collisions collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We find no evidence for the CPT-violating effects tested and place limits on CPT- and Lorentz-invariance violating coupling coefficients, $\Delta a_\mu$.
        Speaker: Iain Bertram (Lancaster University)
    • 16:30 18:00
      Heavy Ion Physics HS42

      HS42

      • 16:30
        Flow and correlations results from CMS 20m
        The observation of long-range two-particle correlations in high energy heavy ion collisions opens the opportunities of exploring novel QCD dynamics in quark gluon plasma (QGP), the hot dense matter created in heavy ion collisions. In particular, such correlations are sensitive to the degree of thermalization in the system. We present selected results from non-identified and identified two-particle and multi-particle correlations in PbPb collisions, as well as in lighter systems.
        Speaker: Damir Devetak (University of Belgrade (RS))
      • 16:50
        Results on angular correlations with ALICE 20m
        Angular correlations of two and more particles are a sensitive probe of the transport properties of the system produced in heavy-ion collisions. In pp and p-Pb collisions, recent results revealed intriguing long-range correlation structures reminiscent of features observed in heavy-ion collisions. We will show recent results from the analysis of two-particle correlations in pp, p-Pb, and Pb-Pb collisions in ALICE. New results involving forward detectors address the question if these long-range correlation structures persist at large rapidities. The talk will discuss what can be learned about the physics processes occurring in small systems and in particular the question if evidence for collective effects exists.
        Speaker: Dr. Jan Fiete Grosse-Oetringhaus (CERN)
      • 17:10
        Latest results from the NA61/SHINE beam energy scan with p+p and Be+Be collisions 20m
        The NA61/SHINE experiment aims to discover the critical point of strongly interacting matter and study the properties of the onset of deconfinement by measurements of hadron production properties in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions in the CERN SPS energy range. In this contribution results on the energy dependence of hadron spectra and yields as well as on fluctuations and two-particle correlations in p+p and centrality selected Be+Be collisions will be presented. In particular, the energy dependence of the signals of deconfinement, the "horn", "step" and "kink", in p+p interactions will be presented and compared with the corresponding results from central Pb+Pb collisions. Also string-hadronic models will be tested using hadron spectra and correlations measured in p+p interactions. Results on fluctuations (multiplicity and transverse momentum) will be shown as a function of the collision energy and number of wounded nucleons for Be+Be and p+p collisions in search for the critical point of strongly interacting matter.
        Speaker: Maja Katarzyna Mackowiak-Pawlowska (Warsaw University of Technology (PL))
      • 17:30
        Hadronic resonances as probes of the fireball evolution in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC 20m
        Hadronic resonances provide valuable observables for the properties of the hot and dense hadronic phase of the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions, since their lifetimes, of the order of few fm/c, are comparable to the time span between the chemical and kinetic freeze-outs, which characterize the latest stage of the fireball evolution. Re-scattering of decay products and regeneration via pseudo-elastic hadron scattering can alter their yields from the values that would be measured in elementary (pp) collisions and those that would be expected from statistical particle-production models. The relative strengths of re-scattering and regeneration, as well as the temperature and lifetime of the hadronic phase, can be studied through measurements of resonance yields and their ratios to the yields of long-lived hadrons. An overview of recent results on resonance production from the ALICE experiment is presented for pp, p-Pb, and Pb-Pb collisions and compared with results at lower energy from the STAR experiment and with statistical model predictions.
        Speaker: Dr. Enrico Fragiacomo (INFN, Trieste (IT))
    • 16:30 18:00
      Higgs and New Physics Großer Festsaal

      Großer Festsaal

      • 16:45
        Killing the CMSSM softly 12m
        The analysis of the data collected by the major LHC experiments during the LHC Run I has put strong constraints on supersymmetric models. We study the parameter space of the constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) in a global fit, taking into account the non-observation of supersymmetry at the LHC, Higgs mass and rate measurements, as well as several cosmological and low energy observables. Before the start of the LHC, global fits of the CMSSM showed a favourable goodness-of-fit and indicated a strong preference for the existence of light SUSY particles. This region now has largely been excluded by the LHC. We present the final results of our study of the status of the CMSSM after the LHC Run1, where for the first time we use toy experiments to determine the p-Value of the model. A special emphasis is given on the dependence of the p-value on the choice of the observable set in the fit, where especially the Higgs rate measurements play a crucial role, since they had the potential for sensitivity to the CMSSM, had the Higgs boson been lighter. We find that the CMSSM is softly getting near its exclusion at the 95% CL.
        Speaker: Matthias Hamer (CBPF - Brazilian Center for Physics Research (BR))
      • 17:00
        pMSSM combination of SUSY searches at the LHC 12m
        The results of supersymmetric searches at the LHC are typically presented in the context of simplified models, with a single specific production channel and decay mode for the supersymmetric particles. In full SUSY models, several production and decay channels are expected, and the limits on supersymmetric particle masses might be weaker. This talk presents the combination of the results from each of the ATLAS and CMS collaborations to place constraints on the 19-parameter phenomenological MSSM.
        Speaker: Alberto Cervelli (Universitaet Bern (CH))
      • 17:15
        $h^0(125GeV) \to c \bar{c}$ as a test case for quark flavor violation in the MSSM 12m
        We compute the decay width of $h^0 \to c \bar{c}$ in the MSSM with quark flavor violation (QFV) at full one-loop level in the $\overline{\rm DR}$ renormalization scheme. We study the effects of $\tilde{c}-\tilde{t}$ mixing, taking into account the constraints on QFV from the B meson data. We find that the full one-loop corrected decay width $\Gamma(h^0 \to c \bar{c})$ is very sensitive to the MSSM QFV parameters. In a scenario with large $\tilde{c}-\tilde{t}$ mixing, $\Gamma(h^0 \to c \bar{c})$ can differ up to $\sim \pm 35\%$ from its SM value. After estimating the uncertainties of the width, we conclude that an observation of these QFV SUSY effects is possible at a future $e^+ e^-$ collider such as ILC. (Published in Phys. Rev. D91 (2015) 015007 [arXiv:1411.2840 [hep-ph]])
        Speaker: Keisho Hidaka (Tokyo Gakugei University)
      • 17:30
        Discriminating between SUSY and Non-SUSY Higgs Sectors through the Ratio $H \to b \bar b / H \to \tau \bar \tau$ 13m
        The ratio of branching ratios R = BR($H \to b \bar b$)/BR($H \to \tau \bar \tau$) of Higgs boson decays is a powerful tool in order to distinguish the MSSM Higgs sector from non-supersymmetric two Higgs doublet models (2HDM). This ratio receives large renormalization-scheme independent radiative corrections in supersymmetric models at large $\tan\beta$, which are insensitive to the SUSY mass scale and absent in the Standard Model or 2HDM. Making use of the current LHC data and the upcoming new results on Higgs couplings to be reported by ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we develop a detailed and updated study of this ratio R which improves previous analyses and sets lower levels of accuracy to discriminate between models.
        Speaker: Ernesto Arganda (Universidad de Zaragoza)
      • 17:45
        LHC phenomenology of light pseudoscalars in the NMSSM 12m
        After the discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs boson, the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM), has become more interesting as a model for new physics since new tree-level contributions to the Higgs mass makes it easier to accommodate the relatively high measured value, as compared to the MSSM. One very distinctive feature of the NMSSM, is the possible existence of a light singlet-like pseudoscalar. As this pseudoscalar may be lighter than the discovered Higgs boson without conflict with data, it may lead to LHC signatures rather different to what is usually searched for in terms of new physics. We will discuss the channels in which light pseudoscalars may be discovered, focusing on cascade decays of heavier scalars as the direct production channels appear too difficult. It is demonstrated that heavier scalars decaying to pairs of pseudoscalars or pseudoscalars and Z bosons may lead to discovery in a large part of parameter space. This is especially important for the non-SM like of the two lightest scalars, as it may have a almost 100% branching ratio for decay into pairs of pseudoscalars. In such a case the discussed channels might be our only means of discovery, also for the scalar.
        Speaker: Nils-Erik Bomark
    • 16:30 18:00
      Neutrino Physics: neutrinos HS7

      HS7

      • 16:30
        Heavy neutrinos in particle physics and cosmology 15m
        Neutrinos are the only particles in the Standard Model of particle physics that have only been observed with left handed chirality to date. If right handed neutrinos exist, they would not only explain the observed neutrino oscillations, but could also be responsible for several phenomena in cosmology, including the baryon asymmetry of the universe, dark matter and dark radiation. A crucial parameter in this context is their mass, which in principle could lie anywhere between the eV scale and GUT scale. The implications for experiments and cosmology strongly depend on the choice of the mass scale. I review recent progress in the phenomenology of right handed neutrinos with different masses, focussing on scenarios where they lie at or below the TeV scale. I put special emphasis on the possibility to discover the heavy neutrinos that are responsible for leptogenesis in near future experiments, such as LHC, BELLE II and SHiP.
        Speaker: Marco Drewes (Technische Universitaet Muenchen (DE))
      • 16:45
        Searches for leptoquarks and heavy leptons with the ATLAS detector at the LHC 15m
        Leptoquarks are hypothetical particles predicted by extensions of the Standard Model, providing an explanation for the similarity between the quark and lepton sectors. Pair-produced scalar leptoquarks have been searched for using final states including leptons and jets. Similar final states are predicted in decays of heavy leptons/neutrinos including Type III neutral/charged leptons as well as heavy Majorana neutrinos produced in decays of heavy right-handed W or SM W boson. In this talk, recent ATLAS results on searches for Leptoquarks and heavy leptons with similar signatures using LHC Run 1 data are presented. First LHC Run-2 results will be included if available.
        Speaker: Sergio Grancagnolo (Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (DE))
      • 17:00
        Indirect searches for sterile neutrinos at a high-luminosity Z-factory 15m
        A future high-luminosity Z-factory will offer the possibility to study rare Z decays, as those leading to lepton flavour violating final states. Processes such as Z → l∓1 l±2 are potentially complementary to low-energy (high-intensity) observables of lepton flavour violation. We address the impact of new sterile fermions on lepton flavour violating Z decays, focusing on potential searches at FCC-ee (TLEP), and taking into account experimental and observational constraints on the sterile states. We consider a minimal extension of the Standard Model by one sterile fermion state, and one well-motivated framework of neutrino mass generation, the Inverse Seesaw embedded into the Standard Model. The results show that sterile neutrinos can give rise to contributions to BR(Z → l∓1 l±2 ) within reach of the FCC-ee. We also discuss the complementarity between a high-luminosity Z-factory and low-energy charged lepton flavour violation facilities.
        Speaker: Valentina De Romeri (CNRS)
      • 17:15
        Global fit to right-handed neutrino mixing at 1 loop 15m
        We extend the Standard Model with 3 right-handed neutrinos with an approximate lepton number symmetry, which leads to sizable neutrino mixing while generating the neutrino masses and PMNS matrix measured in oscillation experiments. Constraints on the right-handed neutrino mixing are derived through a global fit to electroweak precision observables. We analyze explicitly the impact of one-loop corrections on these constraints.
        Speaker: Mr. Josu Hernandez (IFT-CSIC)
      • 17:30
        Radiative Origin of Majorana Neutrino Masses 15m
        Majorana neutrino masses can originate either at the tree level (type-I, II or III seesaws) or can be radiatively induced. The latter option naturally requires order TeV BSM fields, thus leading to -in principle- testable neutrino mass generation mechanisms. Based on a two-loop systematic classification of the dimension five effective Weinberg operator, in this talk I will discuss the different realizations one can envisage for neutrino mass generation at the two-loop order.
        Speaker: Diego ARISTIZABAL (Universite de Liege)
      • 17:45
        Neutrino mass generation in connection with Dark Matter 15m
        We discuss some extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics that naturally generate small neutrino masses and provide a dark matter candidate. The symmetry that stabilizes the dark matter suppresses neutrino masses to appear first at higher order in perturbation theory (e.g. 2 or 3-loops). Without the need of very heavy new fields or right-handed neutrinos. In the talk we will discuss the impact of this approach on neutrinoless double beta decay experiments, neutrino mass matrix texture, flavor mixing angles and dark matter signal.
        Speaker: Dr. Maximiliano Rivera (Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria)
    • 16:30 18:00
      QCD and Hadronic Physics: QCD HS32

      HS32

      • 16:30
        Production of c cbar c cbar in single and double parton scattering in collinear and kt-factorization approaches 15m
        We present first results for the $2 \to 4$ single-parton scattering $g g \to c \bar c c \bar c$ subprocess for the first time fully within the $k_t$-factorization approach. In this calculation we have used the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin unintegrated gluon distribution which effectively includes some class of higher-order gluon emissions, and an off-shell matrix element squared calculated using recently developed techniques. The results are compared with our earlier result obtained within the collinear approach. Only slightly larger cross sections are obtained than in the case of the collinear approach. Inclusion of transverse momenta of gluons entering the hard process leads to a much stronger azimuthal decorrelation between $c c$ and $\bar c \bar c$ than in the collinear-factorization approach. A comparison to predictions of double parton scattering (DPS) results and the LHCb data strongly suggests that the assumption of two fully independent DPS ($g g \to c \bar c \otimes g g \to c \bar c$) may be too approximate. 1) A. van Hameren, R. Maciula and A. Szczurek, "Single-parton scattering versus double-parton scattering in the production of two $c \bar c$ pairs and charmed meson correlations at the LHC", Phys. Rev. D89 (2014) 094019. 2) A. van Hameren, R. Maciula and a. Szczurek, Production of two charm quark-antiquark pairs in single-parton scattering within the $k_t$-factorization approach, arXiv:1504.06491, submitted to Phys.Lett.B.
        Speakers: Antoni Szczurek (Institute of Nuclear Physics) , Rafal Maciula (Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN)
      • 16:45
        Study of fragmentation functions in e+e− annihilation process at Belle 15m
        The $e^+ e^−$ annihilation process provides an access to the fragmentation functions due to its clean environment. Using the high-statistics dataset accumulated by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+ e^−$ collider, we report the first measurements of the double differential cross section of identified di-hadrons (pions and kaons) with respect to the two hadron's fractional energies for any charge and hadron combinations. In addition, we also present an extraction of azimuthal correlation between two pairs of charged pions detected in opposite jets from $e^+ e^−$ annihilation.
        Speaker: Marko Bracko (Jozef Stefan Institute)
      • 17:00
        Measurements of the elastic, inelastic and total cross sections in pp collisions with ATLAS sub-detectors 15m
        The total pp cross section is a fundamental parameter of the strong interaction which cannot be calculated in QCD but still can be measured using the optical theorem, which states that the total cross section can be obtained from the extrapolation to t=0 of the differential elastic cross section measured at small four-momentum transfer t. The ATLAS Collaboration has collected 80 mub-1 of elastic data in a dedicated run with high beta* optics at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy with the ALFA Roman Pot detector in order to perform this measurement. From the extrapolation of the differential elastic cross section to t=0 using the optical theorem the total cross section is extracted with the luminosity-dependent method. In addition the nuclear slope of the elastic t-spectrum, the total elastic and inelastic cross sections are determined. First LHC Run-2 results will be included for the measurement of the inelastic pp cross-section using minimum bias scintillators, if available.
        Speaker: Per Grafstrom (Universita e INFN, Bologna (IT))
      • 17:15
        Data-driven approaches to pile-up subtraction at the LHC 15m
        Experiments in the upcoming high-luminosity runs at the LHC face the challenges of very large pile-up. Primary techniques to deal with this are based on vertexing by trackers. Outside the detector tracking acceptances, however, lie regions of much interest for a great many aspects of the LHC physics program. Treatments of pile-up in these regions rely more strongly on Monte Carlo simulations. Here, on the other hand, one is also approaching parts of the phase space in which the tuning of the Monte Carlo event generators becomes subject to increasingly large uncertainties. In this work we explore complementary approaches to pile-up corrections, with a view to developing data-driven techniques which treat pile-up and do not spoil the physics of the signal process. We present numerical illustrations of these approaches for a variety of processes, including Drell-Yan vector boson production, Drell-Yan plus jets, and associated underlying events.
        Speaker: Hans Van Haevermaet (University of Antwerp (BE))
      • 17:30
        Study of multiple parton interactions in diphoton plus dijet events and in double quarkonia production in pbar p interactions 15m
        We use a sample of diphoton + dijet events, as well as a sample of simultaneous production of two heavy quarkonia (two J/psi or J/psi and Upsilon) collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, to study properties of events with double parton scattering (DPS) in single p¯p collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. We measure the cross sections and extract the effective cross section of double parton interactions in proton-antiproton collisions. Multiple parton interactions are a major background for electroweak precision measurements and new phenomena searches at high energy hadron colliders. These studies provide important information on the parton spatial structure of the nucleon.
        Speaker: Don Lincoln (Fermilab)
      • 17:45
        Measurement of Double Parton Scattering at LHC with the CMS experiment 15m
        Double parton scattering is measured in different channels using the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. Data from pp collisions collected at 7 and 8 TeV center-of-mass energy are used. Several final states are investigated to identify and measure the signature of double parton scattering in inelastic events. Parameters are extracted from the data that are suited in an optimal way to distinguish double parton scattering from various backgrounds. Multivariate analysis techniques are exploited to maximise the sensitivity.
        Speaker: Ankita Mehta (Panjab University (IN))
    • 16:30 18:00
      Top and Electroweak Physics HS31

      HS31

      • 16:30
        Measurements of the top quark pair production cross section in pp collisions 18m
        Precision measurements are presented of the top-quark pair inclusive production cross section in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies of 7 !TeV and 8 !TeV. The data are collected with the CMS experiment during the years 2011 and 2012. The analyses include all top quark pair final states with the exception of events with two tau-leptons in the final state. In most analyses b-jet identification is used to increase the purity of the selection. The backgrounds are determined using data-driven techniques. The results are combined with each other and compared with theory predictions. Indirect constraints on both the top quark mass and alpha_s are obtained through their relation to the inclusive cross section.
        Speaker: Eleni Ntomari (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
      • 16:48
        Measurement of differential cross sections in top pair production in pp collisions 18m
        Differential top quark pair production cross sections are measured in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 !TeV, using data collected by the CMS experiment in the years 2011 and 2012. The differential cross sections are measured as functions of various kinematic observables, including the transverse momentum and rapidity of the (anti)top quark and the top-antitop system and the jets and leptons of the event final state. Multiplicity and kinematic distributions of the jets produced in addition to the top pair are investigated. First measurements of the associate production of top quark pairs with vector bosons and with additional b-quarks in the final state are also presented.
        Speaker: Ulrich Husemann (KIT - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (DE))
      • 17:06
        Top quark pair production measurements using the ATLAS detector at the LHC 18m
        Measurements of the inclusive and differential topquark pair and singletop production cross sections in protonproton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider are presented. The inclusive measurements reach high precision and are compared to the best available theoretical calculations. Differential measurements of the kinematic properties of the top quark production are also discussed. These measurements, including results using boosted tops, probe our understanding of top pair production in the TeV regime. The results, unfolded to particle and parton level, are compared to Monte Carlo generators implementing LO and NLO matrix elements matched with parton showers and NLO QCD calculations.
        Speaker: Dr. Marino Romano (INFN Bologna (IT))
      • 17:24
        Measurements of ttbar+X using the ATLAS detector 18m
        The large integrated luminosity provided by the LHC enables the production significant numbers of top quark pairs in association with addition jets or additional gauge bosons. The production crosssection of topquark pairs in association with jets originating from additional bquarks is presented. This process is an important background to searches for new physics and is compared to the available theoretical calculations. In addition, the production of top quark pairs in association with W and Z bosons is presented. The measurement uses events with multiple leptons and in particular probes the coupling between the top quark and the Z boson. Finally, the crosssection measurement of photons produced in association with top quark pairs is presented. The measurement uses a data driven technique to extract the signal from the background and achieves a significance of greater than 5 standard deviations.
        Speaker: Olga Bessidskaia Bylund (Stockholm University (SE))
      • 17:42
        t tbar + isolated photon production at NLO accuracy matched with parton shower 18m
        We simulate the hadroproduction of a t tbar pair in association with one or two isolated photons at the LHC using the PowHel program. The generated events are stored according to the Les-Houches event format and constitute an almost inclusive event sample (regarding the photons), so that usual experimental photon isolation can be employed. We interface those events to the PYTHIA shower Monte Carlo program, allowing for decays of massive particles, showering and hadronization, and present predictions for differential distributions at the hadron level.
        Speaker: Zoltan Laszlo Trocsanyi (University of Debrecen (HU))
    • 19:30 23:30
      Social Program I
      • 19:30
        Heurigen Reception 3h Winery Fuhrgassl-Huber, 1190 Wien

        Winery Fuhrgassl-Huber, 1190 Wien

    • 09:00 11:10
      Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology, Gravitation HS33

      HS33

      • 09:00
        Recent results from ANTARES & Status and perspectives of KM3NeT 30m
        Neutrinos constitute an alternative to photons and cosmic rays to explore the high-energy sky, as they can emerge from dense media and travel across cosmological distances without being deflected by magnetic fields nor absorbed by ambient matter and radiation. The recent results by IceCube have given a great boost to the efforts towards the detection of high energy astrophysical neutrinos. If the origin of the events observed by IceCube is galactic, a detector located in the Northern hemisphere is well suited for their observation. The ANTARES neutrino telescope is installed in the Mediterranean Sea at a water depth of about 2500m, 42 km from Toulon, France, and consists of a three dimensional array of 885 10-inch photomultiplier tubes, distributed along twelve vertical lines. It is optimized to detect neutrinos in the TeV/PeV range. The detector exploits various signatures like a high energy excess over the atmospheric neutrino flux, searches for localized neutrino sources of various extensions and multi-messenger analyses based on time and/or space coincidences with other cosmic probes. As a successor to Antares, the KM3NeT Collaboration aims at building a multi-site cubic kilometre scale neutrino telescope. New technologies have been developed and validated with two prototype projects. The phase-1 of the construction of KM3NeT has been funded and will be completed by the end of 2016. Following this phase, a project called KM3NeT 2.0 is proposed with an upgraded physics program including the measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy off-shore Toulon, France (KM3NeT/ORCA). Astrophysical high energy neutrinos will be studied with KM3NeT/ARCA, deployed off-shore Capo Passero, Italy. The KM3NeT/ARCA sensitivity will allow to detect the flux measured by IceCube within less than one year of observation, while within about four years of observation KM3NeT/ARCA could give indications at 3-sigma level on some candidate galactic point-like sources.
        Speaker: Simone Biagi (INFN)
      • 09:30
        Underground Physics with DUNE 20m
        DUNE - Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment - plans on using a 34-kton (fiducial mass) liquid argon time projection chamber to be sited at 4850 ft depth at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. The significant overburden at this site gives DUNE significant physics reach for several non-beam physics topics. These include neutrino oscillation studies with atmospheric neutrinos, for which the LAr TPC enables precision reconstruction, baryon number violation searches, for which detection of kaon modes has particularly high efficiency, and detection of neutrino bursts from core-collapse supernovae, for which the electron-neutrino flavor sensitivity will be unprecedented. This talk will discuss the unique underground physics capabilities of DUNE.
        Speaker: Vittorio Paolone (University of Pittsburgh)
      • 09:50
        Baikal-GVD: first cluster Dubna 15m
        In April 2015 the deep underwater neutrino telescope Dubna was deployed and started to take data in Lake Baikal. This array is a first cluster of the cubic kilometer scale Gigaton Volume Detector (Baikal-GVD), which is constructed in Lake Baikal. In this contribution we will review the design and status of the neutrino telescope Dubna.
        Speaker: Olga Suvorova (Russian Academy of Sciences (RU))
      • 10:05
        Methods for Detection of Astrophysical Tau Neutrinos in IceCube 15m
        Neutrinos are expected to be produced in hadronic acceleration processes at the sources of extremely high-energy cosmic rays. These high-energy neutrinos should be produced in astrophysical sources like the Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), type I b/c supernovae, and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs). The expectation for the neutrino flavor ratio at the source is 1: 2: 0 (nu e : nu mu : nu tau). The flavor ratio of astrophysical neutrinos measured by ground-based detectors is modified due to neutrino oscillations averaged over astronomical distances. In particular, tau neutrinos should appear in the astrophysical neutrino flux and be detectable at Earth. Thus, tau neutrino searches are crucial to better determine the flavor composition. Methods to identify high-energy tau neutrino interactions in IceCube, a cubic-kilometer neutrino detector deployed in the glacial ice at the geographical South Pole will be described. An algorithm will be presented for detecting double pulse signature in the IceCube sensor signal, which can be an indication of the tau neutrino interaction and subsequent decay of the tau lepton inside the detector. The recent results for astrophysical tau neutrinos with three years of IceCube data will be shown. Future prospects for tau neutrino detection in IceCube will be discussed.
        Speaker: Dr. Tomasz Palczewski (The University of Alabama)
      • 10:20
        Measurement of Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations with the IceCube/DeepCore Detector 15m
        With its low-energy extension DeepCore, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, located at the geographic South Pole, measures neutrinos with energies above about 10 GeV. With this low energy threshold high statistics of about 150000 triggered atmospheric muon neutrinos are recorded per year. This enables the measurement of neutrino oscillations. The oscillation probability depends on the energy and propagation distance of the neutrino. The oscillation is visible by the energy and zenith dependent disappearance in the recorded muon neutrino rate. Recently, an analysis using three years of data of the completed 86-string detector taken from 2011 to 2014 has achieved a sensitivity approaching that of dedicated oscillation experiments (e.g. MINOS, T2K and Super-Kamiokande-IV). To further improve the sensitivity, this analysis has been extended with data taken from 2010 to 2011 in the 79-string detector configuration, which increases the live time from 953 to 1266 days. Results of this extended muon neutrino disappearance measurement with IceCube/DeepCore will be presented.
        Speaker: Markus Vehring
      • 10:35
        Towards survey of astronomical tau neutrino sources 15m
        The recent IceCube astrophysical PeV neutrino events motivate the planning of the Neutrino Telescope Array (NTA) observatory, which will have three site stations watching the air mass surrounded by Mauna Loa, Mauna Kea, and Hualalai on Hawaii Big Island, plus a site station at the center watching the lower night sky. By separating nu_tau -> tau conversion from tau-shower generation, the Earth-skimming nu_tau method allows for huge target mass and detection volume simultaneously. With the mountains both as target and shield, this method for PeV-EeV neutrino search is almost background-free. With design based on experience from the operating Ashra-1 detector, sensitivities reaching beyond 100 cubic-km water equivalent can be achieved with Cherenkov-fluorescence stereoscopic observation, with pointing accuracy of 0.2 deg or less. With the goal of clear discovery and identification of astronomical nu_tau sources achievable, a new International Collaboration is called for to probe such cosmic proton accelerators.
        Speaker: Prof. George W.S. Hou (National Taiwan University)
    • 09:00 11:00
      Detector R&D and Data Handling HS42

      HS42

      • 09:00
        The CMS muon system in Run2: preparation, status and first results 15m
        The CMS muon system has played a key role for many physics results obtained from the LHC Run-1 data. During the Long Shutdown (2013-2014) significant upgrades have been carried out on the muon detectors and on the L1 muon trigger. In parallel the algorithms for muon reconstruction and identification have been improved for both the High-Level Trigger and the offline reconstruction. Results of studies performed on data and Monte Carlo simulations will be presented, with focus on the improvements aiming to ensure an excellent performance in conditions of multiplicity of pileup events and bunch spacing expected during the high-luminosity phase of Run-2. The early muon performance results from LHC Run-2 will be shown.
        Speaker: Giovanni Abbiendi (Universita e INFN, Bologna (IT))
      • 09:15
        ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Upgrades for the High Luminosity LHC 15m
        The luminosity of the LHC will increase up to 2 and 7x10^34 cm-2s-1 after long shutdowns in 2019 and 2025 (phase-1 and phase-2 upgrades). In order to cope with the increased particle fluxes, upgrades are envisioned for the ATLAS muon spectrometer. At phase-1, the current innermost stations of the ATLAS muon endcap will be upgraded with 2x4-layer modules of Micromega detectors, sandwiched by 2x4-layer modules of small strip Thin Gap detectors. Each 4-layer module of the New Small Wheels covers a surface of approximately 2-3 m^2 for a total active area of 1200 m^2 each. On such large area detectors, the mechanical precision is a key point and must be controlled and monitored along the process of construction and integration. Extensive test-beam campaigns have been carried out on prototype detectors. For phase-2, highly selective first level triggers are essential to exploit the full physics potential. The ATLAS experiment plans to increase the rate and latency of the first two trigger levels. This requires new muon trigger electronics and the replacement of the read-out electronics, which will allow for the inclusion of the precision chambers in the first level trigger. ATLAS plans to reinforce the barrel muon trigger system acceptance by the installation of additional thin resistive plate chambers with a high-rate capability.
        Speaker: Chrysostomos Valderanis (Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (DE))
      • 09:30
        Physics motivations and expected performance of the CMS muon system upgrade with triple-GEM detectors 15m
        For the LHC High Luminosity phase (HL-LHC) the CMS GEM Collaboration is planning to install new large size triple-GEM detectors in the forward region of the muon system (1.5<|η|<2.2) of the CMS detector. The muon reconstruction with triple-GEM chambers information included have been successfully integrated in the official CMS software, allowing physics studies to be carried out. The new sub-detector will be able to cope the extreme particle rates expected in this region along with a high spatial resolution.The resulting benefit in terms of triggering and tracking capabilities has been studied:the expected improvement in the performance of the muon identification and track reconstruction as well as the expected improvement coming from the lowering of the muon pT trigger tresholds will be presented.The contribution will review the status of the CMS upgrade project with the usage of GEM detector, discussing the trigger, the muon reconstruction performance and the impact on the physics analyses.
        Speaker: Rosamaria Venditti (Universita e INFN, Bari (IT))
      • 09:45
        Upgrade of the ATLAS Calorimeters for Higher LHC Luminosities 15m
        The upgrade of the LHC will bring instantaneous and total luminosities which are a factor 5-7 beyond the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) and Tile Calorimeters and their read-out systems. Due to radiation requirements and a new two-level hardware trigger concept the read-out electronics will be improved in two phases. In Phase-I, a dedicated read-out of the LAr Calorimeters will provide higher granularity input to the trigger, in order to mitigate pile-up effects and to reduce the background rates. In Phase-II, completely new read-out electronics will allow a digital processing of all LAr and Tile Calorimeter channels at full 40 MHz bunch-crossing frequency and a transfer of calibrated energy inputs to the trigger. Results from system design and performance of the developed read-out components, including fully functioning demonstrator systems already operated on the detector, will be reported. Furthermore, the current Forward Calorimeter (FCal) may suffer from signal degradation and argon bubble formation at highest instataneous luminosities. A high-granularity replacement is thus proposed, improving on reconstruction of jets and missing energy in the presence of pile-up. The corresponding R&D and expected performance results will be presented.
        Speaker: Ilya Korolkov (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ES))
      • 10:00
        Development of technologies for highly granular calorimeters and their performance in beam tests 15m
        The CALICE collaboration is developing highly granular calorimeter prototypes to evaluate technologies for experiments at a future lepton collider optimized for particle flow event reconstruction. These technologies include electromagnetic calorimeters with tungsten absorbers and silicon or scintillator active elements, and hadronic calorimeters with steel and tungsten absorbers with scintillator and gaseous detector active elements, the former with analog and the latter with purely digital and with semi-digital readout. The latest generation of these readout elements are optimised to fulfill the requirements of collider experiments, such as integrated electronics, power-pulsing and strategies for mass production. We will discuss the latest developments towards full highly granular calorimeter systems as well as performance highlights from beam tests.
        Speaker: Vladislav Balagura (CNRS / IN2P3 / LLR - Ecole Polytechnique (FR))
      • 10:15
        Detailed studies of hadronic showers and comparison to GEANT4 simulations with data from highly granular calorimeters 15m
        The highly granular calorimeter prototypes of the CALICE collaboration have provided large data samples with precise three-dimensional information on hadronic showers with steel and tungsten absorbers and silicon, scintillator and gas detector readout. From these data sets, detailed measurements of the spatial structure, including longitudinal and lateral shower profiles and of the shower substructure are extracted. Recent analyses have extended these studies to different particle species in calorimeters with scintillator readout and steel and tungsten absorbers, to energies below 10 GeV in a silicon tungsten calorimeter and have provided first studies of the shower substructure with gaseous readout and unprecedented granularity of 1 x 1 cm$^2$ over a full cubic meter. These results are confronted with GEANT4 simulations with different hadronic physics models, and present new challenges to the simulation codes and provide the possibility to validate and improve the simulation of hadronic interactions in high-energy physics detectors.
        Speaker: Naomi Van Der Kolk (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (D)
      • 10:30
        Hadron Calorimeters for the future High Energy Physics Nuclear Experiments 15m
        The design and performance of the hadron calorimeters developed for the future high energy nuclear physics experiments at FAIR, NICA, and CERN will be discussed. The Projectile Spectator Detector (PSD) for the CBM experiment at the future FAIR facility, the Forward Calorimeter for the NA61 experiment at CERN and the Multi Purpose Detector at the future NICA facility are reviewed. These detectors are compensating lead-scintillator calorimeters designed to measure the energy distribution of the forward going projectile nucleons and nuclei fragments (spectators) produced close to the beam rapidity. Design of detector modules is presented. Readout electronics is described with an example of PaDiWa frontend board to be used for the PSD CBM. Results of performance study of the centrality and reaction plane determination for the PSD for CBM are reported. Detectors radiation hardness to ionizing and neutral particle fields is discussed with an accent on the radiation hardness properties and investigation methods for detectors exposed to the high neutron radiation. Results of neutron radiation hardness tests for the Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs) used for the light readout in the calorimeter modules are presented.
        Speaker: Mr. Vasily Mikhaylov (Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR)
      • 10:45
        Development of the electromagnetic calorimeter waveform digitizers for the Fermilab Muon g-2 experiment 15m
        We present the design of the uTCA-based waveform digitizers that will instrument the electromagnetic calorimeters deployed for the E989 Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab. Each uTCA advanced mezzanine card (AMC) consists of a custom made 5-channel 12-bit 800 MSPS digitizer with dedicated 1Gbit memory buffers. The digitizer communicates with the CMS designed AMC13 module to receive the synchronous triggers and the 40 MHz master clock that will be up-converted for the sampling clock. The AMC13 also collects the digitized data and transfers it to the data acquisition system.
        Speaker: Antoine Chapelain (Cornell University)
    • 09:00 11:05
      Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries HS21

      HS21

      • 09:00
        Measurements of Vub and Vcb at LHCb 15m
        The long standing discrepancies between the measurements of Vub and Vcb in inclusive and exclusive decays are still unresolved. LHCb recently reported the first observation of the baryon decay Λb→pμν and the related measurement of Vub. Similarly, Λb→Λcμν is used to constrain Vcb and the associated form-factors. Future prospected will also be presented.
        Speaker: Marina Artuso (Syracuse University (US))
      • 09:15
        Inclusive electron spectrum from B-meson decays and determination of |Vub| 15m
        The inclusive electron spectrum from B-meson decays is measured using a sample of 467 million BBbar pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. Contributions from CKM-favored and CKM-suppressed semileptonic B decays, from secondary decays of charm hadrons and from continuum e+e- -> qqbar annihilations are evaluated using a simultaneous fit to data collected at the Y(4S) resonance and at collision energies below the BBbar production threshold. The partial branching fraction BF(B -> Xu l nu, E_min*) is evaluated using four different models for the CKM-suppressed decays as a function of the minimum electron energy in the B rest frame, and corresponding values of |Vub| are determined.
        Speaker: Yuri Skovpen (Budker Institute for Nuclear Physics)
      • 09:30
        Measurement of the D -> pi- e+ nu partial branching fraction and form factor, and implications for Vub. 15m
        Precision measurements of the D -> pi e+ nu form factor could shed new light on the persistent difference between inclusive and exclusive measurements of Vub. We report the measurement of the partial branching fraction of D -> pi e+ nu in intervals of the four-momentum-transfer squared from D to pi using 347.2 /fb of integrated luminosity of the BaBar data. The D -> pi form factor is extracted with fits to the unfolded partial branching fraction using pole or generalized expansions and the value at zero recoil is determined. These form factors are compared to the current world average, the available lattice predictions, and interpreted with the expectation of a single dominant pole term. The measured form factor is then combined with previous BABAR B -> pi l nu information to determine a value of Vub.
        Speaker: Arantza Oyanguren (IFIC - Univers. de Valencia)
      • 09:45
        Semileptonic B and Bs decays at Belle 15m
        Semileptonic B meson decays, $B\to X \ell\nu$, are currently the preferred modes for determining the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix elements $|V_{cb}|$ and $|V_{ub}|$, two fundamental parameters of the Standard Model. At the same time they can also be used to test and refine the theoretical tools used for describing the production of B mesons and their decays. Based on the large data sample accumulated by the Belle experiment at the KEKB asymmetric energy e+ e− collider at KEK, Japan, we present new results on semileptonic decays of B and Bs mesons.
        Speaker: Robin Glattauer (Institute of High Energy Physics Vienna)
      • 10:00
        Vub and Vcb determinations: recent results and prospects 20m
        The most precise determinations of Vub and Vcb come from semileptonic B decays. The results of the B factories, analysed in the light of the most recent theoretical calculations, are puzzling. For both Vcb and Vub the determination based on exclusive channels is about 3σ below the one based on inclusive decays. This discrepancy has survived several checks and may be an indication of new physics. I will review recent developments and future prospects of the Vxb determinations and briefly discuss new physics interpretations.
        Speaker: Paolo Gambino (università di torino)
      • 10:20
        B→D*τν at LHCb 15m
        The decay B→D*τν is sensitive to new physics and its rate exhibits a hint of deviation from the SM expectation. LHCb presents its first measurement of this mode.
        Speaker: Marta Calvi (Univ. degli Studi Milano-Bicocca)
      • 10:35
        Tree-level new physics searches in B decays to τ leptons at Belle 15m
        Semileptonic and leptonic B meson decays involving a heavy $\tau$ lepton are sensitive to new physics scenarios with an extended Higgs sector, such as the type-II two-Higgs-doublet model. Decays that have been studied at Belle include $B\to D^{(*)}\tau\nu$ , $B\to \tau\nu$ and $B\to \pi\tau\nu$. In this talk we report new and updated results for these modes, based on the large data sample accumulated by the Belle experiment at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e− collider at KEK, Japan.
        Speaker: Philipp Hamer (Goettingen)
      • 10:50
        Exclusive semileptonic B decays to a D or D* meson and one or two pions 15m
        The experimental knowledge of semileptonic B decays to a D or D* meson with one or more pions is limited. These limitations are relevant to two experimental puzzles: the tension between the values of |Vcb| determined from inclusive and exclusive semileptonic decays, and the gap between the sum of the exclusive semileptonic B decays to charm and the inclusive b -> c l nu rate. The full BABAR data set is used to improve the precision on decays involving D(D*) pi l nu and to observe, for the first time, decays of the type D(D*) pi pi l nu. Fully-reconstructed hadronic B decays are used to tag events and provide good resolution on the discriminant variable U = Emiss - Pmiss. A simultaneous fit to charged and neutral B decays to D(npi) and D*(npi) is used to extract relative branching fractions. In addition to studying these high mass charm final states, the data are used to obtain a precise measurement of the ratio of branching fractions BF(B -> D l nu)/BF(B -> D* l nu).
        Speaker: Thomas Lueck (SLAC)
    • 09:00 11:00
      Heavy Ion Physics HS30

      HS30

      • 09:00
        Precision measurement of the mass difference between light nuclei and anti-nuclei with ALICE at the LHC 20m
        In ultra relativistic heavy-ion collisions a large and similar amount of nuclei and anti-nuclei is produced in the central pseudorapidity region allowing one to deeply investigate their properties. Mass and electric charge are expected to be the same in nuclei and anti-nuclei as long as the CPT invariance holds for nuclear force, a remnant of the underlying strong interaction between quarks and gluons. In this talk the measurements of the difference of mass-to-charge ratio between deuteron and anti-deuteron, and $^{3}\rm{He}$ and $^{3}\rm{\overline{He}}$ nuclei performed with the ALICE detector at the LHC will be presented for the first time. The measurements improve by one to two orders of magnitude analogous results previously obtained. They are also expressed in terms of binding energy differences. That related to the (anti-)deuteron improves by a factor two the constraints on CPT invariance inferred by existing measurements, while in the case of (anti-)$^{3}\rm{He}$ it has been determined for the first time.
        Speaker: Manuel Colocci (Universita e INFN, Bologna (IT))
      • 09:20
        Nuclear collisions at the LHeC 20m
        The LHeC is a proposed upgrade of the LHC to study ep/eA collisions in the TeV regime, by adding a 60 GeV electron beam through an Energy Recovery Linac. In this talk new results are presented on the physics prospects on energy frontier eA collisions with this machine, with emphasis on the precise determination of nuclear parton densities.
        Speaker: Nestor Armesto Perez (Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (ES))
      • 09:40
        Prospects for dense baryonic matter research at NICA 20m
        The NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility) project is now under active realization at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna). The main goal of the project is an experimental study of hot and dense strongly interacting matter in heavy ion (up to Au) collisions at centre-of-mass energies up to 11 GeV per nucleon. Two modes of the operation is foreseen, collider mode and extracted beams, with the two detectors: MPD and BM@N. In the collider mode the average luminosity is 10E27 cm-2 s-1 for Au(79+). The fixed target experiment BM@N at the JINR superconducting synchrotron Nuclotron is in preparation stage. Extracted beams of various nuclei species with maximum momenta 13 GeV/c (for protons) will be available. The NICA project also foresees a study of spin physics with the detector SPD with extracted and colliding beams of polarized deuterons and protons at the energies up to 27 GeV (for protons). The proposed program allows to search for possible signs of the phase transitions and critical phenomena as well as to shed light on the problem of nucleon spin structure. General design, construction status and physics program of the NICA complex will be presented.
        Speaker: Prof. Alexander Sorin (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna)
      • 10:00
        Progress towards A Fixed-Target ExpeRiment at the LHC: AFTER@LHC 20m
        The multi-TeV LHC beams offer the possibility to perform the most energetic fixed-target experiments ever, in order to study with high precision pp and pA collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} \simeq 115$ GeV and Pbp and PbA collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} \simeq 72$ GeV. AFTER@LHC -- A Fixed-Target ExperRiment -- can greatly complement collider experiments, in particular those of RHIC and EIC projects. We thus discuss the possibility of a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment using LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal or using an internal gas target inspired from the LHCb SMOG system. We have evaluated that the instantaneous luminosity achievable with AFTER would surpass that of RHIC by more than 3 orders of magnitude. This provides a quarkonium, prompt photon and heavy-flavour observatory in pp and pA collisions where, by instrumenting the target-rapidity region, gluon and heavy-quark distributions of the proton, the neutron and the nuclei can be accessed at large x. In addition, the fixed-target mode has the advantage to allow for spin measurements with polarized targets over the full backward rapidity domain. The nuclear target-species versatility provides a unique opportunity to study the nuclear matter versus the hot and dense matter formed in heavy-ion collisions. We will show first results of the fast simulations based on a LHCb-like detector used in the fixed-target mode and discuss connections with data from LHCb SMOG, which can be seen as a low-density internal gas target.
        Speaker: Barbara Trzeciak (Czech Technical University in Prague)
      • 10:20
        Double-scattering mechanism of production of two $\rho^0$ mesons in ultraperipheral, ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions 20m
        We present, for the first time, differential distributions for two $\rho^0$ meson production in exclusive ultraperipheral, ultrarelativistic collisions via a double scattering mechanism. The calculations are done in the impact parameter space. The cross section for $\gamma A \to \rho^0 A$ is parametrized based on an existing calculation. Smearing of $\rho^0$ masses is taken into account. The results of calculations are compared at the RHIC and LHC energies. The cross section for the double scattering mechanism is an order of magnitude larger at $M_{\rho \rho} <$ 2 GeV and more than two orders of magnitude at $M_{\rho \rho} >$ 3 GeV, than that for the photon-photon mechanism. The double scattering mechanism populates somewhat larger $\rho^0 \rho^0$ invariant masses and larger rapidity distances between the two $\rho^0$ mesons compared to the two-photon mechanism. The mechanism considered gives a significant contribution to the $A A \to A A \pi^+ \pi^- \pi^+ \pi^-$ reaction. Some observables related to charged pions are presented too. We compare results of our calculation with the STAR collaboration results on four charged pion production. The shape in invariant mass of the four-pion system is very similar to the measured one. We discuss a possibility of identifying the double scattering mechanism at the LHC. Literature: M. Klusek-Gawenda and A. Szczurek, Phys. Rev. C89 (2014) 024912.
        Speakers: Antoni Szczurek (Institute of Nuclear Physics) , Mariola Jadwiga Klusek-Gawenda (Polish Academy of Sciences (PL))
      • 10:40
        Lightening-like interactions in nuclear collisions at CERN large hadron collider 20m
        A simple basic model for describing proton-nucleus collisions has been the intra-nuclear cascade model, where the interactions are simulated by a sequence of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. This model helped to establish many scientific concepts and also creates the foundation for more modern simulation codes, especially at low and intermediate energies. In this paper, we present a new Monte Carlo model for proton-nucleus collisions at high CERN Large Hadron collider energies. The model implements a collective cascade to induce striking light-like effect in a large nucleus. A single collision (lightening) event is shown to be a complex process: Enormous quantities of energies pass through the surrounding nucleons in a large nucleus. This new simulation code is shown to be good to reproduce the Large Hadron collider data, especially p+p and p+Pb collisions.
        Speaker: Prof. Khaled Abdel-Waged (Physics Department-Umm Al-Qura University- Saudi Arabia)
    • 09:00 11:00
      Higgs and New Physics Großer Festsaal

      Großer Festsaal

      • 09:00
        Interpretation of the Higgs signal and possible phenomenology of additional Higgs states 15m
        The available information on the properties of the observed Higgs signal is assessed in view of the current experimental accuracy and the employed theoretical assumptions. Possible interpretations of the observed signal in scenarios of physics beyond the Standard Model are discussed in view of their phenomenological implications, and the experimental sensitivity for discriminating between different models is investigated. In extended Higgs sectors it is often possible to interpret the observed signal not only in terms of the lightest but also in terms of the second-lightest state of the Higgs sector. The latter scenarios generically predict a light Higgs boson with heavily suppressed couplings to gauge bosons. The current limits and future prospects for accessing such scenarios will be discussed.
        Speaker: Prof. Georg Weiglein (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
      • 09:15
        Searches for neutral and charged Higgs bosons in the context of the MSSM and more general 2HDMs at ATLAS and CMS 25m
        With this talk a review will be given for the searches for charged and neutral Higgs bosons, $A$, $H$, $h$, $H^{+}$, in the context of the MSSM and more general 2HDMs. The result of the ATLAS and the CMS experiment will be discussed. The searches will be based on the full LHC run-1 dataset of each experiment.
        Speaker: Olivier Davignon (Ecole Polytechnique (FR))
      • 09:40
        Searches for heavy Higgs bosons decaying to light Higgs bosons with a mass of 125 GeV 15m
        Searches for Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of Higgs bosons (hh or hA) or for a Higgs boson decaying to Zh/ZA are presented. Different analyses involving Higgs boson decays into bottom-quarks, tau pairs, and diphotons will be summarized in this talk.
        Speaker: Rebecca Charlotte Lane (Imperial College Sci., Tech. & Med. (GB))
      • 09:55
        Search for light CP-odd Higgs decay with a charm tag at BABAR 15m
        We present a search for a light CP-odd Higgs boson (A0) in Upsilon(1S) -> gamma A0, A0 -> ccbar decays. The Upsilon(1S) mesons are selected via the dipion transition Upsilon(2S) -> pi+pi- Upsilon(1S), and the A0 -> ccbar final state is tagged through the reconstruction of various D(*) mesons. No significant signal is observed, and limits on the product branching fraction B(Upsilon(1S) -> gamma A0)xB(A0 -> ccbar) are established at the level of 7x10^-5 - 2x10^-3 for A0 mass values between 4.0 GeV and 9.25 GeV.
        Speaker: Georges Vasseur (CEA/IRFU,Centre d'etude de Saclay Gif-sur-Yvette (FR))
      • 10:10
        Higgs lepton flavour violation 15m
        We study lepton flavor violating Higgs decays in the light of the recent enhancement in the τμ channel, which should be confirmed/excluded with data from the second run of the LHC. From an EFT perspective we study both tree-level and loop-level realizations that can in principle accommodate the excess, being at the same time compatible with other low-energy constraints. We also discuss different HLFV in the context of neutrino mass models. We discuss which are the most promising options that can explain the excess. In particular, we find that loop-level realizations are always too suppressed, while a 2HDM can explain the enhancement.
        Speaker: Juan Herrero Garcia (KTH)
      • 10:25
        Searches for exotic Higgs boson decays with the ALTAS and the CMS experiment 15m
        This talk will summarize the searches for exotic Higgs boson decays. It should cover decays of the observed Higgs boson to dark sector bosons, lepton flavor violating and flavor changing decays, and decays to a light pseudoscalar neutral Higgs boson as predicted by the NMSSM. Prospects for the LHC run-2 should be given. The talk should cover the results from ATLAS and CMS.
        Speaker: Theodota Lagouri (Yale University (US))
    • 09:00 11:00
      Neutrino Physics HS7

      HS7

      • 09:00
        GERDA Phase II and the future of Ge-76 experiments 15m
        The GERDA experiment searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of Ge-76 by operating an array of Ge detectors directly in liquid argon. After a first successful phase of data taking (Phase I), the apparatus is currently being upgraded to double the target mass (up to 38 kg) and to further reduce the background index (<0.001 cts/keV/kg/yr). Results from the on-going hardware commissioning and perspective for the approaching Phase II of data taking will be presented.
        Speaker: Dr. Matteo Agostini (Technische Universität München & Gran Sasso Science Institute)
      • 09:15
        Status of SuperNEMO experiment and last results of NEMO3 15m
        SuperNEMO is a next generation neutrinoless double beta decay experiment with a design capability to reach a half-life sensitivity of 1026 years corresponding to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of ⟨mββ⟩ < 50 - 100 meV. This detector has the unique capability to identify the electrons allowing to reduce drastically the background coming from the natural radioactivity. It measures also all kinematical parameters (individual energy of the ellectrons and angular distribution) and in case of signal it could allow to determine the process leading to neutrinoless double beta decay. We will present the status of SuperNEMO construction and the improvements foreseen compared to NEMO-3. The R&D started in 2007 and today all the requirements are achievable. The collaboration is now equipped with very sensitive complementary detectors (for radon: diffusion apparatus, concentration line and emanation tank and for radiopurity: BiPo, HPGe...). Underground early commissioning of one quarter of tracker and one brick of calorimeter is expected by the end of this year and data takin is expected second semester 2016. We will also present the last last esults from NEMO-3 experiment located in the Modane Underground Laboratory researched the neutrinoless double beta decay from 2003 to 2011. Seven isotopes were studied with the unique tracko-calo technique including the 2 most important in term of sensitivity with 7kg of 100Mo and 1kg of 82Se.
        Speaker: Dr. Alberto Remoto (LAPP)
      • 09:30
        Neutrinoless double beta decay results from CUORE-0 and status of the CUORE experiment 15m
        CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) is a ton-scale experiment aimed at searching for neutrinoless double beta decay in $^{130}$Te with tellurium oxide bolometers, with a projected sensitivity close to the inverted mass hierarchy region. The CUORE detector design and background budget have been validated by CUORE-0: an array of 52 TeO$_2$ bolometers built using the same protocols developed for CUORE and running at the Gran Sasso Laboratories since spring 2013. In this talk we will present the latest results on neutrinoless double beta decay from CUORE-0, and show that its performance in terms of background and energy resolution fully supports the expectations for the CUORE sensitivity. In addition, we will summarize the status of CUORE that is now in its final construction stage: all towers have been assembled and are ready for installation in the cryostat, which reached a record temperature of 6 mK on a 1 m$^3$ volume scale in fall 2014.
        Speaker: Francesco Terranova (Universita & INFN, Milano-Bicocca (IT))
      • 09:45
        Neutrinoless double beta decay, nuclear environment and structure 30m
        The recent progress in theoretical description of the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ−decay) is briefly reviewed. A possible effect of nuclear medium on exchange of three light neutrinos is addressed. It is shown that non-standard neutrino interaction generates in-medium Majorana neutrino masses, which influences the 0νββ-decay rate. Nuclear physics is important for extracting useful information from the 0νββ-decay data. Interpreting existing results as a measurement of effective Majorana neutrino mass depends crucially on the knowledge of the corresponding nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) that govern the decay rate and must be evaluated using tools of nuclear structure theory. To this end, the results of NMEs calculation within sophisticated nuclear structure approaches are presented. Subject of interest are the accuracy and reliability of calculated NMEs. An impact of the quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant on double-beta decay processes is discussed. Further, the 0νββ-decay with the inclusion of the right-handed leptonic and hadronic currents and by assuming small neutrino masses is revisited. Differential characteristics and phase-space integrals are calculated by using exact Dirac wave function with finite nuclear size and electron screening. The effective lepton number violating parameters are discussed in light of recent progress achieved by the GERDA, EXO and Kamland-Zen experiments.
        Speaker: Fedor Simkovic (Comenius University)
      • 10:15
        NEXT: Searching for the bb0n decay in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory 15m
        Although different techniques are used to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay, the common challenges for all the existing or planned experiments are to achieve a good energy resolution and large background rejection factors. The NEXT collaboration addresses these two challenges with a high-pressure gas-Xenon electroluminescent TPC, where the isotope 1 36Xe is used as both the source and the detection medium. The capabilities of this technology have been demonstrated with two small prototypes, NEXT-DBDM and NEXT-DEMO, which were built and operated between 2009 and 2013. The energy resolution has been measured to be below 1% at the Q value of 136Xe, while the reconstruction of the electron tracks provides a powerful background identification handle. A larger prototype containing 10 kg of Xe, NEXT-NEW, is being built in the LSC. This detector will start operation in 2015 with the goal of measuring the bb0n background and the bb2n decay. Given the scalability of the TPC technology, NEXT-NEW will set the grounds for the NEXT-100 detector (100 kg of 136Xe) that will be be operated in the LSC in 2017, searching for the bb0n decay up to a half-life of about 6x1025 years after 3 years of data taking.
        Speaker: Pau Novella (IFIC)
      • 10:30
        Status of the SNO+ Experiment 15m
        The SNO+ experiment has multiple physics goals among which the search for neutrinoless double-beta decay, the study of solar neutrinos, measurements of anti-neutrinos from nuclear reactors and the Earth's natural radioactivity, as well as the ability to detect Supernovae neutrinos. Located in the SNOLAB underground physics laboratory (Canada) it will re-use the SNO detector equipped with ~9000 PMTs and looking at a 12 m diameter spherical volume. The detector will be filled with 780 tons of liquid scintillator to which 130Te at 0.3% loading will be added. The commissioning of the detector at SNOLAB has started, and data with air and partial water fill have been taken. A short phase with the detector completely filled with water is expected to start at the end of the year, before running the detector with scintillator in 2016. The main detector developments and technical challenges inherent to this large volume liquid scintillator and low-energy experiment will be presented. In addition the status of the detector which is in its commissioning phase and the detector and physics plans for the water phase will be described. Finally the neutrinoless double-beta decay sensitivity physics goals that SNO+ aims to achieve in phases with different loadings will be given.
        Speaker: Gersende Prior (LIP)
      • 10:45
        Impact of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay on Models of Baryogenesis 15m
        Interactions that manifest themselves as lepton number violating processes at low energies in combination with sphaleron transitions typically erase any pre-existing baryon asymmetry of the Universe. We demonstrate in a model independent approach that the observation of neutrinoless double beta decay would impose a stringent constraint on mechanisms of high-scale baryogenesis, including leptogenesis scenarios. In combination with the observation of lepton flavor violating processes, we can further strengthen this argument, closing the loophole of asymmetries being stored in different lepton flavors. We further discuss the potential of the LHC to model independently exclude high-scale leptogenesis scenarios when observing lepton number violating processes.
        Speaker: Julia Harz (University College London)
    • 09:00 11:00
      QCD and Hadronic Physics HS32

      HS32

      • 09:00
        Combined Measurement of Inclusive ep Scattering Cross Sections at HERA 15m
        A combination is presented of all inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised ep scattering at HERA. The data correspond to a luminosity of about 1 fb$^{-1}$ and span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q², and Bjorken x. They include data taken at proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV. The combination method took the correlations of the systematic uncertainties into account, resulting in improved accuracy.
        Speaker: Oleksii Turkot (DESY)
      • 09:15
        Combination of D* Differential Cross-SectionMeasurements in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA 15m
        H1 and ZEUS have published single-differential cross sections for inclusive $D^{\star}$ meson production in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from their respective final data sets. These cross sections are combined in the common visible phase space region of photon virtuality $Q^2> $5 GeV², electron inelasticity $0.02 < y< 0.7$ and the $D^{\star}$ meson's transverse momentum $p_{T}(D^{\star})> 1.5$ GeV and pseudorapidity $\vert\eta(D^{\star})\vert< 1.5$. The combination procedure takes into account all relevant correlations yielding significantly reduced experimental uncertainties. To extend the kinematic range down to $Q^2< 1.5$ GeV², double-differential cross sections are also combined with a subset of earlier $D^{\star}$ data. Perturbative next-to-leading order QCD predictions are compared to the results.
        Speaker: Jan Hladky (Acad. of Sciences of the Czech Rep. (CZ))
      • 09:30
        PDF constraints and alpha_s from CMS 15m
        Recent results on PDF constraints from CMS are presented.
        Speaker: Panos Kokkas (University of Ioannina (GR))
      • 09:45
        Determination of strangeness using the data from neutrino experiments and hadron collider 15m
        Improved determination of the strange sea distribution in the nucleon is presented. Recent charm production data in neutrino-nucleon deep-inelastic scattering by the NOMAD and CHORUS experiments and from charged current inclusive deep-inelastic scattering at HERA are used. The results are consistent with the data from the ATLAS and the CMS experiments on the associated production of $W^{\pm}$-bosons with c-quarks. The joined QCD analysis of the LHC measurements of W+charm production and of data of CHORUS experiment is performed.
        Speaker: Kristin Lohwasser (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Campus Zeuthen (DE))
      • 10:00
        New DIS results from COMPASS 15m
        The COMPASS experiment at CERN performs a rich program in inclusive (DIS) and semi-inclusive (SIDIS) deep inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarised muons off longitudinally polarised nucleons. The main topic is the investigation of the spin structure of the nucleon in terms of quark and gluon polarisations. For the extraction of the contribution of the different quarks flavours to the nucleon spin, in addition to the well known spin-averaged quark distributions the fragmentation functions of quarks into hadrons are needed. Especially the information on the strange quark fragmentation is scarce. Thus, COMPASS is also extracting fragmentation functions from the multiplicities of identified hadrons. An overview on recent COMPASS results will be given, including the longitudinal spin structure function and a NLO QCD fit, a verification of the Bjorken sum rule, pion and kaon multiplicities, and the latest results on the gluon polarisation.
        Speaker: Eva-Maria Kabuss (Johannes Gutenberg-Universitat)
      • 10:15
        Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x 15m
        The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions $x$ of the proton momentum, down to $x∼5×10^{−6}$. This kinematic range is currently not covered by other experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.
        Speaker: Katerina Lipka (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
      • 10:30
        Determination of Charm Mass Running from an Analysis of Combined HERA Charm Data 15m
        The combined HERA data on charm production in deep inelastic scattering have recently been used to determine the charm quark running mass $m_c(m_c)$ in the $\overline{MS}$ renormalisation scheme. The same data are used differentially as a function of the photon virtuality Q² to evaluate the charm quark running mass at different scales to one-loop order. The scale dependence of the mass is found to be consistent with QCD expectations, and a graphical representation of the charm mass running, similar to the representation of the beauty mass running from LEP data, is obtained from data for the first time.
        Speaker: Achim Geiser (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Hamburg and Zeuthen (DE))
      • 10:45
        3-Loop Corrections to the Heavy Flavor Wilson Coefficients in Deep-Inelastic Scattering 15m
        A survey is presented on the calculation of the 3-loop QCD corrections to the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients in deep-inelastic scattering in the region of large momentum transfer $Q^2 \gg m^2$ and on the 3-loop matching coefficients in the variable flavor number scheme. Results are presented for the flavor non-singlet and pure singlet cases and for contributions due to Feynman diagrams containing internal fermion lines with two different masses, giving analytic results. We also present the mathematical and computer-algebraic methods to derive these results and discuss the numerical results, which are important in analyses measuring the heavy quark masses and the strong coupling constant.
        Speaker: Johannes Bluemlein (DESY)
    • 09:00 11:00
      Top and Electroweak Physics HS31

      HS31

      • 09:00
        Flavour-changing top decays in the aligned two-Higgs-doublet model 18m
        We perform a complete one-loop computation of {the two-body flavour-violating top decays $t \rightarrow c h$ and $t \rightarrow c V$ ($V= \gamma, Z$),} within the aligned two-Higgs-doublet model. We evaluate the impact of the model parameters on the associated branching {ratios,} taking into account constraints from flavour data and measurements of the {Higgs} properties. Assuming that the $125$ GeV Higgs corresponds to the lightest CP-even {scalar} of the CP-conserving aligned two-Higgs-doublet model, we find that the rates for such flavour-violating top decays lie {below} the expected sensitivity of the {future high-luminosity phase of the} LHC. Measurements of the Higgs signal {strength} in the di-photon channel are found to play an important role in limiting the size of the $t \rightarrow c h$ decay rate when the charged scalar of the model is light.
        Speaker: gauhar abbas (IFIC, Valencia)
      • 09:18
        Z'-induced FCNC Decays of Top, Beauty and Strange Quarks 18m
        With a large amount of top and anti-top quarks produced at the LHC, rare top quark decays offer a nice probe to search for physics beyond the standard model. In this talk, I will discuss about a flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC) decay of the top quark by emitting a new massive gauge boson Z', namely, t --> c Z', based on a model of gauged L_mu - L_tau (the difference between the muon and tauon numbers). This Z' boson is motivated by the anomalous data in the angular distribution of the B --> K^* mu^+ mu^- decay observed by LHCb, as well as the long-standing muon g-2 anomaly. Taking into account various constraints on the model, especially from rare B and K meson decay data, I will illustrate whether the t --> c Z' branching ratio can be as large as an observable level at the LHC. I will also discuss about collider phenomenology of a new Higgs boson phi for the gauged L_mu - L_tau symmetry breaking, which may show up in a FCNC decay t --> c phi, followed by phi --> Z'Z' --> 4mu.
        Speaker: Dr. Masaya Kohda (Chung-Yuan Christian University)
      • 09:36
        Searching for anomalous top quark couplings and decays with the ATLAS detector 18m
        The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle and probing its couplings with the other fundamental particle may open a window to physics beyond the Standard Model. Searches for flavour changing neutral current top quark decays using the full 2012 ATLAS dataset are presented. In addition, single top events are used to probe for anomalous couplings between the top quark and the light quarks and gluons. In addition, a new measurement using the 2011 ATLAS dataset is presented, where measurements of the different topquark pair final states are used to measure the branching ratios of the top quark decay modes.
        Speaker: Joseph Boudreau (University of Pittsburgh (US))
      • 09:54
        Hadroproduction of a charged vector boson pair in association with a b-quark pair at NLO accuracy matched with parton shower 18m
        We present the computation of the differential cross section for the process pp -> W+ W- b bbar -> e mu b bbar + X at NLO~QCD accuracy matched to Shower Monte Carlo. We include all resonant and non-resonant contributions. This is achieved by fully taking into account the effect of off-shell t-quarks and off-shell W-bosons in the complex mass scheme. We also present a program called DECAYER that can be used to let the t-quarks present in the event files for pp -> t tbar +X processes decay including both the finite width of the t-quarks and spin correlations.
        Speaker: Zoltan Laszlo Trocsanyi (University of Debrecen (HU))
      • 10:12
        Matching NLO QCD Corrections in WHIZARD with the POWHEG scheme 18m
        Building on the new automatic subtraction of NLO amplitudes in WHIZARD, we discuss our implementation of the POWHEG scheme to match the radiative corrections consistently with the parton shower. Doing so, we consider also the ambiguities involved in the selection of the terms that are resummed to all orders. Although these ambiguities are of higher order, they can be numerically important. We study these effects at linear collider processes like $e^+ e^- \rightarrow t\bar{t}H$ or $e^+ e^- \rightarrow W^+ W^- b \bar{b}$. In this context, it is also interesting to see the impact and interplay of the QCD corrections with beamstrahlung and lepton ISR.
        Speaker: Bijan Chokoufe (DESY)
      • 10:30
        Subleading P-wave, Higgs and nonresonant contributions to top-pair production near threshold 18m
        A threshold scan of top-pair production at a future linear collider allows to determine several standard model parameters with very high precision. The recent completion of the third-order QCD corrections to the inclusive top-pair production cross section demonstrates that strong dynamics are under control. We investigate effects from P-wave production and Higgs contributions at third order and from the nonresonant production of the physical final state $b\bar{b}W^+W^-$ at first order. We discuss the dependence of the cross section on the top mass, width and Yukawa coupling as well as on the strong coupling and implications for possible measurements of these parameters.
        Speaker: Mr. Thomas Rauh (TU Munich)
    • 11:00 11:30
      Coffee Break & Poster Session 30m Arcades

      Arcades

    • 11:30 13:30
      Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology, Gravitation HS33

      HS33

      • 11:30
        Dark matter signals from the gamma-ray sky 15m
        Unveiling the nature of dark matter is one of the biggest challenges of particle physics and cosmology. Beside direct detection and collider experiments, it is possible to look for a dark matter signal through indirect searches whose goal is to disentangle the signal from particle dark matter annihilation or decay from the large astrophysical background. I will discuss messengers and targets for indirect dark matter searches and I will then focus on gamma rays, the golden channel for dark matter indirect searches. Since its launch in 2008, the Fermi-LAT is taking snap-shots of the whole gamma-ray sky with unprecedented accuracy. Besides astrophysical processes, the gamma rays collected by the Fermi-LAT offer the unique possibility to probe dark matter at the center of the Milky Way. Recently, a spatially extended excess of gamma rays collected by the Fermi-LAT from the inner region of the Milky Way has been claimed by different and independent groups. I will review previous analyses claiming the discovery of a spatially extended excess of gamma rays above standard astrophysical backgrounds. I will then characterise the spatial and spectral properties of such an extended diffuse emission in light of background model systematics. Finally, I will scrutinise the most promising interpretations - among others, the possibility that the signal originates from dark matter annihilation - in order to shed light onto the origin of this yet unknown extra-emission at the Galactic Center.
        Speaker: Francesca Calore (University of Amsterdam)
      • 11:45
        Searches for Dark Matter with the Fermi Large Area Telescope 15m
        The era of precision cosmology has revealed that ~80% of the total amount of matter in the universe is dark. Cosmic microwave background measurements, galactic rotation curves, and gravitational lensing each provide strong evidence for the existence of dark matter. One promising candidate, motivated by both Particle Physics and Astrophysics, is the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP). WIMPs are predicted to produce gamma rays via annihilation or decay which are detectable by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT). A detection of gamma rays from dark matter would provide evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model. I present several recent results from the Fermi-LAT Collaboration from a variety of WIMP-like dark matter searches including the extragalactic gamma-ray background, gamma-ray excesses in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and gamma-ray spectral lines.
        Speaker: Regina Caputo (University of California, Santa Cruz)
      • 12:00
        Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station 15m
        Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The results show, for the first time, that neither e+ nor e− can be described by a single power law above 27.2 and 52.3 GeV, respectively. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.
        Speaker: Nikolas Zimmermann (Rheinisch-Westfaelische Tech. Hoch. (DE))
      • 12:15
        Thermal transport of the solar captured dark matter and its impact on the indirect dark matter search 15m
        We study the thermal transport occurring in the system of solar captured dark matter (DM) and explore its impact on the DM indirect search signal. We particularly focus on the scenario of self-interacting DM (SIDM). The energy flows in and out of the system include the gravitational capture via DM-nucleon and DM-DM scatterings, the energy dissipation via DM annihilation, and the heat exchange between DM and solar nucleus. We examine the DM temperature evolution and demonstrate that the DM temperature can be higher than the core temperature of the Sun if the DM-nucleon cross section is sufficiently small such that the energy flow due to DM self-interaction becomes relatively important. We argue that the correct DM temperature should be used for accurately predicting the DM annihilation rate and consequently the signal for the indirect detection.
        Speaker: Mr. Yen-Hsun Lin (Institute of Physics, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan)
      • 12:30
        A description of the Galactic Center excess in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model 15m
        Observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) indicate an excess in gamma rays originating from the center of our Galaxy. A possible explanation for this excess is the annihilation of Dark Matter particles. We have investigated the annihilation of neutralinos as Dark Matter candidates within the phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM). An iterative particle filter approach was used to search for solutions within the pMSSM. We found solutions that are consistent with astroparticle physics and collider experiments, and provide a fit to the energy spectrum of the excess. The neutralino is a Bino/Higgsino or Bino/Wino/Higgsino mixture with a mass in the range 84−92~GeV or 87−97~GeV annihilating into W bosons. A third solutions is found for a neutralino of mass 174−187~GeV annihilating into top quarks. The best solutions yield a Dark Matter relic density 0.06<Ωh2<0.13. These pMSSM solutions make clear forecasts for LHC, direct and indirect DM detection experiments. If the MSSM explanation of the excess seen by Fermi-LAT is correct, a DM signal might be discovered soon.
        Speaker: Sascha Caron (Nikhef National institute for subatomic physics (NL))
      • 12:45
        Sensitivity of CTA to dark matter annihilations in the galactic centre 15m
        We present prospects for detection of WIMP dark matter at the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). We derive a realistic assessment of the sensitivity of CTA to photon fluxes from dark matter annihilation by means of a binned likelihood analysis for the Einasto and Navarro-Frenk-White halo profiles. We use the most up to date instrument response functions and background simulation model provided by the CTA Collaboration. We find that, with 500 hours of observation, under the Einasto profile CTA is bound to exclude at the 95% C.L. realistic and well motivated dark matter candidates, like the 1 TeV higgsino region of the MSSM. CTA will be able to probe the vast majority of cases corresponding to a spin-independent scattering cross section below the reach of 1-tonne underground detector searches for dark matter, in fact even well below the irreducible neutrino background for direct detection and will provide a highly sensitive way of searching for dark matter that will be partially overlapping and partially complementary with 1-tonne detector and collider searches. It will thus be instrumental to, for example, effectively explore the nearly full parameter space of the MSSM.
        Speaker: Enrico Maria Sessolo (NCBJ, Warsaw)
    • 11:30 13:00
      Detector R&D and Data Handling HS42

      HS42

      • 11:30
        Perfomance of novel and upgraded instrumentation for luminosity and beam conditions measurements in CMS 15m
        The beam monitoring and luminosity systems of the CMS experiment are enhanced by several new and upgraded sub-detectors to match the challenges of the LHC operation and physics program at increased energy and higher luminosity. A dedicated pixelated luminosity telescope is installed for a fast and precise luminosity measurement. This detector measures coincidences between several three-layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to arrive at luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. An upgraded fast beam conditions monitor measures the particle flux using single crystalline diamond sensors. It is equipped with a dedicated front-end ASIC produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. The excellent time resolution is used to separate collision products from machine induced background, thus serving as online luminosity measurement. A new beam-halo monitor at larger radius exploits Cerenkov light from fused silica to provide direction sensitivity and excellent time resolution to separate incoming and outgoing particles. The back-end electronics of the beam monitoring systems include dedicated modules with high bandwidth digitizers developed in both VME and microTCA standards for per bunch beam measurements and gain monitoring. All new and upgraded sub-detectors have been taking data from the first day of LHC operation in April 2015 and results on their essential characteristics will be presented.
        Speaker: Jessica Lynn Leonard (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Hamburg and Zeuthen (DE))
      • 11:45
        The CMS Level-1 Trigger for the LHC Run 2 15m
        The CMS Level-1 Trigger from Run 1 is being replaced with an entirely new system which is based on large FPGAs, 10 Gbps optical links and it is based on the uTCA technology. This platform allows for new trigger algorithms whose sophistication approaches those of higher level triggers. Whilst the new trigger will be operational early in 2016, elements of it will be installed already in 2015. The new algorithms allow for calorimeter and muon trigger objects of substantially higher resolution. Pipe-up subtraction for calorimeter objects is also performed at Level-1 which results to marked improvements for the electron, tau and jet triggers. All these upgrades will improve significantly the background rejection and the efficiency compared to Run 1. Results on the performance of the new trigger based both on Monte Carlo and data are presented.
        Speaker: Costas Fountas (University of Ioannina (GR))
      • 12:00
        The ATLAS Trigger System: Ready for Run 2 15m
        The ATLAS trigger system has been used successfully for data collection in the 2009-2013 Run 1 operation cycle of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at center-of-mass energies of up to 8 TeV. With the restart of the LHC for the new Run 2 data-taking period at 13 TeV, the trigger rates are expected to rise by approximately a factor of 5. The trigger system consists of a hardware-based first level (L1) and a software-based high-level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of ~ 1kHz. This presentation will give an overview of the upgrades to the ATLAS trigger system that have been implemented during the LHC shutdown period in order to deal with the increased trigger rates while efficiently selecting the physics processes of interest. These upgrades include changes to the L1 calorimeter trigger, the introduction of a new L1 topological trigger module, improvements in the L1 muon system, and the merging of the previously two-level HLT system into a single event filter processing farm. At hand of a few examples the impressive performance improvements of the upgraded system will be demonstrated and the trigger selection strategy for maximal physics coverage in Run-2 will be discussed. Finally the commissioning status of the overall trigger system and its performance in the initial phase of the 2015 data taking campaign will be summarized.
        Speaker: Patrick Czodrowski (University of Alberta (CA))
      • 12:15
        Novel real-time calibration & alignment and tracking performance for LHCb Run II 15m
        The LHCb detector consists of subsystems designed to perform high efficiency tracking (>95%) with an excellent momentum resolution (0.5% for p<20 GeV). Two Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors provide precise particle identification. In Run II of the LHC, a new scheme for the LHCb software trigger allows splitting the triggering of the event in two stages, giving room to perform the alignment and calibration in real time. In the novel detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II, data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction. The larger timing budget, available in the trigger, results in the convergence of the online and offline track reconstruction. The same performance of the track reconstruction and PID are achieved online and offline. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection in the trigger with stronger constraints and including the hadronic PID. It additionally increases selection efficiencies and purity and reduces systematic uncertainties. The novel real-time alignment and calibration strategy at LHCb is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. The development and improvements in the track reconstruction are highlighted. The overall performances of the LHCb detector on the first data of Run II are presented.
        Speaker: Paul Seyfert (Universita & INFN, Milano-Bicocca (IT))
      • 12:30
        Hardware-based Tracking at Trigger Level for ATLAS: The Fast TracKer (FTK) Project 15m
        Physics collisions at 13 TeV are expected at the LHC with an average of 40-50 proton-proton collisions per bunch crossing. Tracking at trigger level is an essential tool to control the rate in high-pileup conditions while maintaining a good efficiency for relevant physics processes. The Fast TracKer (FTK) is an integral part of the trigger upgrade for the ATLAS detector. For every event passing the Level 1 trigger (at a maximum rate of 100 kHz) the FTK receives data from the 80 million channels of the silicon detectors, providing tracking information to the High Level Trigger in order to ensure a selection robust against pile-up. The FTK performs a hardware-based track reconstruction, using associative memory (AM) that is based on the use of a custom chip, designed to perform pattern matching at very high speed. It finds track candidates at low resolution (roads) that seed a full-resolution track fitting done by FPGAs. Narrow roads permit a fast track fitting but need many patterns stored in the AM to ensure efficient matching, wide roads allow for fewer patterns but combinatorics slow down the track fitting. To optimize this choice, the feature of variable resolution of the roads is implemented via ternary bits in the AM logic. An overview of the FTK system with focus on the pattern matching procedure will be presented. Furthermore, the expected performance and the integration of FTK within the ATLAS trigger system will be discussed.
        Speaker: Johanna Gramling (Universite de Geneve (CH))
      • 12:45
        FTK AMchip05: an Associative Memory Chip Prototype for Track Reconstruction at Hadron Collider Experiments 15m
        The Fast TracKer (FTK) trigger project is an upcoming upgrade for the ATLAS trigger system currently under installation. A first reduced-coverage FTK is expected to participate in data taking by the end of 2015, while full detector coverage will be reached in 2016 and more processing power will be added in 2017-2018. The ATLAS FTK is a dedicated supercomputing processor based on FPGAs and a custom ASIC: the Associative Memory chip (AMchip). The AMchip is the core processor in charge of the real-time pattern recognition stage of the FTK algorithm. It is based on Content Addressable Memory elements connected by advanced computation logic that adds the unique feature to look for correlated hits forming tracks. The AMchip05 is the latest AMchip prototype before the final FTK production. It is functionally identical to the upcoming production chip with the only difference of pattern capacity. We will show the AMchip05 architecture, the design, implementation and the in-depth performance analysis under different working conditions (power supply voltage and operating frequency). We will discuss the impact on physics performance enabled by the new features with respect to the previous AMchip generation, in particular the possibility to have variable resolution patterns. We will also address the impact on LHC Phase-2 tracking applications of the current chip and the foreseen developments.
        Speaker: Francesco Crescioli (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (FR))
    • 11:30 13:10
      Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries HS21

      HS21

      • 11:30
        Kaon Theory News 20m
        After stressing the importance of kaon physics in searching for new physics I will briefly summarize the status of the parameter $\epsilon$K in the standard model. The second part of my talk will be the presentation of new analyses of $K^+ \rightarrow \pi^+ \nu \bar{\nu}$ and $K_L \rightarrow \pi^0 \nu \bar{\nu}$ in the Standard Model and beyond. Finally, motivated by recent lattice results, I will briefly summarize the status of the Delta I=1/2 rule and of epsilon' /epsilon in the standard model."
        Speaker: Andrzej Buras (Munich)
      • 11:50
        KL --> pi0 nu nu(bar) Beyond the Grossman-Nir Bound 15m
        We do not violate the Grossman-Nir (GN) bound per se, but point out that the commonly perceived current GN bound of B(KL --> pi0 nu nu(bar)) < 1.4 x 10^-9 can be evaded, if a weakly interacting narrow state falls into the windows of kinematic exclusion of the K+ --> pi+ nu nu(bar) experiments. An explicit example is a Z' boson motivated by the muon g-2 anomaly and linked with flavor physics. The model has implications for K+ --> pi+ mu+ mu-, B --> K+ mu+ mu-, K(*) nu nu(bar) studies, the LBNE and Muon g-2 experiments, and possibly even LHC collider physics. But the main point is that the KOTO experiment is already breaking New Physics ground in their search for KL --> pi0 nu nu(bar).
        Speaker: Prof. George W.S. Hou (National Taiwan University)
      • 12:05
        Prospects for K+ ->pi+ nu nu observation at CERN in NA62 15m
        The rare decays K+ ->pi+ nu nu are excellent processes to make tests of new physics at the highest scale complementary to LHC thanks to their theoretically cleaness. The NA62 experiment at CERN SPS aims to collect of the order of 100 events in two years of data taking, keeping the background at the level of 10%. Part of the experimental apparatus has been commissioned during a technical run in 2012. The physics prospects and the status of the experiment will be reviewed after the commissioning run of 2014 and the data taking in 2015.
        Speaker: Vito Palladino (CERN)
      • 12:20
        First observation of K->pi+pi0e+e- decay at NA48 15m
        We report the first observation of the very rare decay K+- -> pi+- pi0 e+ e- by the NA48/2 experiment. From a clean sample of almost 2000 reconstructed signal events, we have determined the branching fraction with high precision and measured the e+ e- invariant mass distribution, which allows to differentiate between different decay models.
        Speaker: Riccardo Fantechi (INFN - Sezione di Pisa)
      • 12:35
        epsilon’ / epsilon from the lattice and its implications 15m
        Recent publication [arXiv:1505.07863 by RBC and UKQCD Collaborations] of the first lattice QCD calculation of the complex kaon decay amplitude A0 with physical kinematics, using a single 323 x 64 domain wall ensemble is discussed. Approximate agreement with the experimental value for Re(A0) is obtained.. The calculated value of Im(A0) is used to compute the direct CP violating ratio Re(epsilon'/epsilon), which is found to be ~2 sigma lower than the experimental value. The outlook for improved determination as well as implications are discussed. The talk is based on the lattice work done by the presenter in collaboration with RBC and UKQCD collaborations and the phenomenological work is being done with Enrico Lunghi and Christoph Lehner.
        Speaker: Dr. amarjit soni (Brookhaven National Lab)
      • 12:50
        $B\to K^{(*)}\nu\bar\nu$ decays in the Standard Model and beyond 15m
        We present an analysis of the rare exclusive $B$ decays $B\to K\nu\bar\nu$ and $B\to K^{\star}\nu\bar\nu$ within the Standard Model (SM), in a model-independent manner, and in a number of new physics (NP) models. Combining new form factor determinations from lattice QCD with light-cone sum rule results and including complete two-loop electroweak corrections to the SM Wilson coefficient, we obtain the SM predictions $\mbox{BR}(B^+\to K^+\nu\bar\nu) = (4.0 \pm 0.5) \times 10^{-6}$ and $\mbox{BR}(B^0\to K^{\star 0}\nu\bar\nu) = (9.2\pm1.0) \times 10^{-6}$, more precise and more robust than previous estimates. Beyond the SM, we make use of an effective theory with dimension-six operators invariant under the SM gauge symmetries to relate NP effects in $b\to s\nu\bar\nu$ transitions to $b\to s\ell^+\ell^-$ transitions and use the wealth of experimental data on $B\to K^{(\star)}\ell^+\ell^-$ and related modes to constrain NP effects in $B\to K^{(\star)}\nu\bar\nu$. We then consider several specific NP models, including $Z$' models, the MSSM, models with partial compositeness, and leptoquark models, demonstrating that the correlations between $b\to s\nu\bar\nu$ observables among themselves and with $B_s\to\mu^+\mu^-$ and $b\to s\ell^+\ell^-$ transitions offer powerful tests of NP with new right-handed couplings and non-MFV interactions.
        Speaker: Christoph Niehoff (Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich)
    • 11:30 13:00
      Heavy Ion Physics HS30

      HS30

      • 11:30
        New results on two-particle correlations in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV from ATLAS at the LHC 20m
        The measurement of centrality and pseudorapidity dependence of the $p_{T}$-integrated flow harmonics, $v_{2}$ up to $v_{5}$, in Pb+Pb collisions at $\sqrt {s_{NN}}$=2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. These measurements give a clear picture of the average geometry as well as fluctuations in it. These measurements are extended to include the correlations between flow harmonics of different order, which are sensitive to quantum fluctuations in the initial geometry and hydrodynamic response in the final state collective expansion. The results include correlations of $v_2-v_n$ and $v_3-v_n$ (n=2-5) obtained by varying the event ellipticity in narrow centrality intervals using an event-shape engineering technique. Several unique features in these correlations suggest new sources of geometrical fluctuations in the initial state. Recent measurements of the ridge correlations and associated first five azimuthal harmonics ($v_1$-$v_5$) in p+Pb collisions are also presented. The $v_n$ results are shown as a function of pT, $\eta$ and event activity providing important constraints on the hydrodynamic model of collective flow in small systems. The non-zero double-ridge amplitudes and $v_n$ are found to exist up to pT of ~10 GeV. A simple conformal scaling pattern in the pT dependence is observed for $v_2$-$v_4$ between p+Pb and Pb+Pb with similar event activity, suggesting similar hydrodynamic response and non-linear mode-mixing effects in the 2 collision systems.
        Speaker: Miguel Arratia (University of Cambridge (GB))
      • 11:50
        Triangular flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions within HYDJET++ 20m
        The hadronic collective flow was found to be one of the most pronounced signatures of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), the hot and dense matter created in the collisions of relativistic heavy ions. The azimuthal distribution of detected hadrons can be expanded into a Fourier series over the azimuthal angle, the flow harmonics are then represented by the Fourier coefficients. In semi-peripheral and peripheral collisions, the anisotropic flow is dominated by elliptic flow, defined by the second Fourier coefficient $v_2$. On the other hand, the contribution of the third component $v_3$ becomes more pronounced in central collisions due to the spatial initial state fluctuations. Study of the triangular flow, $v_3$ in Pb+Pb collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 2.76$ TeV and in Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV was performed using HYDJET++ Monte Carlo model. HYDJET++ combines a parametrised hydrodynamics for soft physics with a microscopic jet quenching generator for hard and semi-hard scattering, giving a realistic prediction of the shape of distribution for different hadron species. The model also enables study of influence of final-state interactions on flow of created hadrons. The interplay between soft and hard processes, as well as the influence of the resonance decays on the triangular flow in AA collisions at RHIC and LHC were studied. Reasons for violation of number-of-constituent-quark scaling at LHC for triangular and elliptic flow will be also discussed.
        Speaker: Jana Crkovska (FNSPE CTU Prague)
      • 12:10
        Spectra and elliptic flow of charmed hadrons in HYDJET++ model 20m
        Heavy-flavour quarks are predominantly produced in hard scattering on a short time-scale and traverse the medium interacting with its constituents, thus they are one of the effective probes of the transport properties of the medium formed in relativistic heavy ion collisions. On the other hand, the thermal production of heavy-flavour quarks in quark-gluon plasma is itself of interest. In this report, the production and elliptic flow of the prompt charmed mesons D^{0}, D^{+}, and D^{∗+} and J/psi in PbPb collisions at the center-of-mass energy 2.76 TeV per nucleon pair are described in the frameworks of two-component HYDJET++ model. The model combines thermal and pQCD production mechanisms. The nuclear modification factor and elliptic flow of charmed mesons are presented, the results are compared with LHC data.
        Speakers: Gyulnara Eyyubova (Czech Technical University (CZ)) , Mr. Ponimatkin Georgij (Ostrov Industrial High School (CZ))
      • 12:30
        Recent developments in hydrodynamics and collectivity in small systems 25m
        One of the main goals in heavy ion collision experiments at relativistic energies is to determine the properties, like viscosity, of nearly thermalized strongly interacting matter. The dynamics of the system formed in these collisions is, however, complex and the matter properties reflect into the experimental observables in a non-trivial way. Therefore, it is essential to have a good understanding of the dynamics, as well as understand how the different stages of the collisions affect the measured particle spectra. Fluid dynamics is a natural framework to use in constraining the transport properties of the matter as the transport coefficients, like shear and bulk viscosity, are direct inputs to the models. While fluid dynamics is a convenient tool, it also has limited applicability, and for system as small as those created in heavy ion collisions it is not at all clear whether it is strictly applicable. However, the system is also strongly interacting, and the comparisons between the experimental data and the predictions of fluid dynamical models show an extremely good agreement, suggesting that we indeed create a small droplet of fluid in these collisions. I will review the current status of describing space-time evolution of the relativistic nuclear collisions with fluid dynamics, and of determining the transport coefficients of strongly interacting matter.
        Speaker: Harri Niemi (University of Jyväskylä)
    • 11:30 13:00
      Higgs and New Physics Großer Festsaal

      Großer Festsaal

      • 11:30
        The global electroweak fit at NNLO and constraints on new physics 25m
        We present an update of the global electroweak fit using electroweak next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) calculations for all precision observables that enter the fit. The availability of NNLO corrections allows for the first time the inclusion of realistic estimates of theoretical uncertainties due to missing higher order calculations. The knowledge of the mass of the Higgs boson improves the precision of the predictions in the global electroweak fit considerably and the global fits are used as powerful tools to assess the validity of the Standard Model and to constrain scenarios for new physics. We present updated constraints on a model with modified Higgs couplings to bosons and fermions, two Higgs doublet models, and dimension-6 operators. We show that in many cases the Higgs signal strength measurements give complementary information to constraintes obtained from electroweak precison observables. Future measurements at the LHC and an expected electron-positron collider promise to improve the experimental precision of key observables used in the fit. We assess the influence of present and future experimental and theoretical sources of systematic uncertainties on the fit predictions.
        Speaker: Thomas Peiffer (Hamburg University (DE))
      • 11:55
        Constraints on new phenomena through Higgs coupling measurements with the ATLAS detector 15m
        The discovery of the Higgs boson opens many perspectives to explore physics beyond the Standard Model. This talk describes constraints of new physics in a number of models using the combined measurements of the coupling strength of the 125 GeV Higgs particle using the entire ATLAS run-I data. The various models presented include an additional real electroweak singlet, two Higgs doublet models, a simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, and a Higgs portal to dark matter.
        Speaker: G. Carrillo-Montoya (CERN)
      • 12:10
        Tevatron constraints on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity using decays to bottom-antibottom quark pairs 15m
        Combined constraints from the CDF and D0 Collaborations on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin J and parity P are presented and compared with results obtained assuming the standard model value $J^P = 0^+$. Both collaborations analyzed approximately 10 fb$^{−1}$ of proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected at the Fermilab Tevatron. They combined analyses of the $WH \to \ell \nu bb$, $ZH \to \nu\nu bb$, and $ZH\to \ell\ell b b$ channels. Two models of bosons with $J^P = 0^−$ and $J^P = 2^+$ were tested.
        Speaker: Gavin Davies (Imperial College Sci., Tech. & Med. (GB))
      • 12:25
        Searches for invisible Higgs boson decays with ATLAS and CMS 15m
        This talk will summarize the latest results of searches for the decay of the observed Higgs boson into invisible and quasi-invisible states. The talk should cover the results of the ATLAS and the CMS experiment based on the full dataset of LHC run-1.
        Speaker: Philippe Calfayan (Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (DE))
      • 12:40
        Search for low mass Higgs-boson like resonances at CMS 15m
        A search is performed on the 8 TeV LHC data for additional scalars and pseudoscalar with masses below the newly discovered higgs boson h(125). These searches are motivated within several BSM theories, most significantly extensions of the non mininal extensions of the MSSM like the NMSSM, where additional scalar and pseudoscalar states are expected. The mass range from 350 MeV to 110 GeV is explored with different final states. The current status of these searches will be reviewed and prospects will be given to extend these searches in the Run2 of the LHC
        Speaker: Abdollah Mohammadi (Kansas State University (US))
    • 11:30 13:00
      Neutrino Physics HS7

      HS7

      • 11:30
        Status of the neutrino mass experiments KATRIN and Project 8 15m
        A model independent, direct way to measure the neutrino masses is the investigation of the kinematics of single $\beta$-decay via a precise measurement of the $\beta$-decay electron energy spectrum close to the endpoint. This talk will present the current status of two experiments intending to use this method by measuring the $\beta$-spectrum of tritium. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is currently under construction at KIT. The measurement setup consists of a high luminosity windowless gaseous tritium source, a magnetic electron transport system with differential and cryogenic pumping for tritium retention, and an electro-static spectrometer section (pre-spectrometer and main spectrometer) for energy analysis, followed by a segmented detector system for counting transmitted $\beta$-electrons. The latest results of a recent commissiong measurement phase aiming to investigate the performance of the main spectrometer will be presented. The Project 8 experiment aims to detect coherent cyclotron radiation emitted by energetic electrons in a magnetic field in order to perform $\beta$-spectroscopy. Only recently, a dedicated test experiment was able to successfully detect synchrotron radiation emitted from a single, mildly relativistic electron for the first time, showing the feasability of this approach and allowing for a new method to perform spectroscopy.
        Speaker: Florian Fraenkle (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology)
      • 11:45
        The Electron Capture in 163Ho experiment 15m
        The Electron Capture in 163Ho experiment, ECHo, is designed to investigate the electron neutrino mass in the sub-eV range by means of the analysis of the calorimetrically measured spectrum following the electron capture in 163Ho. Arrays of low temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), read-out using microwave SQUID multiplexing, will be used in this experiment. With a first MMC prototype having the 163Ho source ion-implanted in the absorber, we performed the first high energy resolution measurement of the EC spectrum, which demonstrated the feasibility of such an experiment. In addition to the technological challenges for the development of MMC arrays which preserve the single pixel performance in term of energy resolution and bandwidth, the success of the experiment relies on the availability of large ultra-pure 163Ho samples, on the precise description of the expected spectrum and on the identification and reduction of background. We present the plan for a medium scale experiment, ECHo-1k, in which about 1000 Bq of high purity 163Ho will be ion-implanted into detector arrays. With one year of measuring time we will be able to achieve a sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass below 10 eV/c2 (90% C.L.), improving the present limit by more than one order of magnitude. This experiment will guide the necessary developments to reach the sub-eV sensitivity.
        Speaker: Stephan Scholl (Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen)
      • 12:00
        Borexino: recent solar and terrestrial neutrino results 15m
        The Borexino experiment is running at the Laboratori del Gran Sasso in Italy since 2007. Its technical distinctive feature is the unprecedented ultralow background of the inner scintillating core, which is the basis of the outstanding achievements accumulated by the experiment. In this talk, after recalling the main features of the detector, the impressive solar and geo-neutrino data gathered so far by the experiment will be summarized, with special emphasis to the most recent and prominent result concerning the detection of the fundamental pp solar neutrino flux, which is the direct probe of the engine mechanism powering our star. Such a milestone measurement puts Borexino in the unique situation of being the only experiment able to do solar neutrino spectroscopy over the entire solar spectrum; the counterpart of this peculiar status in the oscillation interpretation of the data is the capability of Borexino alone to perform the full validation across the solar energy range of the MSW-LMA paradigm. The talk will be concluded highlighting the perspectives for the final stage of the solar program of the experiment, centered on the goal to fully complete the solar spectroscopy with the missing piece of the CNO neutrinos. If successful, such a measurement would represent the final crowning of the long quest of Borexino to unravel all the properties of the neutrinos from the Sun.
        Speaker: Werner Maneschg (MPI)
      • 12:15
        Future prospects of neutrino oscillation experiments 15m
        Standard neutrino oscillation physics has entered the era of precision measurements. With a large value of $\theta_{13}$ having been measured, the remaining unknowns yet to be determined are the mass hierarchy, CP violation and the octant of $\theta_{23}$. The main problem in determining these parameters is the problem of parameter degeneracy. T2K, NOvA, SK, IceCube and the reactor experiments are all currently collecting data to resolve this problem. However if the degeneracies are severe, we will need the next set of oscillation experiments that are currently in various stages of planning/construction, such as DUNE, ESSnuSB, ICAL, PINGU and the medium baseline reactor experiments. We discuss the ability of the current and future experiments to measure the unknown parameters.
        Speaker: Dr. Sushant Raut (KTH Royal Institute of Technology)
      • 12:30
        An Experimental Program in Neutrinos, Nucleon Decay and Astroparticle Physics Enabled by the Fermilab Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility 15m
        A new International Team (DUNE - Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment) has been formed to pursue an accelerator-based long-baseline neutrino experiment, as well as neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay, with an approximately 40-kt (fiducial) modular liquid argon TPC (LAr-TPC) detector located deep underground and a high-resolution near detector. Several independent worldwide efforts, developed through years of detailed studies, are converging around the opportunity provided by the megawatt neutrino beam facility planned at Fermilab and by the new significant expansion with improved access at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, 1,300 km from Fermilab. The principle goals of this experiment are: a comprehensive investigation of neutrino oscillations to test CP violation in the lepton sector, determine the ordering of the neutrino masses, and test the three-neutrino paradigm; to perform a broad set of neutrino scattering measurements with the near detector; and to exploit the large, high-resolution, underground far detector for non-accelerator physics topics including atmospheric neutrino measurements, searches for nucleon decay, and measurement of astrophysical neutrinos especially those from a core-collapse supernova.
        Speaker: Alec Habig
      • 12:45
        Neutrino oscillation physics potential of Hyper-Kamiokande 15m
        Hyper-Kamiokande (HK) is a megaton scale water Cherenkov detector proposed to be built in Japan. HK is the logical continuation of the highly successful program of neutrino physics and proton decay searches using a water Cherenkov technique. HK will study the CP asymmetry in neutrino oscillations using the neutrino and anti-neutrino beams produced at J-PARC. With an exposure of 7.5 MW x 10^7 seconds, delta can be measured to better than 19 degrees at all values, and CP violation can be detected with more than 3 sigma significance for 76% of values of delta. Studies of the sensitivity of this detector to neutrino oscillation parameters, CP violating phase, matter effect, and mass hierarchy will be presented.
        Speaker: Linda Cremonesi (Queen Mary University of London)
    • 11:30 13:00
      QCD and Hadronic Physics HS32

      HS32

      • 11:30
        MMHT 2014 PDFs 15m
        We present the MMHT2014 PDFs, an update of the previous major release in the same framework, i.e. MSTW2008. We discuss the changes in both the central values and uncertainties in the PDFs due to changes in theoretical procedures and the impact of new, largely LHC data-sets. We note, however, that changes in predictions are rather small. We discuss the correlation between the PDFs and the strong coupling constant and the constraint on the latter. We also highlight plans for the future.
        Speaker: Robert Samuel Thorne (University College London (UK))
      • 11:45
        HERAFitter project and its related studies 15m
        The uncertainties of protons parton distribution functions (PDFs) play a dominant role for the precision tests of the Standard Model (SM) and they also impact substantially the theory predictions of Beyond SM high mass production. We present the HERAFitter project which provides a unique open-source software framework for the determination of the proton's PDFs and for the interpretation of the physics analyses in the context of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We report here the highlighted results based on the HERAFitter functionalities, as well as novel studies performed by HERAFitter. The latter includes the impact of correlations between uncertainties for PDFs extracted at different perturbative QCD orders as well as the QCD analysis of the recent Drell-Yan production measurements at Tevatron. Reference of studies that the abstract covers are: 1. "HERAFitter Open Source QCD Fit Project", arXiv:1410.4412 [submitted to EPJC] 2. "Parton distribution functions at LO, NLO and NNLO with correlated uncertainties between orders", EPJC (2014) 74:3039, arXiv:1404.4234 3. "QCD analysis of W- and Z-boson production at Tevatron", arXiv:1503.05221 [to be submitted to EPJC]
        Speaker: Voica Ana Maria Radescu (Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg (DE))
      • 12:00
        QCD Analysis HERAPDF2.0 of the combined HERA structure function data 15m
        The new combined inclusive HERA cross sections were input to QCD analyses at NNLO, NLO and LO providing a new set of parton distribution functions, HERAPDF2.0. Besides the small experimental uncertainties, model and parameterisation uncertainties were also considered. The consistency of data and the QCD fit was tested for variants of the fit such as the treatment of heavy flavour production and the threshold in Q² for including data points in the fit.
        Speaker: Voica Ana Maria Radescu (Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg (DE))
      • 12:15
        The role of intrinsic charm in the proton via photon production in association with a charm quark 15m
        We present a comparative analysis of the non-perturbative intrinsic charm quark contribution in the proton, using the inclusive production of $\gamma +c $-jet in $ pp $ and $ p\bar{p} $ collisions and for the kinematic regions that are sensitive to this contribution. We discuss the $ Q^2 $ evolution of intrinsic quark distributions and present a code that provide these distributions as a function of $ x $ and $ Q^2 $ for any arbitrary momentum fraction. For the $ p\bar{p} $ collisions at the Tevatron, the results are compared with the recent experimental data of D0 at $ \sqrt{s} =1.96$ TeV and also predictions for $ pp $ collisions at $ \sqrt{s} =8$ TeV and $ \sqrt{s} =13$ TeV for the LHC.
        Speaker: Ali Khorramian (IPM and Semnan University)
      • 12:30
        QCD Analysis of the combined HERA inclusive data together with HERA jet and charm data 15m
        An extendend QCD analysis of the new combined inclusive HERA was performed at NLO, also including HERA data on jet and charm production. This enables the simultaneous measurement of parton distribution functions and the strong coupling using data from HERA alone. The strong coupling is measured to be $\alpha_s(M_Z)$= 0.1182 ±0.0008(exp) ±0.0005(model/param.) ±0.0012(hadronisation) ${}^{+0.0037}_{-0.0030}$ (scale).
        Speaker: Katarzyna Wichmann (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Hamburg and Zeuthen (DE))
      • 12:45
        Parton Distributions for the LHC Run II 15m
        I present NNPDF3.0, the first set of parton distribution functions (PDFs) determined with a methodology validated by a closure test. NNPDF3.0 uses a global dataset including HERA-II deep-inelastic inclusive cross-sections, the combined HERA charm data, jet production from ATLAS and CMS, vector boson rapidity and transverse momentum distributions from ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, $W$+$c$ data from CMS and top quark pair production total cross sections from ATLAS and CMS. Results are based on LO, NLO and NNLO QCD theory and also include electroweak corrections. To validate our methodology, we show that PDFs determined from pseudo-data generated from a known underlying law correctly reproduce the statistical distributions expected on the basis of the assumed experimental uncertainties. This enables us to determine with confidence PDFs at different perturbative orders and using a variety of experimental datasets ranging from HERA-only up to a global set including the latest LHC results, all using precisely the same validated methodology. I explore some of the phenomenological implications of our results for the upcoming 13 TeV Run of the LHC, in particular for Higgs production cross-sections.
        Speaker: Juan Rojo Chacon (University of Oxford (GB))
    • 11:30 13:00
      Top and Electroweak Physics HS31

      HS31

      • 11:30
        CMS Measurements of the top quark mass 18m
        Measurements of the top quark mass are presented using data collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. Analyses in several decay channels of top quark pair events are employed to determine the top quark mass. The results are combined and compared to the world average.
        Speaker: Henning Kirschenmann (CERN)
      • 11:48
        Measurements of the top quark mass with the ATLAS detector 18m
        The top quark mass is one of the fundamental parameters of the Standard Model. The latest ATLAS measurements of the top quark mass are presented. A measurement using lepton+jets events is presented, where a multidimensional template fit is used to constrain the uncertainties on the energy measurements of jets. The measurement is combined with a measurement using dilepton events. In addition, novel measurements aiming to measure the mass in a welldefined scheme are presented. These measurements use precision theoretical QCD calculations for both inclusive ttbar production and ttbar production with an additional jet to extract the top quark mass in the polemass scheme.
        Speaker: Oleg Brandt (Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg (DE))
      • 12:06
        Measurement of the top quark mass and spin polarization at the Tevatron 18m
        We report most recent measurements of the mass of the heaviest known standard model particle, the top quark, performed by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We present measurements in the lepton+jet and dilepton decay channels. For these measurements the full D0 data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ is used. We also discuss a measurement of top quark spin correlations using the matrix element technique.
        Speaker: Boris Tuchming (CEA Saclay)
      • 12:25
        New approaches in determining mtop: alternative techniques and differential measurements 18m
        Measurements of the top quark mass employing alternative methods are presented using data collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at the LHC in the years 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The alternative methods include the use of endpoint distributions as well as the study of possible model dependencies of the top mass measurement on the event kinematics. Measurements of the difference between the masses of top and anti-top quarks are also presented. Furthermore, the top quark mass, and also alpha_s are extracted from the measured top quark pair cross section.
        Speaker: Jan Kieseler (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
    • 13:00 14:30
      Lunch 1h 30m
    • 14:30 16:05
      Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology, Gravitation HS33

      HS33

      • 14:30
        The CRESST dark matter search - Status and Perspectives 30m
        While the presence of dark matter in the universe was verified by observations on various astronomical scales, the nature of dark matter still remains a puzzling question. The most favored solution is the existence of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Experiments around the globe search for WIMPs; one of them is CRESST aiming to directly detect WIMPs scattering off nuclei in CaWO$_4$ target crystals. The main background in CRESST-II phase 1 (2009-2012) originated from alpha decays on, or slightly below non-scintillating materials in the line of sight to the crystal. Thus, we developed new detector designs for phase 2 (2013-now) capable to veto such events. In this contribution we will present a low-threshold analysis of 2013 data of phase 2 from a single upgraded detector module. With 29kg days of exposure we could set a leading limit in the low WIMP-mass region below 3GeV/c$^2$. While detector performance is the key factor for low WIMP masses, the exposure of the full phase 2 data set (still blinded) will be needed to further improve for higher WIMP masses. Due to low thresholds and a precise energy reconstruction, CRESST detectors are ideal to measure tiny nuclear recoils ($\mathcal{O}$(1 keV)) expected for light WIMPs ($\mathcal{O}$(1GeV/c$^2$)). Thus, CRESST-III phase 1 will use new upgraded detectors optimized towards the detection of low-mass WIMPs. We will report on the currently ongoing preparations for CRESST-III phase 1 and outlooks beyond.
        Speaker: Florian Reindl (Max-Planck-Insitute for Physics Munich)
      • 15:00
        Recent results from the EDELWEISS-III WIMP search experiment 15m
        The EDELWEISS experiment is dedicated to the direct detection of Dark Matter. The current setup – EDELWEISS-III – aims at exploring a spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section down to the $10^{-9}$pb range, and extend the coverage for masses below 20 GeV. Since July 2014, the collaboration is taking data with 24 state-of-the-art cryogenic FID800 Germanium detectors installed in the radio pure environment of the Modane underground laboratory - the deepest of its kind in Europe. In this talk I will present the current status of the EDELWEISS-III experiment and show first preliminary results highlighting our new low WIMP mass analysis and the current background budget.
        Speaker: antoine cazes (Université Claude Bernard Lyon I)
      • 15:15
        The XENON Project for Direct Dark Matter Detection 15m
        Detectors based on noble gases are a very efficient and promising technology which leads the active field of dark matter searches. The XENON collaboration aims at a direct detection of dark matter with experiments based on liquid xenon. The XENON100 detector, which is being operated at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory in Italy, is a dual-phase time-projection chamber with a 62 kg target volume, which has set the best limits on spin-independent WIMP-nucleus scattering at the time of publication. The next step of the research program, the XENON1T experiment is currently under construction, and features 2t of liquid xenon in the target, the ~10m water tank for background reduction via Cherenkov muon veto, and an innovative system for gas storage, liquefaction and purification. In my talk I will explain the technology behind XENON100, analysis routine and science results, including spin-independent and spin-independent WIMP interactions, and more recent searches for axions and axion-like particles, as well as data interpretation in terms of luminous and mirror dark matter, and the annual modulation analysis of the electronic recoil spectrum. The technological advances and status of the construction of the XENON1T experiment will be also presented.
        Speaker: Alexander Kish (Physik-Institut UZH)
      • 15:30
        Direct Detection of Dark Photon Dark Matter 15m
        Dark matter detectors built primarily to probe elastic scattering of WIMPs on nuclei are also precise probes of light, weakly coupled particles that may be absorbed by the detector material. Ensuing constraints on the minimal model of dark matter comprised of long-lived vector states V (dark photons) in the 0.01-100 keV mass range are presented. The absence of an ionization signal in direct detection experiments such as XENON10 and XENON100 places a very strong constraint on the dark photon mixing angle, exceeding the indirect bounds derived from stellar energy loss considerations over a significant fraction of the available mass range; the talk is based on arXiv:1412.8378.
        Speaker: Josef Pradler (Austrian Academy of Sciences (AT))
      • 15:45
        Phenomenological aspects of flavoured dark matter 15m
        Flavour symmetries in the dark sector are a theoretically motivated and phenomenologically appealing possibility. The dark matter particle can be stabilised with the help of flavour symmetries, without the need to introduce an additional discrete symmetry by hand. Apart from the usual searches in direct and indirect detection experiments and high energy colliders, flavoured dark matter generally also gives rise to new flavour violating interactions leading to interesting signatures in rare meson decays. In this talk I introduce a simplified model of flavoured dark matter in which the dark matter coupling to quarks constitutes a new source of flavour violation, so that the model goes beyond Minimal Flavour Violation. Particular emphasis is put on the discussion of its phenomenological implications in flavour, collider and direct detection experiments.
        Speaker: Monika Blanke (CERN)
    • 14:30 16:00
      Detector R&D and Data Handling HS42

      HS42

      • 14:30
        CMS Tracker Upgrades: R&D Plans, Present Status and Perspectives 15m
        The present CMS pixel detector designed for a luminosity of 10^34 cm-2s-1 will have to be replaced at the end of 2016. The new upgraded detector will have higher tracking efficiency and lower mass with four barrel layers and three forward/backward disks to provide a hit coverage up to absolute pseudo-rapidities of 2.5. In a second stage, in order to maintain its physics reach during the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), when the machine is expected to deliver an instantaneous luminosity of 5 x 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1 for total of 3000 fb^-1, CMS will build a new tracker, comprising completely new pixel detector and outer tracker. The ongoing R&D activities on both pixel and strip sensors will be presented. The present status of the Inner and Outer Tracker projects will be illustrated, and the possible perspectives will be discussed.
        Speaker: Benedikt Vormwald (Hamburg University (DE))
      • 14:45
        The upgraded Pixel detector and the commissioning of the Inner Detector tracking of the ATLAS experiment for Run-2 at the Large Hadron collider 15m
        The upgraded Pixel detector and the commissioning of the Inner Detector tracking of the ATLAS experiment for Run-2 at the Large Hadron collider. Run-2 of the LHC will provide new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 at a radius of 3.3 cm between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe. The new detector, built to cope with the high radiation and expected occupancy, is the first large scale application of 3D detectors and CMOS 130nm technology. In addition the Pixel detector was refurbished with a new service quarter panel to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run-1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. In addition, many improvements to Inner Detector track and vertex reconstruction were developed during the two year shutdown of the LHC. These include novel techniques developed to improve the performance in the dense cores of jets, optimisation for the expected conditions, and a software campaign which lead to a factor of three decrease in the CPU time needed to process each recorded event.
        Speaker: Karolos Potamianos (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (US))
      • 15:00
        Inner tracking devices at the Belle II experiment 15m
        In the future Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Tsukuba, Japan, charged particle tracking in the vicinity of the $e^+$ $e^-$ interaction point is provided by a two-layer silicon pixel detector based on the novel DEPFET technology (PXD) and by a four-layer silicon strip detector (SVD). In this presentation, we review the technology and the design of these two devices, and describe the current state of their construction.
        Speaker: Giulia Casarosa (Sezione di Pisa (IT))
      • 15:15
        Upgrade of the LHCb VELO detector 15m
        The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2019, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm. The upgraded detector will run at luminosities of 2 x 1033 /cm2/s and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy flavour sector with unprecedented precision. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The detector comprises silicon pixel sensors with 55x55 um2 pitch, read out by the VeloPix ASIC, from the TimePix/MediPix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The detector halves are retracted when the beams are injected and closed at stable beams, positioning the first sensitive pixel at 5.1 mm from the beams. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 um thick silicon substrates. The current status of the VELO upgrade will be described and latest results from irradiated sensor assemblies will be presented.
        Speaker: Mark Richard James Williams (CERN)
      • 15:30
        LHCb Upgrade – The Scintillating Fibre Tracker 15m
        The LHCb detector will be upgraded during 2019 in order to collect data from proton-proton collisions at the LHC at higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with the higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will be constructed using 2.5m long scintillating fibres and read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) located outside the acceptance. The fibres have a diameter of 0.25mm, are wound into ribbons with 5 or 6 staggered layers of fibres, and will cover a total active area of around 360m2. State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres. A custom ASIC, the PACIFIC, will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs and additional front-end electronics based on FPGAs will be used to reconstruct hit positions. There are a number of challenges involved in the construction of this detector: the radiation hardness of the fibres and the SiPMs; the mechanical precision required while building large active detector components; and the cooling required to mitigate the effects of radiation damage. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest results, including test beam data, will be presented.
        Speaker: Blake Dean Leverington (Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg (DE))
      • 15:45
        Test of MPGD modules with a large prototype Time Projection Chamber 15m
        The International Large Detector (ILD) is one of the detector concepts at the ILC where calorimetry and tracking systems are combined. The tracking system consists of a Silicon vertex detector, forward tracking disks and a large volume Time Projection Chamber (TPC). R&D for a Micro Pattern Gaseous Detector (MPGD) TPC has been carried out within the framework of LC-TPC collaboration. Beam tests have been performed using a Large Prototype, equipped with up to seven identical modules in a 1 T magnetic field at DESY. Results obtained with several technologies (GEM, Resistive Micromegas) will be presented (drift velocity, field distortions, spatial resolution, alignment measurements). Recently a new resistive material, diamond-like carbon, has been tested and compared with carbon-loaded polyimide. Cooling with two-phase CO2 has been applied, leading to stabilize within 0.1 °C the temperature of the electronics below 30 °C.
        Speaker: Deb Sankar Bhattacharya (CEA/IRFU,Centre d'etude de Saclay Gif-sur-Yvette (FR))
    • 14:30 16:00
      Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries HS21

      HS21

      • 14:30
        A Critical Examination of SU(3) in D to P P Decays 15m
        The question of the validity of analyzing charmed meson decays to pairs of hadrons within the SU(3) framework has been long and often debated. While there are convincing arguments that small breaking of this symmetry can accommodate for the current experimental results, the inability to compute QCD effects in these modes render it quite impossible to justify with complete authority the physical interpretations of the parameters extracted from experimental data. In our work we explore the SU(3) framework for its strengths and weaknesses and cross-examine it with arguments derived from a diagrammatic approach. We show that isospin non-universality of QCD should be considered within this framework. We also consider η - η' mixing in our attempt to build a complete analysis of these modes.
        Speaker: Ayan Paul (INFN, Sezione di Roma)
      • 14:45
        Searches of CP violation in two-body charm decays 15m
        LHCb has collected the world's largest sample of charmed hadrons. This sample is used to search for direct and indirect CP violation in charm, and to measure D0 mixing parameters. New updated measurements from several decay modes are presented, with complementary time-dependent and time-integrated analyses. We report on recent measurements of CP asymmetries in D→KK and D→ππ decays using the full LHCb dataset.
        Speaker: Michael Thomas Alexander (University of Glasgow (GB))
      • 15:00
        Searches of CP violation in multibody charm decays 15m
        LHCb has collected the world's largest sample of charmed hadrons. Recently many searches for CP violation have focused on analysing the Dalitz phase space. New results and novel techniques are presented.
        Speaker: Maurizio Martinelli (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (CH))
      • 15:15
        UTfit Collaboration Average of D meson mixing data. 15m
        We update the analysis of D meson mixing including the latest experimental results as of May 2015. We derive constraints on the parameters M12, Gamma12 and Phi12 that describe D meson mixing using all available data, allowing for CP violation. We also provide posterior distributions for observable parameters appearing in D physics.
        Speaker: Denis Derkach (University of Oxford (GB))
      • 15:30
        Charmed hadron decays at BESIII 15m
        The BESIII Experiment at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPCII) has accumulated the world's largest samples of $e^+e^-$ collisions in the tau-charm region. Based on the samples taken at $\psi(3770)$ and $\psi(4010)$ peaks, we present the purely leptonic and semi-leptonic decays of D meson, the Dalitz analysis of $D^+\to K_s \pi^+ \pi^0$ and $D^0\to K_sK^+K^-$, the $K^-\pi^+$ and $K_s\pi^+\pi^-$ strong phases, the D0-D0bar mixing parameter $y_{CP}$, and $D_s$ decays involving $\eta’$. In addition, BESIII collected 506/pb sample at $\sqrt{s}$ = 4.6 GeV, which allows us to perform the double-tag technique to measure the rates in the model-independent way near threshold for the first time. Herein, we present our analysis results on branching fractions for 12 $\lambda_c^+$ hadronic decays, including BF($\lambda_c^+ \to p K^-\pi^+$). In addition, we will present the results of the semi-leptonic decay BF($\lambda_c^+ \to \lambda e^+ \nu$).
        Speaker: Liaoyuan Dong (BESIII)
      • 15:45
        Recent studies of CP violation in bottom and charm meson decays at Belle 15m
        We present recent CP violation studies in B decays sensitive to the interior angles of the unitarity triangle in the Kobayashi-Maskawa scheme, $\phi_2 (\alpha)$ and $\phi_3 (\gamma)$. In addition, we present an updated CP-asymmetry measurement in charm meson decays. All measurements are based on the high statistics data set accumulated by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e− collider.
        Speaker: Pit Vanhoefer (MPI Munich)
    • 14:30 16:00
      Higgs and New Physics Großer Festsaal

      Großer Festsaal

      • 14:30
        Impact of electroweak precision measurements for dark matter constraints 12m
        We study SUSY models in the context of LHC searches and LHC exclusion bounds and explore models in the parameter range that may be accessible at future colliders. We study in particular the impact of precision measurements of masses, cross sections and further observables, for instance as forward-backward asymmetries, to determine the fundamental SUSY parameters for dark matter predictions. We focus in particular on the impact of electroweak loop corrections. We perform our dark matter predictions from the model-independent parameter determination at full one-loop order corrections and study which observables are most powerful with regard to the dark matter constraints.
        Speaker: Gudrid Moortgat-Pick (University of Hamburg/DESY)
      • 14:45
        Searches for Dark Matter in ATLAS and CMS 12m
        CMS and ATLAS search for the presence of dark matter particles in missing energy + X final states, where X signals the production in association with jets, photons and gauge bosons. The results of these searches place stringent limits on on the cross sections of interactions of dark matter with light and heavy flavor quarks and gluons. They are interpreted in terms of simplified models with different structures and mediators, as well as generic effective theory terms from higher mass scales.
        Speaker: Dirk Zerwas (Laboratoire de l'Accelerateur Lineaire (FR))
      • 15:00
        Status of the Inert Doublet Model of dark matter after Run-1 of the LHC 12m
        The Inert Doublet Model (IDM) is one of the simplest extensions of the Standard Model that can provide a viable dark matter (DM) candidate. Despite its simplicity, it predicts a versatile phenomenology both for cosmology and for the Large Hadron Collider. I will present the status of searches for IDM dark matter in direct DM detection experiments and the LHC, focusing on the impact of the latter on the model's parameter space. In particular, I will discuss the consequences of the Higgs boson discovery as well as those of searches for dileptons accompanied by missing transverse energy during the first LHC Run and comment on the prospects of probing some of the hardest to test regions of the IDM parameter space during the 13 TeV Run.
        Speaker: Dr. Andreas Goudelis (HEPHY - Vienna)
      • 15:15
        New probes for bino dark matter with coannihilation at the LHC 12m
        It has been widely known that bino-like dark matter in the supersymmetric theories in general suffers from over-production. The situation can be drastically improved if gluinos have a mass slightly heavier than bino as they reduce the dark matter abundance through coannihilation. We consider such a bino-gluino coannihilation in high-scale SUSY models. In this scenario, gluinos have long lifetime due to the limited phase space for the decay and the heavy squark mass indicated by higgs mass. The over-production of the bino-like dark matter can be also mitigated by wino with degenerated mass from bino. Then, the heavy higgsino could make bino long-lived. We study the prospects for exploring the bino-gluino and bino-wino coannihilation scenario at the LHC. We show that the searches for the long-lived particles with displaced vertices offer a strong tool to test these scenario in collider experiments.
        Speaker: Hidetoshi Otono (Kyushu University (JP))
      • 15:30
        Searches for electroweak SUSY in ATLAS and CMS 12m
        Results for SUSY searches in the electroweak sector are summarized, based on ̃20 fb-1 of 8 TeV proton-proton collisions collected by the CMS and ATLAS detector. A variety of complementary final state signatures and methods are used to probe gaugino and slepton production, including compressed scenarios. This talk includes the latest CMS results from the first ever search for SUSY production through vector boson fusion processes in a topology of two leptons, two forward jets and missing transverse energy.
        Speaker: Amandeep Kaur Kalsi (Panjab University (IN))
      • 15:45
        A light singlino in the NMSSM: Challenges for SUSY searches at the LHC 12m
        A light singlino in the NMSSM can reduce considerably the missing transverse energy at the end of sparticle decay cascades. This happens when the NLSP (typically bino-like) decays into a light singlino plus a Higgs boson with a mass just below the NLSP mass. This Higgs boson can be the SM-like Higgs, or a lighter NMSSM-specific Higgs boson. When such a scenario is realised, upper bounds on squark and gluino masses from the LHC run I are considerably reduced. Searches for SUSY at the run II should include searches for the remnants of two Higgs bosons per event, with yet unknown masses. Concrete proposals for such searches are made, including signal/background analyses.
        Speaker: Mr. Ulrich Ellwanger (LPT, University Paris-Sud)
    • 14:30 16:00
      Neutrino Physics HS7

      HS7

      • 14:30
        LBNO-DEMO (WA105): a large demonstrator of the Liquid Argon double phase TPC 15m
        A giant (10-50 kt) liquid argon TPC has been proposed as the detector for an underground observatory for the study of neutrino oscillations, neutrino astrophysics and proton decay. This detector has excellent tracking and calorimetric capabilities much superior to currently operating neutrino detectors. LBNO-DEMO (WA105) is a large demonstrator of the double phase liquid argon TPC based on the GLACIER design, with a 6$\times$6$\times$6~m$^3$ (appr. 300t) active volume. The TPC will be built inside a tank based on industrial LNG technology. Electrons produced in the liquid argon are extracted in the gas phase. Here, a readout plane based on LEM detectors provides amplification before the charge collection onto an anode plane with strip readout. PMT located on the bottom of the tank containing the liquid argon provide the readout of the scintillation light. This demonstrator is an industrial prototype of the design proposed for a large underground detector. WA105 is under construction at CERN and will be exposed to a charged particle beam (0.5-20 GeV/c) in the North Area in 2018. The data will provide necessary calibration of the detector performances and benchmark sophisticated reconstruction algorithms. This project is a crucial milestone providing feedback for the long baseline neutrino program, including projects like LBNO and DUNE.
        Speaker: Vyacheslav Galymov (Universite Claude Bernard-Lyon I (FR))
      • 14:45
        Stokes-shift engineered colloidal quantum dots as wavelength downshifters for detection of VUV light in Lar and LXe detectors 15m
        The detection of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation emitted by ionizing particles in large liquid Argon (LAr) or Xenon Time Projection chambers (TPCs ) is of key relevance in experimental neutrino or dark matter search. Typical schemes use photodetectors coated with down-conversion dyes, such as tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB). The development of large-area waveguides based on TPB is, however, hampered by the strong spectral overlap between its absorption and emission spectrum that leads to severe optical losses. Colloidal quantum dots (QD) offer a promising alternative to organic dyes for VUV down-conversion thanks to their large absorption cross section and efficient narrow emission, that can be tuned so as to match the efficiency peak of chosen photodetectors. It has been recently shown that QD can be engineered so as to effectively decouple their absorption and emission functions and concomitantly suppress Auger recombination that typically affects the scintillation performances of conventional QDs. So called ‘Stokes-shift engineered QDs’ have been successfully applied to demonstrate large area LSCs with complete suppression of re-absorption losses for distances of tens of centimeters. Here we report VUV absorption and photoluminescence excitation spectra of Stokes shift engineered CdSe/CdS QDs up to 100 nm, that demonstrate the great applicative potential of this class of functional nanomaterials for VUV harvesting and down-conversion in LAr or LXe VUV measurement.
        Speaker: Maurizio Bonesini (Sezione INFN, Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Universita' Milano-Bicocca)
      • 15:00
        Predicting the Leptonic Dirac CP Violation Phase from Sum Rules 15m
        Establishing the status of the CP symmetry in the lepton sector is one of the major goals of the programme of future research in neutrino physics. In the reference 3-neutrino mixing scheme CP-violating effects in neutrino oscillations can be caused by the Dirac CP violation phase $\delta$ present in the $3\times3$ unitary neutrino mixing matrix $U$. Using the fact that $U = U_e^\dagger U_\nu$, where $U_e$ and $U_\nu$ are $3\times3$ unitary matrices which diagonalise respectively the charged lepton and the neutrino mass matrices, we consider in a systematic way forms of $U_e$ and $U_\nu$ allowing us to express $\delta$ as a function of the neutrino mixing angles present in $U$ and the angles contained in $U_{\nu}$. After obtaining sum rules for $\cos\delta$, we consider several forms of $U_\nu$ dictated by, or associated with, symmetries, such as tri-bimaximal, bimaximal, etc., for which the angles in $U_\nu$ are fixed. For each of these forms and forms of $U_e$ allowing to reproduce the measured values of the neutrino mixing angles, we construct the likelihood function for $\cos\delta$, using i) the latest results of the global fit analysis of neutrino oscillation data, and ii) the prospective uncertainties in the determination of the neutrino mixing angles. Our results show that the measurement of $\delta$ along with improvement of the precision on the neutrino mixing angles can provide unique information about the possible existence of symmetry in the lepton sector.
        Speaker: Mr. Arsenii Titov (SISSA/INFN)
      • 15:15
        Neutrino CP violating phase from μ decay at rest 15m
        The determination of the value of θ13, which turned out to be considerably larger than the expected, opened the way to the measurement of the CP violating phase δ in the leptonic sector. We consider the following experimental setup: a 800MeV proton beam hits a target at a single site, creating μ antineutrinos via μ decay at rest; the electron antineutrinos produced by oscillations interact via IBD in two large liquid scintillators or water Cherenkov detectors. Studying the oscillation probability at different baselines it is possible to measure δ with good precision (5-15 degree in 10 years). We present several possible locations for this experiment in east Asia, each using accelerators or detectors already planned or under construction. No degeneracy is present between δ and π-δ.
        Speaker: Prof. Emilio Ciuffoli (IMP, CAS)
      • 15:30
        Neutrino Super Beam for lepton CP violation discovery based on the European Spallation Source 15m
        For the lepton CP violation discovery very intense neutrino beams are needed produced using very powerful proton beams. The proposed project, ESSnuSB, is based on the European Spallation Source proton linac the construction of which started in 2014 and will finish by 2023. This linac will have a power of 5 MW producing protons of 2 GeV energy. The combination of the high beam intensity and the comparatively low proton energy allows the neutrino measurements to be made with a megaton Water Cherenkov neutrino detector installed 1000 m down in a mine at ~540 km from the neutrino source which is near the position of the second neutrino oscillation maximum. The relative variation of the electron neutrino yield with the CP violation angle δCP is about three times larger at the second maximum as compared to that at the first maximum. This implies that the measurement of δCP is about three times less sensitive to the experimental systematic errors, which is the error determining the ultimate performance for discovery and measurement of leptonic CP violation. This observation has the potential to shed light on the matter-antimatter asymmetry in Universe. The performance of the experiment for such measurements will be presented and compared with other proposed experiments. The use of the large underground neutrino detector to measure the proton lifetime, detect cosmological neutrinos and neutrinos from supernova will also be described.
        Speaker: Eric Baussan (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (FR))
      • 15:45
        Probing non-standard neutrino interactions at ESSnuSB 15m
        Non-standard interactions (NSI) of neutrinos arise in various models of physics beyond the Standard Model. These interactions affect the oscillations of neutrinos and can therefore be probed by long-baseline experiments. In this work, we study the possibility of probing NSI at the source and detector using the proposed superbeam experiment at the ESS facility (ESSnuSB). ESSnuSB has been shown to have exceptional capability in measuring the Dirac-CP phase of the neutrino mixing matrix. We study the effect of NSI on this measurement at ESSnuSB. We also determine the bounds that ESSnuSB can impose on the values of the various NSI parameters, and compare them with the existing bounds.
        Speaker: Dr. Sushant Raut (KTH Royal Institute of Technology)
    • 14:30 16:00
      QCD and Hadronic Physics HS32

      HS32

      • 14:30
        Fully differential VBF Higgs production at NNLO 15m
        I will present fully differential NNLO corrections to vector-boson fusion (VBF) Higgs production at hadron colliders, in the limit in which there is no cross-talk between the hadronic systems associated with the two protons.The result is obtained by combining an inclusive NNLO calculation in the structure-function approach and a suitably factorised NLO VBF Higgs plus 3-jet calculation, supplemented with appropriate Higgs plus 2-parton counter-events. An earlier calculation of the fully inclusive cross section had found small NNLO corrections, at the percent level. In contrast, I will show that the cross section after typical experimental VBF cuts and differential distributions receive larger NNLO corrections.
        Speaker: Alexander Karlberg (University of Oxford (GB))
      • 14:45
        First LHCb results from the 13 TeV LHC data 15m
        The very first Run II LHC data allows LHCb to measure the cross-sections for quarkonia, beauty and charm productions. Results should be available quickly thanks to the new "Turbo" stream procedure allowing the analysis of particle candidates selected at trigger level without the need of offline reconstruction. First results are presented, conditional on LHC machine operation.
        Speaker: Ilya Komarov (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (CH))
      • 15:00
        Matching the Nagy-Soper parton shower at next-to-leading order 15m
        We give a short review of the shower concept, first introduced by Nagy and Soper, that includes full quantum correlations in the shower evolution. We also state the current status of implementation of the publicly available shower program Deductor. However, the main focus of the talk will be the matching of the shower at next-to-leading order within the MC@NLO formalism. Matching is necessary in order to increase the accuracy of theoretical predictions and to employ a hadronization model. We will show first results using Deductor in conjunction with the Helac-NLO framework for top quark pair production in association with one hard jet.
        Speaker: Manfred Kraus (RWTH Aachen)
      • 15:15
        Fully differential decay rate of a standard model Higgs boson into a b-quark pair at NNLO accuracy 15m
        We compute the fully differential decay rate of the standard model Higgs boson to a b-quark pair at NNLO accuracy. We use a general subtraction scheme developed for computing QCD jet cross sections in perturbation theory. The double real and real-virtual contributions to the second order radiative corrections, regularized by subtractions, are finite in four space-time dimensions and their contribution to the decay rate can be computed with any jet function defined in four dimensions. We also demonstrate the finiteness of the regularized double virtual correction analytically. We present the differential decay rate into b-jets as a function of the jet resolution parameter for the JADE and Durham clustering algorithms.
        Speaker: Zoltan Laszlo Trocsanyi (University of Debrecen (HU))
      • 15:30
        Numerical Implementation of the Loop-Tree Duality 15m
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