ICHEP 2016 Chicago

US/Central
Chicago IL USA

Chicago IL USA

Sheraton Grand Chicago 301 East Water Street Chicago IL 60611 USA
Young-Kee Kim (University of Chicago (US))
Description

The U.S. particle physics community is proud to host the 38th ICHEP in Chicago from the 3rd to the 10th August 2016. ICHEP is a focal point of the field of particle physics, bringing together experimentalists and theorists of the world. It was first held in 1950, and is biennial since 1960.

Dates: from 3 August 2016 17:00 to 10 August 2016 17:50
Timezone: US/Central
Location:

Sheraton Grand Chicago
Map

Address: 301 East North Water Street
Chicago IL 60611
USA
Webcast
There is a live webcast for this event
    • Registration Registration Desk

      Registration Desk

      Sheraton Grand Chicago 301 East Water Street Chicago IL 60611 USA
    • Registration: Registration desk will be open until 6pm
    • Accelerator: Physics, Performance, R&D and Future Facilities: 1 Superior B

      Superior B

      Sheraton Grand Chicago 301 East Water Street Chicago IL 60611 USA
      Convener: Eugene Levichev
      • 1
        Status of the CEPC Project, accelerator, detector and physics (15' + 5')
        Being the next generation of circular collider, the CEPC project will be installed in a tunnel of at least 54 km circumference. Using electron-positron collisions, the CEPC project provides high precision measurements for Higgs physics and electroweak physics. The CEPC could be upgraded to SPPC, which can explore the physics landscape at o(100) TeV proton collisions. Other collision operations, such as e-p and heavy ion collisions, is also under discussion. This talk covers the accelerator baseline design, R&D progress of Detector and the exploration of Physics potential with simulation at CEPC.
        Speaker: Jie GAO (IHEP)
      • 2
        Review of interaction regions for future crab waist colliders. (15' + 5')
        Invention of the crab waist collision scheme gave birth to several projects of future colliders with luminosity by one or two orders of magnitude higher than in previous particle factories. The biggest influence in luminosity gain comes from extremely small vertical beta function, which enhances nonlinear chromaticity of the interaction region lattice. Therefore, all the projects have to compensate it. We will review three projects for completely different energies of the future colliders with crab waist collision scheme: FCC-ee (CERN), tau-charm (Novosibirsk) and super-phi (Novosibirsk), explain the common problems of the interaction region nonlinear properties and solutions we used to control them.
        Speaker: Dr Anton Bogomyagkov (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (RU))
      • 3
        Beam Optics for FCC-ee Collider Ring (15' + 5')
        Design of beam optics will be presented for the FCC-ee double-ring collider. The main characteristics are 45 to 175 GeV beam energy, 100 km circumference with two IPs/ring, 30 mrad crossing angle at the IP, crab-waist scheme with local chromaticity correction system, and "tapering" of the magnets along with the local beam energy. An asymmetric layout near the interaction region suppresses the critical energy of synchrotron radiation toward the detector at the IP less than 100 keV, while keeping the geometry as close as to the FCC-hh beam line. A sufficient transverse/longitudinal dynamic aperture is obtained for beta* = (0.5 m, 1 mm) to assure the lifetime with beamstrahlung and top-up injection. The synchrotron radiation in all magnets, the IP solenoid and its compensation, nonlinearity of the final quadrupoles are taken into account.
        Speaker: Katsunobu Oide (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (JP))
      • 4
        Research program on the cryogenic beam-vacuum of the FCC-hh (15' + 5')
        The FCC-hh is an accelerator with unique vacuum issues. Naively it could be thought of as a beefed-up LHC, but a careful scrutiny of its technical specifications immediately shows that it presents distinctive features which are nowhere to be found in the present LHC or even in its funded upgrade, HiLumi-LHC. Its peculiarity stems from the fact that FCC-hh is characterized by extremely high synchrotron radiation (SR) power density and photon flux while at the same time technology- and cost-wide issues call for a smaller cold-bore diameter with respect to the present 8.3 tesla dipoles of the LHC. Another important constraint for the design of the beam screen (BS) comes from the need to remove the SR power at a temperature as high as allowed by vacuum considerations in order to minimize the capital and operational costs of the cryogenic cooling system. The design of the BS in the arcs is presently the subject of a EuroCirCol work package 4 (*) collaboration between 6 different research centers, aiming at developing and testing a conceptual BS suitable for installation in the 16 tesla FCC-hh dipoles. This paper highlights the current status of the analysis of the performances of the BS, via coupled montecarlo simulations for SR and molecular flow, and coupled electromagnetic-thermo-mechanical calculations as well. The latter take into account the powerful forces generated during a simulated dipole quench, and the complex SR heat transfer across the novel BS geometry. In parallel, the collaboration is designing a test-stand for installation of a prototype BS at the 2.5 GeV light source ANKA, where the SR spectrum of the FCC-hh can be reproduced quite accurately. The currents status of the design of the test bench and its main goals will also be briefly highlighted. These activities are mainly carried out at CERN, while studies covering electron-cloud mitigation measures, involving other participating EuroCirCol WP4 collaboration institutions, are also briefly highlighted. (*)This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (EuroCirCol)
        Speaker: Roberto Kersevan (CERN)
      • 5
        The CERN High Field Magnet Program (15' + 5')
        High Field Magnets is one of the priority R&D clearly identified in the Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, as well as the HEPAP Accelerator R&D Subpanel. CERN, together with several collaborating institutes in the Member States, is responding with a broadly structured and progressive approach to increasing field levels. The activities in the domain of high field accelerator magnets cover technology, demonstration and engineering developments, embracing construction projects such as HL-LHC, and design studies such as the FCC, but also beyond. This presentation covers the rationale of the program, by putting it in the context of previous developments, and lists the main milestones in the path that we traced to drawing the maximum performance from LTS materials, and exploring the potential of HTS materials.
        Speaker: Paolo Fessia (CERN)
      • 6
        Landscape of Future Accelerators at the Energy and Intensity Frontier (15' + 5')
        This talk will provide an overview of the currently envisaged landscape of charge particle accelerators at the energy and intensity frontiers to explore particle physics beyond the standard model via 1-100 TeV-scale lepton and hadron colliders and multi-Megawatt proton accelerators for short- and long-baseline neutrino experiments. The particle beam physics, associated technological challenges and progress to date for these accelerator facilities (LHC, HL-LHC, future 100 TeV p-p colliders, Tev-scale linear and circular electron-positron colliders, high intensity proton accelerator complex PIP-II for DUNE and future upgrade to PIP-III) will be outlined. Potential and prospects for advanced “plasma-wakefield-based techniques” at the TeV-scale energy frontier and advanced “nonlinear dynamic techniques” at multi-MW level intensity frontier will be touched upon.
        Speaker: Prof. Michael Syphers (Northern Illinois University)
    • Astro-particle Physics and Cosmology: AMS/Holometer Chicago 10

      Chicago 10

      Sheraton Grand Chicago 301 East Water Street Chicago IL 60611 USA
      Convener: Kirsten Anne Tollefson (Michigan State University (US))
      • 7
        Precision Measurement of the (e$^{+}$+e$^{−}$) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station (12' + 3')
        We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e$^{+}$+e$^{−}$) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e$^{+}$+e$^{−}$) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. AMS measurements of individual e$^{+}$ and e$^{−}$ fluxes show neither e$^{+}$ nor e$^{−}$ can be described by a single power law above 27.2 and 52.3 GeV, respectively. Surprisingly, above 30.2 GeV, the combined (e$^{+}$+e$^{−}$) flux can be described accurately by a single power law with a spectral index γ=-3.170 ± 0.008(stat+syst) ± 0.008(energy scale).
        Speaker: Valerio Vagelli (Universita e INFN, Perugia (IT))
      • 8
        Precision measurement of the antiproton-to-proton ratio by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station (12' + 3')
        A precision measurement, with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, of the antiproton-to-proton ratio in the primary cosmic rays is presented. The measurement is made in the rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV and is based on 300,000 antiproton events. The measurement increases the precision and significantly extends the high rigidity range beyond previous observations.
        Speaker: Andrew Chen (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
      • 9
        Precision Measurement of Boron-to-Carbon and Carbon-to-Helium flux ratio in Cosmic Rays from 2 GV to 2 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station. (12' + 3')
        AMS-02 is wide acceptance high-energy physics experiment installed on the International Space Station in May 2011 and operating continuously since then. AMS-02 is able to precisely separate cosmic rays light nuclei ($1\leq Z \leq 8$) with contaminations less than $10^{-3}$. The light nuclei cosmic ray Boron to Carbon flux ratio is a very well known sensitive observable for the understanding of the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy, being Boron a secondary product of spallation on the interstellar medium of heavier primary elements such as Carbon and Oxygen. The ratio of the two primary species such as Carbon and Helium is also important for understanding charge dependencies of the production, acceleration and propagation mechanisms of cosmic rays in our galaxy. The status of the measurement of the boron-to-carbon and carbon-to-helium based on 10 millions Boron and Carbon and 50 million Helium events is presented.
        Speaker: Alberto Oliva (Centro de Investigaciones Energ. Medioambientales y Tecn. - (ES)
      • 10
        Search for Space-Time Correlations from the Planck Scale with the Fermilab Holometer (15' + 5')
        Measurements are reported of high frequency cross-spectra of signals from the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of co-located 39 m, high power Michelson interferometers. The instrument obtains differential position sensitivity to cross-correlated signals far exceeding any previous measurement in a broad frequency band extending to the 3.8 MHz inverse light crossing time of the apparatus. General experimental constraints are placed on parameters of a set of models of universal exotic spatial shear correlations, with a sensitivity that exceeds the Planck scale holographic information bound of space-time position states by a significant factor. Current status and future plans are discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Chris Stoughton (Fermilab)
      • 11
        Exotic Rotational Correlations from Quantum Geometry (15' + 5')
        Planck scale quantum geometry can lead to exotic correlations in displacements of bodies and phases of fields that grow with scale, in the same way as standard quantum correlations in extended systems. Such correlations resolve some of the well known conflicts of standard field theory with gravity on large scales. Even without a theory of quantum gravity, basic quantum principles suffice to predict the effect of exotic rotational correlations in the signal of an interferometer. The prediction can be tested with a reconfiguration of an existing instrument, the Fermilab Holometer. Entanglement of these correlations with the Standard Model vacuum might explain the origin of the cosmological constant.
        Speaker: Prof. Craig Hogan (Fermilab and University of Chicago)
      • 12
        Sterile neutrino dark matter and the 3.5 keV line (15' + 5')
        The cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm has been extremely successful in explaining the large-scale structure of the Universe. However, it continues to face issues when confronted by observations on sub-Galactic scales. We first summarize the small-scale issues surrounding CDM and discuss the solutions explored by modern state-of-the-art numerical simulations including treatment of baryonic physics. We identify the `too-big-to-fail' in field galaxies as among the best targets to study modifications to CDM, and discuss the particular solution of keV sterile neutrino warm dark matter. Furthermore, we discuss how the claimed anomalous 3.5 keV X-ray lines, when interpreted as sterile neutrino dark matter decay, provide a very good description of small-scale observations of the Local Group.
        Speaker: Shunsaku Horiuchi (Virginia Tech)
      • 13
        Hints of new physics from stars (12' + 3')
        Several stellar systems show a preference for a mild non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, together they seem to indicate a systematic problem with our understanding of stellar evolution and, perhaps, a hint to new physics. Indeed, the exotic cooling could be provided by new Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and contributing directly to the energy loss. I will present an overview of the most recent observations and of the available solutions. I will show that Axion-Like Particles (ALPs) represent the best option for this problem. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and especially the International Axion Observatory (IAXO).
        Speaker: Maurizio Giannotti (Barry University)
    • Beyond the Standard Model: 1 Chicago 7

      Chicago 7

      Sheraton Grand Chicago 301 East Water Street Chicago IL 60611 USA
      Conveners: Bruce Mellado Garcia (University of the Witwatersrand) , Seema Sharma (Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IN))
      • 14
        Search for supersymmetry with jets and missing transverse momentum in pp collisions at 13 TeV with CMS (15' + 5')

        A search for new physics is performed based on multijet events with large missing transverse momentum produced in 13 TeV proton-proton collisions. The data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb-1, was collected with the CMS detector at Run 2 of the CERN LHC. The data are examined in search regions of jet multiplicity, bottom-quark jet multiplicity, missing transverse momentum, and the scalar sum of jet transverse momenta. Exclusion limits are presented for simplified supersymmetric models of gluino pair production.These results significantly extend the limits from LHC Run 1.

        Speaker: Francesco Pandolfi (ETH Zürich)
      • 15
        Inclusive searches for squarks and gluinos in fully hadronic final states with the ATLAS detector (15' + 5')
        Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. The recent increase in the center of mass energy of the proton-proton collisions gives a unique opportunity to extend the sensitivity to production of supersymmetric particles at the Large Hadron Collider. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results on inclusive searches for promptly decaying supersymmetric squarks and gluinos in events containing jets, missing transverse momentum and no light lepton.
        Speaker: David Miller (University of Chicago (US))
      • 16
        Search for supersymmetry in events with one lepton, jets and missing transverse momentum in pp collisions at 13 TeV with CMS (15' + 5')

        Results are reported from a search for supersymmetric particles in pp collisions in the final state with a single, high pT lepton; multiple jets, including at least one btagged jet; and large missing transverse momentum. The data sample corresponds to 2.1 fb-1 recorded by the CMS experiment at ps = 13 TeV. The search focuses on processes leading to high jet multiplicities, such as gluino pair production with the gluino decaying to top quarks. The quantity MJ, defined as the sum of the masses of the large-radius jets in the event, is used in conjunction with other kinematic variables to provide discrimination between signal and backgrounds and as a key part of the background estimation method. Competitive exclusion limits are obtained.

        Speaker: Artur Apresyan (California Institute of Technology (US))
      • 17
        Inclusive searches for squarks and gluinos in lepton channels with the ATLAS detector (15' + 5')
        Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. The recent increase in the center of mass energy of the proton-proton collisions gives a unique opportunity to extend the sensitivity to production of supersymmetric particles at the Large Hadron Collider. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results on inclusive searches for promptly decaying supersymmetric squarks and gluinos in events containing jets, missing transverse momentum and electrons or muons.
        Speaker: Lucian Stefan Ancu (Universite de Geneve (CH))
      • 18
        Search for supersymmetry in events with two or more leptons in pp collisions at 13 TeV with CMS (15' + 5')

        We present a search for new physics in events with one or two low-momentum leptons and missing transverse energy, based on the first proton-proton integrated luminosity recorded with the CMS detector at 13 TeV. The final state can be the phenomenology of SUSY models foreseeing a small mass splitting between the lightest supersymmetric particle and e.g. the top squark or chargino, in the so called compressed mass spectra scenario. The event selection and kinematics, together with methods for estimating the standard model backgrounds are presented. Results are interpreted in terms on SUSY models where a compressed mass scenario is foreseen.

        Speaker: Marc Dunser (CERN)
      • 19
        Searches for electroweak production of supersymmetric gauginos and sleptons with the ATLAS detector (15' + 5')
        Many supersymmetry models feature gauginos and also sleptons with masses less than a few hundred GeV. These can give rise to observables direct pair production rates at the LHC. The talk presents results from searches for gaugino and slepton pair production in final states with leptons, including prospects for very high integrated luminosities.
        Speaker: Dongliang Zhang (University of Michigan (US))
    • Detector: R&D and Performance: Overview Chicago 8

      Chicago 8

      Convener: Ingrid-Maria Gregor (DESY)
      • 20
        The SiD Detector for the International Linear Collider (15' + 5')
        The SiD Detector for the future International Linear Collider will deliver superb performance for high precision Higgs and Top measurements, and will have excellent sensitivity to a wide range of possible new phenomena. SiD features a compact, cost-constrained design, with a robust silicon vertex and tracking system, which, combined with a 5 Tesla central solenoidal field, provides excellent momentum resolution. The highly granular calorimeter system is optimized for Particle Flow application to achieve very good jet energy resolution over a wide range of energies. Details of the proposed implementation of the SiD subsystems, as driven by the physics requirements, together with recent changes to the overall design and assembly procedures, will be given. Integration with the accelerator, the push-pull mechanism, and the assembly logistics at the Kitakami site will be described, with an estimated timeline for construction in relation to the overall ILC Project.
        Speaker: Andrew White (University of Texas at Arlington)
      • 21
        ATLAS Upgrades for the next Decades (15' + 5')
        fter the successful operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010 - 2012, the LHC is ramped up and successfully took data at the center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb−1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. In parallel, the experiments need to be keep lockstep with the accelerator to accommodate running beyond the nominal luminosity this decade. Along with maintenance and consolidation of the detector in the past few years, ATLAS has added inner b-layer to its tracking system. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of extensions to larger pseudorapidity, particularly in tracking and muon systems. This report summarizes various improvements to the ATLAS detector required to cope with the anticipated evolution of the LHC luminosity during this decade and the next.
        Speaker: Guido Volpi (Universita di Pisa & INFN (IT))
      • 22
        Detector Systems for the Muon g-2 Experiment (15' + 5')
        The Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab will collect more than 20 times the data obtained in the BNL E821 measurement of the muon’s anomalous magnetic moment. Because $g \neq 2$, the spin of a muon confined in a magnetic storage ring precesses slightly faster than the cyclotron frequency; the difference between these frequencies is proportional to the magnetic moment anomaly. The signature of this difference is a modulation in the decay rate of muons to higher-energy positrons, which we measure using 24 electromagnetic calorimeters positioned uniformly around the inside of the ring. The larger data set compared to BNL will be obtained by employing a higher muon fill rate frequency, a longer running period, and higher muon storage intensity per fill. Each of these issues has implications in the instrumentation design, but none more challenging than handling the anticipated higher instantaneous rates and potential systematic uncertainties related to pileup and gain (energy) instability. We have developed an ultra-fast, segmented Cherenkov crystal calorimeter read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), which are insensitive to the magnetic field environment. The SiPM signals are continuously digitized at 800 MSPS at depth of 12 bits. The SiPM pulse widths are less than 8 ns, and two-pulse separation resolution has been demonstrated down to a few ns. Complementing this system is a series of in-vacuum straw chamber planes positioned in front of three calorimeters. The straw system allows both accurate determination of the important muon storage parameters that are critical for systematic error corrections {\e em and} sensitivity to a muon EDM signal that would manifest itself as an up/down modulation in the average slope of decay positrons at the $g-2$ precession frequency, but out of phase with it by $\pi/2$. This talk will emphasize the key developments in these systems and why they will lead to a robust measurement.
        Speaker: Jarek Kaspar (University of Washington)
      • 23
        Simulations for energy frontier (15' + 5')
        Monte Carlo (MC) event samples with simulation of detector response are an essential part of the strategic planning for future energy-frontier experiments, such as High-Luminosity LHC, ILC (International Linear Collider), FCC (Future Circular Collider), CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collider), SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) and other future particle collider proposals. This talk describes a project, called HepSim, that focuses on Monte Carlo samples created using large-scale computing facilities such as High-performance computing (HPC) and the Open Science grid (OSG). HepSim provides software tools and publicly accessible Monte Carlo event samples including fast and full detector simulations, to be used for physics and performance studies by the HEP community. A few examples relevant to specific physics cases will be illustrated.
        Speaker: Sergei Chekanov (Argonne National Laboratory (US))
      • 24
        Status of the CEPC Project: Accelerator, Detector and Physics (15' + 5')
        The high energy Circular Electron-Positron Collider (CEPC) is envisioned to be installed in a tunnel of at least 54 km in circumference. The CEPC physics program includes high precision measurements of the Higgs boson and the study of the electroweak physics. The CEPC may be upgraded to a Super proton-proton Collider (SppC), which can explore the physics landscape at o(100) TeV in proton-proton collisions. Other collision operations, such as e-p and heavy ion collisions, are also under discussion. This talk covers the accelerator baseline design, the detector R&D progress and the physics potentials of the CEPC project.
        Speaker: Jie GAO (IHEP)
      • 25
        Study Of Boosted W-Jets And Higgs-Jets With the SiFCCDetector (15' + 5')

        We study detector performance of Higgs boson identification variables at very high energy proton colliders. We study Higgs bosons decaying to bottom quarks with transverse momentum in the multi-TeV range. Detectors are benchmarked in various configurations in order to understand the impact of granularity and resolution on boosted Higgs boson discrimination.

        Speaker: Shin-Shan Yu (National Central University (TW))
    • Higgs Physics: 1 Chicago 9

      Chicago 9

      Sheraton Grand Chicago 301 East Water Street Chicago IL 60611 USA
      Conveners: Kirill Prokofiev (The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HK)) , Stefania Gori (Perimeter Institute/Cincinnati University)
      • 26
        Determination of the total LHC Higgs boson Cross Section (15' + 5')
        In this talk I will present the most precise theoretical determination of the total Higgs boson Cross Section at the LHC known to this date. This new determination was made possible only through the first complete calculation of an LHC observable at N3LO in perturbative QCD. I will discuss the impact of the N3LO correction on the total cross section and examine remaining sources of theoretical uncertainties, such as limited knowledge of physical parameters, parton densities and yet unknown higher order corrections.
        Speaker: Dr Franz Herzog (Nikhef)
      • 27
        Measurement of cross sections and couplings of the SM Higgs boson in the diphoton decay channel using the ATLAS detector (12' + 3')
        The latest results on the measurement of the cross sections and couplings of the Higgs boson in the diphoton decay channel with the ATLAS detector are presented, using approximately 10 fb-1 of pp collision data collected at 13 TeV.
        Speaker: Andrew Pilkington (University Of Manchester)
      • 28
        Measurements of Higgs boson production and properties in the di-photon decay channel using the CMS detector (12' + 3')
        A summary of the CMS results in the study of the Higgs boson in decays to diphotons will be presented in this talk.
        Speaker: Vittorio Raoul Tavolaro (Eidgenoessische Tech. Hochschule Zuerich (CH))
      • 29
        Measurement of cross sections and couplings of the SM Higgs boson in the ZZ decay channel using the ATLAS detector (12' + 3')
        The latest results on the measurement of the cross sections and couplings of the Higgs boson in the ZZ decay channel with the ATLAS detector are presented, using approximately 10 fb-1 of pp collision data collected at 13 TeV.
        Speaker: Ludovica Aperio Bella (University of Birmingham (GB))
      • 30
        Measurements of Higgs boson production and properties in the ZZ decay channel using the CMS detector (12' + 3')
        A summary of the CMS results in the study of the Higgs boson in decays to four leptons will be presented in this talk.
        Speaker: Simon Regnard (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (FR))
      • 31
        Measurement of cross sections and couplings of the SM Higgs boson in the WW decay channel using the ATLAS detector (12' + 3')
        The measurement of the cross sections and couplings of the Higgs boson in the WW decay channel with the ATLAS detector is presented, using the run-1 dataset.
        Speaker: Claudia Bertella (Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (DE))
      • 32
        Measurements of Higgs boson production and properties in the WW decay channel using the CMS detector (12' + 3')
        A summary of the CMS results in the study of the Higgs boson in decays to W pair bosons will be presented in this talk.
        Speaker: Andrea Massironi (Northeastern University (US))
    • Neutrino Physics: Solar/Atm/SN Chicago 6

      Chicago 6

      Convener: Hiroyuki Sekiya (University of Tokyo)
      • 33
        Atmospheric Neutrino Results from Super-Kamiokande (15' + 2')
        The latest results from the Super-Kamiokande on the topic of atmospheric neutrino oscillation will be presented. Atmospheric neutrinos cover a wide energy range, have both electron and muon flavors, and through a 3-flavor analysis are sensitive to the neutrino mass hierarchy and CP-violating phase.
        Speaker: Mr Zepeng Li (Duke University)
      • 34
        Solar neutrino results from Super-Kamiokande (15' + 3')
        Super-Kamiokande (SK), a 50 kton water Cherenkov detector in Japan, observes $^{8}$B solar neutrinos with neutrino-electron elastic scattering. SK searches for distortions of the solar neutrino energy spectrum caused by the edge of the MSW resonance in the core of the Sun. It also searches for a day/night solar rate asymmetry induced by the matter in the Earth. A combined analysis of the all SK spectral, day/night and absolute rate measurements as well as all solar neutrino and KamLAND data is presented. The installation of new front-end electronics in 2008 marks the beginning of the 4th phase of SK (SK-IV). With the improvement of the water circulation system, calibration methods, reduction cuts, this phase achieved the lowest energy threshold thus far (~3.5 MeV kinetic energy). SK observed solar neutrinos for about 18 years, that is more than 5,000 days. This long operation covers about 1.5 solar activity cycles. An analysis about a possible correlation between solar neutrino flux and 11 year activity cycle will be presented.
        Speaker: Yuuki Nakano (Kamioka Observatory)
      • 35
        Recent results from Borexino (25' + 5')
        The Borexino experiment is running at the “Laboratori del Gran Sasso” in Italy since 2007. Its technical distinctive feature is the unprecedented ultralow background of the inner scintillating core, which is the basis of the outstanding achievements obtained by the experiment. In this talk, after recalling the main features of the detector, the impressive solar and geoneutrino results accumulated so far by Borexino will be summarized, with special emphasis to the most recent and prominent results. Specifically, these are on one hand the measure of the fundamental pp solar neutrino flux, which is the direct probe of the engine mechanism powering our star, and on the other the detection of the geo-neutrino signal with a significance as high as 5.9 sigma. The pp milestone measurement puts Borexino in the unique situation of being the only experiment able to do solar neutrino spectroscopy over the entire solar spectrum; the counterpart of this peculiar status in the oscillation interpretation of the data is the capability of Borexino alone to perform the full validation across the solar energy range of the MSW-LMA paradigm. The implications of the geoneutrino data in term of capability to investigate important geophysical properties of the interior of the Earth will be also discussed. The talk will be concluded highlighting the perspectives for the final stage of the solar program of the experiment, centered on the goal to fully complete the solar spectroscopy with the missing piece of the CNO neutrinos. If successful, such a measurement would represent the final crowning of the long quest of Borexino to unravel all the properties of the neutrinos from the Sun.
        Speaker: Davide D'Angelo (Universita' degli Studi Milano)
      • 36
        Neutrino decay and Solar Neutrino Seasonal effect (15' + 2')
        We consider the possibility of solar neutrino decay on their propagation between production and detection. Using current oscillation data, we set a new lower bound to the $\nu_2$ neutrino lifetime at $\tau_2\, /\, m_2 \geq 7.2 \times 10^{-4}\,\,\hbox{s}\,.\,\hbox{eV}^{-1}$ at $99\%\,$C.L.. We show that in neutrino decay scenario induce an non-usual seasonal variation in the solar neutrino data.
        Speaker: Orlando L. G. Peres (UNICAMP)
      • 37
        $\nu_{\mu}$ Disappearance with IceCube/Deepcore (15' + 5')
        Located at the South Pole Station in Antarctica, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory is the world's largest neutrino telescope. In the clearest part of the ice sits a more densely instrumented section, DeepCore, that is able to measure neutrinos from 10-60 GeV. Using DeepCore, neutrino oscillations can be observed via $\nu_{\mu}$ disappearance. This talk will go over the latest atmospheric disappearance results from IceCube/DeepCore and the future outlook of the oscillation physics that can be done with such detector.
        Speaker: Joshua Hignight (Michigan State University)
    • Quark and Lepton Flavor Physics: 1 Superior A

      Superior A

      Sheraton Grand Chicago 301 East Water Street Chicago IL 60611 USA
      Convener: Diego Milanes Carreno (Universidad Nacional de Colombia (CO))
      • 38
        CP asymmetries in $D$ decays to two pseudoscalars (15' + 5')

        Current experiments measuring CP asymmetries in $D$ meson decays approach a sensitivity which is comparable to the tiny Standard-Model (SM) predictions for these quantities. However, the errors of the SM predictions, which essentially all rely on the approximate SU(3) flavour symmetry, make the search for new physics in $D$-meson CP asymmetries difficult. I present new calculations which control the dominant hadronic uncertainties up to linear order in SU(3) breaking. I further discuss the potentially large CP asymmetry in $D^0 \to K_S K_S$.

        Speakers: Ulrich Nierste (KIT) , Ulrich Nierste (Unknown) , Ulrich Nierste (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT))
      • 39
        Mixing and CP violation in charm decays at LHCb (10' + 5')
        LHCb has collected the world's largest sample of charmed hadrons. This sample is used to measure $D^0 - \bar D^0$ mixing and to search for direct and indirect CP violation. New measurements from several decay modes are presented, as well as prospects for future sensitivities.
        Speaker: Adam Davis (University of Cincinnati (US))
      • 40
        Recent BABAR results on mixing and CP violation in the charm sector. (10' + 5')
        Based on the full data set recorded with the BABAR detector at center-of-mass energies at and near the Upsilon(4S) resonance, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 468 fb-1, we measure the D0-D0bar mixing parameters using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D0 -> pi+pi-pi0. The neutral D-meson candidates are selected from D*(2010)+ -> D0 pi+ decays where the flavour at the production is identified by the charge of the low-momentum pion. With the same data set we perform an analysis of CP-asymmetries in the singly Cabibbo-suppressed decay process D+ -> pi+ pi0. We discuss the sensitivity to CP-violating phases, and the correspondening New Physics constraints.
        Speaker: Alessandro Pilloni (Jefferson Lab)
      • 41
        Search for $CP$ violation in $D$ decays to radiative and hadronic decays (10' + 5')
        Enhancement of branching fraction and $CP$ violation in $D$ decays would represent a signal of physics beyond the Standard Model. Using the large data sample accumulated by the Belle experiment at KEKB asymmetric energy $e^+ e^−$ collider, we present the results for search for rare $D$ decays such as $D^0 \to \gamma\gamma$, along with the search for $CP$ violation in $D^0 \to V \gamma$ ($V$ = light vector meson) and $D^0 \to K_S^0 K_S^0$.
        Speaker: Nibedita Dash (IIT Bhubaneswar)
      • 42
        CP Asymmetries in Many-Body Final in Beauty & Charm Transitions (15' + 5')
        Our community has focused on two-body final states in B & D decays. The SM produces at least the leading source of CP violation in B transitions; none has been established yet in charm decays. It is crucial to measure three- and four-body final states (FS) with accuracy and to compare with predictions based on refined theoretical tools. Correlations between different final states (FS) based on CPT invariance are often not obvious, how to apply them and where. We have to probe regional asymmetries and use refined parameterization of the CKM matrix. One uses (broken) U- & V-spin symmetries for spectroscopy. The situations with weak decays of hadrons are much more complex. The impact of strong re-scattering is large, and it connects U- & V-spin symmetries. Drawing diagrams often does not mean we understand the underlying dynamics. I give a few comments about probing the decays of beauty & charm baryons. I discuss the ‘strategies’ more than the ‘tactics’.
        Speaker: Ikaros Bigi (Univ. of Notre Dame)
      • 43
        D0D0-bar mixing and hadronic D decays at BESIII (10' + 5')
        The BESIII detector at BEPCII collider accumulated 2.93 and 0.482 fb-1 data at 3.773 and 4.009 GeV. Using the quantum correlation property of D0D0-bar production, we determine the parameters of the strong phase difference and D0D0-bar mixing. Also, we perform Dalitz plot analysis on D+ to Kspi+pi0, measurements of D0 to KsKK, D0(+) to omegapi0(+) and Ds+ to etaprime X, Ds+ to etaprime rho+.
        Speaker: Xiao-Rui Lyu (UCAS)
      • 44
        Standard Model Prediction for Direct CP-violation in K-decays, and Long-Distance Contributions to Kaonic Ampltiudes (15' + 5')
        Recent theoretical and computational advances have enabled the precision determination of multi-particle Standard Model amplitudes using lattice QCD. In particular the measure of direct CP-violation in kaon decays, \epsilon', has now been computed with errors that are 40% of the experimental value; this quantity is highly sensitive to BSM sources of CP-violation and may help shed light on the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe. We will discuss this calculation of \epsilon' and our present and future efforts in improving our result. We will also briefly discuss our ongoing calculations of other long-distance contributions to kaonic amplitudes sensitive to new physics.
        Speaker: Christopher Kelly (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
    • Strong Interactions and Hadron Physics: LHC Exotic hadrons, b, charm Ontario

      Ontario

      Sheraton Grand Chicago 301 East Water Street Chicago IL 60611 USA
      Convener: Xiaoyan Shen (Univ. of Science & Tech. of China (CN))
      • 45
        Exotic hadrons at the LHC (25' + 5')
        Merged abstract
        Speaker: Liming Zhang (Tsinghua University (CHINA))
      • 46
        Exotic hadrons at the Tevatron (15' + 5')
        Merged abstract
        Speaker: Daria Zieminska (Indiana University (US))
      • 47
        b-hadron production at ATLAS and CMS (20' + 5')
        Merged abstract
        Speaker: Eduard De La Cruz Burelo (Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (MX))
      • 48
        b-hadron production at LHCb (15' + 5')
        Merged abstract
        Speaker: Marina Artuso (Syracuse University (US))
      • 49
        charm-hadron production at hadron colliders (20' + 5')
        Merged abstract
        Speaker: Miriam Watson (University of Birmingham (GB))
    • Top Quark and Electroweak Physics: 1 Huron

      Huron

      Sheraton Grand Chicago 301 East Water Street Chicago IL 60611 USA
      Convener: Pedro Vieira De Castro Ferreira Da Silva (CERN)
      • 50
        Top quark pair production cross-section measurements with the ATLAS detector (15' + 5')
        Measurements of the inclusive and differential top-quark pair production cross sections in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider are presented at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. The inclusive measurements reach high precision and are compared to the best available theoretical calculations. Differential measurements of the kinematic properties of top quark pair production are also discussed. These measurements, including results using boosted tops, probe our understanding of top pair production in the TeV regime. The results, unfolded to particle and parton level, are compared to Monte Carlo generators implementing LO and NLO matrix elements matched with parton showers and NLO QCD calculations.
        Speaker: James William Howarth (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
      • 51
        Top pair cross section measurements (incl./diff.) and event modelling with the CMS detector (15' + 5')

        Precision measurements are presented of the top-quark pair inclusive production cross section in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies of 7, 8 and 13 TeV. The data are collected with the CMS experiment during the years 2011, 2012, and 2015. The analyses profit from different top quark final states and make use of events with two, one or no reconstructed charged leptons. In most analyses b-jet identification is used to increase the purity of the selection. The backgrounds are determined using data-driven techniques. The results are combined with each other and compared with theory predictions. Indirect constraints on both the top quark mass and alpha_s are obtained through their relation to the inclusive cross section.
        Differential top quark pair production cross sections are measured in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies of 7, 8, and 13 TeV, using data collected by the CMS experiment in the years 2011, 2012, and 2015. The differential cross sections are measured as functions of various kinematic observables, including the transverse momentum and rapidity of the (anti)top quark and the top-antitop system and the jets and leptons of the event final state. Multiplicity and kinematic distributions of the jets produced in addition to the top pair are investigated. Measurements of the associate production of top quark pairs with additional b-quarks, and a search for four-top production are also presented.
        State-of-the-art theoretical predictions accurate to next-to-leading order QCD interfaced with Pythia8 and Herwig++ event generators are tested by comparing the unfolded ttbar differential data collected with the CMS detector at 8 TeV. These predictions are also compared with the underlying event activity distributions in ttbar events using CMS proton-proton data collected in 2015 at a center of mass energy of 13 TeV.

        Speaker: James Michael Keaveney (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
      • 52
        Theoretical results for top-quark cross sections and distributions (15' + 5')
        I present new results and updates for total cross sections and differential distributions in top-antitop pair and single-top production. Soft-gluon corrections are added to exact fixed-order results to provide the best predictions up to N^3LO. Total cross sections and transverse-momentum and rapidity distributions are presented and compared with data at LHC and Tevatron energies.
        Speaker: Nikolaos Kidonakis (Kennesaw State University)
      • 53
        Latest developments on WbWb production at hadron colliders (15' + 5')
        In the last few years we have seen a number of advances in the higher order calculation of this more complex final state. I will review these new developments and illustrate how they impact existing approaches in Monte Carlo event generation and experimental measurements of the top-quark antitop-quark sector.
        Speaker: Jan Winter (Michigan State University (MSU), USA)
      • 54
        Measurements of ttbar+X using the ATLAS detector (15' + 5')
        The large integrated luminosity provided by the LHC enables the production of a significant number of top-quark pairs in association with addition jets or additional gauge bosons. The production of top-quark pairs in association with W and Z bosons is presented. The measurement uses events with multiple leptons and in particular probes the coupling between the top quark and the Z boson. The cross-section measurement of photons produced in association with top-quark pairs is also discussed. The production cross-section of top-quark pairs in association with additional light or heavy jets is presented. These process are important backgrounds to searches for new physics and are all compared to the best available theoretical calculations.
        Speaker: Dr Yichen Li (Siegen University)
      • 55
        Latest developments in the simulation of final states involving top-pair and heavy bosons (15' + 5')
        I will give an overview of recent progress in the simulation of final states involving top-quarks and vector bosons pair. In the first part of the talk, I'll discuss the obstacles, and present recently found solutions needed to simulate, at NLO+PS accuracy, fully differential top pair production (pp -> 4 leptons + b bar), retaining exactly offshellness and interference effects. In the second part, I'll introduce very quickly the MiNLO method, and then show a recent application, namely the simultaneous NLO+PS description of WW and WW+1jet production.
        Speaker: Emanuele Re (LAPTh Annecy)
    • 11:00 AM
      Break
    • 56
      Outreach Training Riverwalk A/B

      Riverwalk A/B

      Training session for volunteers for library program. Stop by for 30 minutes when you have time to learn about your presentation.

    • Higgs Physics: 2 Chicago 9

      Chicago 9

      Conveners: Kirill Prokofiev (The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HK)) , Stefania Gori (Perimeter Institute/Cincinnati University)
      • 57
        Measurement of fermionic couplings of the SM Higgs boson using the leptonic decay channels with the ATLAS detector (12' + 3')
        The latest results on the measurement of the cross sections and couplings of the Higgs boson in the leptonic decay channels with the ATLAS detector are presented, using approximately 10 fb-1 of pp collision data collected at 13 TeV
        Speaker: Dr Christian Grefe (Universitaet Bonn (DE))
      • 58
        Measurements of Higgs boson production and properties in the di-lepton decay channel using the CMS detector (12' + 3')
        The most recent results from CMS on the search for a neutral Higgs bosons decaying into a tau or a muon pair will be presented.
        Speaker: Pooja Saxena (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
      • 59
        Search for the SM Higgs boson in VH(bb) channel using the ATLAS detector (12' + 3')
        ATLAS results in the search for the Higgs boson in the VH production mode with the Higgs decaying to a b-quark pair will be given, using approximately 10 fb-1 of pp collision data collected at 13 TeV.
        Speaker: Patricia Conde Muino (LIP Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Part)
      • 60
        Measurements of Higgs boson production and properties in the bbbar decay channel using the CMS detector (12' + 3')
        The most recent results from CMS on the search for a neutral Higgs bosons decaying to bottom quarks will be presented.
        Speaker: Chris Palmer (Princeton University (US))
      • 61
        Search for the SM Higgs boson in the ttH production channel using the ATLAS detector. (12' + 3')
        The associated production of the Higgs boson with top quarks should allow the direct observation of the coupling of the Higgs boson to top quarks. The channel also benefits for a large cross-section increase between 8 and 13 TeV. ATLAS results in the search for the Higgs boson in the ttH production mode will be presented.
        Speaker: John Stakely Keller (DESY (DE))
      • 62
        Search for Higgs bosons produced in association with top quarks in the CMS detector (12' + 3')
        We present new results of CMS searches for a Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks, and decaying to gamma gamma, ZZ, WW, tautau, and bbbar final states. The analyses use pp collision data collected at center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015 and part of 2016. Where possible, results will be combined to give a total ttH sensitivity.
        Speaker: Marco Peruzzi (CERN)
      • 63
        Determination of the Higgs boson properties with the ATLAS detector. (15' + 5')
        The results obtained from the different search channels are combined to determine global properties of the SM Higgs boson production and decay, measured at 13 TeV using about 10 fb-1 of p-p collisions.
        Speaker: Bertrand Laforge (Lab.de Phys.Nucleaire et de Hautes Energie/LPNHE (LPNHE))
      • 64
        Combined results of the 125 GeV Higgs boson on the mass, tensor structure, and couplings measured by the CMS detector (15' + 5')
        The status of mass, tensor structure, and couplings measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs boson using the combination of all decay channels from the CMS experiment will be discussed in this talk.
        Speaker: Ulascan Sarica (Johns Hopkins University (US))
    • Accelerator: Physics, Performance, R&D and Future Facilities: 2 Superior B

      Superior B

      Conveners: Jie GAO (IHEP) , Katsunobu Oide (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (JP))
      • 65
        Fermilab PIP-II Status and Strategy (15' + 5')
        Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II) is the centerpiece of Fermilab’s plan for upgrading the accelerator complex to establish the leading facility in the world for particle physics research based on intense proton beams. PIP-II has been developed to provide 1.2 MW of proton beam power at the start of operations of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE), while simultaneously providing a platform for eventual extension of LBNE beam power to >2 MW and enabling future initiatives in rare processes research based on high duty factor/higher beam power operations. PIP-II is based on the construction of a new, 800 MeV, superconducting linac, augmented by improvements to the existing Booster, Recycler, and Main Injector complex. PIP-II is currently in the development stage with an R&D program underway targeting the front end and superconducting rf acceleration technologies. This paper will describe the status of the PIP-II conceptual development, the associated technology R&D programs, and the strategy for project implementation. Work supported by the Fermi Research Alliance under U.S. Department of Energy contract number DE-AC02-07CH11359
        Speaker: Shekhar Mishra (Fermilab)
      • 66
        Achievement and future upgrade of J-PARC accelerator (15' + 5')
        The J-PARC accelerator comprises an H- linac, a 3-GeV Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron (RCS), a 30-GeV slow cycling Main Ring synchrotron (MR). The MR has two beam extraction systems; a fast extraction for beam delivery to the neutrino beam line of the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) experiment, and a slow extraction for beam delivery to particle and nuclear physics experiments in the hadron experimental hall. The MR delivered 400 kW beam in maximum to the T2K experiment and 43 kW beam to the hadron experimental hall. For near future plan, high repetition rate scheme will be adopted to achieve beam power higher than the design specification 750 kW. The cycle time of the FX will be decreased from the present 2.48 s to 1.3 s by replacing all of main magnet power supplies. The budget of the power supplies have been approved by Japanese government in JFY2016. In this paper, the most recent status of the J-PARC accelerator and details of the future upgrade plan will be presented.
        Speaker: Tadashi Koseki (KEK)
      • 67
        Update of the HL-LHC Baseline Configuration, operation scenarios and performance projections (15' + 5')
        The presentation summaries the current baseline configuration of the HL-LHC and highlights the most recent changes. Following the end of the EU funded design study the HL-LHC project published the main technical choices in form a Preliminary Design report. After the publication of the PDR, the design work was further updated in form of a Technical Design Report in 2015 and, following a cost and schedule review in 2015, the HL-LHC baseline configuration has been further revised. This presentation summaries the main changes in the configuration and discusses the current operation scenarios and performance projections.
        Speaker: Gianluigi Arduini (CERN)
      • 68
        Fermilab's Accelerator Complex: Current Status, Upgrades and Outlook (15' + 5')
        Current status, upgrades and outlook of the Fermilab's accelerator complex will be presented. Expectations of beam delivery for the neutrino experiments and intensity frontier research for the next decade will be discussed.
        Speaker: Mary Convery (Fermilab)
      • 69
        Review of Laser Backscattering as an Approach for Electron Beam Energy Measurement (15' + 5')
        Direct measurement of energy spectrum of backscattered laser photons allows to determine the average energy of beam electrons. With HPGe detector the mean energy could be measured with relative accuracy about 30ppm in absolute scale for beam energies below 2 GeV. This report includes an overview of beam energy measurement systems for VEPP-4M, BEPC-II and VEPP-2000 colliders. Some ideas about how to extend the capabilities of the approach to higher beam energies will be presented on the example of future Higgs factories.
        Speaker: Nickolai Muchnoi
      • 70
        Simulation of orientational coherent effects via Geant4 (15' + 5')
        Simulation of orientational coherent effects via Geant4 Beam manipulation of high- and very-high-energy particle beams is a hot topic in accelerator physics. Coherent effects of ultra-relativistic particles in bent crystals allow the steering of particle trajectories thanks to the strong electrical field generated between atomic planes. Recently, a collimation experiment with bent crystals was carried out at the CERN-LHC [1], paving the way to the usage of such technology in current and future accelerators. Geant4 [2] is a widely used object-oriented tool-kit for the Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of particles with matter in high-energy physics. Moreover, its areas of application include also nuclear and accelerator physics, as well as studies in medical and space science. We present the first Geant4 extension for the simulation of orientational effects in straight and bent crystals for high energy charged particles [3]. The model allows the manipulation of particle trajectories by means of straight and bent crystals and the scaling of the cross sections of hadronic and electromagnetic processes for channeled particles. Based on such a model, an extension of the Geant4 toolkit has been developed. The code and the model have been validated by comparison with published experimental data regarding the deflection efficiency via channeling and the variation of the rate of inelastic nuclear interactions. [1] CERN Bulletin 11 November 2015, Crystals channel high-energy beams in the LHC (2015). [2] S. Agostinelli et al., Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment 506, 250 (2003). [3] Bagli, E., Asai, M., Brandt, D., Dotti, A., Guidi, V., and Wright, D. H., Eur. Phys. J. C 74, 2996 (2014).
        Speaker: Enrico Bagli (Universita di Ferrara & INFN (IT))
    • Astro-particle Physics and Cosmology: Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Rays Chicago 10

      Chicago 10

      Convener: Prof. Justin Vandenbroucke (University of Wisconsin)
      • 71
        Latest Results from the Pierre Auger Observatory (15' + 5')
        The Pierre Auger Observatory, located near the town of Malargüe, Argentina, has been detecting ultra-high energy cosmic rays for more than ten years. An essential feature of the 3,000 km$^2$ Observatory is its hybrid design: cosmic rays above 10$^{17}$ eV are detected through the observation of the associated air showers with different and complementary techniques, from surface detector arrays and fluorescence telescopes to radio antennas. The analyses of the multi-detector data have enabled high-statistics and high-precision studies of the energy spectrum, mass composition and distribution of arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), the investigation of whose origin being a primary objective of the Observatory. The data have also enabled us to search for ultra-high energy photons and neutrinos, and to perform a measurement of the proton-air cross section at 57 TeV center-of-mass energy. A coherent interpretation of all these recent results, requiring the use of LHC-tuned interaction models to describe the air showers, opens new directions regarding the properties of UHECR sources. The resulting picture, calling into question the perception of UHECRs at the time of the conception of the Observatory in the early 1990s, has led to a plan for an upgrade of the Observatory. In this talk, I will present the most recent results obtained with the Pierre Auger Observatory, their interpretation, and the motivations for upgrading the Observatory - upgrade which is currently undertaken.
        Speaker: Olivier Deligny (CNRS/IN2P3)
      • 72
        Results from the Telescope Array Experiment (15' + 5')
        Since 2008, the Telescope Array (TA) has been the largest experiment observing ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in the northern sky. TA combines the precision of the air fluorescence technique with the efficiency of a ground array. Currently, TA consists of a surface detector with 507 scintillation counters, covering over 700 square kilometers, along with 38 fluorescence telescopes divided over three fluorescence stations located along the periphery of the array. TA has now collected over eight years of data. We will present the cosmic ray spectra from both TA and its low energy extension (TALE), covering a range of energies from just below 10 PeV to over 100 EeV. We will also present an update of the measurement of mass composition by TA, and show the latest results from our search for arrival direction anisotropy, including the apparent hotspot at the highest energies, seen in the vicinity of Ursa Major. Lastly, we will discuss the planned upgrade, TAx4, which will quadruple the detection area of our experiment, and allow us to collect 20 TA-years equivalent of data by 2020.
        Speaker: Prof. Charles Jui (Telescope Array Collaboration)
      • 73
        Search for anisotropy of UHECR with the Telescope Array experiment (12' + 3')
        Telescope Array (TA) is a hybrid detector of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) sensitive to cosmic rays with energies from about 10^16 eV to over 10^20 eV. The detector, which is operational from May 2008, by now has collected full 8 years of data and accumulated the largest to date UHECR data set in the Northern hemisphere. We will summarize the searches for anisotropy of UHECRs that have been performed in TA.
        Speaker: Peter Tinyakov (Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB))
      • 74
        Detection of High Energy Cosmic Rays at the Auger Engineering Radio Array (12' + 3')
        Detection of (ultra) high energy cosmic rays with the use of radio frequency emission in extensive air showers has been proven as complimentary to existing ground array detection techniques. Great progress has been booked in the theoretical understanding of the emission processes and in their Monte Carlo modelling. These have led to experimental results, notably also at the Auger Engineering Radio Array, on energy, angular and mass composition resolution of the primary cosmic rays. Recent results will be shown. The measured resolutions turn out to be competitive with existing techniques and they have independent uncertainties. Implications for cross calibration with existing techniques and for future large scale application of radio detection of ultra high energy cosmic rays will be discussed.
        Speaker: Sijbrand De Jong (Radboud University Nijmegen (NL))
      • 75
        First Results from the Telescope Array RADAR (TARA) Cosmic Ray Observatory Remote Stations (12' + 3')
        The TARA Remote Stations (RS) are autonomous Very-High-Frequency radio receivers for the detection of Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). UHECR cause charged showers in the atmosphere which may become dense enough to reflect radio waves. The RS use firmware-based filtration and trigger techniques to receive and record these reflections from a dedicated VHF transmitter. We are co-located with the primary TARA detector as well as the Telescope Array (TA) ground-based cosmic ray detector, which allows us to make coincident detection studies. In this presentation, first results of the RS experiment, which ran from February to April of 2016, are relayed and compared to previous such measurements. The station design and novel trigger mechanism are briefly discussed, as well as future prospects for radio-based cosmic ray physics.
        Speaker: steven prohira (University of Kansas)
      • 76
        The Origin of the Broken Power Law Spectrum for Cosmic Rays (15' + 5')
        A long-standing puzzle in cosmic ray physics has been the nature of the spectrum, which is very well modeled by a broken power law with differing exponents, both close to -3, above and below the "knee". We show that a rather simple hadronic evaporation model reproduces the correct exponents, and the location of the knee without free parameters. The model is predictive, with some successful predictions already and has broader implications for nuclear physics and particle astrophysics.
        Speaker: John Swain (Northeastern University (US))
      • 77
        Prompt atmospheric neutrino flux (12' + 3')
        Cosmic rays incident on the Earth produce neutrinos through the interaction with nuclei in the atmosphere. At the energies above about 1 PeV, neutrinos from the charmed hadron decay (prompt neutrinos) dominate those from the pion and kaon decay (conventional neutrinos). The prompt neutrinos are important because they are the background to the astrophysical neutrinos. We calculate the fluxes of the prompt atmospheric muon neutrinos in the different frameworks: perturbative QCD and the dipole model, using the most recent versions of the PDFs and the cosmic ray spectrum. Nuclear effects are included and their impact is investigated. We compare the results from the various models and estimate the uncertainties. The new calculation of the prompt atmospheric tau neutrino flux is also presented.
        Speaker: Dr Yu Seon Jeong (KISTI)
    • Beyond the Standard Model: 2 Chicago 7

      Chicago 7

      Conveners: Bruce Mellado Garcia (University of the Witwatersrand) , Seema Sharma (Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IN))
      • 78
        Search for electroweak production of SUSY at CMS (15' + 5')

        Searches for the direct electroweak production of supersymmetric charginos and neutralinos in topologies containing leptons and W, Z, and Higgs bosons are presented.

        Speaker: Santiago Folgueras (Purdue University (US))
      • 79
        Global Fits of the MSSM with GAMBIT (15' + 5')
        The wide range of probes of physics beyond the standard model leads to the need for tools that combine experimental results to make the most robust possible statements about the validity of theories of new physics and the preferred regions of their parameter space. In this talk, I will introduce a new code for such analyses: GAMBIT, the Global and Modular BSM Inference Tool. GAMBIT is a flexible and extensible framework for global fits of essentially any BSM theory. The code currently incorporates direct, indirect, solar and relic density searches for dark matter, limits on production of new particles from the LHC and LEP, complete flavor constraints from LHCb, LHC Higgs production and decay measurements, and various electroweak precision observables. I will discuss both the code's capabilities and results of scans of the parameter space of the MSSM.
        Speaker: Jonathan Cornell (McGill University)
      • 80
        Phenomenological MSSM interpretation of CMS results (15' + 5')
        Using a global Bayesian analysis, it is shown how the results from searches for supersymmetry performed by CMS constrain the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). The study is performed within the framework of the phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM), a 19-parameter realization of the R-parity conserving weakscale MSSM, that captures most of the latter’s phenomenological features and which, therefore, permits robust conclusions to be drawn about the MSSM.
        Speaker: Samuel Louis Bein (Florida State University (US))
      • 81
        CheckMATE: Checkmating new physics at the LHC (15' + 5')
        In the first four years of running, the LHC has delivered a wealth of new data that is now being analysed. The two multi-purpose detectors, ATLAS and CMS, have performed many searches for new physics but theorists are eager to test their own particular model. We present the program CheckMATE (Check Models At Terascale Energies) that helps to automise this procedure so that new theories can easily be checked against the latest results. The backbone of CheckMATE is a library of almost 50 LHC analyses that almost any new physics model can be tested against. The user only needs to provide a model in SLHA format and CheckMATE will automatically decide if the model is ruled out or not. In addition, if new physics begins to appear, CheckMATE offers the possibility to quickly determine the model that best fits the data. New CheckMATE features are also presented including Machine Learning tools that allow for fast and accurate scans of theories with many free parameters. In addition, a novel technique using kinematic transformations of existing events will be presented that promises to speed up the determination of model best fit points by many orders of magnitude. https://checkmate.hepforge.org/
        Speaker: Jamie Tattersall (RWTH Aachen)
      • 82
        Search for third generation squarks in pp collisions at 13 TeV with CMS (15' + 5')

        A search for direct top squark pair production in the hadronic final state is presented. The data used are 2.3 fb-1 of pp collision data at 13 TeV taken with the CMS detector in 2015.

        Speaker: Nadja Strobbe (Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (US))
      • 83
        Search for third generation squarks in pp collisions at 13 TeV with ATLAS (15' + 5')

        Naturalness arguments for weak-scale supersymmetry favour supersymmetric partners of the third generation quarks with masses not too far from those of their Standard Model counterparts. Top or bottom squarks with masses of a few hundred GeV can also give rise to large direct pair production rates at the LHC. The recent increase in the center of mass energy of the proton-proton collisions gives a unique opportunity to extend the sensitivity to production of supersymmetric particles at the Large Hadron Collider. The talk presents recent ATLAS results from searches for direct stop and sbottom pair production, with emphasis on those obtained using proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

        Speaker: Kilian Rosbach (Universität Freiburg (DE))
    • Computing: Overview Ontario

      Ontario

      Sheraton Grand Chicago 301 East Water Street Chicago IL 60611 USA
      Convener: Randy Sobie (University of Victoria (CA))
      • 84
        CMS operations for Run II: preparation and commissioning of the offline infrastructure (15' + 5')
        The restart of the LHC coincided with an intense activity for the CMS experiment. Both at the beginning of Run II in 2015 and the restart of operations in 2016, the collaboration was engaged in an extensive re-commissioning of the CMS data-taking operations. After the long stop, the detector was fully aligned and calibrated. Data streams were redesigned, to fit the priorities dictated by the physics program for 2015 and 2016. A new reconstruction software (both online and offline) was commissioned with early collisions and further developed during the year. A massive campaign of Monte Carlo production was launched, to assist physics analyses. This presentation reviews the main event of this commissioning journey and describes the status of CMS physics performances for 2016.
        Speaker: Gianluca Cerminara (CERN)
      • 85
        First experience with the new ATLAS analysis model (15' + 5')
        During the Long shutdown of the LHC, the ATLAS collaboration overhauled its analysis model based on experience gained during Run 1. The main components are a new analysis format and Event Data Model which can be read directly by ROOT, as well as a "Derivation Framework" that takes the Petabyte-scale output from ATLAS reconstruction and produces smaller samples targeted at specific analyses, using the central production system. We will discuss the technical and operational aspects of this new system and review its performance during the first year of 13 TeV data taking.
        Speaker: Jack Cranshaw (Argonne National Laboratory (US))
      • 86
        The Geant4 Validation Repository (15' + 5')
        Geant4 is a toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. Its areas of application include high energy, nuclear and accelerator physics as well as studies in medical and space science. The Geant4 collaboration regularly performs validation and regression tests through its development cycle. A validation test compares results obtained with a specific Geant4 version with data obtained by various experiments. On the other hand, a regression test compares results of two or more versions of Geant4 for any observable. To make validation materials easily available to both collaborators and the user community in general, most of the validation data are stored in one central repository. The availability of this data should help experimenters to find answers to questions like: • What data is used to validate Geant4 physics? • How well does Geant4 describe the data of interest for the experiment? • Which model provided by Geant4 best describes the data of interest for the experiment? • What are the benefits of switching to the latest improved version of Geant4? Having easy access to this data might also help in estimating the systematical uncertainties stemming from the simulation of physical processes like the response of a detector or predicting the flux of neutrinos produced when a target is bombarded with protons. The repository consists of a relational database that stores experimental data and Geant4 test results, accessed through a Java API and a web application which allows to select and search the data and display the results graphically. Future plans include providing a web API, expanding the number of experimental data sets and providing quantitative statistical tests. We also want to stress that the project is not specific to Geant4 and it can be used with other Monte Carlo (e.g. GENIE) tools as well.
        Speaker: Hans-Joachim Wenzel (Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (US))
      • 87
        Linear Collider Software and Computing (15' + 5')
        The ILC/CLIC linear collider community has for many years followed a strategy of developing common and generic software tools for studying the physics potential as well as continuously optimizing their detector concepts. The basis of the software framework is formed by the common event data model LCIO and the detector description toolkit DD4hep. DD4hep is a recently developed, generic detector description toolkit that allows to provide all aspects of detector geometry, materials and physics properties of the detector as needed for simulation, reconstruction and analysis from one single source of information. It offers an application framework for running full simulations with Geant4 as well as interfaces for handling conditions data and simulating mis-alignment of detector components. DD4hep has also been adopted by detector projects at FCC and CEPC. The proposed detectors for ILC and CLIC combine unprecedented momentum and impact parameter resolution with very high jet energy resolution, achieved with highly granular calorimeters and the application of particle flow reconstruction algorithms (PFA). The reconstruction algorithms for tracking and PFA are written as much as possible in a detector independent way, which on the one hand facilitates common software developments and on the other hand simplifies the comparison of different detector variants. For large scale Monte Carlo production and physics analyses the iLCDIRAC system provides a unified interface to the distributed computing resources used by the LC community. A simplified API allows to transparently submit jobs running all of the LC software to a large number of different batch and Grid-resources that are either directly provided or opportunistically available for the VO ILC. In this talk we will present the complete LC software for simulation and reconstruction with a focus on recent developments and application to ILD and the new CLIC detector model.
        Speaker: Nikiforos Nikiforou (CERN)
      • 88
        Overview and Highlights of the Belle II Computing and Software (25' + 5')
        The Belle II experiment is the next-generation flavor factory experiment at the SuperKEKB accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan. The first physics run will take place in 2017, then we plan to increase the luminosity gradually. We will reach the world's highest luminosity L=8x10^35 cm-2s-1 finally and collect a total of 50ab-1 data by the end of 2024. Such a huge amount of data allows us to explore the new physics possibilities through a large variety of analyses in quark sectors as well as tau physics and to deepen understanding of nature. In terms of the software and computing, the Belle II experiment is highly challenging. The higher luminosity leads to higher background levels and requires a major upgrade of the detector. As a consequence, the simulation, reconstruction, and analysis software must also upgraded substantially. Most of the software has been redesigned from scratch, taking into account the experience from Belle, the predecessor of Belle II, and other experiments and utlizing new technologies. The Belle II computing system is expected to manage the process of massive raw data, production of copious simulation and many concurrent user analysis jobs. The required resource estimation for the Belle II computing system shows a similar evolution curve of the resource pledges in LHC experiments. Eventually, we have to handle several tens of Petayte of beam data per year. Here, the Belle II is a worldwide collaboration of about 700 scientists working in 23 countries and region. It is natural to adopt a distributed computing model based on existing technologies and infrastructure. We chosen DIRAC as a workload and data management system, which provides us an interoperability of heterogeneous computing systems such as grids with different middleware, academic/commercial clouds and local computing clusters. This year, we will experience the first beam data from the SuperKEKB accelerator, the advanced Trans-Pacific network and the full replacement of the central computing system at KEK with upgraded resources. We will present the overview and highlights of the recent achievements and present status of the Belle II computing system and software in this presentation.
        Speaker: Malachi Schram
    • Detector: R&D and Performance: Calorimeter Chicago 8

      Chicago 8

      Convener: Marzio Nessi (CERN)
      • 89
        Design studies for the Phase II upgrade of the CMS Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter (12' + 3')
        The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will provide unprecedented instantaneous and integrated luminosity. The lead tungstate crystals forming the barrel part of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) will still perform well, even after the expected integrated luminosity of 3000fb-1 at the end of HL-LHC. The avalanche photodiodes (APDs) used to detect the scintillation light will also continue to be operational, although there will be some increase in noise due to radiation-induced dark currents. This will be mitigated by reducing the barrel operating temperature during HL-LHC running. The front-end electronics of the ECAL barrel will be replaced, in order to remove existing constraints on trigger rate and latency and to provide additional capability to fully exploit the higher luminosity delivered by the HL-LHC. New developments in high-speed optical links will allow single-crystal readout at 40 MHz to upgraded off-detector processors, allowing maximum flexibility and enhanced triggering possibilities. Improved algorithms, currently being evaluated in Run II, are being developed to reduce the effects of out-of-time pileup on signal amplitude reconstruction. The very-front-end system will also be upgraded, to provide improved rejection of anomalous signals in the APDs and to further mitigate the increases in APD noise and pileup. The potential to provide precise timing measurements for high energy signals (with a precision of approximately 20-30 ps) is being explored in the design of the new electronics. This should further mitigate the effects of large event pileup at HL-LHC, where around 200 interactions per 25ns bunch crossing are anticipated. The requirements of the new ECAL electronics will be reviewed and the status of design studies and evaluations of demonstrator systems will be provided. Finally, a summary of the expected performance of the upgraded detector during HL-LHC operation will be presented.
        Speaker: Toyoko Orimoto (Northeastern University (US))
      • 90
        Recent progress with very forward calorimeters for linear colliders (12' + 3')
        This talk will summarize recent R&D developments for very compact calorimeters designed for precise luminosity measurement (LumiCal) and beam monitoring (BeamCal) in the very-forward region of future linear colliders. Silicon pad sensors for LumiCal have been equipped with modern read-out electronics and tested in the laboratory. Ultra-compact assemblies of these sensors, with only 1 mm spacing between tungsten absorber plates, have been developed. This stack has been exposed to few-GeV electron and muon test beams at CERN and DESY. First results on shower development in such a compact stack are presented and compared to Geant4 simulations.
        Speaker: Oleksandr Borysov (Tel Aviv University (IL))
      • 91
        Design, status and test of the Mu2e crystal calorimeter (12' + 3')
        The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab searches for the charged-lepton flavor violating neutrino-less conversion of a negative muon into an electron in the field of a aluminum nucleus. The dynamics of such a process is well modelled by a two-body decay, resulting in a mono-energetic electron with an energy slightly below the muon rest mass (104.967 MeV). If no events are observed in three years of running, Mu2e will set a limit on the ratio between the conversion and the capture rates, \convrate, of $\leq 6\ \times\ 10^{-17} (@ 90 \%$ C.L.). This will improve the current limit by four orders of magnitude. A very intense pulsed muon beam ($\sim 10^{10} \mu/$ sec) is stopped on a target inside a long evacuated solenoid where the detector is located. The Mu2e detector is composed of a tracker, an electromagnetic calorimeter and a veto for cosmic rays externally surrounding the detector solenoid. The calorimeter plays an important role in providing excellent particle identification capabilities and an online trigger filter while aiding the track reconstruction capabilities. It should keep functionality in an environment where the neutron, proton and photon backgrounds from muon capture processes and beam flash deliver a dose of $\sim$ 120 Gy/year in the hottest area. It will also need to work in 1 T axial magnetic field and a $10^{-4}$ torr vacuum. The calorimeter requirements are to provide a large acceptance for 100 MeV electrons and reach at this energies: + a time resolution better than 0.5 ns; + an energy resolution *O($5\%$)*; + a position resolution of *O(1)* cm. The baseline calorimeter configuration consists of two disks, each one made of $\sim$ 700 undoped CsI crystals read out by two large area UV extended Silicon Photomultipliers (SIPM). These crystals emit at 310 nm with a large light yield (30 pe/MeV) when coupled in air to the SIPMs and provide a fast response and accurate timing having a time emission of $\tau \sim$ 20 ns. These crystals match the requirements for stability of response, high resolution and radiation hardness. SIPM signals are amplified, shaped and then read out through 200 msps waveform digitizers optically connected to the DAQ system. We present the calorimeter design, the experimental tests and the simulation carried out to prove the validity of the chosen configuration. In particular, we will summarise the results of the test beam with electron beams in the energy range between 80 and 140 MeV and the irradiation program carried out both with crystals and SiPM.
        Speaker: David Hitlin
      • 92
        Performance study for the CEPC ScW Ecal (12' + 3')
        This article presents the status of a highly granular scintillator-based electromagnetic calorimeter (ScW Ecal) proposed to realize Particle Flow Algorithm for the CEPC. The ScW Ecal is a sandwich calorimeter consists of sampling and sensitive layers. The material of tungsten is selected as absorb material. The active layers are plastic scintillators consisting of 5×45 mm2 scintillator strips. The scintillator strips in adjacent layers are perpendicular to each other to achieve a 5×5 mm2 effective transverse size. Each strip is covered by a reflector film to increase collection efficiency and improve uniformity of the scintillation light. Photons from each scintillator strip are read out by very compact photon sensor, SiPM, attached at the end of the strip. Scintillator-SiPM unit is the core part of ScW Ecal. Optimization of the scintillator-SiPM unit such as shape of scintillator strip, thickness of scintillator strip, design of combination of a scintillator and a SiPM are discussed. Additionally, the performance of SiPM was tested. The gain is typically of order a few 105, the dark noise rate and the inter-pixel cross-talk probability are of order 100 kHz/mm2 and 0.1 respectively. The SiPM dynamic range is determined by the number of pixels.
        Speaker: Dr Zhigang Wang (IHEP,China)
      • 93
        Upgrade of the ATLAS Calorimeters for Higher LHC Luminosities (12' + 3')
        The upgrade of the LHC will bring instantaneous and total luminosities which are a factor 5-7 beyond the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) and Tile Calorimeters and their read-out systems. Due to radiation requirements and a new hardware trigger concept the read-out electronics will be improved in two phases. In Phase-I, a dedicated read-out of the LAr Calorimeters will provide higher granularity input to the trigger, in order to mitigate pile-up effects and to reduce the background rates. In Phase-II, completely new read-out electronics will allow a digital processing of all LAr and Tile Calorimeter channels at the full 40 MHz bunch-crossing frequency and a transfer of calibrated energy inputs to the trigger. Results from system design and performance of the developed read-out components, including fully functioning demonstrator systems already operated on the detector, will be reported. Furthermore, the current Forward Calorimeter (FCal) may suffer from signal degradation and argon bubble formation at highest instataneous luminosities. A high-granularity replacement is thus proposed, improving on reconstruction of jets and missing energy in the presence of pile-up. The corresponding R&D and expected performance results will be presented. Another upgrade project that is under consideration is a high-granularity timing-device in front of the end-cap/forward calorimeters to help particle identification and pile-up mitigation. The R&D work on this project will be also presented.
        Speaker: Ryne Michael Carbone (Columbia University (US))
      • 94
        test beam results on W-fiber and tilted plate calorimeters for a new RHIC experiment (12' + 3')
        Achim Franz Brookhaven National Laboratory for the (s)PHENIX collaboration Over the 16 years of data taking at the Relativistic Heavy Ion collider, RHIC at BNL it became important to identify and analyze jets in the heavy ion collisions. Comparing jets from partons traversing the hot and dense medium to ones created in vacuum sheds light on the microscopic structure of the quark gluon plasma. One important tool in jet recognition is calorimetry with electromagnetic (EM) and hadronic (HAD) sections, ladder is missing on both current RHIC experiments. The PHENIX collaboration is planning substantial upgrades to a new detector with large coverage EM and HAD calorimetry and precision charged particle tracking. Beam tests of the W-fiber EM calorimeter and tilted plate HAD calorimeter have been performed in 2014 and 2016 at the FNAL test beam facility. This talk will present results from these tests and an outlook on the new experiment.
        Speaker: Dr Achim Franz (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
      • 95
        Technologies for highly granular electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters (12' + 3')
        The CALICE collaboration is developing highly granular calorimeters primarily to establish those technologies for experiments at a future lepton collider optimized for particle flow event reconstruction. These technologies are now also finding applications in other areas, such as upgrades for the LHC. After the successful validation of the principle of imaging calorimeters with different electromagnetic and hadronic physics prototypes, the emphasis has now shifted to technological prototypes that address system issues relevant for full detector systems and production techniques amenable to mass production. At examples such as the SiPM-based Analog Hadron Calorimeter and the RPC-based Semi-Digital Hadron Calorimeter, we will discuss new developments on electronic integration, the fabrication of large size detector elements extending over several square meters and techniques for the mass production and assembly of scintillator tiles. We will also report results from recent beam tests of such elements, and give an outlook on the development towards combined beam tests of different CALICE technological prototypes integrated via a common DAQ system.
        Speaker: Huong Lan Tran (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
      • 96
        The Shashlik Calorimeter, a LYSO/W plate Calorimeter for Precision EM Calorimeter in the High Luminosity LHC environment (12' + 3')
        Over the last four years, a group of institutions active in the CMS experiment have developed with beam tests, radiation damage studies, and simulations a sampling EM calorimeter option that consists of two endcap 30,000 element LYSO/W plate configurations that would provide superb EM resolution for photons and electrons of order (10%)/√E+1%. When coupled with the existing HE hadron calorimeter it also delivers excellent hadronic resolution for jets in the harsh environment of the forward eta region of the LHC collider. We present the Shashlik configuration proposed to CMS together with the results of beam tests, radiation damage, and the performance of the configuration.
        Speaker: Brad Cox (University of Virginia (US))
    • Neutrino Physics: Reactor Chicago 6

      Chicago 6

      Convener: Seon-Hee Seo (Seoul National University)
      • 97
        What is delta m^2_{ee} ? (15' + 5')
        Both Daya Bay and Reno have performed a combined analysis of sin^2 2 theta_{13} and Delta m^2_ee using reactor anti-neutrinos. In the literature there are various definitions of Delta m^2_ee, in this presentation I will review the properties of these different definitions and argue that "the nu_e average of Delta m^2_{31} and Delta m^2_{32}" is the not only L/E independent but the simplest definition on the market which is applicable to both the short baseline experiments, Daya Bay, RENO and Double Chooz as well as the medium baseline future experiments JUNO and RENO 50. see arXiv:1601.07464
        Speaker: Stephen Parke (Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (US))
      • 98
        Precision Measurement of $\sin^{2}(2\theta_{13})$ and $|\Delta m^{2}_{ee}|$ from Daya Bay (15' + 5')
        In the three-flavor neutrino mixing framework, $\theta_{13}$ was the least known mixing angle. The Daya Bay experiment was designed to measure this parameter with unprecedented precison through a relative measurement with eight functionally identical electron anti-neutrino detectors deployed at three experimental halls near three high-power nuclear reactor complexes in south China. In March 2012 the Daya Bay experiment discovered the non-zero value of $\sin^{2}2\theta_{13}=0.092 \pm 0.016 \pm 0.005$ with significance better than $5\sigma$. The Daya Bay experiment is continuously improving the precision of $\sin^{2}2\theta_{13}$ and the effective neutrino mass squared difference $|\Delta m^{2}_{ee}|$ with more statistics, less background and better control of systematics. In this talk, I will report the latest status on the measurement of $\sin^{2}2\theta_{13}$ and $|\Delta m^{2}_{ee}|$ from the Daya Bay experiment.
        Speaker: Dr Jiajie Ling
      • 99
        Spectral measurment of theta13 and |dm_ee^2| at RENO (15' + 5')
        The Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation(RENO) has been taking data since August 2011 using two identical detectors. In 2012 RENO has unambiguously measured the smallest neutrino mixing angle theta13 using 220 days data. In this talk, we report our new results with a larger data set and improved systematics using ~500 days data. They are a more precisely measured value of sin^2 (2theta_13) = 0.082 +- 0.009 (Stat.) +- 0.006 (Syst.) and our first measured value of |Delta m^2_ee| = 2.62 +0.21 -0.23 (Stat.) +0.12 -0.13 (Syst.) (X 10^-3 eV^2) based on a spectral analysis. Most improvement in the systematic error comes from the reduction of Li/He background uncertainty. We also report the result on the 5 MeV excess in the observed reactor neutrino spectrum.
        Speaker: Dr Jun-Ho Choi (Dongshin University)
      • 100
        First double-detector results from Double Chooz experiment (15' + 5')
        Double Chooz is reactor neutrino experiment designed for precise measurement of the neutrino mixing angle $\theta_{13}$. The first non-zero indication of the $\theta_{13}$ from a reactor experiment was provided by Double Chooz in 2011. A robust observation of $\theta_{13}$ was followed in 2012 by the Daya Bay and RENO experiments with multiple detectors. The final precision of the $\theta_{13}$ by reactor experiment is a critical matter for current and future experiments addressing the possible observation of leptonic CP violation in neutrino oscillations, such as T2K and NOvA. Systematic errors in reactor experiments are on the per-mill level each, hence comparison of multi-experimental measurements is important in the field. In addition to the Far detector, the Near detector started operation since December 2014, which allows us to reach significantly improved sensitivity of the $\theta_{13}$. In this talk, we will show the first double-detector results for the $\theta_{13}$, combining ~1 year of double-detector and ~2 years of single-detector data analysis. We will also show information of reactor-neutrino flux normalization and shape.
        Speaker: Tsunayuki Matsubara (Tokyo Metropolitan University)
      • 101
        Design, status and plans of JUNO & RENO-50 as a comprehensive neutrino program (15' + 5')
        The Status of JUNO and RENO-50 Both the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) in China and the RENO-50 in South Korea are multipurpose neutrino experiments designed to determine neutrino mass hierarchy and precisely measure oscillation parameters by detecting reactor neutrinos from nuclear power plants, observe supernova neutrinos, study the atmospheric, solar neutrinos and geo-neutrinos, and perform exotic searches. The two experiments both plan to use the liquid scintillator detector with large scale to have huge target mass and with the critical performance of the precise energy resolution. All the design and research progresses of JUNO will be introduced in this talk including detector structure design, high detection efficiency PMT, transparent liquid scintillator, electronics readout, calibration, veto system, etc. The main design of structure of central detector in JUNO is determined and it uses the acrylic sphere with the diameter of 35.4 m to contain the 20 ktons of liquid scintillator. The acrylic sphere is supported by stainless steel latticed shell and the shell also holds about 17000 pieces of 20 inch PMTs and 34000 pieces of 3 inch PMTs with high detection efficiency to detect the light from the liquid scintillator. The liquid scintillator is very transparent with the attenuation length of over 20 meters. The central detector is surrounded by pure water as veto Cherenkov detector and its top is covered by tracker detector composed of plastic scintillator with wavelength shift fiber. There are several calibration methods to be used for the central detector. Also the RENO-50 R&D status will be introduced.
        Speaker: Prof. Yuekun Heng (Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing)
      • 102
        Theoretical motivations for the precision measurement of the oscillation parameters (15' + 5')
        Current neutrino oscillation data strongly suggests specific flavour structures in the lepton sector which can be explained by underlying flavour symmetries. Discrete flavour symmetries have emerged as a powerful tool to realise the observed mixing patterns in which the values of the parameters are uniquely predicted or specific correlations between parameters are obtained. In many models the values of CP violating phase take special values, for instance conserving or maximally-violating values. The precision measurement of mixing angles and the CP violating phase delta will be crucial tasks in the next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments, such as DUNE and T2HK. They will allow to test the flavour models both by constraining the individual parameters and in probing the correlations among them. We consider the current status, comparing the current neutrino oscillation data with typical mixing patterns. We then present the expected sensitivities in the DUNE and T2HK, and JUNO/RENO-50 experiments and how they will provide the opportunity to distinguish different flavour models. We will discuss the guidance for model building that this will provide.
        Speaker: Dr Ye-Ling Zhou (Durham University)
    • Quark and Lepton Flavor Physics: 2 Superior A

      Superior A

      Convener: Diego Milanes Carreno (Universidad Nacional de Colombia (CO))
      • 103
        Dalitz analysis of charmless b-hadron decays at LHCb (10' + 5')
        Charmless b-hadron decays in the Standard Model are characterised by tree amplitudes which are comparable in size to loop amplitudes, and potentially by New Physics amplitudes. CP violation measurements using Dalitz plot analyses in multi-body decays enable the various contributions to be disentangled. We present the most recent measurements in this sector, notably results on $B \to K_s hh$ and $B \to 3h$ decays.
        Speaker: Louis Henry (Paris-LPNHE)
      • 104
        Recent results on charmless $B$ and $B_s$ decays from Belle (10' + 5')

        Charmless hadronic B decays constitute a powerful probe to search for new physics beyond the standard model and provide constraints of various CP violation parameters. We report the final measurements from Belle of the branching fraction and CP asymmetry for a variety of charmless decays -- $B^0 \to \pi^0\pi^0$, $B^+ \to K^+ K^- \pi^+$, $B\to \phi \phi K$, and $B^+ \to K_S^0 K_S^0 h^+$ $(h=K,\pi)$ -- as well as a search for the $B^0 \to \eta\eta$ decay. All investigations employ the full dataset at $\Upsilon(4S)$ delivered by the KEKB $e^+ e^-$ collider. The $B^0 \to \pi^0 \pi^0$ measurement enables improved constraints on the CKM unitarity triangle $\phi_2$. For $B^+ \to K^+ K^- \pi^+$ we measure CP asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass of the $K^+ K^-$ system, where LHCb has earlier reported an unexpectedly strong enhancement at low mass. The three-body decays $B^+ \to K_S^0 K_S^0 h^+$ $(h=K,\pi)$ and $B\to \phi \phi K$ both proceed predominantly via flavor-changin!
        g neutral current transitions and hence are sensitive to potential new physics effects. The $B^0 \to \eta\eta$ decays could play an important role in understanding the $B$ decay dynamics and improving the deviation boundary of $\sin 2\phi_1$ measured in $b\to s c\bar{c}$ and $b\to s q\bar{q}$ decays.

        Charmless $B_s$ decays are studied using a data sample of 121 fb−1 collected at the Υ(10860) resonance ($\sqrt{s} = 10.87$ GeV) at Belle. We present the branching fraction of $B_s \to K^0 \bar{K}^0$, which is the first observation of a charmless two-body $B_s$ decays involving only neutral hadrons in the final state. Also presented is the first search for $B_s \to \eta\eta$ decay.

        Speaker: Kamal Jyoti Nath (research scholar)
      • 105
        Charmless two-body b-meson decays at LHCb (10' + 5')
        Charmless b-mesons decays receive contributions from penguin diagrams which may exhibit effects of physics beyond the Standard Model. We present the most recent measurements on such decays performed by LHCb, using the full data sample collected during the first run of the LHC. In particular, we present the results of the analyses of B->VV decays (where V indicate a vector particle) including measurements of branching fractions, CP asymmetries, polarisation fractions and T-odd correlations. Moreover, we present CP violation measurements in $B_{d,s} \to h^+h^-$ decays and discuss their implication on the the CKM picture of the Standard Model.
        Speaker: Maria Vieites Diaz (Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (ES))
      • 106
        Recent Heavy Flavor results from D0 (10' + 5')
        We report on recent measurements using $B$-meson decays in $10.4\ \rm fb^{−1}$ of proton-antiproton collisions collected by the D0 detector during Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We present the first search for exclusive CPT-violating effects in the mixing of $B_s^0$ mesons. We find no evidence for the CPT-violating effects tested and place limits on CPT- and Lorentz-invariance violating coupling coefficients, $\Delta a_\mu$. We also present the first measurement of the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry in $B^\pm$ mesons decaying to $\mu^\pm D^{0} X$ where the $D^0$ decays to $K^+ \pi^-$.
        Speaker: Iain Bertram (Lancaster University (GB))
      • 107
        CP violation measurements in B0 to D(*)0_CP h0 decays with BaBar+Belle joint analysis approach (10' + 5')

        Knowledge on the angles of the Unitarity Triangle provides stringent tests on the Standard Model of electroweak interactions and enables one to constrain potential effects of the physics beyond. The parameter $\sin (2\beta) = \sin (2\phi_1)$ has been precisely measured by the B factory experiments BaBar and Belle using $b \to c \bar{c} s$ transitions such as the golden mode $B^0 \to J/\psi K_S^0$. In terms of the angle $\beta = \phi_1$, the value smaller than $\pi/2$ is favored between two possible solutions, however the discrimination is not evident yet at current experimental status. By reconstructing the neutral $D$ meson decays in self-conjugated multi-body final states, a time-dependent Dalitz analysis in $B^0 \to D^{(*)} h^0$ decays provide a theoretically clean probe to constrain $\cos(2\beta) = \cos(2\phi_1)$. We present a time-dependent Dalitz analysis of $B^0 \to D^{(*)} h^0$ decays followed by the $D$ meson decays to $K_S^0 \pi^+ \pi^-$ where the $h^0$ is a $\pi i^0$, $\eta$ or $\omega$ meson. The measurement is performed by combining the final data samples of $471 \times 10^6$ $B\overline{B}$ pairs and $772 \times 10^6$ $B\overline{B}$ pairs recorded by the BaBar and the Belle experiments, respectively.

        Speaker: Markus Roehrken (California Institute of Technology)
      • 108
        CP violation in hadronic tau decays (15' + 5')
        The decay $\tau \to 3\pi\nu_\tau$ shows no CP violation in the Standard Model. Therefore it serves as an excellent testing ground for New Physics effects. These effects in rate asymmetries depend on the interference of two helicity amplitudes of the axial vector current decaying to three pions. Motivated by the precise measurements from CLEO, BaBar and Belle, we present an analysis of these amplitudes with unprecedented precision that considers the rescattering between the final state pions. We show how unitarity and analyticity is preserved in our framework. Moreover, this analysis improves the description of the experimental data and is thus very interesting in view of the upcoming measurements at Belle II. The constraints from our results on New Physics models are discussed.
        Speaker: Ina Lorenz (Indiana University)
      • 109
        Vus from tau decay data (15' + 5')
        We discuss the results from two determinations of Vus using hadronic tau decay data. In the first, we revisit the determination from flavor-breaking finite-energy sum rules and show that the low Vus values obtained from this approach in the past are the result of a systematic problem associated with assumptions, which can now be shown to be incorrect, about higher dimension OPE contributions on the theory side of the relevant sum rules. Lattice data is used to confirm this analysis and to aid in quantifying the theory errors on the OPE side. Fitting the higher dimension contributions to data leads to Vus in good agreement with that obtained from K_{ell 3} data using lattice input for f_+(0). The second determination results from a novel approach in which sum rules for the sum of the vector and axial vector flavor us polarizations are constructed which relate integrals over the strange hadronic tau decay distributions to lattice values of the underlying polarization sum at intermediate Q^2, where lattice data for the polarization is rather accurate. We compare the results of these determinations to those from K_{ell 3} and Gamma_[K_{mu 2}]/Gamma[pi_{mu 2}].
        Speaker: Kim Maltman (York University)
    • Top Quark and Electroweak Physics: 2 Huron

      Huron

      Convener: Doreen Wackeroth (SUNY Buffalo)
      • 110
        Higher-orders in heavy quark processes within the LTD approach (15' + 5')
        The computation of perturbative corrections to processes involving heavy quarks is crucial for the precision program of LHC and future colliders. In this talk, we describe a powerful method to calculate higher-orders in QCD skipping the traditional subtraction method. Our proposal is based in the loop-tree duality (LTD) theorem, which allows to rewrite virtual contributions in terms of integrals over the real emission phase-space. Then, we proceed to combine both real and virtual parts at integrand level, obtaining regular expressions that can be numerically integrated. In this way, we avoid dealing with complicated massive Feynman integrals and introducing infrared counter-terms. Some reference examples are explained, in order to exhibit the potential of our approach.
        Speaker: German Sborlini (IFIC-Valencia)
      • 111
        NLO predictions for SM EFT in the top-quark sector (15' + 5')
        The standard model (SM) effective field theory (EFT) is a powerful approach to the SM deviations, where predictions can be systematically improved in precision. I will discuss some recent progresses and ongoing efforts in developing the SM EFT to next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy, in particular in the top-quark sector. Based on the MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework, one can start from an EFT with top-quark operators, and make NLO predictions for various processes, for cross sections as well as distributions, in a fully automatic way. Furthermore, NLO results matched to the parton shower simulation are available, allowing for event generation to be directly employed in an experimental analyses. These works provide a solid basis for the interpretation of current and future measurements in the EFT framework, with improved accuracy and precision. Dedicated investigations of the features of deviations from the SM can be performed based on the presented works, with an expected improvement in sensitivity.
        Speaker: Cen Zhang (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
      • 112
        Top properties measurements with the ATLAS detector (15' + 5')
        The top quark is unique among the known quarks in that it decays before it has an opportunity to form hadronic bound states. This makes measurements of its properties particularly interesting as one can access directly the properties of a bare quark. The latest measurements of these properties are presented. Measurements of the charge asymmetry in top-quark pair, which probe models of physics beyond the Standard Model, are presented; these include measurements at high invariant masses of the ttbar system using boosted top quarks. Measurements of the top polarisation produced either through pair process or through single top process are discussed. The helicity of the W boson from the top decays and the production angles of the top quark are further discussed. Limits on the rate of flavour changing neutral currents in the production or decay of the top quark are discussed.
        Speaker: Antonio Limosani (University of Sydney (AU))
      • 113
        Top properties measurements with the CMS detector at the LHC (15' + 5')

        Measurements are presented of the properties of top quarks in pair production from proton-proton collisions at the LHC. The data were collected at pp centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV by the CMS experiment during the years 2011 and 2012. The charge asymmetry is measured using the difference of the absolute rapidities of the reconstructed top and anti-top kinematics, as well as from distributions of the top quark decay products. The measurements are performed in the decay channels of the ttbar pair into both one and two leptons in the final state. The results, obtained differentially in several kinematic variables of the ttbar-system, are discussed in the context of the forward-backard asymmetry measurements at Tevatron. The polarization of top quarks is measured from the decay angular distributions. Ttbar spin correlation and asymmetries are measured from the angular distributions of the top quark decay products. These measurements are used to search for new physics. TTbar spin correlation is also measured using a matrix element method. Measurements of the associate production of top quark pairs with vector bosons (photons, W and Z) are also presented. The results are compared with standard model predictions.
        Several measurements of top quark properties in top quark decays are presented using data collected by the CMS experiment during the years 2011 and 2012. The polarization of W bosons in top quark decays is measured. The W-boson helicity fractions and angular asymmetries are extracted and limits on anomalous contributions to the Wtb vertex are determined. Furthermore, searches for flavor-changing neutral currents in top quark decays are presented using samples of top-quark pair event candidates decaying via Wb and Zq into lνb and llq events, or decaying via Hq into 3 b-quarks. The flavor contents in top-quark pair events are measured using the fraction of top quarks decaying into a W-boson and a b-quark relative to all top quark decays, R=BR(t->Wb)/Sum(BR(t->Wq)), and the result is used to determine the CKM matrix element Vtb as well as the width of the top quark resonance. The top-quark charge is measured, using the charge correlations between high-pT muons from W boson decays and soft muons from B-hadron decays in b jets. We also report on searches for CP violation effects in ttbar.

        Speaker: Jui-Fa Tsai (National Taiwan University (TW))
      • 114
        Measurement of top quark properties in single top production (15' + 5')
        Single top topologies are exploited for studies of top quark properties. This includes the first measurement of single top polarization in the t-channel production mode in pp collisions, which directly confirms the V-A nature of the tWb production vertex. W-helicity fractions are measured in the phase space sampled by a selection optimized for t-channel single top production, orthogonal to the ttbar final states used in traditional measurements of these properties. Anomalous couplings of the top quark are also searched in t-channel single top production with a NN-based analysis.
        Speaker: Abideh Jafari (Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL) (BE))
      • 115
        Measurements of spin correlation, spin polarization, and forward-backward asymmetries in $t\bar t$ -> ttbar events at the Tevatron (D0+CDF) (15' + 5')
        We present recent measurements on top properties obtained in $t\bar t$ events produced in $p\bar p$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron Collider. We first present a measurement of the spin correlations strength obtained with a matrix element technique applied to dilepton and lepton plus jets final states in $9.7\,$fb$^{-1}$ of data accumulated with the D0 detector. The measured correlation coefficient in the off-diagonal basis is in agreement with the standard model prediction, and represents evidence for a top-antitop spin correlation different from zero at a level of 4.2 standard deviations. Using the same dataset in the lepton plus jets channel, we also discuss a measurement of the top quark polarization in the beam and helicity bases, as well as the first measurement of the transverse polarization at a hadron collider. The combination between D0 polarization measurements in the lepton plus jets and dilepton channels is also presented. We finally discuss the complete overview of the forward-backward asymmetry measurements in the angular distributions in $t\bar t$ events at the Tevatron. These measurements use the full data set accumulated by the Tevatron in lepton plus jets and dilepton channels, in the D0 and CDF detectors. The combinations of the measurements of the $t\bar t$ and leptonic asymmetries are presented and compared with the NNLO QCD predictions.
        Speaker: Andreas Jung (Purdue)
    • 1:30 PM
      Lunch
    • Accelerator: Physics, Performance, R&D and Future Facilities: 3 Superior A

      Superior A

      Convener: Katsunobu Oide (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (JP))
      • 116
        Will there be energy frontier colliders after LHC? (15' + 5')
        The future of the world-wide HEP community critically depends on the feasibility of possible post-LHC colliders. The concept of the feasibility is complex and includes at least three factors: feasibility of energy, feasibility of luminosiity and feasibility of cost. The talk will give on overview of all current options for post-LHC colliders from such perspective (ILC, CLIC, Muon Collider, plasma colliders, CEPC, FCC, HE-LHC, etc) and discuss major challenges and accelerator R&D required to claim these machines feasible.
        Speaker: Vladimir Shiltsev (Fermilab)
      • 117
        Muon storage for the Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab (15' + 5')
        The muon storage ring for the g-2 experiment at Fermilab poses optimization challenges that couple directly to the statistical and systematic uncertainties of the measurement. The statistical uncertainty in the Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab is coupled to the number of measured positrons emitted by muons stored in a weak-focusing magnetic storage ring. The frequency that the ring is filled and the number of muons stored per fill determine the running time to achieve the experimental precision goal of 20 times the data obtained in BNL E821. Coherent betatron oscillation can introduce effects that must be controlled in the extraction of the muon spin precession frequency. Optimizing muon storage involves matching the final leg of the beamline with the storage ring acceptance, subject to very restrictive physical apertures. The storage ring is anchored by a 7.11 m radius superconducting magnet with a highly uniform 1.45 T vertical magnetic. Additional components include four sets of electrostatic quadrupoles that provide vertical focusing, a series of collimators that define the allowed storage volume, a superconducting inflector magnet that provides a near field-free corridor though which the muons enter the magnet, and a fast magnetic kicker that places the incoming muons on orbit. In practice, relatively pure 120-ns-long bunches of 3.094 GeV/$c$ polarized muons are injected through a hole in the back yoke of the C-shaped magnet, next through the inflector, which has a very narrow constriction, then into the ring. One quarter of the way around the first turn, the kicker imparts a $\sim11$ mrad outward deflection to the bunch. After a scraping scheme using the quadrupoles and collimators, muons orbit within a 9-cm circular aperture until they decay. We have used a variety of models to establish the expected storage rate and to demonstrate how tuning parameters affects this rate and the behavior of the stored beam. Instrumentation to provide feedback on rates and profiles of the beam at various locations has been developed. This talk will describe our expected muon storage rates, which exceed that obtained at BNL, as well as our studies of the stored beam dynamics.
        Speaker: Vladimir Tishchenko (BNL)
      • 118
        Advanced Controls for Particle Accelerators (15' + 5')
        Particle accelerators are host to myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena, involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruption. Machine learning and artificial intelligence constitute a versatile set of techniques that are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems, as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of adaptive, machine learning-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators and the scientific endeavors that they support. Here, we discuss our efforts to develop and deploy machine learning-based tools specifically to address control challenges found in particle accelerators, with a focus on neural networks.
        Speaker: Auralee Edelen (Colorado State University)
      • 119
        Superconducting technology for future HEP particle accelerators: opportunities and challenges (15' + 5')
        Superconducting magnets and radio frequency cavities are cornerstone technologies for future high energy particle accelerators. In this talk I will briefly discuss state of the art of these two technologies, outline how they enable future generation of accelerators for particle physics and discuss challenges.
        Speaker: Sergey Belomestnykh (Fermilab)
      • 120
        Recomissioning and Perspectives of VEPP-2000 e+e- Collider (15' + 5')
        VEPP-2000 is electron-positron collider exploiting the novel concept of round colliding beams. After three seasons of data taking in the whole energy range of 160-1000 MeV per beam it was stopped in 2013 for injection chain upgrade. The linking to the new BINP source of intensive beams together with booster synchrotron modernization provides the drastic luminosity gain at top energy of VEPP-2000.
        Speaker: Dmitry Shwartz (BINP)
      • 121
        Performance and Perspective of Beijing Electron Positron Collider (15' + 5')
        The Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) was upgraded as a double-ring factory-like charm-tau collider (BEPCII) with the design luminosity of 1*10^{33}cm^{-2}s^{-1} at 1.89 GeV. Being finished construction and passed the national test and check in 2009, the BEPCII has been operated for high energy physics studies for more than 6 years. The luminosity at the design energy has been steadily enhanced, and its performance was also optimized at various energies the HEP required. A lot of important HEP results, such as the observation of Zc(3900) was done at the BEPCII under its excellent performance. In the meanwhile, the collider is also served as a synchrotron radiation facility with 5 insertion devices for extracting beam lines to synchrotron light users during the past years. Status of the machine and beam performance are described in this talk. Various accelerator physics and technology results and developments have been obtained in the year of BEPCII. The future plan is also discussed in this talk.
        Speaker: Prof. QING QIN (IHEP)
    • Astro-particle Physics and Cosmology: Gamma Ray Astrophysics Chicago 10

      Chicago 10

      Convener: Karen Byrum (Argonne National Lab)
      • 122
        VERITAS Observations of the Galactic Center (15' + 5')
        Weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPS) are among the wide range of candidates for the dark matter (DM) that dominates the mass content of the universe. In some scenarios these WIMPs are self-annihilating. In regions of high dark matter density (such as our own Galactic Center) this self-annihilation is expected to produce a characteristic gamma-ray radiation signature that cuts off at the WIMP mass. Observations of these regions of high dark matter density with very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray telescopes can constrain a unique phase space of heavy WIMP masses. However, in the case of the Galactic Center gamma-ray emission arising from more conventional astrophysical sources complicates the interpretation of such observations. We provide an update on deep observations of the Galactic Center with VERITAS, an array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes sensitive to VHE gamma rays with energies between 85 GeV and 30 TeV.
        Speaker: Amanda Weinstein (Iowa State University)
      • 123
        Multimessenger studies with the VERITAS Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope (15' + 5')
        Multimessenger astronomy is an emerging area of study in high-energy astrophysics aimed at combining observations from instruments sensitive to different “cosmic messengers”; neutrinos, photons, cosmic rays, and potentially gravitational waves. The VERITAS gamma-ray observatory has an active multimessenger program, currently focused on studying the connection between very high energy gamma-rays and the astrophysical neutrino flux recently discovered by IceCube. As both gamma-rays and neutrinos are produced in hadronic interactions, it is expected that a joint study of both messenger channels could reveal powerful cosmic-ray accelerators and probe their properties. We present an overview and recent results from the VERITAS multimessenger program and discuss prospects for combined studies with other multimessenger facilities, such as the aLIGO gravitational wave observatory, that could benefit from the synergy between the VERITAS, HAWC, and Fermi gamma-ray instruments.
        Speaker: Marcos Santander (Barnard College, Columbia University)
      • 124
        Measurement of the Cosmic-ray Electron Spectrum with VERITAS (15' + 5')
        Cosmic-ray electrons and positrons (CREs) at GeV-TeV energies are a unique probe of our local Galactic neighbourhood. CREs lose energy rapidly via inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron processes while propagating in the Galaxy, effectively placing a maximal propagation distance for TeV electrons of order $\sim$1 kpc. Within this window, production of CREs can come from a handful of known, nearby astrophysical sources capable of exciting CREs to that energy or from more exotic production mechanisms, like particle dark matter. VERITAS is an array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes in southern Arizona and is one of the world's most sensitive detectors of very high energy (VHE: >100 GeV) gamma rays and cosmic rays. In this presentation, we'll discuss the VERITAS measurement of an electron plus positron cosmic ray spectrum to TeV energies.
        Speaker: David Staszak (University of Chicago)
      • 125
        Observation of Galactic Cosmic Rays and Gamma Rays with the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (15' + 5')
        The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, or HAWC, is carrying out an unbiased survey of cosmic rays and gamma rays from the Northern Hemisphere between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. HAWC is currently the only high-uptime wide-field TeV observatory in operation, and has a robust program to search for flares and other transient sources of gamma rays. The detector is also well suited to observe spatially extended regions of gamma-ray emission and cosmic-ray anisotropy. HAWC recently concluded its first year of data taking with the complete detector. The results include not only observations of many known TeV point sources, but also extended emission from Galactic objects like the Geminga supernova remnant. These results have implications for the origins of several astrophysical anomalies observed in the cosmic-ray data, such as the excess of Galactic positrons at Earth. We will describe results from HAWC with a focus on the observation of cosmic rays and Galactic sources of gamma rays.
        Speaker: Segev BenZvi (University of Rochester)
      • 126
        Searches for Dark Matter and Primordial Black Holes with the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-ray Observatory (15' + 5')
        The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) gamma-ray observatory is a continuously operated, wide field-of-view (FOV) observatory sensitive to 100 GeV – 100 TeV gamma rays and cosmic rays. HAWC has been making observations since summer 2012 and officially commenced data-taking operations with the completed detector on March 20, 2015. With an instantaneous FOV of 2 steradians, HAWC observes 2/3 of the sky in 24 hours and can be used to search for astrophysical signatures of dark matter (DM) and primordial black holes (PBHs). In particular, HAWC should be the most sensitive experiment to signals coming from annihilation or decay of dark matter with masses greater than 10-100 TeV. I will present the HAWC sensitivity and current limits to dark matter signals from several likely sources of these signals, including dwarf spheroidal galaxies, galaxy clusters, emission from the center of the Milky Way, and from non-luminous dark matter subhalos. I will also show HAWC's sensitivity and current limits on evaporating PBHs.
        Speaker: Kirsten Anne Tollefson (Michigan State University (US))
      • 127
        Fundamental physics with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (15' + 5')
        The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a next-generation array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes that will feature an order of magnitude improved sensitivity compared to the previous generation of instruments. Building on the success of H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS in a complementary energy range to Fermi, CTA will investigate the particle physics of the cosmos through observations of gamma rays between tens of GeV and several hundred TeV. By observing the inner Galaxy, dwarf galaxies, and other targets rich in dark matter, CTA will detect signatures of WIMP annihilations in situ in the universe or provide strong constraints on their annihilation cross section for WIMP masses ranging from below 100 GeV to above 10 TeV, including a mass range inaccessible with other methods. CTA will also detect or constrain the nature of axion-like particles and test Lorentz invariance violation over a large energy range. Finally, CTA’s measurements of the energy spectrum and possible anisotropy of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons will provide important constraints on the excess positron signal that could be connected to dark matter .
        Speaker: Prof. Justin Vandenbroucke (University of Wisconsin)
    • Beyond the Standard Model: 3 Chicago 7

      Chicago 7

      Convener: Kiwoon Choi (KAIST)
      • 128
        Supersymmetry versus Extra Dimensions at the LHC (15' + 5')
        Non-minimal universal extra dimensions (nmUED) involve the choice of boundary localized kinetic terms (BLKT) for the 5 dimensional gauge bosons and fermions. We find that with suitable choice of these parameters needed to explain the current Higgs data, the BLK terms removes the approximate degeneracy of the KK mass spectrum, and the pair productions of the level-1 quarks and gluons give rise to hard jets, leptons and large missing energy. Thus the LHC will not be able to distinguish between the supersymmetry and extra dimensions, and the production of the 2nd KK excitation will be the key for such a distinction.
        Speaker: Prof. Satyanarayan Nandi (Oklahoma State University)
      • 129
        Search for supersymmetry with diphotons in pp collisions at 13 TeV with CMS (15' + 5')

        We present a search for supersymmetry in diphoton plus jets plus missing transverse energy final states. The analysis uses data collected with the CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

        Speaker: Si Xie (California Institute of Technology (US))
      • 130
        Searches for SUSY in photons and tau channels with the ATLAS detector (15' + 5')
        The talk presents searches for the prompt decay of supersymmetric particles in events containing photons or taus and large transverse missing momentum, performed by the ATLAS experiment. The final states considered are particularly motivated in gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking models with a light gravitino as the lightest supersymmetric particle. The increase in the center-of-mass energy of the proton-proton collisions gives a unique opportunity to extend the sensitivity to production of supersymmetric particles at the Large Hadron Collider. Results obtained with pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV are presented.
        Speaker: Bruce Andrew Schumm (University of California,Santa Cruz (US))
      • 131
        Imposing LHC constraints on the combined Anomaly and $Z^\prime$ Mediation Mechanism of Supersymmetry Breaking (15' + 5')
        Combining anomaly with $Z^\prime$ mediation allows us to solve the tachyonic problem of the former and avoid fine tuning in the latter. This model includes an extra $U(1)^\prime$ gauge symmetry and extra singlet scalar $S$ which provides a solution to the `$\mu$ problem' of the MSSM. The low-energy particle spectrum is calculated from the UV inputs using the Renormalization Group Equations. The benchmark points considered in the original model, suggested before the Higgs discovery, predicted a Higgs mass close to the current measured value of 125 $\mathrm{GeV}$. We use the current LHC data to update the predictions of the model, its particle spectrum and in particular the mass of the $Z^\prime$ gauge boson.
        Speaker: Joydeep Roy (Wayne State University)
      • 132
        Naturalizing Supersymmetry with a Two-Field Relaxion Mechanism (15' + 5')
        We present a supersymmetric version of a two-field relaxion model that natu- ralizes tuned versions of supersymmetry. This arises from a relaxion mechanism that does not depend on QCD dynamics and where the relaxion potential barrier height is controlled by a second axion-like eld. During the cosmological evolution, this allows the relaxion to roll with a nonzero value that breaks supersymmetry and scans the soft supersymmetric mass terms. Electroweak symmetry is broken after the soft masses become of order the supersymmetric mass scale, causing the relaxion to stop rolling at values corresponding to superpartner mass scales up to ~10^9 GeV. This helps to explain the tuning in supersymmetric models, including split-SUSY models at the PeV scale, while preserving the QCD axion solution to the strong CP problem. Besides predicting two very weakly-coupled axion-like par- ticles, the supersymmetric spectrum contains an extra Goldstino, which could be a viable dark matter candidate.
        Speaker: Prof. Jason Evans (Korean Institute for Advanced Study)
      • 133
        Searches for R-Parity violating SUSY with the ATLAS detector (15' + 5')
        The violation of R-parity allows new signatures to be pursued in the search for supersymmetry at the LHC. This talk presents the latest results from the ATLAS experiment on searches for R-parity vilating SUSY using data from pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The results presented are for dedicated searches for resonances, as well as a systematic analysis of the constraints placed on R-parity violating models.
        Speaker: Suen Hou (Academia Sinica (TW))
    • Computing: Infrastructure Huron

      Huron

      Convener: Elizabeth Sexton-Kennedy (Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (US))
      • 134
        Data Acquisition with GPUs: The DAQ for the Fermilab Muon g-2 Experiment (15' + 5')
        Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) have have recently become a valuable computing tool for the acquisition of data at high rates and for a relatively low cost. The devices work by parallelizing the code into thousands of threads, each executing a simple process, such as identifying pulses from a waveform digitizer. The cuda programming library can be used to effectively write code to parallelize such tasks on Nvidia GPUs, providing a significant upgrade in performance over CPU based acquisition systems. The muon $g$-$2$ experiment at Fermilab is heavily relying on GPUs to process it's data. The data acquisition system for this experiment must have the ability to create deadtime-free records from 700 $\mu$s muon spills at a raw data rate 18 GB per second. Data will be collected using 1296 channels of $\mu$TCA-based 800 MSPS, 12 bit waveform digitizers and processed in a layered array of networked commodity processors with 24 GPUs working in parallel to perform a fast recording of the muon decays during the spill. The described data acquisition system is currently being constructed, and will be fully operational before the start of the experiment in 2017.
        Speaker: Wesley Gohn (University of Kentucky)
      • 135
        Fermilab HEP Cloud: an elastic computing facility for High Energy Physics. (15' + 5')
        The need for computing in the HEP community follows cycles of peaks and valleys mainly driven by holiday schedules, conference dates and other factors. Because of this, the classical method of provisioning these resources at providing facilities has drawbacks such as potential overprovisioning. As the appetite for computing increases, however, so does the need to maximize cost efficiency by developing a model for dynamically provisioning resources only when needed. To address this issue, the HEP Cloud project was launched by the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division in June 2015. Its goal is to develop a facility that provides a common interface to a variety of resources, including local clusters, grids, high performance computers, and community and commercial clouds. Initially targeted communities include CMS and NOvA, as well as other Fermilab stakeholders. In its first phase, the project has demonstrated the use of the “elastic” provisioning model offered by commercial clouds, such as Amazon Web Services. In this model, resources are rented and provisioned automatically over the Internet upon request. In January 2016, the project demonstrated the ability to increase the total amount of global CMS resources by 58,000 cores from 150,000 cores - a 25 percent increase. This burst of resources was used in preparation for the Recontres de Moriond conference to generate and reconstruct Monte Carlo events. At the same time, the NOvA experiment has also run data-intensive computations through HEP Cloud, readily provisioning 1,500 cores on Amazon to process reconstructed detector data. NOvA is using the same familiar services they use for local computations such as data handling and job submission. In both cases, the cost was contained by the use of the Amazon Spot Instance Market, a rental model that allows Amazon to sell their overprovisioned capacity at a fraction of the regular price. This paper describes the Fermilab HEP Cloud Facility and the challenges overcome for all targeted communities.
        Speaker: Burt Holzman (Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (US))
      • 136
        The FIFE Project at Fermilab: Computing for Experiments (15' + 5')
        The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is an initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division designed to steer the computing model for non-LHC Fermilab experiments across multiple physics areas. FIFE is a collaborative effort between experimenters and computing professionals to design and develop integrated computing models for experiments of varying size, needs, and infrastructure. The major focus of the FIFE project is the development, deployment, and integration of solutions for high throughput computing, data management, database access and collaboration management within an experiment. To accomplish this goal, FIFE has developed workflows that utilize Open Science Grid compute sites along with dedicated and commercial cloud resources. The FIFE project has made significant progress integrating into experiment computing operations several services including a common job submission service, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, flexible and robust data transfer clients, and access to opportunistic resources on the Open Science Grid. The progress with current experiments and plans for expansion with additional projects will be discussed. FIFE has taken the leading role in defining the computing model for Fermilab experiments, aided in the design of experiments beyond those hosted at Fermilab, and will continue to define the future direction of high throughput computing for future physics experiments worldwide.
        Speaker: Dr Kenneth Richard Herner (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (US))
      • 137
        GeantV: from CPU to accelerators (15' + 5')
        The GeantV project aims to research and develop the next generation simulation software describing the passage of particles through matter, targeting not only modern CPU architectures, but also more exotic resources such as GPGPU, Intel© Xeon Phi, Atom or ARM, which cannot be ignored any more for HEP computing. While the proof of concept GeantV prototype has been mainly engineered for CPU threads, we have foreseen from early stages a bridge for such accelerators, materialized in the form of architecture/technology specific backend templates. This approach allows to abstract out not only basic types such as scalar/vector, but also to formalize generic computation kernels using transparently library or device specific constructs based on several industry leading libraries. While the main goal of this approach is performance and access to functionality, this comes as bonus with the insulation of the core application and algorithms from the technology layer, allowing our application to be long term maintainable and versatile to changes at the backend side. The talk will present the early results of basket-based GeantV geometry navigation on the Intel© Xeon and Intel© Xeon Phi KNC architecture, as well as the work done for making the transport NUMA aware. We will present a detailed scalability and vectorization study conducted using Intel performance tools, as well as our preliminary conclusions on the use of accelerators for GeantV transport. We will also describe the current work and preliminary results for using the GeantV transport kernel on GPUs..
        Speaker: Philippe Canal (Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (US))
      • 138
        Developments in Architectures and Services for using High Performance Computing in Energy Frontier Experiments (25' + 5')

        The integration of HPC resources into the standard computing toolkit of HEP experiments is becoming important as traditional resources are being outpaced by the needs of the experiments. We will describe solutions that address some of the difficulty in running data-intensive pipelines on HPC systems. Users of NERSC HPCs are benefiting from a newly developed package called "Shifter" that creates docker-like images and the deployment of the new "Burst Buffers" NVRAM file system designed to offer extreme I/O performance, supporting terabyte-per-second bandwidth and 10s of millions of IO operations per second. These tools have enabled particle physicists from multiple experiments routinely run their entire multi-TB sized CVMFS software stacks across tens of thousands of compute cores. In addition, an Edge Service has been developed to provide a uniform interface for HEP job management systems to access supercomputer sites. It is based on the Python Django framework and is composed of two processes, of which one runs inside the supercomputing environment and one runs outside. It has been used to run over 100 million core-hours of LHC experiment jobs on the Mira supercomputer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility and on the Edison supercomputer at NERSC for LHC experiments.

        Speakers: Lisa Gerhardt (LBNL) , Taylor Childers (Argonne National Laboratory (US))
    • Dark Matter Detection: 1 Chicago 9

      Chicago 9

      Sheraton Grand Chicago 301 East Water Street Chicago IL 60611 USA
      Convener: Young-Im Kim (Institute for Basic Science)
      • 139
        IAXO, next-generation of helioscopes (15' + 5')
        The International Axion Observatory (IAXO) is a proposed next-generation axion helioscope with the primary physics research goal to search for solar axions via their Primakoff conversion into photons in a strong magnetic field. IAXO consists of a 20 m long superconducting 8-coil toroidal magnet optimized for axion research. Each one of the eight 60-cm-diameter magnet bores is equipped with state-of-the-art x-ray optics and low-background x-ray detectors. The magnet is built into a structure with elevation and azimuth drives that allow for daily solar tracking. IAXO will achieve a sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling gaγγ down to a few 10-12 GeV-1 for a wide range of axion masses up to ~0.25 eV. This is an improvement over the currently best axion helioscope, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), of about 5 orders of magnitude in signal strength.
        Speakers: Dr Jaime Ruz Armendariz (LLNL) , Dr Maurizio Giannotti, Maurizio Giannotti (Barry University)
      • 140
        CULTASK, the Coldest Axion Experiment at CAPP/IBS in Korea (15' + 5')
        The axion is an excellent dark matter candidate motivated by the Peccei-Quinn solution to the strong-CP problem. The IBS Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research (CAPP) in Korea will explore the dark matter axion using a method suggested by P. Sikivie, converting axions into microwave photons in a resonant cavity permeated by a strong magnetic field. CAPP’s first microwave axion experiment, CULTASK (CAPP’s Ultra Low Temperature Axion Search in Korea) is being launched at KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) campus this spring utilizing top of the line equipment and technology. I will outline many R&D efforts that are currently being undertaken to make the axion search range broader and the sensitivity greater. I will also discuss the results from the recent engineering runs and future plans of the axion experiment.
        Speaker: Dr Chung Woohyun (CAPP/IBS)
      • 141
        ADMX Status (30' + 10')
        Nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter (CDM) in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of CDM axions between approximately a μeV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) is a direct-detection CDM axion search which has set limits at the KSVZ coupling of the axion to two photons for axion masses between 1.9 and 3.7 μeV. The current upgrades will allow ADMX to detect axions with even the most pessimistic couplings in this mass range. In order to expand the mass reach of the detector, ADMX is conducting extensive research and development of microwave cavity technology. Status of the experiment, current research, and projected results will be presented. This work was supported in part by the Department of Energy under grant DE-SC0010280.
        Speaker: Ian Stern (University of Florida)
      • 142
        Single Microwave Photon Detectors for ADMX (15' + 5')
        High quantum efficiency, qubit-based single microwave photon detectors are being developed for the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX). This cross-disciplinary research aims to transfer the already mature qubit readout technology used in quantum computing and bring it to bear on particle physics applications. Because dark noise from thermal photons is exponentially suppressed in low temperature operation, the effective noise power of these photon counting detectors can be orders of magnitude below that of the quantum-limited linear amplifiers presently used in axion searches. The resulting improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio will enable future searches for dark matter axions at higher mass.
        Speaker: Dr Aaron Chou (Fermilab)
      • 143
        Status of the ADMX-HF Dark Matter Axion Search (15' + 5')
        Axions are a leading dark matter candidate, and may be detected by their resonant conversion to a monochromatic RF signal in a tunable microwave cavity permeated by a strong magnetic field. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment – High Frequency (ADMX-HF) serves both as a innovation platform for cavity and amplifier technologies for the microwave cavity axion experiment, and as a pathfinder for a first look at data in the 20 – 100 μeV (~ 4 – 25 GHz) range. A collaboration of Yale University, where the experiment is sited, the University of California Berkeley, Colorado University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, ADMX-HF is a small but highly capable platform where advanced concepts can be developed and vetted in an operational environment. The experiment is built on a superconducting solenoidal magnet (9 T, 17.5 cm ∅ x 40 cm) of high field uniformity, and a dilution refrigerator capable of cooling the cavity and amplifier to 25 mK. In its initial configuration, the microwave cavity is made of high purity electroformed copper, tunable between 3.6 – 5.8 GHz. The cavity is coupled to a Josephson Parametric Amplifier; JPAs are ideally suited for the 5 GHz range, being broadly tunable and exhibiting near-quantum-limited noise temperature. Construction of the experiment was completed in 2015, and has embarked on a first data run in January 2016. Technologies to be deployed in the near future include a squeezed-vacuum state receiver, superconducting thin-film cavities, and photonic band-gap resonators. This work was supported under the auspices of the National Science Foundation, under grants PHY-1067242 and PHY-1306729, the Heising-Simons Foundation under grant 2014-182, and the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.
        Speaker: Maria Simanovskaia (University of California, Berkeley)
    • Detector: R&D and Performance: Trigger/DAQ Chicago 8

      Chicago 8

      Convener: Kenji Inami (Nagoya university)
      • 144
        The ATLAS Dataflow system in Run-2: Design and Performance (12' + 3')
        The ATLAS detector uses a real time selective triggering system to reduce the high interaction rate from 40 MHz to its data storage capacity of 1 kHz. A hardware first level trigger limits the rate to 100 kHz and a software high level trigger selects events for offline analysis. By building on the experience gained during the successful first run of the LHC, the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition system has been simplified and upgraded to take advantage of state of the art technologies. The Dataflow element of the system is composed of distributed hardware and software responsible for buffering and transporting event data from the Readout system to the High Level Trigger and to the event storage. This system has been reshaped in order to maximize the flexibility and efficiency of the data selection process. The updated dataflow is different from the previous implementation both in terms of architecture and performance. The biggest difference is within the high level trigger, where the merger of region-of-interest based selection with event building and filtering into a single process allows incremental data collection and analysis. The previous structure of the commodity server farm running the high level trigger algorithms, previously subdivided with each slice managed by a dedicated supervisor, has been dropped in favor of global management by a single farm master operating at 100 kHz referred to as the high level trigger supervisor. The Region of Interest Builder previously implemented on a VMEbus system is now integrated with this supervisor, with the region of interest building done in software. The Data Collection network that connects the high level trigger processing nodes to the Readout and the storage systems has evolved to a single Ethernet network and the Readout PCs have been directly connected to it. The aggregate throughput and port density have been increased by an order of magnitude with the introduction of advanced network routing and significantly enhanced fault tolerance and redundancy. The overall design of the system will be presented, along with performance results from the start up phase of LHC Run-2.
        Speaker: Othmane Rifki (University of Oklahoma (US))
      • 145
        The Fast Interaction Trigger Upgrade for ALICE (12' + 3')
        The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major detector upgrade for the second LHC long shutdown (2019-20). The LHC heavy-ion luminosity and collision rate from 2021 onwards will considerably exceed the design parameters of the present ALICE forward trigger detectors. Furthermore, the introduction of a new Muon Forward Tracker will significantly reduce the space available for the upgraded trigger detectors. To comply with these conditions a Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) has been designed. FIT will be the primary forward trigger, luminosity, and collision time measurement detector. The FIT will be capable of triggering at an interaction rate of 50 kHz, with a time resolution better than 30 ps, with 99% efficiency. It will also determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane. FIT will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov radiators with MCP-PMT sensors and of a scintillator ring. The arrays will be placed on the opposite sides of the interaction point (IP). Because of the presence of the hadron absorber of the muon spectrometer, the placement of the FIT arrays will be asymmetric: about 800 mm from IP on the absorber side and 3200 mm from IP on the opposite side. Scheduled for installation in 2020, FIT is in the midst of an intense R&D and prototyping period. The timing, amplitude and efficiency characteristics are determined with relativistic particles and with lasers. The ongoing Monte Carlo studies verify the physics performance and refine the geometry of the FIT arrays. The presentation will give a short description of FIT, a summary of the performance, and the outcome of the simulations and beam tests. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant NSF-PHY-1305280.
        Speaker: Prof. Edmundo Garcia-Solis (Chicago State University (US))
      • 146
        The CMS Level-1 Trigger for LHC Run II (12' + 3')
        The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment has implemented a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 10e5. During Run II, the LHC will increase its centre-of-mass energy up to 13 TeV and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of 2e34cm-2s-1. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition (DAQ) system has been upgraded. The upgraded CMS L1 trigger is designed to improve the performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing (pile-up). During the technical stop at the beginning of 2016, all the electronic boards of the CMS L1 trigger have been replaced, tested, and commissioned with data. The L1 calorimeter trigger hardware and architecture have been redesigned to maintain the current thresholds for electrons and photons in these more challenging conditions. This design benefits from recent microTCA technology, allowing sophisticated algorithms to be deployed, better exploiting the calorimeter granularity and opening the possibility of making correlations between different parts of the detector. The new Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger uses a novel Time Multiplexed Trigger which allows the L1 trigger a global view of the entire event with higher granularity. Smarter, more complex, and innovative algorithms are now the core of the first decision layer of CMS: the upgraded trigger system implements pattern recognition and MVA (Boosted Decision Tree) regression techniques in the trigger boards for $\text{p}_{\text{T}}$ assignment, pile up subtraction, and isolation requirements for muons, electrons, and taus. In addition, the new global trigger is capable of evaluating complex selection algorithms such as those involving the invariant mass of trigger primitives. All the above is drastically reducing the trigger rate and improving the trigger efficiency for a wide variety of physics signals. In this presentation the upgraded CMS L1 trigger design and its performance are described. The impact of the improved selection criteria on benchmark physics channels such as Higgs and Supersymmetry will be presented as well in this talk.
        Speaker: Alex Tapper (Imperial College Sci., Tech. & Med. (GB))
      • 147
        A level-1 pixel based track trigger for the CMS upgrade (12' + 3')
        We present feasibility studies to investigate the performances and interest of a Level-1 trigger based on pixels. The Level-1 (real-time) pixel based tracking trigger is a novel trigger system that is based on the real-time track reconstruction algorithms able to cope with very high rates and high flux of data in a very harsh environment. The pixel detector has an especially crucial role in precisely identifying the primary vertex of the rare physics events from the large pile-up (PU) of events. The goal of adding the pixel information already at the real-time level of the selection is to help reducing the total level-1 trigger rate while keeping an high selection capability. This is quite an innovative and challenging objective for the experiments upgrade for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC).
        Speaker: Chang-Seong Moon (UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista (BR))
      • 148
        The ATLAS Run-2 Trigger: Design, Menu, Performance and Operational Aspects (12' + 3')
        The LHC, at design capacity, has a bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz whereas the ATLAS experiment has an average recording rate of about 1000 Hz. To reduce the rate of events but still maintain high efficiency of selecting rare events such as physics signals beyond the Standard Model, a two-level trigger system is used in ATLAS. Events are selected based on physics signatures such as presence of energetic leptons, photons, jets or large missing energy. Despite the limited time available for processing collision events, the trigger system is able to exploit topological informations, as well as using multi-variate methods. In total, the ATLAS trigger systems consists of thousands of different individual triggers. The ATLAS trigger menu specifies which triggers are used during data taking and how much rate a given trigger is allocated. This menu reflects not only the physics goals of the collaboration but also takes into consideration the instantaneous luminosity of the LHC and the design limits of the ATLAS detector and offline processing Tier0 farm. We describe the criteria for designing the ATLAS trigger menu used for the LHC Run 2 period. Furthermore, we discuss how the trigger menu is deployed online, through different phases: validation before being used online, decision on prescale values for different triggers (ahead of running, or online in case of sudden rate changes), and monitoring during data taking itself. The performance of the high-level trigger algorithms used to identify leptons, hadrons and global event quantities which are crucial for event selection relevant to wide range of physics analyses is presented at hand of a few examples.
        Speaker: Joana Machado Miguens (University of Pennsylvania (US))
      • 149
        Overview of the ATLAS Fast Tracker Project (12' + 3')
        The next LHC runs, with a significant increase in instantaneous luminosity, will provide a big challenge for the trigger and data acquisition systems of all the experiments. An intensive use of the tracking information at the trigger level will be important to keep high efficiency for interesting events despite the increase in multiple collisions per bunch crossing. In order to increase the use of tracks within the High Level Trigger, the ATLAS experiment planned the installation of a hardware processor dedicated to tracking: the Fast TracKer processor. The Fast Tracker is designed to perform full scan track reconstruction of every event accepted by the ATLAS first level hardware trigger. To achieve this goal the system uses a parallel architecture, with algorithms designed to exploit the computing power of custom Associative Memory chips, and modern field programmable gate arrays. The processor will provide computing power to reconstruct tracks with transverse momentum greater than 1 GeV in the whole tracking volume. The tracks will be available at the begin of the trigger selections, allowing to develop new more pileup resilient triggering strategies as well as allow for entirely new ones. The Fast Tracker system will be massive, with about 8000 Associative Memory chips and 2000 field programmable gate arrays, providing full tracking with a rate up to 100 KHz and an average latency below 100 microseconds. The system will begin the commissioning in 2016, with a full barrel coverage reached by the end of the year. The final version of the electronic boards is presented, reporting on the commissioning status as well as the first data-taking experience. An overview of the Fast Tracker processor is presented, reporting the design of the system, the expected performance from simulation studies and the status of the latest hardware prototypes.
        Speaker: Lucian Stefan Ancu (Universite de Geneve (CH))
      • 150
        The Upgrade of the ATLAS Electron and Photon Triggers for LHC Run 2 and their Performance (12' + 3')
        Electron and photon triggers covering transverse energies from 5 GeV to several TeV are essential for signal selection in a wide variety of ATLAS physics analyses to study Standard Model processes and to search for new phenomena. Final states including leptons and photons had, for example, an important role in the discovery and measurement of the Higgs particle. Dedicated triggers are also used to collect data for calibration, efficiency and fake rate measurements. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in a hardware-based Level 1 and a software based high level trigger, both of which were upgraded during the long shutdown of the LHC in preparation for data taking in 2015. The increasing luminosity and more challenging pile-up conditions as well as the planned higher center-of-mass energy demanded the optimisation of the trigger selections at each level, to control the rates and keep efficiencies high. To improve the performance multivariate analysis techniques are introduced. The evolution of the ATLAS electron and photon triggers and their performance will be presented, including new results from the 2015 LHC Run 2 operation.
        Speaker: Fernando Monticelli (Universidad Nacional de La Plata (AR))
      • 151
        Data acquisition and online control system for new gas-electron multiplier detectors in the endcap muon system of the CMS experiment (12' + 3')
        A new data acquisition and on-line control system is being developed for gas-electron multiplier (GEM) detectors which will be installed in the forward region (1.6 < |η| < 2.2) of the CMS muon spectrometer during the 2nd long shutdown of the LHC, planned for the period 2018-2019. A prototype system employs the TOTEM VFAT2 ASIC that will eventually be replaced with the VFAT3 ASIC, under development. The front-end ASIC communicates over printed circuit lines with an intermediate on-detector board called the opto-hybrid. Data, trigger, and control information is transmitted via optical fiber between the opto-hybrid and an off-detector readout system using micro-TCA technology. On-line software, implemented in the CMS XDAQ framework, includes applications for latency and HV scans, and system management. We report on the operational status of the prototype system that has been tested using cosmic ray muons and extracted high-energy particle beams. This work is preparatory for the operation of a prototype GEM detector system to be installed in the CMS experiment in 2017.
        Speaker: Dr Jose David Ruiz Alvarez (Universidad de los Andes (CO))
    • Heavy Ions: Collective Effects and Correlations Superior B

      Superior B

      Sheraton Grand Chicago 301 East Water Street Chicago IL 60611 USA
      Convener: Matthew Nguyen (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (FR))
      • 152
        Anisotropic flow and related phenomena in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV with ALICE (15' + 5')
        ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is designed and optimised to study the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), a new state of matter, which is expected to be created at the high energy densities reached at the LHC. One of the key observables used to characterize the properties of the QGP is the azimuthal anisotropy in particle production. This so-called anisotropic flow is sensitive to the transport properties and equation of state of the QGP. In this presentation, we report the first measurements of anisotropic flow in Pb–Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV with ALICE and compare them with both theoretical predictions and experimental measurements at lower energies and other collision systems. This provides a unique opportunity to test the validity of the hydrodynamic paradigm and to further constraint the key transport parameters of the QGP.
        Speaker: Jacopo Margutti (Utrecht University (NL))
      • 153
        Recent results on collective effects in small systems from PHENIX at RHIC (15' + 5')
        Collisions of simple systems, such as p+p, or p+Nucleus have been used as benchmarks for our understanding of Heavy Ion Collisions, since it was assumed they would be free of the effects from hot nuclear matter.▒ Recently long range correlations and anisotropies of momentum spectra have been seen in such collisions, challenging this assumption. Such phenomena have been understood to be the result of the collective motion, which can best be described by hydrodynamics, whose initial conditions are set by the geometry of the colliding systems, together with their fluctuations. This talk will discuss the recent results from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC using a variety of colliding species (p+Au, d+Au, He3+Au) which give a better understanding of the origin of the observed correlations and anisotropies, thus providing insight as to whether a Quark Gluon Plasma is formed in these simple systems.▒
        Speaker: Sarah Campbell (PHENIX)
      • 154
        Correlations in small systems with ALICE (15' + 5')
        Igor Lakomov for the ALICE Collaboration ALICE is dedicated to the study of the strongly interacting matter, the so-called Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), formed in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. In addition, ALICE also actively participated in the pp and p-Pb collision programs at the LHC. In particular, the measurements of the two-particle azimuthal correlations in pp collisions at 7 TeV and in p-Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV have been performed by the ALICE Collaboration during Run I of the LHC. Similar long-range correlations in p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions have been observed on the near and away side - also known as the double ridge. Further investigations showed the importance of the Multi-Parton Interactions (MPI) in high-multiplicity collisions in small systems. In this talk we present the ALICE results on the correlations in small systems including the latest analyses using the data from Run II at the LHC.
        Speaker: Igor Lakomov (CERN)
      • 155
        Anomalous Chiral Transport in Heavy Ion Collisions (15' + 5')
        Anomalous chiral transport processes, with the notable examples of Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) and Chiral Magnetic Wave (CMW), are remarkable phenomena that stem from highly nontrivial interplay of QCD chiral symmetry, axial anomaly, and gluonic topology. The heavy ion collisions provide a unique environment where a hot chiral-symmetric quark-gluon plasma is created, gluonic topological fluctuations generate chirality imbalance, and very strong magnetic fields $|\vec{\bf B}|\sim m_\pi^2$ are present during the early stage of such collisions. Significant efforts have been made to look for signals of CME and various other anomalous chiral transport effects signals in heavy ion collision experiments. Crucial for such search and for interpretation of data, is the development of quantitative simulations based on hydrodynamics, with realistic initial conditions and properly accounting for possible backgrounds. We report a number of important recent progress toward this direction. Fluid systems with chiral fermions are described by anomalous hydrodynamics. We combine this new framework with the state-of-the-art, data-validated viscous hydro simulations of heavy ion collisions to describe the anomalous chiral transport of various charges in the quark-gluon plasma in a linearized fashion. Furthermore we have used partonic transport tools (AMPT) to simulate realistic initial conditions for each parton flavor, to be then evolved in time using the anomalous hydro. In addition, known background effects are incorporated in the computation of relevant observables for final state hadrons. Such quantitative simulations have allowed us to (1) systematically examine and contrast the transport of conserved charges with and without anomaly effects; and (2) meaningfully compare modeling predictions with experimental measurements related to CME and CMW. We will present these results in details and discuss their implications for the search of anomalous chiral transport effects. [Refs] Shi, Jiang, Yin, Liao, to appear; Liao, 1601.00381; Kharzeev, Liao, Voloshin, Wang, 1511.04050; Yin, Liao, 1504.06906; Jiang, Huang, Liao, 1504.03201.
        Speaker: Jinfeng Liao (Indiana University)
      • 156
        Measurements of flow and correlation phenomena in pp, pPb and PbPb collisions at CMS (15' + 5')
        Many aspects of anisotropic collective flow in ultra relativistic heavy-ion collisions have been studied extensively in the past years using two or more particle correlations. An overview of collective flow and particle correlation measurements at CMS as a function of transverse momentum, pseudorapidity, event multiplicity, for both charged hadrons or identified particles will be presented. These results will be compared among pp, pPb and PbPb systems. Latest results of pp and PbPb data from 2015 run will also be discussed.
        Speaker: Sandra Padula (UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista (BR))
      • 157
        Measurement of the ridge correlations in pp and pPb collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC (15' + 5')
        ATLAS measurement of azimuthal correlations between particle pairs at large pseudorapidity separation in pp and pPb collisions are presented. The data were collected using a combination of the minimum-bias and high track-multiplicity triggers. A detailed study of the dependence of two-particle correlations on the charged particle multiplicity, transverse momentum of the pair constituents and the pseudorapidity separation between particles forming a pair is shown. Measurements of multi-particle cumulants in the azimuthal angles of produced particles in wide pseudorapidity (|η|<2.5) and multiplicity ranges, with the aim to extract a single particle anisotropy coefficient, v1-v5, are also presented. These measurements can help to understand the origin of the long-range correlations seen in high-multiplicity pp and p+Pb collisions.
        Speaker: Anne Marie Sickles (Univ. Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (US))
    • Neutrino Physics: VSBL reactor exp + Sterile Chicago 6

      Chicago 6

      Convener: Seon-Hee Seo (Seoul National University)
      • 158
        Search for Sterile Neutrino at Short Baseline using a Nuclear Reactor (15' + 3')
        The existence of sterile neutrinos may explain the discrepancy between the recent calculation and experimental measurements for the reactor anti-neutrino flux. The sterile neutrino can be searched by measuring the distortion of the anti-neutrino energy spectrum at a very short distance from the reactor core. NEOS, Neutrino Experiment for Oscillation at Short Baseline, measured the anti-neutrino energy spectrum at 24m baseline, in the tendon gallery of a 3 GW$_{\textrm{th}}$ commercial reactor in Yeonggwang, South Korea. A homogeneous target with 0.5% Gd doped liquid scintillator was used to detect e+ and neutron coincidence from the inverse beta decay. The experiment has taken data for about 8 months, reactor off for 2 months and reactor on for the last 6 months. We observed about 2,000 IBD events per day with the signal to background ratio 20. We also observed the energy spectrum discrepancy around 5 MeV between the calculation and experimental data for the first time in the short baseline reactor experiments, as in the $\theta_{13}$ experiments. In this talk, we will present the sterile neutrino search with our data sample.
        Speaker: Dr Yoomin Oh (Institute for Basic Science)
      • 159
        PROSPECT: A Short-baseline Reactor Precision Spectrum and Oscillation Experiment (15' + 3')
        Comparison of reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum measurements to model predictions have revealed an apparent deficit in the reactor antineutrino interaction rate and an unexpected spectral deviation. PROSPECT is a phased experiment consisting of segmented Li-loaded liquid scintillator antineutrino detectors that will be located near the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experiment is designed to resolve these anomalous results by searching for short-baseline neutrino oscillations to test the hypothesis of sterile neutrinos and by performing the first precision measurement of the U-235 reactor antineutrino spectrum. This talk will provide an overview of the design, sensitivity and discovery potential of PROSPECT, and discuss the status of the experiment.
        Speaker: Michael Mendenhall (National Institute of Standards and Technology)
      • 160
        SoLid: Search for Oscillations with a Lithium-6 Detector at the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor (15' + 3')
        The disappearance of reactor antineutrino into a new neutral state (called sterile neutrino) has been proposed as a possible explanation for the recent reactor and Gallium anomalies arising from the re-analysis of reactor flux and calibration data of previous neutrino experiments. A way to test this hypothesis is to look for distortions of the anti-neutrino energy caused by oscillation from active to sterile neutrino at close stand-off (~ 6-8m) of a compact reactor core. Due to the small anti-neutrino cross-section, the main challenge in achieving a precise measurement is to control the high level of gamma rays and neutron background that are present at close stand off and to the surface. The SoLid experiment intends to search for active-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillation at very short baseline of the SCK•CEN BR2 research reactor. A novel approach to measuring reactor anti-neutrinos was developed based on an innovative sandwich of composite Polyvynil-Toluene and 6LiF:ZnS scintillators. The system is highly segmented and read out by a network of wavelength shifting fibers and MPPCs. High experimental sensitivity can be achieved with the combination of high granularity, high neutron-gamma discrimination using 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillator and precise localisation of the inverse beta decay products. We will describe the principle of detection, the detector design and we will focus on the performance of the first full scale SoLid module 1 (SM1) installed at BR2 early 2015 demonstrating the technology. We will present first results on selecting inverse beta decay events using the first data set collected with the SM1 module in 2015, and will show the physics reach of the next phase that will start in 2016.
        Speaker: Dan Saunders (Bristol)
      • 161
        SOX : Short Distance Neutrino Oscillations with Borexino (15' + 3')
        The Borexino detector has convincingly shown its outstanding performances in the low energy regime through its accomplishments in the solar and geo neutrinos detection. These performances make it the ideal tool to accomplish a state-of-the-art, source based experiment able to test the long-standing issue of the existence of a sterile neutrino, as suggested by the several anomalous results accumulated over the past two decades, i.e. the outputs of the LSND and Miniboone experiments, the results of the source calibration of the two Gallium experiments, and the recently hinted reactor anomaly. The SOX project will exploit a Cerium based source, which deployed under the experiment, in a location foreseen on purpose at the time of the construction of the detector, will emit an intense beam of anti-neutrinos. Interacting in the active volume of the liquid scintillator, the beam would create an unmistakable spatial wave pattern in case of oscillation of the anti nu-e into the sterile state: such a pattern would be the smoking gun evidence of the presence of the new sterile member of the neutrino family. Otherwise, its absence will allow setting very stringent limit on the existence of the hypothesized sterile state. The talk will outline the project, discuss in detail its sensitivity and update about the status of the ongoing efforts to prepare the measurement.
        Speaker: Birgit Neumair (Technical University of Munich)
      • 162
        Status of the MicroBooNE Experiment (15' + 3')

        Text coming

        Speaker: Dr Jyoti Joshi (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
      • 163
        Neutrino-argon interactions in MicroBooNE (10' + 2')
        MicroBooNE is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment located in the Booster Neutrino Beamline at Fermilab at a distance of 470 m from the target. The detector is a 89 t active volume liquid-argon time projection chamber (LArTPC). The technology of LArTPCs introduced bubble chamber-like image quality with a fully automated triggering, readout and calorimetric information to the field of neutrino detection. With this data quality, detailed studies of the neutrino interaction and final state particles are possible. MicroBooNE successfully started data taking in fall 2015 and is since collecting unprecedented statistics of neutrino-argon interactions. Besides the investigation of short-baseline oscillations, MicroBooNE is carrying out an extensive cross section physics program, that will help to probe current theories on neutrino-nucleon interactions and nuclear effects. This talk will summarize the latest results of MicroBooNE’s cross section analyses in various channels.
        Speaker: Xiao Luo (Yale)
      • 164
        How to make the short baseline sterile neutrino compatible with cosmology (15' + 3')
        A number of short baseline neutrino experiments have found anomalous results throughout the past decades. These can be interpreted as oscillations between the active neutrinos and a sterile neutrino with a mass around $1$eV. The individual anomalies are not very significant themselves, but taken together they provide an interesting hint for a new particle beyond the Standard Model. However, combining a light sterile neutrino with the standard cosmological $\Lambda$CDM model would increase the expansion rate of the Universe and the sterile neutrino would act as hot dark matter. Such modifications to $\Lambda$CDM are not compatible with observations of the cosmological microwave background (CMB), large scale structures (LSS) and primordial abundances of the light elements, which show that the Universe is very well described by standard $\Lambda$CDM. In this talk, I will describe how to reconcile a light sterile neutrino with cosmology by introducing a new hidden interaction for the sterile neutrino. An interaction of this type is capable of suppressing oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos in the early Universe, which is otherwise the main production mechanism of steriles. While this leads to good agreement with the light element abundances, the accommodation of current LSS and CMB observations further constrain the model. Despite the constraints, the force mediator can be either a vector boson or a pseudoscalar, although the two options lead to quite different phenomenologies.
        Speaker: Rasmus Sloth Lundkvist (Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik)
    • Strong Interactions and Hadron Physics: V+jets, photons Ontario

      Ontario

      Conveners: Emily Laura Nurse (University of London (GB)) , Robert Schoefbeck (Ghent University (BE))
      • 165
        LHCb results with vector bosons (12' + 3')

        A variety of vector boson measurements has been performed with Run 1 LHCb data, including inclusive Z/W cross-sections, the Z forward-backward asymmetry, Z plus charm, Z/W production with jets (including heavy flavor), and top production. Additionally, new inclusive Z/W cross-sections have been measured with Run 2 data. A summary of the most relevant results will be presented.

        Speaker: Donatella Lucchesi (Universita e INFN, Padova (IT))
      • 166
        Z+jet production at NNLO (15' + 5')
        We present the complete calculation of the NNLO QCD corrections to the hadronic production of a charged lepton pair in association with a jet. Our results comprise various kinematical distributions that are of importance at the LHC and a significant reduction of the residual scale uncertainty is observed throughout. The corrections to differential distributions are not always uniform and imply the need of such a fully differential computation for precision applications.
        Speaker: Dr Alexander Huss (ETH Zurich)
      • 167
        V+jets and MC modelling at the LHC (20' + 5')
        merged abstract
        Speaker: Federico Sforza (CERN)
      • 168
        VINCIA for Hadron Colliders (15' + 5')
        We present the first public implementation of antenna-based QCD initial- and final-state showers. The shower kernels are $2\to 3$ antenna functions, which capture not only the collinear dynamics but also the leading soft (coherent) singularities of QCD matrix elements. We define the evolution measure to be inversely proportional to the leading poles, hence gluon emissions are evolved in a $p_\perp$ measure inversely proportional to the eikonal, while processes that only contain a single pole (e.g., $g\to q\bar{q}$) are evolved in virtuality. Non-ordered emissions are allowed, suppressed by an additional power of $1/Q^2$. Recoils and kinematics are governed by exact on-shell $2\to 3$ phase-space factorisations. Tree-level matrix-element corrections a la GKS are included for QCD up to $\mathcal{O}(\alpha_s^4)$ (4 jets), and for Drell-Yan and Higgs production up to $\mathcal{O}(\alpha_s^3)$ ($V/H$ + 3 jets). The perturbative shower uncertainties can be evaluated by variations of renormalization scales and non-singular terms, including an automated mode in which each event is accompanied by a vector of "uncertainty weights". As a proof-of-concept for the applicability of our method we focus on Z boson production at the LHC. The resulting algorithm has been made publicly available in VINCIA 2.0, which is written as a simple plug-in to the PYTHIA 8 event generator.
        Speaker: Peter Skands (Monash University (AU))
      • 169
        Prompt photons, diphotons and photon plus jets at hadron colliders (15' + 5')
        Merged abstract
        Speaker: Alessandra Lucà (INFN)
      • 170
        New Approach to Hard Corrections in Precision QCD for LHC and FCC Physics (15' + 5')
        We present a new approach to the realization of hard fixed-order corrections in predictions for the processes probed in high energy colliding hadron beam devices, with some emphasis on the LHC and the future FCC devices. We show that the usual unphysical divergence of such corrections as one approaches the soft limit is removed in our approach, so that we would render the standard results to be closer to the observed exclusive distributions. We use the single $Z/\gamma*$ production and decay to lepton pairs as our prototypical example, but we stress that the approach has general applicability. In this way, we open another part of the way to rigorous baselines for the determination of the theoretical precision tags for LHC physics, with an obvious generalization to the future FCC as well.
        Speaker: Bennie Ward (Baylor University (US))
    • 4:30 PM
      Break
    • Beyond the Standard Model: 4 Chicago 7

      Chicago 7

      Convener: JiJi Fan (Brown University)
      • 171
        Lighting up Collider Searches for Electroweak States (15' + 5')
        Despite appearing in many extensions of the Standard Model, uncolored electroweak particles face limited collider search prospects. For nearly degenerate electroweak multiplets where the lightest state is electrically neutral, searches typically rely on pair production of the new states in association with visible radiation, e.g. the mono-X final state. We show that for such new particles, considering final-state photon radiation can provide increased sensitivity. As an example, we demonstrate that a photon + jet search would extend the ability of the LHC to probe degenerate Higgsinos beyond the reach achievable by a monojet analysis. We find that the additional kinematical information provided by considering an extra photon from final state radiation more than compensates for the reduced statistics, when including the effects of systematic uncertainties.
        Speaker: Ahmed Ismail (Argonne National Laboratory/University of Illinois at Chicago)
      • 172
        Prospects for SUSY DM after the LHC Run 1 (15' + 5')
        We present the prospects for the searches for SUSY and Dark Matter at the LHC, future $e^+e^-$ colliders and direct detection experiments, based on our recent studies: "Supersymmetric Dark Matter after LHC Run 1", Eur.Phys.J. C75 (2015) 500, arXiv:1508.01173 "The pMSSM10 after LHC Run 1", Eur.Phys.J. C75 (2015) 9, 422, arXiv:1505.04702 This talk is submitted on behalf of the MasterCode collaboration: http://mastercode.web.cern.ch/mastercode/ A speaker has not yet been assigned but will a member of the Collaboration who is well familiar with the details of the different analyses covered in this talk.
        Speaker: Rick Cavanaugh (University of Illinois at Chicago (US))
      • 173
        Studies of dark sector at Belle & Becays involving tau (15' + 5')

        The Belle II experiment aims to record 50 ab$^{-1}$ data with the high
        luminosity to be provided by the SuperKEKB energy-asymmetric $e^+e^-$
        collider. The anticipated high statistics data enables us to perform
        studies of $B$ decays involving $\tau$ leptons such as
        $B^+ \to \tau^+ \nu_{\tau}$ and $B \to D^{(*)} \tau^+ \nu_{\tau}$ modes.
        The precise measurements of branching fraction as well as the $\tau$
        lepton polarization in these $B$ decays provide a very sensitive indirect
        search for a charged Higgs boson. Belle IIs's sensitivity for the charged
        Higgs is complementary to direct searches at ATLAS and CMS.

        Speaker: Gianluca Inguglia (DESY)
      • 174
        Lepton Jets from Radiating Dark Matter (15' + 5')
        The idea that dark matter forms part of a larger dark sector is very intriguing, given the high degree of complexity of the visible sector. In this paper, we discuss lepton jets as a promising signature of an extended dark sector. As a simple toy model, we consider an O(GeV) DM fermion coupled to a new $U(1)'$ gauge boson (dark photon) with a mass of order GeV and kinetically mixed with the Standard Model photon. Dark matter production at the LHC in this model is typically accompanied by collinear radiation of dark photons whose decay products can form lepton jets. We analyze the dynamics of collinear dark photon emission both analytically and numerically. In particular, we derive the dark photon energy spectrum using recursive analytic expressions, using Monte Carlo simulations in Pythia, and using an inverse Mellin transform to obtain the spectrum from its moments. In the second part of the paper, we simulate the expected lepton jet signatures from radiating dark matter at the LHC, carefully taking into account the various dark photon decay modes and allowing for both prompt and displaced decays. Using these simulations, we recast two existing ATLAS lepton jet searches to significantly restrict the parameter space of extended dark sector models, and we compute the expected sensitivity of future LHC searches.
        Speaker: Jia Liu (Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz)
      • 175
        A simplified model for dark matter interacting primarily with gluons. (15' + 5')
        We consider a simple renormalizable model providing a UV completion for dark matter whose interactions with the Standard Model are primarily via the gluons. The model consists of scalar dark matter interacting with scalar colored mediator particles. A novel feature is the fact that (in contrast to more typical models containing scalar dark matter interacting with gluons) the colored scalars typically decay into multi-quark final states, with no associated missing energy. We construct this class of models and examine associated phenomena related to dark matter annihilation, scattering with nuclei, and production at colliders. We compare the results obtained from effective field theory (EFT) with a loop-induced calculations for the collider processes and show that EFT is not applicable for a large parameter space where mediator mass is comparable to the cuts on missing energy. We calculate the bounds from from $\sqrt{s}=$ 8 and 13 TeV data and show the expected reach of $\sqrt{s}=$ 14 TeV LHC and 100 TeV FCC in constraining or discovering the model. References: Godbole, Rohini M., Gaurav Mendiratta, and Tim MP Tait. "A simplified model for dark matter interacting primarily with gluons." Journal of High Energy Physics 2015.8 (2015): 1-15.
        Speaker: Gaurav Mendiratta (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore,India)
      • 176
        The TREK-E36 Search for New Physics at J-PARC (15' + 5')
        For the TREK Collaboration The TREK-E36 experiment aims to provide a precision test of lepton universality in the leptonic decay ratio for positive kaons RK = Ke2/Kμ2 = Γ(K+->e+νe)/ Γ(K+->μ+νμ), to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) . The SM prediction for RK is very precise with an uncertainty of ΔRK/RK = 4 x 10-4. An observed deviation would be an indication of New Physics beyond the SM. The TREK-E36 apparatus consists of a toroidal spectrometer, that affords high resolution tracking, in concert with a kaon stopping target, a multi-element CsI(TI) photon detector, and particle ID detector array. TREK-E36 was installed in 2014, at the J-PARC K1.1BR kaon beamline. Commissioning was carried out in 2015 and production data taking was completed in the latter part of 2015. Because TREK-E36 employs stopped kaons, it will provide a unique cross-check to the CERN NA48/62 measurement, with considerably different systematics. The TREK-E36 data will also provide the opportunity to search for light bosons in the mass region below 300 MeV/c2, via rare decay of K+ in several decay channels. The light boson search would be in a mass region that is relevant for explanations of the muon anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) as well as the proton charge radius. This talk will go over the status of the data analysis. Supported by DOE awards DE-SC0003884 and DE-SC0013941 in the US, NSERC in Canada, and Kaken-hi in Japan.
        Speaker: Michael Kohl (Hampton University)
    • Dark Matter Detection: 2 Chicago 9

      Chicago 9

      Convener: Dr Aaron Chou (Fermilab)
      • 177
        Searching for Dark Matter Using the NOvA Upward-going Muon Trigger (15' + 5')
        The NOvA collaboration has constructed a 14,000 ton, fine-grained, low-Z, total absorption tracking calorimeter at an off-axis angle to an upgraded NuMI neutrino beam. This detector, with its excellent granularity and energy resolution and relatively low-energy neutrino thresholds, was designed to observe electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam, but it also has unique capabilities suitable for more exotic efforts. In fact, if sufficient cosmic ray background rejection can be demonstrated, NOvA will be capable of a competitive indirect dark matter search for low-mass Weakly-Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The cosmic ray muon rate at the NOvA far detector is approximately 100 kHz and provides the primary challenge for triggering and optimizing such a search analysis. We present the first dark matter search results using data collected with the upward-going muon trigger.
        Speaker: Aristeidis Tsaris (Fermilab)
      • 178
        Search for Dark Forces with KLOE (15' + 5')
        During the last years several Dark Sector Models have been proposed in order to address striking astrophysical observations which fail standard intepretations. In the minimal case a new vector particle, the so called dark photon or U-boson, is introduced, with small coupling with Standard Model particles. Also, the existence of a dark Higgs boson h' is postulated, in analogy with the Standard Model, to give mass to the U-boson through the Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking mechanism. KLOE searched for the existence of the U-boson in a quite complete way, investigating three different processes and six different final states: - in dalitz decays of the Phi meson Phi-> eta U, with U->e+e- and eta-> pi+pi-pi0 and p0p0p0 - in e+e- -> U gamma events, with U decaying to electron, muon and pion pairs - in the dark Higgsstrahlung process, e+e- -> Uh', U-> mu+mu-, h' invisible. Tight limits on the model parameters have been set at 90%CL. Further improvements are expected in terms of sensitivity and discovery potential with the new KLOE2 detector working on the improved DAFNE e+e- collider.
        Speaker: Francesca Curciarello
      • 179
        The Heavy Photon Search experiment at Jefferson Lab (15' + 5')
        The Heavy Photon Search (HPS) experiment at Jefferson Lab is searching for potential particle carriers of a dark force called “heavy photons” that mix with ordinary photons through kinetic mixing. If the coupling to normal matter is weak, then heavy photons can travel a detectable distances before decaying to e+e–. HPS uses a PWO Electromagnetic Calorimeter for fast triggering and complementary energy information in the reconstruction of the e+e– invariant mass. The silicon microstrip vertex tracker is used for momentum and vertex reconstruction with unprecedented precision. The HPS experiment took its first data in an engineering run during the spring of 2015 using a 1 GeV electron beam and a 4 μm tungsten target. HPS is taking more data at 2 GeV in winter 2016. This talk will present the HPS setup, data analysis, and preliminary results, if available.
        Speaker: Dr Greg Kalicy (ODU/JLab)
      • 180
        The PADME experiment at DAFNE Linac (15' + 5')
        The long standing problem of reconciling the cosmological evidence of the existence of dark matter with the lack of any clear experimental observation of it, has recently revived the idea that the new particles are not directly connected with the Standard Model gauge fields, but only through mediator fields or “portals”, connecting our world with new “secluded” or “hidden” sectors. One of the simplest models just adds an additional U(1) symmetry, with its corresponding vector boson A'. All SM particles will be neutral under this symmetry, while the new field will couple to the charged particles of the SM with an effective charge $\epsilon$e, so that this new particle is often called “dark photon". Additional interest arises from the observation that A' in the mass range 1 MeV/$c^{2}$ to 1 GeV/$c^{2}$ and coupling $\epsilon \sim10^{−3}$, would justify the discrepancy between theory and observation for the muon anomalous magnetic moment, (g − 2)μ. This possibility has been recently disproved in the hypothesis that the A' decays to SM particles only, on the contrary if A' decays to dark sector particles, almost all of the available experimental constraints can be evaded and the dark photon is still a valuable explanation for the muon (g-2) anomaly. Due to the weak experimental signature, the search for invisibly decaying A' requires carefully designed dedicated experiment. At the end of 2015 INFN has formally approved a new experiment, PADME, to search for invisible decays of the A' at the DAFNE Linac in Frascati. The experiment is designed to detect dark photon produced in positron on fixed target annihilation ($e^+e^-\to \gamma A'$) decaying to dark matter by measuring the final state missing mass. The collaboration aims to complete the design and construction of the experiment by the end of 2017 and to collect $\sim 10^{13}$ positron on target by the end of 2018, thus allowing to reach the $ \epsilon \sim 10^{−3}$ sensitivity up to a dark photon mass of $\sim 26$ MeV/c$^2$
        Speakers: Mauro Raggi (LNF INFN) , Paolo Valente (Universita e INFN, Roma I (IT))
      • 181
        New methods to search for DM candidates (15' + 5')
        ABSTRACT: The search for Axions, a particle theorized to explain the lack of CP violation in strong physics and suspected to contribute if not explain galactic dark matter, has lead to ever-sensitive techniques to study induced vacuum birefringence. What remains an issue: many of the measurable parameters that could give evidence for this illusive particle scale with the square of the birefringent angle (proportional to the photon-axion coupling constant). This talk will look at new techniques that can generate measurables that scale linearly (first order) with an induced birefringence. This has the potential to extend significantly the range through which cavity experiments can probe the vacuum of space in performing searches for axions and other exotic particles.
        Speaker: Dr Carol Scarlett (Florida A&M University)
      • 182
        STAX: a new technique for detecting Axions (15' + 5')
        We propose a new improved detection scheme for axion-like particles search based on a Light-Shining- Through-Wall (LSW) experiment in a photon frequency domain never explored before. We expect to extend the present exclusion limits on the axion-photon coupling constant, Gaγγ, by at least four orders of magnitude with respect to the present limits from similar configuration experiments, as we have proved by explicit calculations. [Capparelli, Cavoto, Ferretti, Giazotto, Polosa, Spagnolo, arXiv1510.06892] Axions appear in very well motivated extensions of the Standard Model, including the Peccei-Quinn mechanism proposed to solve the long-standing strong-CP problem. Together with the weakly interacting massive particles of supersymmetric theories, axions are also a favored candidate to puzzle out the Dark Matter issue. There are three classes of experiments searching for axions: haloscopes, helioscopes and laboratory searches, including LSW experiments. Among these different approaches, the LSW seems to be the most effective, since it is not depending on stellar and astrophysical models and allows a higher axion flux. The photon-axion conversion rate is independent of the energy in our search range and the double conversion rate of the LSW experiments depends only on luminosity, i.e. from the number of photons produced by the source before the wall, and the magnetic field (intensity and extension). The best photon sources currently available on the market, the gyrotrons, operate typically below the THz region, namely between 30 GHz and 1THz, and may exceed an output power of 1 MW. In these microwaves region, a single photon detection is extremely difficult and this is the reason why LSW experiments never operated in this range. Nevertheless, a LSW experiment in this microwave range could increase the sensitivity of the axion search by several orders of magnitude with respect to the current exclusion limits of this class of experiments. We suggest a new technique, based on transition-edge-sensors (TES), operating below 10mK temperature to detect single photons with an energy of 30-100 GHz, where gyrotrons sources have the highest power in output.
        Speaker: Paolo Spagnolo (Universita di Pisa & INFN (IT))
    • Detector: R&D and Performance: Tracking Detectors Chicago 8

      Chicago 8

      Convener: Ingrid-Maria Gregor (DESY)
      • 183
        The Silicon Vertex Detector of the Belle II Experiment (12' + 3')
        The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB flavor factory will operate at an unprecedented luminosity of $8\times 10^{35} cm^{2} s^{-1}$, which is about 40 times larger than its predecessor Belle experiment. The vertex detector is composed of two-layer DEPFET pixel detector (PXD) and four-layer double-sided silicon microstrip detector (SVD). To achieve a precise vertex position determination and excellent low-momentum tracking, even under the high background and high trigger rate of 10 kHz, the SVD employs several innovative techniques. In order to minimize the parasitic capacitance in the signal path, 1,748 APV25 ASIC chips, which readout signals from 224k strip channels, are directly mounted on the ladders with the novel Origami concept. The analog signals from APV25 are digitized by an FADC system and sent to the central DAQ and also to online tracking system based on SVD hits to provide the region of interests to PXD in order to reduce the data size of PXD to achieve the required bandwidth and data storage space. In this talk, we present the design principles and construction status of the Belle II SVD.
        Speaker: Antonio Paladino (INFN - National Institute for Nuclear Physics)
      • 184
        Silicon pixel R&D for CLIC (12' + 3')
        The physics aims at the future CLIC high-energy linear e+e- collider set very high precision requirements on the performance of the vertex and tracking detectors. Moreover, these detectors have to be well adapted to the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of a few μm, ultra-low mass (~0.2% X0 per layer for the vertex region and ~1% X0 per layer for the outer tracker), very low power dissipation (compatible with air-flow cooling in the inner vertex region) and pulsed power operation, complemented with ~10 ns time stamping capabilities. A highly granular all-silicon vertex and tracking detector system is under development, following an integrated approach addressing simultaneously the physics requirements and engineering constraints. For the vertex-detector region, hybrid pixel detectors with small pitch (25 μm) and analogue readout are explored. For the outer tracking region, both hybrid concepts and fully integrated CMOS sensors are under consideration. The feasibility of ultra-thin sensor layers is validated with Timepix3 readout ASICs bump bonded to active edge planar sensors with 50-150 μm thickness. Prototypes of CLICpix readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology with 25 μm pixel pitch have been produced. Hybridisation concepts have been developed for interconnecting these chips either through capacitive coupling to active HV-CMOS sensors or through bump-bonding to planar sensors. Recent R&D achievements include results from beam tests with all types of hybrid assemblies. Simulations based on Geant4 and TCAD are used to validate the experimental results and to assess and optimise the performance of various detector designs. The R&D project also includes the development of through-silicon via (TSV) technology, as well as various engineering studies involving thin mechanical structures and full-scale air-cooling tests. An overview of the R&D program for silicon detectors at CLIC will be presented.
        Speaker: Dominik Dannheim (CERN)
      • 185
        The LHCb VELO Upgrade (12' + 3')
        The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, scheduled for LHC Run-3, will transform the experiment to a triggerless system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm. enabling the detector to run at luminosities of $ \rm{2 \times 10^{33}/cm^2/s}$. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current strip detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The upgraded VELO will provide fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction to the software trigger. The silicon pixel sensors have 55×55 μm2 pitch, and are read out by the VeloPix ASIC, from the Timepix/Medipix family. The VeloPix builds on the currently available Timepix3, modified to deliver a radiation hard design capable of an order of magnitude increase in output rate. The hottest regions will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The silicon pixel sensors must be radiation hard to a level of $\rm{8 \times 10^{15} 1 MeV~n_{eq}/cm^2}$, delivered non uniformly over the sensor surface, and the $\rm {R\&D}$ is focussing on designs capable of tolerating high voltage after irradiaton and maintaining good efficiency and resolution. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The foil will be manufactured through a novel milling process and possibly thinned further by chemical etching. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative $\rm CO_2$ coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 um thick silicon substrates. This breakthrough technology allows very efficient heat removal for minimal material and excellent CTE match but poses considerable challenges in the design of the circuits and connectors. The current status of the VELO upgrade will be described and latest results from the design and prototyping will be presented.
        Speaker: Stefano De Capua (University of Manchester (GB))
      • 186
        The Phase-1 Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector (12' + 3')
        The innermost layers of the CMS tracker are built out of pixel detectors arranged in three barrel layers (BPIX) and two forward disks in each endcap (FPIX). The original CMS detector was designed for the nominal instantaneous LHC luminosity of 1 x 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1. Under the conditions expected in the coming years, which will see an increase of a factor two of the instantaneous luminosity, the CMS pixel detector will see a dynamic inefficiency caused by data losses due to buffer overflows. For with full eff this reason the CMS Collaboration has been building a replacement pixel detector which is scheduled for installation in an extended end of year shutdown during Winter 2016/2017. The Phase I upgrade of the CMS pixel detector will operate at full efficiency at an instantaneous luminosity of 1 x 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1 with increased detector acceptance and additional redundancy for the tracking, while at the same time reducing the material budget. These goals are achieved using a new readout chip and modified powering and readout schemes, one additional tracking layer both in the barrel and in the disks, and new detector supports including a CO2 based evaporative cooling system, that contribute to the reduction of the material in the tracking volume. This contribution will review the design and technological choices of the Phase I detector, and discuss the status of the construction of the detector and the performance of its components as measured in test beam and system tests. The challenges and difficulties encountered during the construction will also be discussed, as well as the lessons learned for future upgrades.
        Speaker: Petra Merkel (Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (US))
      • 187
        First testbeam results of prototype modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS strip tracking detector (12' + 3')
        The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential of the LHC through a sizeable increase in the luminosity, totalling 1x1035cm-2s-1 after 10 years of operation. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at a integrated luminosity of 3000fb-1, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron equivalences to over 1x1016 1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm2. With the addition of increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk), which will consist of both strip and pixellated silicon detectors.  The silicon strip tracker exploits the concept of modularity. Fast readout electronics, deploying 130nm CMOS front-end electronics is glued on top of a silicon sensor. These so-called modules are glued on carbon structures and will span about 200m2 of active area. A broad R&D program is ongoing to develop and prototype many detector components. The modules are extensively tested electronically and recent tests of the prototype strip sensors and associated binary readout electronics have been performed at the DESY II testbeam. The DURANTA telescope was used to obtain a pointing resolution of <4um, with an additional pixel layer installed to improve timing resolution to ~25ns. Results will be shown on the tracking performance of both silicon sensors for the central and forward region of the future silicon strip tracker using the Generalized Broken Lines algorithm. Moreover, results of gain measurements of the CMOS 130nm binary readout chip (ABC130) will be presented and an outlook of their applicability be given. ![The ATLAS ITK protoype Strip (left) central and (right) forward modules under test at the DESY II testbeam][1] [1]: http://www.ppe.gla.ac.uk/~andrewb/TestbeamModules.png
        Speaker: Susanne Kuehn (Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg (DE))
      • 188
        Upgrade of the CMS Tracker for the HL-LHC (12' + 3')
        The LHC machine is planning an upgrade program which will smoothly bring the luminosity at about 5*10^34cm-2s-1 in 2028, to possibly reach an integrated luminosity of 3000fb-1 by the end of 2037. This High Luminosity LHC scenario, HL-LHC, will require a preparation program of the LHC detectors known as Phase-2 upgrade. The current CMS Tracker, including both inner pixel and outer strip systems, is already running beyond design specifications and will not be able to survive HL-LHC radiation conditions. CMS will need a completely new device in order to fully exploit the high-demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The upgrade plan includes extending the pixel detector in the forward region from the current coverage of |\eta|<2.4 to 4, where up to ten disks will compose of the new forward pixel detector. Additionally, the new outer system should have also trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R&D activities are ongoing to explore options and develop solutions that would allow including tracking information at Level-1. The design choices for the CMS Tracker upgrades are discussed along with some highlights of the R&D activities.
        Speaker: Georg Auzinger (CERN)
      • 189
        The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment for Run-2 at the Large Hadron collider. (12' + 3')
        Run-2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 at a radius of 3.3 cm between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe. The new detector, built to cope with high radiation and expected occupancy, is the first large scale application of 3D detectors and CMOS 130nm technology. In addition the Pixel detector was refurbished with a new service quarter panel to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run-1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. The commissioning and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector, in particular the IBL, will be presented, using collision data.
        Speaker: Mapo Giordani (Universita degli Studi di Udine (IT))
      • 190
        A High Resolution Fine Grained Tracker as the Reference Near Detector for DUNE (12' + 3')
        This talk presents the reference near detector for DUNE is a fine-grained tracker (FGT). The FGT comprises straw tube tracker (STT), with continuous transition radiation (TR) measurement capability and having an average density of liquid-hydrogen, surrounded by electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL). The STT and ECAL are embedded in a large dipole magnet. Muon detectors, composed of RPCs, instrument iron-yokes, and the downstream and upstream stations outside the magnet. Neutrino targets including hydrocarbon, argon-gas, calcium, and graphite interleave the STT. The FGT is designed to precisely measure all four species of neutrinos via their charged current interactions: (anti-)muon neutrinos and (anti-)electron neutrinos. The high resolution of the detector allows measurement of the ID and momentum vectors for electrons, muons, pions, protons, and kaons. Anticipated physics capabilities of the FGT are outlined.
        Speaker: Bipul Bhuyan (IIT Guwahati)
      • 191
        3 Dimensional Stacked Pixel Detector and Sensor Technology Using less than 3-μmφ Robust Bump Junctions (12' + 3')
        A 3D-IC (Three Dimensional Integrated Circuit) is an effective solution for reducing the manufacturing costs of advanced 2D LSI while ensuring equivalent device performance and functionalities. This technology allows for a new device architecture of stacked detectors/sensor devices with a small dead sensor area and facilitates hyper-parallel data processing. In pixel detectors, many transistors must be accommodated per pixel area to improve the space and time resolutions without increasing the pixel size. Consequently, many methods of realizing 3D-IC devices have been developed to meet this requirement by focusing on the unit processes of 3D-IC technology: (1) through-silicon via (TSV) formation and (2) electrical and mechanical bonding between tiers of the stack. The bonding process consists of several unit processes such as bump or metal contact formation, chip/wafer alignment, chip/wafer bonding, and underfill formation, and many combinations of these processes have been reported. Our research focuses on fine pitch bonding technology with the objective of realizing a versatile bonding for silicon LSI devices and compound semiconductor devices at temperatures less than 150 C for preventing device degradation. Gold microbump connections realized by solid-phase diffusion are one of the promising candidates for this purpose. This paper presents experimental results for a prototype pixel detector with 3.0-μmφ gold cone bumps fabricated by NpD (nanoparticle deposition) and that with gold cylindrical bumps fabricated by a low-incident-angle deposition method. The as-deposited cone bumps consist of gold nanoparticles and are easier to deform compared to the plated gold bumps. Consequently, the collapsibility of the gold cone bumps allows for low-stress bonding, resulting in a compliant and reliable junction without damaging the device surface. The bump size is determined by photoresist patterning, and the bump connection does not greatly protrude during junction formation, in contrast with melting-type bump connections. In addition, the shrinkage ratio of the volume is larger than that of the surface area. Thus, the bump resistance of an easily oxidized metal with a diameter of few microns is affected by the bonding atmosphere. On the other hand, gold is an oxidation-resistive material; therefore, bonding with gold cone microbumps does not adversely affect the electrical characteristics. The resistances per bump of the stacked Si-base pixel detector and stacked CdTe/Si-LSI X-ray sensor are both approximately 0.25 Ω.
        Speaker: Makoto Motoyoshi (Tohoku-MincroTec Co., Ltd (T-Micro))
    • Heavy Ions: Heavy Flavor Superior B

      Superior B

      Convener: Zvi Citron (Weizmann Institute of Science (IL))
      • 192
        Heavy Flavor Production in Heavy Ion Collisions at CMS (15' + 5')
        Studies of Heavy flavor production are of great interest in heavy ion collisions. In the produced medium, the binding potential between a quark and antiquark in quarkonium is screened by surrounding light quarks and antiquarks. Thus, the various quarkonium states are expected to be melt at different temperatures depending on their binding energies, which allows us to characterize the QCD phase transition. In addition, open heavy flavor production are relevant for flavor-dependence of the in-medium parton energy loss. In QCD, gluons are expected to lose more energy compared to quarks when passing through the QGP due to the larger color charge. Compared to light quarks, heavy quarks are expected to lose less radiative energy because gluon radiation is suppressed at angles smaller than the ratio of the quark mass to its energy. This “dead cone” effect (and its disappearance at high transverse momentum) can be studied using open heavy flavor mesons and heavy flavor tagged jets. With CMS detector, quarkonia, open heavy flavor meson and heavy flavor tagged jet spectra are studied with high precision. In this talk, recent results from pp, pPb and PbPb at 2.76 and 5.02 TeV collisions are presented.
        Speaker: Jian Sun (Purdue University (US))
      • 193
        Quarkonium and open heavy-flavor production in Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC (15' + 5')
        According to lattice QCD calculations, the hot and dense fireball created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions undergoes a phase transition to a relatively long lived deconfined state, named Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), which allows the study of QCD in a new regime with respect to pp or elementary particle collisions. Heavy quarks constitute an important probe for QGP studies since they are created during the pre-QGP stage of the collision, with a relatively well known cross section, and their number is conserved throughout the collision history. The way they are affected while traversing the medium, e.g. energy loss, collective motion, provides important information on the QGP properties. Heavy quarkonium particles, strongly bound states consisting of a heavy quark-anti-quark pair ($Q\bar{Q}$), are predicted to melt in the QGP due to color screening, an effect analogous to the Debye screening in QED. However, at high enough heavy-quark densities, it becomes probable to recreate quarkonium states either during the QGP phase or at the system freeze-out. We will present an overview of the ALICE measurements on quarkonium and open heavy-flavor production in Pb-Pb collisions at $\sqrt{s_{\mathrm{NN}}}=$~2.76 and 5.02 TeV and in p-Pb collisions at $\sqrt{s_{\mathrm{NN}}}=$~5.02 TeV. The focus of the talk will be on the Run-2 Pb-Pb and latest Run-1 p-Pb results. The theoretical understanding of the presented data will be discussed using recent model calculations.
        Speaker: Ionut Cristian Arsene (University of Oslo (NO))
      • 194
        What lattice QCD spectral functions can tell us about heavy quarkonium in the QGP (15' + 5')
        The bound states of a heavy quark and antiquark ( $b\bar{b},c\bar{c}$ ) are ideal probes of the quark-gluon plasma created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the RHIC and LHC, since their comparatively large mass allows them to sample the properties of the bulk over its full lifetime. A rich phenomenology is connected with these states. On the one hand, their sequential melting, as e.g. observed in di-muon spectra by CMS, has been considered for a long time as prime signal of QGP formation. On the other hand with measurements of Charmonium replenishment by the ALICE collaboration, the aspect of recombination at the phase boundary has received renewed interest. Here we present recent progress in understanding the in-medium behavior of heavy-quarkonium with the help of first principles lattice QCD simulations, in particular spectral functions extracted therein using a novel Bayesian method [1]. The suppression pattern in di-lepton spectra, observed for the heavier species $b\bar{b}$ urge for a real-time understanding of Bottomonium evolution in the QGP. Due to the heavy bottom mass it can be cast in the language of a Schrödinger equation with an in-medium potential. Lattice QCD spectral functions allow us to determine the values of this in general complex potential from first principles [2] at temperatures even close to the deconfinement crossover transition [3], eliminating the need for model potentials. With experimental indications mounting that Charmonium participates to some extent collectively in the bulk (e.g. $v_2 \neq 0$) we might approximate heavy quarkonium as kinetically thermalized and extract its thermal spectral functions also directly from lattice QCD at $T>0$ [4]. These in-medium spectra in turn provide insight on phenomenologically relevant observables such as the $\psi'$ to $J/\psi$ ratio [5] under measurement in run2 at the LHC. [1] Y. Burnier, A.R., Phys.Rev.Lett. 111 (2013) 182003 [2] A.R., T. Hatsuda, S. Sasaki, Phys.Rev.Lett. 108 (2012) 162001 [3] Y. Burnier, O. Kaczmarek, A.R., Phys.Rev.Lett. 114 (2015) 8, 082001 [4] S. Kim, P. Petreczky, A.R., Phys.Rev. D91 (2015) 054511 and arXiv:1512.05289 [5] Y. Burnier, O. Kaczmarek, A.R., JHEP 1512 (2015) 101
        Speaker: Alexander Rothkopf (Heidelberg University)
      • 195
        Tranverse Momentum Distribution in Quarkonium Photoproduction in pp and AA Collisions at the LHC (15' + 5')
        It is investigated the exclusive production of quarkonium states in proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC employing the light-cone dipole formalism theoretical framework. We calculate the rapidity, amd specially the tranverse momentum distributions for J/Psi´s and Upsilons, and excited states. Our results are compared to recent experimental data (ALICE and LHCb), and predictions are done for the next LHC data taken in ultraperipheral collisions. The results are discussed in order to critisize the robustness of the formulation to express the effects of QCD at low-x for those systems.
        Speaker: Prof. Maria Beatriz Gay Ducati (UFRGS)
      • 196
        Heavy flavor measurements at STAR (15' + 5')
        Heavy quarks are produced by hard processes early in the collision at RHIC energy, and their interaction with the QCD medium is sensitive to the medium properties. The suppression pattern of heavy quarkonia also carries information about the Quark Gluon Plasma. In this talk we will report selected new measurements of open and hidden heavy flavor hadrons from the STAR experiment, especially those with the new Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) and Muon Telescope Detector (MTD). We will report an improved D0 RAA measurement, the first D0 v2 and Ds measurements in Au+Au collisions at top RHIC energy, thanks to the HFT. We will also present new J/ψ polarization measurements in p+p collisions. J/ψ production in p+p events with different multiplicities at 500 GeV, RAA and v2 in Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV measured with the MTD will also be presented.
        Speaker: Hao Qiu (LBNL, CA (US))
      • 197
        Charmonium and bottomonium spectral functions and the heavy quark diffusion coefficient from lattice QCD (15' + 5')
        We investigate charmonium and bottomonium correlation and spectral functions in lattice QCD at finite temperature to understand in-medium properties of charmonia and bottomonia as well as the heavy quark diffusion. Our simulations with the quenched approximation are performed on large isotropic lattices with a couple of lattice spacings towards the continuum limit. At temperatures in a range from 0.73$T_c$ to 2.2$T_c$ with two different quark masses for charm and bottom we reconstruct spectral functions from Euclidean meson correlation functions. Th heavy quark diffusion coefficient can be estimated from behavior of the correlation function for the vector channel at large imaginary time separation as well as low-frequency behavior of the corresponding spectral function. We show temperature and quark mass dependence of the spectral functions and discuss dissociation of charmonia and bottomonia. We also show temperature dependence of the heavy quark diffusion coefficient for the charm and bottom quarks.
        Speaker: Dr Hiroshi Ohno (Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba)
    • Higgs Physics: 3 Chicago 10

      Chicago 10

      Conveners: Kirill Prokofiev (The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HK)) , Stefania Gori (Perimeter Institute/Cincinnati University)
      • 198
        Tools for Higgs Boson Properties with the JHUGen / MELA Framework (15' + 5')
        Study of the CP parity of a Higgs boson and its anomalous couplings to gauge bosons or fermions is one of the priorities of the LHC. We present a coherent framework for the measurement of Higgs boson couplings to two weak vector bosons using its decay, vector boson fusion production, and associated production with a vector boson. Both on-shell and off-shell Higgs boson productions are considered, including their interference with background processes, where relevant. The framework also allows the study of the anomalous couplings of the Higgs boson to fermions in ttH, bbH, tH production and in H->tau tau decays. Particular attention is given to the analysis tools, which include the Monte Carlo generator, re-weighting techniques for a fast simulation of anomalous interactions, and matrix element techniques for the optimal analysis of the processes. The formalism is presented using both the effective field theory and effective scattering amplitudes, where the dependence on the virtuality of weak and Higgs bosons is also tested with form factors. The capabilities of the framework are illustrated with projections for measuring CP-violating properties of the Higgs boson at the LHC.
        Speaker: Dr Meng Xiao (Johns Hopkins University (US))
      • 199
        Constraints on the Standard Model dimension 6 effective Lagrangian with HEPfit (15' + 5')
        Using the HEPfit code, we derive constraints on dimension 6 gauge-invariant operators involving Standard Model fields using Electroweak Precision Observables and Higgs signal strengths. We present bounds on Wilson coefficients and translate them into bounds on the New Physics scale. We obtain bounds on individual coefficients and discuss the most general set of operators that can be simultaneously constrained using present data.
        Speaker: Dr Jorge de Blas (INFN Rome)
      • 200
        SMEFT, a theory for SM deviations (15' + 5')
        After the LHC Run 1, the standard model (SM) of particle physics has been completed. Yet, despite its successes, the SM has shortcomings vis-à-vis cosmological and other observations. At the same time, while the LHC restarts for Run 2 at 13 TeV, there is presently a lack of direct evidence for new physics phenomena at the accelerator energy frontier. From this state of affairs arises the need for a consistent theoretical framework in which deviations from the SM predictions can be calculated and compared to precision measurements. Such a framework should be able to comprehensively make use of all measurements in all sectors of particle physics, including LHC Higgs measurements, past electroweak precision data, electric dipole moment, g
        Speaker: Prof. Giampiero Passarino (Torino University)
      • 201
        Higgs productions in the gluon fusion channel: a complete EFT analysis (15' + 5')
        Much can be gleaned about new degrees of freedom from loop induced gluon fusion processes in the LHC runs in the near future. We look at multiple channels like the gg $\to$ 4l, double Higgs production and Higgs + jet production for the HL-LHC and the 100 TeV FCC and make a combination of these processes to address the $c_t - c_g$ degeneracy in the EFT language. We look at some simplified models in correspondence with our EFT analysis and analyze the extent of the validity of an EFT analysis in this scope.
        Speaker: Ayan Paul (INFN, Sezione di Roma)
      • 202
        Higgs off-shell effects at NLO (15' + 5')
        There has been a lot of interest recently in the high-mass behavior of the Higgs boson in its decay to a pair of massive electroweak bosons. In this kinematic regime, the interference between Higgs-mediated amplitudes and continuum $gg \to VV$ amplitudes becomes significant and destructive. I will present the NLO QCD corrections to the interference, including corrections to the continuum massive loop processes calculated in the heavy top mass expansion. An understanding of the radiative corrections to this process is essential in order to exploit off-shell effects to understand properties of the Higgs boson.
        Speaker: Raoul Rontsch (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology)
      • 203
        Role of low-energy observables in precision Higgs boson analyses (15' + 5')
        A conventional approach to precision calculations of Higgs boson observables uses quark masses $m_c$ and $m_b$ as inputs. However, quark masses are single numbers that hide a variety of low-energy data from which they are extracted, and also hide the various sources of theoretical uncertainties and correlations with additional input parameters such as $\alpha_s$. Higher-precision calculations, which are needed to give meaning to future measurements, require more direct engagement with the low-energy data in a global analysis. We present an initial calculation in this direction, which illustrates the procedure and reveals some of the theory uncertainties that challenge subpercent determinations of Higgs boson partial widths.
        Speaker: Alexey Petrov (Wayne State University)
    • Neutrino Physics: Sterile Chicago 6

      Chicago 6

      Convener: Seon-Hee Seo (Seoul National University)
      • 204
        Results from the Search for eV-Sterile Neutrinos with IceCube (15' + 5')
        The IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole has measured the atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum as a function of zenith angle and energy. We have performed a search for eV-scale sterile neutrinos by looking at distortion in those distributions. Such a sterile neutrino, motivated by the anomalies in short-baseline experiments, is expected to have a significant signature in the $\bar{\nu}_\mu$ survival probability due to matter induced resonant effects for energies of order 1 TeV. This effect makes this search unique and sensitive to small sterile mixings. In this talk, I will present the results of the IceCube sterile neutrino search.
        Speaker: Dr Carlos Argüelles (MIT)
      • 205
        Sterile Neutrino Searches with MINOS/MINOS+ (15' + 5')

        Text coming

        Speaker: Dr Leigh Whitehead (UCL)
      • 206
        The Short Baseline Neutrino (SBN) Oscillation Program at Fermilab (15' + 5')

        Text coming

        Speaker: Matthew Bass (University of Oxford)
      • 207
        Searching for a Sterile Neutrino at J-PARC MLF: JSNS^2 experiment (15' + 5')
        The JSNS^2 experiment aims to search for the existence of neutrino oscillations with Delta m^2 near 1 eV^2 at the J-PARC Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF). The combination of the 1 MW proton beam (3 GeV), created by the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS), and the spallation neutron target, provides an intense neutrino source from muon decay at rest (mu+ --> e+ + numubar + nue). The oscillation to be searched for is numubar to nuebar which is detected by the inverse beta decay interaction, nuebar + p --> e+ + n, followed by gammas from the neutron capture of Gd. The two detectors with a total fiducial volume of 50 tons will be located 24 meters away from the mercury target. Additional physics programs include cross section measurements with neutrinos from muon decay at rest (10s of MeV) and with monochromatic 236 MeV muon neutrinos from kaon decay at rest.
        Speaker: Prof. Takasumi Maruyama (KEK)
      • 208
        Opportunities With Decay-At-Rest Neutrinos From Decay-In-Flight Neutrino Beams (15' + 5')
        Neutrino beam facilities, like spallation neutron facilities, produce copious quantities of neutrinos from the decay at rest of mesons and muons. The viability of decay-in-flight neutrino beams as sites for decay-at-rest neutrino studies has been investigated by calculating expected low-energy neutrino fluxes from the existing Fermilab NuMI beam facility. Decay-at-rest neutrino production in NuMI is found to be roughly equivalent per megawatt to that of spallation facilities, and is concentrated in the facility’s target hall and beam stop regions. The physics implications and experimental challenges of decay-at-rest neutrino measurements near the target hall are discussed, along with prospects for measurements at facilities along a future Fermilab long-baseline neutrino beam.
        Speaker: Christopher Grant (UC Davis)
      • 209
        The front-end of IsoDAR (15' + 5')
        IsoDAR is a cyclotron based neutrino experiment, proposed to investigate the short baseline anomalies by measuring $\bar{\nu_e}$ disappearance over an L/E of approximately 0.6-7.0 m/MeV. When paired with a kiloton class detector like KamLAND, IsoDAR would be able to distinguish between a 3+1 and 3+2 sterile neutrino model and cover the current global allowed region to 5 $\sigma$ in less than 3 years. In order to meet this desired sensitivity, there are several key technologies that IsoDAR must expand on. This talk will focus on the technologies associated with the design of the front-end of IsoDAR. In particular, I will discuss the development and testing of a high-current multicusp H$_2^+$ ion source and the idea of using a radio frequency quadrupole for axial injection into the cyclotron.
        Speaker: Spencer Axani (MIT)
    • Quark and Lepton Flavor Physics: 3 Superior A

      Superior A

      Convener: Bradley Lee Roberts (Boston University)
      • 210
        Correlating new physics signals in flavor physics and possible impact for collider experiments (15' + 5')
        There are several lingering anomalies in flavor physics. There is the long-standing issue of the discrepancy between inclusive and exclusive Vub. Semi-leptonic decays B=> D(*) tau nu when compared with B=> D(*) l nu [for l=mu, e] show deviation from the SM as seen by BABER, Belle and LHCb. And then there is also the long-standing deviation in g-2 of muon from the SM. In this talk An attempt will be made in this talk to study the correlations in the possible new physics signals effecting these processes and their possible impact on collider physics
        Speaker: Amarjit Soni (BNL)
      • 211
        The Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab (20' + 5')
        The Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab has been designed to determine the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (a_mu) to a precision of 140 parts per billion (ppb). This four-fold improvement over the previous Brookhaven E821 measurement will provide significant insight into the resilient 3.5 standard deviation discrepancy between measurement and the Standard Model prediction. Determination of a_mu at the design precision requires measurement of both the spin precession rate and the magnetic field strength, each with a 70 ppb systematic uncertainty, with projected equal statistical and systematic uncertainties of 100 ppb. The factor of 25 increase in delivered muons from the Fermilab complex drives the gain in statistical precision. The first of this two-part talk will provide an overview of the experiment, and will then detail the methodology, and resulting detector design, for measurement of the anomalous spin precession rate. The second part will discuss the storage ring magnet (transported 3200 miles from Brookhaven over land and sea), the features of the magnet that will allow this experiment to achieve an average field uniformity of one part per million. We will also describe the methodology and status of the shimming process, and provide an overview of the absolute calibration procedure and field monitoring system.
        Speaker: Chris Polly (Fermilab)
      • 212
        Computing Hadronic Light by Light Contributions to Muon g-2 on Lattice with Physical Pions (15' + 5')
        The current measurement of muonic $g-2$ disagrees with the theoretical calculation by about 3 standard deviations. Hadronic vacuum polarization (HVP) and hadronic light by light (HLbL) are the two types of processes that contribute most to the theoretical uncertainty. The current value for HLbL is still given by a model . In this talk, I will describe results from a first-principles lattice calculation with a physical 139 MeV pion in a box of 5.5 fm extent. Our current numerical strategies, including noise reduction techniques, evaluating the HLbL amplitude at zero external momentum transfer, and important remaining challenges, in particular those associated with finite volume effects, will be discussed.
        Speaker: Luchang Jin
      • 213
        Measurement of hadronic cross-sections with CMD-3 at VEPP-2000 (10' + 5')
        The first round of data taking with CMD-3 detector at VEPP-2000 $e^+e$ collider (BINP, Novosibirsk, Russia) was performed in 2011-2013. The CMD-3 is the general purpose particle detector, equipped by tracking system, two crystal (CSI and BGO) calorimeters, liquid Xe calorimeter, TOF and muon systems. The main goal of experiments at CMD-3 is the measurement of cross-sections and dynamics of exclusive modes of $e^+e^-\to hadrons$. In particular, these results provide important input for calculation of the hadronic contribution to the muons anomalous magnetic moment. Here we present the survey of results of analysis of data taken in 2011-2013, including modes of $e^+e^-\to hadrons$ with up to 6 pions or 2 kaons in final state. About 60 1/pb were taken in the energy range from 0.32 to 2.0 GeV in c.m. The beam energy was continuously measured concurrently with the data taking using Compton backscattering. In 2016 VEPP-2000 resumed operations after upgrade with project luminosity of $10^{32}$ $cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ at 2 GeV.
        Speaker: Dr Ivan Logashenko (BINP)
      • 214
        A precise first-principles computation of the hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment (15' + 5')
        The leading-order hadronic vacuum polarization contribution dominates the uncertainty of the standard model prediction for the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Significant recent advances in lattice QCD methodology make a precise first-principles computation of this contribution with uncertainties comparable to the Fermilab E989 target precision realistic in the next few years. I will review recent breakthroughs, including our precise computation of the quark-disconnected contribution, and outline the necessary steps to complete the computation with sub-percent accuracy.
        Speaker: Christoph Lehner
      • 215
        Lattice calculation of the HVP contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of muon (15' + 5')
        The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, defined as the fractional difference of its gyromagnetic ratio from the naive value of 2, has been measured with an impressive accuracy of 0.54 parts per million in experiment (BNL E821), thus providing one of the most stringent tests of the Standard Model. Intriguingly, the experimentally measured anomaly disagrees by around 3 standard deviations with the calculated value from the Standard Model. The current theoretical uncertainty is dominated by that from the calculation of the lowest order “hadronic vacuum polarisation (HVP)”. Improvements in the experimental uncertainty by a factor of 4 in the upcoming experiment at Fermilab (E989) are expected and improvements in the theoretical determination would make the discrepancy (if it remains) really compelling in trying to ascertain the possibility of new physics beyond the Standard Model. I will report on our (HPQCD) progress (Phys.Rev. D89 (2014) 11,114501; arXiv:1511.05870; arXiv:1512.03270) and plans for improving the theoretical calculation of the HVP contribution to the anomaly using our new lattice QCD method. We have achieved the most precise lattice results so far for this quantity on multiple lattices with physical up/down, strange and charm quarks in the sea. Our accuracy on the HVP is 2% and this is low enough for the first time to see a 3 sigma discrepancy between the Standard Model and experiment.
        Speaker: bipasha chakraborty (University of Glasgow)
    • Strong Interactions and Hadron Physics: Belle, Besi Ontario

      Ontario

      Convener: Xiaoyan Shen (Univ. of Science & Tech. of China (CN))
      • 216
        Hadron spectroscopy at BES-III (15' + 5')
        Merged abstract
        Speaker: Shan JIN (IHEP)
      • 217
        Results from e+e- collisions at BESIII (15' + 5')

        Merged abstract

        Speaker: Ryan Mitchell (Indiana University)
      • 218
        Production of exotic hadrons and charmonium at Belle/Babar (12' + 3')
        Merged abstract
        Speaker: Kay Kinoshita (Cincinnati)
      • 219
        Charmonia and bottomomia decays at Belle/Babar (12' + 3')
        Merged abstract
        Speaker: Bob Kowalewski (University of Victoria (CA))
      • 220
        Excited heavy mesons from lattice QCD (15' + 5')
        I will discuss some recent investigations of excited mesons using first-principles lattice QCD calculations. Over the last few years, by developing a range of novel techniques we have made significant advances in studying hadrons with exotic quantum numbers, near-threshold states, resonances and related scattering phenomena. Some highlights of results from scattering channels involving charm mesons will be presented, including D K scattering relevant for the enigmatic Ds(2317). I will also comment on applications to other phenomenologically-interesting channels and future prospects.
        Speaker: Dr Christopher Thomas (University of Cambridge)
      • 221
        Measurement of the Collins asymmetries as a function of energy and transverse momentum for kaons and pions at BABAR (8' + 2')
        Inclusive hadron production cross sections and angular distributions in e+e- collisions shed light on fundamental questions of hadronization and fragmentation processes. We present measurements of the Collins azimuthal asymmetries in inclusive production of hadron pairs, in the e+e- -> h1 h2 X annihilation process, where the hadrons (either kaons or pions) are produced in opposite hemispheres. The data collected by the BABAR detector allow the determination of the Collins fragmentation function dependence on hadron fractional energy and transverse momentum for the up, down and, for the first time, strange quarks. These data can be combined with semi-inclusive deep-inelastic-scattering data to extract the transversity distribution function, which is the least known leading-twist component of the QCD description of the partonic structure of the nucleon.
        Speaker: Georges Vasseur (CEA)
    • Top Quark and Electroweak Physics: 3 Huron

      Huron

      Convener: Pedro Vieira De Castro Ferreira Da Silva (CERN)
      • 222
        Single Top quark production cross section using the ATLAS detector at the LHC (15' + 5')
        Measurements of single top-quark production in proton proton collisions are presented at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. A measurement of the cross section where a W boson is exchanged in the t-channel is discussed. The single top-quark and anti-top total production cross sections, their ratio, as well as measurements of the inclusive production cross sections are presented. Differential cross-section measurements of the t-channel process are also discussed. A measurement of the production cross section of a single top quark in association with a W boson, the second largest single-top production mode, is also presented. Evidence for single-top production in the s-channel with the 8 TeV ATLAS dataset is discussed. Finally, measurements of the properties of the Wtb vertex allows to set limits on anomalous couplings. All measurements are compared to state-of-the-art theoretical calculations.
        Speaker: Sebastian Mergelmeyer (Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (DE))
      • 223
        Single top quark production measurements in CMS (15' + 5')

        Measurements are presented of t-channel single top quark production in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies of 7, 8 and 13 TeV, using data collected with the CMS experiment during the years 2011, 2012 and 2015. The analyses consider leptonic decay channels of the W from the top decays, and makes use of kinematic characteristics of electroweak single top production for the separation of signal from backgrounds using multivariate methods. The measurement is used to constrain the Vtb CKM matrix element. The results are compared with the most precise standard model theory predictions. The inclusive fiducial cross section is also measured. Measurements of top/antitop cross section ratio and of various differential single top quark production cross sections are also presented.
        Measurements of single top quark production in the tW-channel in pp collisions are presented. In the tW-channel a top quark is produced in association with a W boson. The data were collected in the years 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The experimental signature is similar to top pair production, and there is interference at higher orders between the two processes. The measurements are performed using final states in which the associated W boson as well as the one originating from the top quark decay leptonically. Multivariate methods are used to extract the cross section. The result is compared with current standard model theory predictions. The measurement is used to constrain the Vtb CKM matrix element. Furthermore, a search for s-channel single top production at 8 TeV is presented.

        Speaker: Hamed Bakhshiansohi (CP3, UCL)
      • 224
        Top physics at CLIC and ILC (15' + 5')
        Measurements of top quark production at e+e- colliders can provide a leap in precision in our knowledge of top quark properties and open a new window on physics beyond the Standard Model. In this contribution the top quark physics prospects of linear colliders is reviewed. Progress in detailed full-simulation studies is reported for the highlights of the programme. We present the prospects for a measurement of the top quark mass and width in a scan of the beam energy through the pair production threshold, and discuss new studies of alternative measurements in continuum production, which are also capable of a precise determination of the mass in a rigorously defined mass scheme. A precision of ~50 MeV on the MSbar mass is expected when taking into account the dominant systematic uncertainties. Another key measurement is the study of the top quark couplings to electroweak gauge bosons, where form factors can be determined to 1% precision, an order of magnitude better than the full LHC programme. New results extend the prospects to different center-of-mass energies and to CP violating form factors. Finally, new studies are presented into the possibility at linear colliders to detect Flavour Changing Neutral Current decays of the top quark, such as the decay t -> cH, to a branching ratio BR(t->cH) ~ 10^-5.
        Speaker: Aleksander Filip Zarnecki (University of Warsaw)
      • 225
        Top physics in pp collisions at 100 TeV (15' + 5')
        A 100 TeV pp collider, with a statistics of a trillion produced top quarks, offers many opportunities for precision measurements of the top quark couplings, searches of rare or forbidden decays, and studies of production in extreme kinematical configurations, potentially sensitive to new short-distance phenomena, and an important background to many searches for new physics. This presentation reviews recent progress in these explorations, done in the framework of the Future Circular Collider Study.
        Speaker: Michelangelo Mangano (CERN)
      • 226
        Top, EW and BSM physics at the LHeC and FCC-he (15' + 5')
        Energy-frontier deep inelastic scattering at 1000 times higher luminosity than HERA is considered with the LHeC and further the FCC-he. These collider configurations provide unique possibilities for SM and BSM top physics, for novel electroweak precision measurements and for further BSM investigations such as for lepto-partons at the FCC-he. The high precision PDF and $\alpha_s$ information from the LHeC will have a direct impact on the BSM search potential and interpretation of new physics at the LHC.
        Speaker: Christian Schwanenberger (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DE))
    • DOE - PI Meetings: Cosmic Frontier Chicago 9

      Chicago 9

    • DOE - PI Meetings: Energy Frontier Chicago 8

      Chicago 8

    • Registration: Registration desk will be open until 6pm
    • Diversity and Inclusion: Conversation with Students at the African School for Fundamental Physics (2016, Rwanda) Superior B

      Superior B

      • 229
        Panel Discussion with Students from Rwanda

        Early-career scientists from Fermilab will discuss physics, life and career with students attending the ASP.

    • Accelerator: Physics, Performance, R&D and Future Facilities: 4 Superior B

      Superior B

      Convener: Jie GAO (IHEP)
      • 230
        The status of MICE (15' + 5')
        Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well characterised neutrino beams of the Neutrino Factory and for lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam. MICE is being constructed in a series of Steps. The configuration currently in operation at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory is optimised for the study the properties of liquid hydrogen and lithium hydride that affect cooling. The results that have recently been submitted for publication will be described along with preliminary results from the MICE study of the effect of liquid hydrogen and lithium hydride on the muon beam. The plans for data taking in the present configuration will be described together with a summary of the status of preparation of the final experimental configuration by which MICE will demonstration the principle of ionization cooling.
        Speaker: Steven Boyd (University of Warwick)
      • 231
        Very low Emittance Muon Beam using positron beam on target (15' + 5')
        Muon beams are customarily obtained via K/π decays produced in proton interaction on target. In this paper we investigate the possibility to produce low emittance muon beams from electron–positron collisions at centre-of-mass energy just above the μ+μ- production threshold with maximal beam energy asymmetry, corresponding to a positron beam of about 45 GeV interacting on electrons on target. We present the main features of this scheme with an outline of the possible applications for Higgs factory and Multi-TeV collider. Performances on both amorphous and crystal target are presented, and the general scheme for the muon production will be given.
        Speaker: Mario Antonelli (Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare Frascati (IT))
      • 232
        Study of RF Breakdown in Strong Magnetic Field (15' + 5')
        RF cavities are essential components of almost every particle accelerator. Among other limitations, cavity gradients are restricted by occasional sparking inside the cavity, or RF breakdown. It has been shown that presence of external static magnetic field aggravates the influence of breakdown on performance of the cavity. This problem can arise in designs of muon ionization cooling channel, RF guns, klystrons and other applications. The MTA area at Fermilab is the facility that allows us to study the effects of static magnetic fields up to several Tesla on RF cavity operation. As a part of this research program, we have tested "modular" cavity in strong external magnetic fields. The special design of the cavity allowed for easier inspection of the cavity, swapping endplates with different materials and hence better control over sources of systematic errors. I will present results of high-power tests of “modular” cavity with and without external multi-Tesla magnetic field.
        Speaker: Alexey Kochemirovskiy (The University of Chicago)
      • 233
        High voltage electron cooling in ion colliders (15' + 5')
        Results of calculations of high voltage electron cooling process in NICA collider are presented. Two independent electron cooling systems in the collider are intended to increase luminosity in space charge dominated regime. The model of cooling calculations was tested on experimental results, obtained in COSY synchrotron, which is equipped with 2 MeV electron cooler, produced by Budker INP. Also a project of high voltage electron cooling systems for the NICA collider is presented.
        Speaker: Maxim Bryzgunov (Budker INP)
      • 234
        Options for energy frontier electron-hadron scattering at CERN (15' + 5')
        The design and recent developments are presented for a Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) combining the HL-LHC hadron (p,A) beams with a new electron beam of about 60 GeV energy achieved in a racetrack energy recovery linac configuration. This electron accelerator is also considered as a default for the electron-hadron configuration of the FCC currently under study. The talk will focus on recent studies for achieving around 10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ luminosity with the LHeC, making that a competitive future Higgs facility, the design of a demonstrator of the ERL principle specific for the LHeC, and it also presents first studies of the FCC-he configuration.
        Speaker: Max Klein (University of Liverpool (GB))
      • 235
        PROTON BEAM INTENSITY UPGRADES ON THE NEUTRINO TARGETS AT THE FERMILAB ACCELERATOR COMPLEX (15' + 5')
        Fermilab is committed to making a substantial increase in the average beam power delivered to the neutrino and muon programs via upgrades to the accelerator complex. Many of the upgrades to the existing injector accelerators are being carried out under the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP). Proton Improvement Plan –II proposes to build an 800 MeV superconducting LINAC, adding to the existing facility which has significant upgrade possibilities in future. In any case, the Fermilab Booster, an 8 GeV injector to the 120 GeV Main Injector, is going to play very significant role for nearly next two decades. In this context, very recently, we proposed and implemented a new beam injection scheme in operation called "early injection scheme" (EIS) for the Fermilab Booster that has a potential to increase the beam intensity from the Booster by at least 40% from current operation of 4.5E12 protons per Booster pulse (design intensity for the PIP). Here we present results from recent beam studies, current status of operational implementation and future plans for the EIS. The EIS operation and improvements should serve the Fermilab program well between the current PIP and future PIP-II upgrade at Fermilab.
        Speaker: Dr Chandrashekhara Bhat (Fermilab)
    • Astro-particle Physics and Cosmology: Large Scale Structure Chicago 10

      Chicago 10

      Convener: Shirley Ho (Carnegie Mellon University (US))
      • 236
        Strong Lensing Search and Confirmation Results from the Dark Energy Survey (12' + 3')
        The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is carrying out a five-year, 5000-sq.-deg. survey of the Southern Galactic Cap. Much of the wide-field area has not yet been systematically surveyed, so we expect to discover many new strongly lensed galaxies and quasars. One of the main objectives of the strong lensing science program in DES is to derive constraints on dark energy. The two major components of this part of the program will be exploiting (1) lenses with background sources at multiple redshifts and (2) lensed quasars. In addition to cosmology, we will use the cluster-scale lens sample to study dark matter mass profile, along with the large sample of sources at varying redshifts to study galaxy evolution and substructure. In early DES data, we have identified over 50 candidates for strong gravitational lensing systems. To find lenses, we use a combination of automated arc-finders, photometric catalog searches and visual scans. Each of these methods has particular strengths for finding different types of lenses, distinguished by their geometric configuration — arcs, rings and multiple images. In an effort to confirm these candidates, we performed spectroscopic follow-up of over half of these candidates at the Gemini South 8m telescope. We present results for the spectroscopic follow-up campaign and the confirmation of new gravitational lenses. As part of the effort to constrain profiles of dark matter haloes, we also present preliminary mass modeling of lenses. Finally, we describe a new ‘holistic’ technique for finding gravitational lenses based on shapelets. This technique has the potential to find lenses regardless of their geometric configuration, as well as to target the types of lenses most valuable for deriving dark energy constraints.
        Speaker: Brian Nord (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory)
      • 237
        Galaxy Clusters in DES: latest results (12' + 3')
        The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is the largest imaging survey by cosmological volume to date. By observing and studying in detail the properties of tens of thousands of galaxy clusters, the DES clusters effort works towards our goal of measuring cosmological parameters with percent-level precision. We present the latest results from this program and discuss prospects for the upcoming data.
        Speaker: Marcelle Soares-Santos (Fermilab)
      • 238
        Cosmology from Clusters and Joint SPT-DES Analyses of Clusters in the SPT-SZ survey (12' + 3')
        Galaxy clusters—the largest gravitationally collapsed systems in the Universe—are powerful tools with which to constrain cosmological models as their abundance depends upon both the expansion history of the universe and the growth of density fluctuations. In this talk I will highlight cosmological results derived using clusters identified in the 2500-square-degree South Pole Telescope (SPT) SZ Survey. The SPT cluster sample consists of 516 galaxy clusters (>80% new discoveries) selected via the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) effect. The sample has a median mass of $M_{500}\sim3.5x10^{14} M_{sun}/h$, a median redshift of $z$=0.55, and a maximum spectroscopic redshift to date of 1.47. We have used the high-significance portion (377 clusters at $z > 0.25$, detection significance greater than 5)—in combination with dedicated Chandra X-ray follow up observations for 82 of these systems—to place constraints on base $\Lambda$CDM model parameters, the species-summed neutrino mass, the effective number of relativistic species, as well as the equation of state of dark energy. Further constraints from this sample are limited by uncertainties in the mass-SZ observable scaling relation and ongoing efforts to improve this calibration using weak lensing observations will be discussed. Beyond this high-mass SZ-selected sample, there is a wealth of information that can be extracted from joint analyses of clusters using multi-wavelength data from SPT and the optical Dark Energy Survey (DES). I will highlight several of these efforts including a new $\sim 4\sigma$ measurement of the pairwise motion of DES-identified clusters using CMB survey data. While the first modest-significance detections of this phenomena have only recently occurred, measurements using future CMB and galaxy survey data have the potential to place interesting constraints on both cosmological parameters (esp. dark energy models and the sum of the masses of the neutrino species) as well as to test models of gravity at $\sim$100 Mpc scales.
        Speaker: Lindsey Bleem (Argonne National Laboratory)
      • 239
        The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) and Survey (15' + 5')
        DESI is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a wide-area galaxy and quasar spectroscopic redshift survey. The DESI instrument consists of a new wide-field (3.2 deg. field of view) corrector plus a multi-object spectrometer with 5000 robotically positioned optical fibers. It will be installed at prime focus on the Mayall 4m telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona. The fibers feed 10 three-arm spectrographs producing spectra that cover a wavelength range from 360-980 nm and have resolution up to 5000. The DESI instrument is designed for a 5 year, 14,000 sq. deg. survey of targets that trace the evolution of dark energy. In particular, we will measure the redshifts galaxies to z = 1.6 and the Lyman Alpha forest to z>2. DESI is the successor to the BOSS spectroscopic redshift survey and complements imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES), which recently completed year 3 out of the planned 5 years of operations, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will start operations early in the next decade.
        Speaker: brenna flaugher (Fermilab)
      • 240
        In the era of large scale surveys: from BOSS to WFIRST (15' + 5')
        Despite tremendous recent progress, gaps remain in our knowledge of our understanding of the Universe. We have not yet pinned down the properties of dark energy, dark matter, nor have we confirmed Einstein’s theory of Gravity at the largest scales. Current and upcoming large sky surveys of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Large Scale Structure (LSS) in galaxies, quasars and lyman-alpha forest present us with the best opportunity to understand various mysterious properties of the Universe and its underlying principles. I will review recent results from Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) and introduce the newly commenced space telescope Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) which aims to understand the dark components of the Universe and directly image exoplanets. I will then introduce novel cosmological probes which combine large sky surveys of biased tracers with cosmic microwave background measurements. These novel cosmological probes will open up a window in both the momentum field of the Universe and Gravity at the largest scales.
        Speaker: Shirley Ho (Carnegie Mellon University (US))
      • 241
        Disentangling redshift-space distortions and nonlinear bias using large scale structure dynamics (15' + 5')
        The distortion of clustering due to the peculiar motions of galaxies and the apparent scale of characteristic features in the galaxy distribution are key tests of cosmic acceleration. I will discuss some of the current challenges in modeling redshift space distortions in large scale clustering statistics, at the percent level required by future galaxy redshift surveys. This will require us to re-consider the scales at which linear perturbation theory is applicable, the impact of stochasticity on defining a linear growth rate and nonlinear velocity-density correlations. I will present a new approach using the information content along different lines of sight to isolate the impact of nonlinear growth and redshift space distortions.
        Speaker: Elise Jennings
      • 242
        Non-Gaussian Covariance of the Matter Power Spectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure (12' + 3')
        In the era of precision cosmology, understanding the formation of large scale structure (LSS) is essential for gaining insight into physics beyond the Standard Model and of the primordial universe. To that end, effective field theory (EFT) techniques familiar in high-energy physics are being developed for efficient and precise calculations of LSS observables. In this talk, we present the non-Gaussian contribution to the covariance of the matter power spectrum at one-loop order in Standard Perturbation Theory (SPT), and using the framework of the EFT of LSS. The complete one-loop contributions are evaluated for the first time, including the leading EFT corrections that involve seven independent operators, of which four appear in the power spectrum and bispectrum. In the basis where the three new operators are maximally uncorrelated, we find that two of them are suppressed at the few percent level relative to other contributions, and may thus be neglected. We extract the single remaining coefficient from N-body simulations, and obtain robust predictions for the non-Gaussian part of the covariance C(ki, kj ) up to ki + kj ∼ 0.3 h/Mpc.
        Speaker: Mikhail Solon
    • Detector: R&D and Performance: Trigger/DAQ Chicago 8

      Chicago 8

      Convener: Marzio Nessi (CERN)
      • 243
        Mu2e upgrade physics reach optimization studies for the PIP-II era (15' + 5')
        The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is being designed to study the coherent neutrino-less conversion of a negative muon into an electron in the field of a nucleus. This process has an extremely low probability in the Standard Model, and its observation would provide unambiguous evidence for BSM physics. The current Mu2e design aims to reach a single-event-sensitivity of about $2.5 \cdot 10^{-17}$ and will probe effective new physics mass scales in the $10^3-10^4$ TeV range, well beyond the reach of the LHC. This work studies how the sensitivity might be further improved with a second generation experiment using an upgraded proton beam from the PIP-II project, which will be capable of providing MW beams to Fermilab experiments later in the next decade. We will examine the maximum beam power that can be tolerated for beam energies in the $0.5-8$ GeV range. We will also explore variations in the geometry in the region of the production target using the MARS15 code.
        Speaker: Vitaly Pronskikh (Fermilab)
      • 244
        Status of SuperKEKB commissioning and Belle II detector construction (15' + 5')
        The SuperKEKB energy-asymmetric $e^+e^-$ collider has now started commissioning and is working towards its design luminosity of $8 \times 10^{35}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. The collisions will be recorded and analyzed with the Belle II spectrometer, the construction of which is on-going at the roll-out position. Highlights will include the outcome of Phase I commissioning of the SuperKEKB accelerator, BEASTII background commissioning and the most recent progress on the construction of the Belle II detector.
        Speaker: Peter Lewis (University of Hawaii)
      • 245
        The Fermilab Test Beam Facility (15' + 5')
        The Fermilab Test Beam Facility is a world class facility for testing and characterizing particle detectors. The facility has been in operation since 2005 and has undergone significant upgrades in the last two years. A second beam line with cryogenic support has been added and the facility has adopted a unified data acquisition system. The facility also recently added a cosmic telescope test stand and improved tracking capabilities. With two operational beam lines, the facility can deliver a variety of particle types and momenta ranging from 120 GeV protons in the primary beam line down to 200 MeV particles in the tertiary beam line. In addition, recent work has focused on analyzing the beam structure to provide users with information on the data they are collecting. With these improvements, the Fermilab Test Beam facility is one of the most versatile test beams in the world, capable of supporting High Energy physics applications as well as industry users. The upgrades will be discussed along with plans for future improvements.
        Speaker: Mandy Rominsky (Fermilab)
      • 246
        GIF++: A new CERN Irradiation Facility to test large-area particle detectors for the High-Luminosity LHC program (15' + 5')
        The high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade is setting a new challenge for particle detector technologies. The increase in luminosity will produce a higher particle background with respect to present conditions. Detector performance and stability at LHC and future system upgrades will remain the subject of extensive studies. The present contribution describes the new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++) recently built at CERN. GIF++ is a unique place where high energy charged particle beams (mainly muon beam with momentum up to 100 GeV/c) and gammas from a 14 TBq 137Cesium source are simultaneously available. The high activity of the source produces a background gamma field allowing to accumulate doses equivalent to HL-LHC experimental conditions in a reasonable time (typically few months for muon detectors). The 100 m2 GIF++ irradiation bunker has two independent irradiation zones making possible to test real size detectors (several m2), as well as a broad range of smaller prototype detectors and electronic components. The photon flux of each irradiation zone can be tuned using a set of Lead filters with attenuation factors from zero to 50000. Flexible services and infrastructure including electronic racks, gas systems, radiation and environmental monitoring systems and a large preparation zone allow time-effective installation of detectors. A dedicated control system provides the overview of the status of the facility and archives relevant information. The new facility is operational since April 2015 with an active user community of about 90 physicists, engineers and technicians. About 15 setups are constantly performing R&D tests in the bunker. They include seven different gaseous detector technologies: Drift Tubes, Gas Electron Multiplier, Cathode Strip Chambers, Micro-Megas, Resistive Plate Chambers, glass based Resistive Plate Chambers and Thin Gap Chambers. In addition, the facility permits to perform validation tests for the final production chambers just before installation in the LHC experiments. The varieties of tests performed will be presented.
        Speaker: Roberto Guida (CERN)
      • 247
        Hybrid cosmic rays detector (15' + 5')
        Here is the design, the construction and characterization of a hybrid cosmic rays detector based on drift tube and Cherenkov radiation detector with two ionization detection channels and two Cherenkov radiation detection channels operating simultaneously. The basic detection cell is a structural Aluminum tube of 2.54 cm x 2.54 cm cross section, 1.01 m long and 0.1 cm thick tube interiorly polished to mirror and slightly covered with TiO2, filled with (90%)Argon + (10%)Methane gas mixture. There is an Au-coated Tungsten wire coaxially and instrumented at both ends, to supply a high voltage, around +1800 V to +2000 V to the metal wire and read the output signals from ionization detection channel. The Cherenkov channel is based on S10362-11-100U Hamamatsu avalanche photodiodes placed in both ends over the acrylic caps designed to hold them. The avalanche photodiodes are electronically instrumented to supply them + 70 V and read the output signals due to Cherenkov radiation produced inside the cell. All the output signals are amplified in a 2 factor; the data acquisition system, CompactRio, from National Instruments records digital pulses from the discriminated output signals every 1 ms for each detection channel. This detector is the basic unit to build a larger cosmic rays detector. Details on design, construction, characterization, calibration, operation and potential applications of this hybrid cosmic rays detector is all about this report. Keywords: Cosmic rays, hybrid detector, drift tubes, ionizing radiation, Cherenkov radiation.
        Speakers: Diego Andrade (Universidad de Guanajuato) , Julian Felix (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato. Mexico)
      • 248
        Challenges of Particle Flow reconstruction in the CMS High-Granularity Calorimeter at the High-Luminosity LHC (15' + 5')
        The challenges of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) are driven by the large number of overlapping proton-proton collisions (pileup) in each bunch-crossing and the extreme radiation dose to detectors positioned at high pseudorapidity. To overcome this challenge CMS is designing and implementing an endcap electromagnetic+hadronic sampling calorimeter employing silicon pad devices in the electromagnetic and front hadronic sections, comprising over 6 million channels, and highly-segmented plastic scintillators in the rear part of the hadronic section. This High-Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) will be the first of its kind used in a colliding beam experiment. Clustering deposits of energy over many cells and layers is a complex and challenging computational task, particularly in the high-pileup and high-event-rate environment of HL-LHC. These challenges, their solutions will be discussed in detail, as well as their implementation in the HGCAL offline reconstruction. Baseline detector performance results will be presented for electromagnetic and hadronic objects, and case studies demonstrating the advantages of fine longitudinal and transverse segmentation will be explored.
        Speaker: Lindsey Gray (Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (US))
    • Joint Beyond the Standard Model & Higgs Chicago 7

      Chicago 7

      Sheraton Grand Chicago 301 East Water Street Chicago IL 60611 USA
      Conveners: Kirill Prokofiev (The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HK)) , Kiwoon Choi (KAIST) , Stefania Gori (Perimeter Institute/Cincinnati University)
      • 249
        Search for a high mass diphoton resonance using the ATLAS detector (15' + 5')
        The search for a spin-0 or spin-2 state decaying into two photons in a large mass range is presented, using about 10 fb-1 of p-p collisions at 13 TeV.
        Speaker: Bruno Lenzi (CERN)
      • 250
        Searches for BSM physics in diphoton final state at CMS (15' + 5')
        A search for new physics in high-mass diphoton events is presented. The analysis is performed by looking for bumps on the continuum diphoton mass spectrum. This clean signature is sensitive to high-mass gravitons predicted by models with extra dimensions and to scalar resonances arising from many extensions of the standard model. The talk focuses on the recent results obtained using data collected during the 2015 run as well as the first part of the 2016 run.
        Speaker: Chiara Ilaria Rovelli (Universita e INFN, Roma I (IT))
      • 251
        The Relaxion and Composite Higgs (12' + 3')
        The recently-proposed relaxion framework aims to provide a novel dynamical solution to the Standard Model hierarchy problem. We examine the phenomenology of a new TeV-scale QCD-like sector associated with particular relaxion models in which non-perturbative effects in the new sector provide the stopping-potential for the relaxion. Among the host of potential new-physics signals, whose impact we consider in exploring the parameter space available to these models, it is particularly interesting that decays of the new-sector mesons may provide an explanation for the recent evidence from ATLAS and CMS indicating the presence of an excess of diphoton events with an invariant mass near 750GeV.
        Speaker: Michael Fedderke (University of Chicago)
      • 252
        Dark sector shining through 750 GeV dark Higgs boson at the LHC (12' + 3')

        We consider a dark sector with SU(3)C×U(1)Y×U(1)X and three families of dark fermions that are chiral under dark U(1)X gauge symmetry, whereas scalar dark matter X is the SM singlet. U(1)X dark symmetry is spontaneously broken by nonzero VEV of dark Higgs field ⟨Φ⟩, generating the masses of dark fermions and dark photon Z′. The resulting dark Higgs boson ϕ can be produced at the LHC by dark quark loop (involving 3 generation) and will decay into a pair of photon through charged dark fermion loop. Its decay width can be easily ∼45 GeV due to its possible decays into a pair of dark photon, which is not strongly constrained by the current LHC searches pp→ϕ→Z′Z′ followed by Z′ decays into the SM fermion pairs. The scalar DM can achieve thermal relic density without conflict with direct detection bound or the invisible ϕ decay into a pair of DM.

        Speaker: pyungwon ko (Korea Inst. for Advanced Study (KIAS))
      • 253
        The NMSSM lives - with the 750 GeV diphoton excess (12' + 3')
        We propose an NMSSM scenario that can explain the excess in the diphoton spectrum at 750 GeV recently observed by ATLAS and CMS. We show that in a certain limit with a very light pseudoscalar one can reproduce the experimental results without invoking exotic matter. The 750 GeV excess is produced by two resonant heavy Higgs bosons that subsequently decay to light pseudoscalars. Each of these decays to collimated photon pairs that appear as a single photon in the electromagnetic calorimeter. A mass gap between heavy Higgses mimics a finite width of the 750 GeV peak. The production mechanism via initial b quarks ameliorates a possible tension with 8 TeV data compared to other production modes. We also discuss other constraints, in particular from low energy experiments. Finally, we discuss possible methods that could distinguish our proposal from other physics models in the run-2 of the LHC.
        Speaker: Krzysztof Rolbiecki (University of Warsaw)
      • 254
        Measuring the diphoton coupling of a 750 GeV resonance at the LHC (12' + 3')
        A slight excess has been observed in the first data of photon-photon events at the 13~TeV LHC, that might be interpreted has a hint of physics beyond the Standard Model. We show that a completely model-independent measurement of the photon-photon coupling of a putative 750 GeV resonance will be possible using the forward proton detectors scheduled at ATLAS and CMS. We consider the possibility that the diphoton excess at 750 GeV is caused by a new scalar resonance produced in photon fusion. This scenario is parametrised by only one relevant effective couplings and is thus minimal. We show that this setup can reproduce both the production rate and width of the resonance, and is not in conflict with the 8 TeV limits on the diphoton cross section. The scenario also predicts event rates for $WW$, $ZZ$, $Z\gamma$ final states. We suggest to perform precision measurements by studying light-by-light scattering with intact protons detected in forward detectors. We construct a simple model that shows that the required couplings can be achieved with new vectorlike, uncolored fermions (with a strong Yukawa coupling to the resonance) which may also account for the required width.
        Speaker: Christophe Royon (University of Kansas (US))
      • 255
        Diphoton and Diquark Resonances in U(1) Extension of MSSM (12' + 3')
        Inspired by the 750 GeV resonance displayed in Run II by the ATLAS and CMS experiments, we propose to incorporate it in an extension of the MSSM based on a suitable gauge symmetry G. The combination of G and a U(1) R-symmetry yields a unique renormalizable superpotential containing a G-singlet superfield S, such that G breaks to MSSM at scale M with supersymmetry unbroken. The mass of the predicted MSSM singlet scalar resonance, as well as masses of the associated MSSM vectorlike fields do not exceed the symmetry breaking scale M because of G and U(1)_R, and indeed can be considerably smaller. The MSSM mu problem is elegantly resolved in these models. We present details for two models including production cross sections and decay widths based on well known U(1) extensions of the MSSM.
        Speaker: qaisar shafi (university of delaware)
      • 256
        Higgs-radion Interpretation of the 750 GeV di-photon excess at the LHC (12' + 3')
        We present a possible interpretation of the excess in the di-photon channel at 750 GeV recently observed by ATLAS and CMS as the radion of the five-dimensional Randall-Sundrum model. We show that the Higgs-radion scenario can give a cross section of (5--􀀀15) fb in the di-photon final state at 750 GeV while at the same time giving a very SM-like state at 125 GeV. Tests of the model using other final states will be discussed. Theoretical implications of this di-photon explanation are also considered.
        Speaker: Jack Gunion (University of California Davis (US))
    • Neutrino Physics: Neutrino models + collider tests Chicago 6

      Chicago 6

      Convener: Andre De Gouvea (Northwestern University)
      • 257
        Sterile Neutrinos in Models (15' + 3')
        Sterile Neutrino Models appear in many models, and their masses can lie anywhere between zero and the GUT scale. Depending on that mass and the mixing with the active sector, their phenomenology can cover aspects such as leptogenesis, dark matter, short baseline neutrino oscillations, vacuum stability, neutrinoless double beta decay etc. Typical models for several such cases are discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Werner Rodejohann
      • 258
        Gauge Coupling Unification in Radiative Neutrino Mass Models (15' + 2')
        We investigate the renormalization group running of gauge couplings in various radiative neutrino mass models, which generate neutrino masses at one- and two-loop order. We discuss the possibility for these couplings to unify in such models at an energy scale close to the GUT scale. The studies are performed both analytically, at one-loop level, and numerically, at two-loop level, using the software PyR@TE. We study five different classes of models, which are (i) minimal dimension-7 models which generate neutrino masses at one-loop level (15 models), (ii) the same models with additional dark matter candidates (15 models), (iii) models with minimal dark matter which generate neutrino masses at one-loop level (35 models), (iv) the same models with all particles colored, and finally, (v) models with scalar colored octets (three models). The dark matter candidates, which are added in class (ii), are not excluded by direct detection constraints. In addition, each of the dark matter representations should not have a contribution to the running so that there is a Landau pole below a presumed unification scale. We find that unification is achieved in several models. The particles in class (i) are added in up to six generations and we find unification in four versions of the models in this class. Out of the models in class (ii), we find that 15 models that unify. In classes (iii) and (iv), we find unification in eight and two models, respectively. Finally, none of the models in class (v) unify. In general, we find that unification can occur and the scale is normally in the range $(10^{10}-10^{14})$ GeV. The model with the highest scale is a model in class (i), which has the scale $1.8 \cdot 10^{16}$ GeV.
        Speaker: Stella Riad (KTH Royal Institute of Technology)
      • 259
        Testing Neutrino Mass Models at the LHC and beyond (15' + 3')
        We will review the current status and future prospects of testing some simple neutrino mass mechanisms at the energy frontier, with particular emphasis on the ongoing searches at the LHC, as well as some recent theoretical developments to enhance the sensitivity. We will also discuss the complementarity with various low-energy probes at the intensity frontier.
        Speaker: Dr Bhupal Dev (MPIK, Heidelberg)
      • 260
        Searches for heavy neutrinos at the LHC (30' + 4')
        Heavy neutrinos occur in various extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and may explain the observed small masses of the SM neutrinos via several possible variants of the seesaw mechanism. We present results on searches for heavy neutrinos at the LHC. Searches are performed in the dilepton+jets channel and the trilepton channel, and results are interpreted in terms of the Left-Right Symmetrical model, Type-I, and the Type-III seesaw mechanism.
        Speakers: Un Ki Yang (Seoul National University (KR)) , Un-ki Yang (Seoul National University)
      • 261
        Global constraints on heavy neutrino seesaw mixing (15' + 3')
        We extend the Standard Model with 3 right-handed neutrinos with an approximate lepton number symmetry, which leads to sizeable neutrino mixing while generating the neutrino masses and PMNS matrix measured in oscillation experiments. Constraints on the right-handed neutrino mixing are derived through a global fit to electroweak precision observables. We analyze explicitly the impact of one-loop corrections on these constraints.
        Speaker: Josu Hernandez
      • 262
        Neutrino physics with SHIP (13' + 2')
        SHIP is a new general purpose fixed target facility, whose Technical Proposal has been recently reviewed by the CERN SPS Committee, who recommended that the experiment proceeds further to a Comprehensive Design phase. In its initial phase, the 400GeV proton beam extracted from the SPS will be dumped on a heavy target with the aim of integrating $2\times 10^{20}$ pot in 5 years. A dedicated detector, based on a long vacuum tank followed by a spectrometer and particle identification detectors, will allow probing a variety of models with light long-lived exotic particles and masses below O(10) GeV/c$^2$. The main focus will be the physics of the so-called Hidden Portals. The sensitivity to Heavy Neutrinos will allow for the first time to probe, in the mass range between the kaon and the charm meson mass, a coupling range for which Baryogenesis and active neutrino masses could also be explained.Another dedicated detector will allow the study of neutrino cross-sections and angular distributions. $\nu_\tau$ deep inelastic scattering cross sections will be measured with a statistics 1000 times larger than currently available, with the extraction of the $F_4$ and $F_5$ structure functions, never measured so far and allow for new tests of lepton non-universality with sensitivity to BSM physics.
        Speaker: Eric Van Herwijnen (CERN)
    • Quark and Lepton Flavor Physics: 4 Superior A

      Superior A

      Convener: Bradley Lee Roberts (Boston University)
      • 263
        Lepton Flavor Violation in B decays (15' + 5')
        Recent b to s data from the LHCb experiment seem to hint at lepton-flavor non-universality effects beyond the SM. We argue that such effects generally imply also lepton flavor violation at rates much higher than within the SM. In the context of a simple model we provide a number of experimental tests of this possibility, at LHCb itself and elsewhere.
        Speaker: Diego Guadagnoli (LAPTh Annecy)
      • 264
        Direct probes of flavor-changing neutral currents in e+e− collisions (15' + 5')
        We propose a novel method to study flavor-changing neutral currents in the $e^+ e^− \to D^{∗0}$ and $e^+ e^− \to B^∗_s$ transitions, tuning the energy of $e^+e^−$- collisions to the mass of the narrow vector resonance $D^{∗0}$ or $B^∗_s$. We present a thorough study of both short-distance and long-distance contributions to $e^+e^− \to D^{∗0}$ in the Standard Model and investigate possible contributions of new physics in the charm sector. This process, albeit very rare, has clear advantages with respect to the $D^0 \to e^+ e^−$ decay: the helicity suppression is absent, and a richer set of effective operators can be probed. Implications of the same proposal for $B^∗_s$ are also discussed.
        Speaker: Alexey Petrov (Wayne State University)
      • 265
        The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab (10' + 5')
        The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab will search for coherent, neutrinoless conversion of muons into electrons in the field of a nucleus with a sensitivity improvement of a factor of 10,000 over previous experiments. Such a charged lepton flavor-violating reaction probes new physics at a scale inaccessible with direct searches at either present or planned high energy colliders. The experiment both complements and extends the current search for muon decay to electron+gamma at MEG and searches for new physics at the LHC. We will present the physics motivation for Mu2e, the novel design of the muon beamline and the detector, and the current status of the experiment.
        Speaker: Bertrand Echenard (Caltech)
      • 266
        Search for Muon to Electron Conversion at J-PARC - COMET Experiment - (10' + 5')
        Muon to electron conversion in a muonic atom is a process of charged lepton flavor violation (CLFV). It is not allowed in the Standard Model (SM) and known to be one of the best processes to search for new physics beyond the SM. The COMET experiment aims to search for this process at J-PARC with single-event sensitivity of 3x10^{-17}. which is about 10,000 improvement over the current limit. Recently the COMET experiment has taken a staged approach. COMET Phase-I, as the first phase, aims at a single-event sensitivity of 3x10^{-15} with the partial muon beam line and a Phase-I dedicated detector. The construction of COMET Phase-I has started in 2013 and its physics run is expected to start in 2018/2019. The COMET Phase-II will follow immediately. In this talk, we will describe the physics motivation of CLFV, and the details of COMET Phase-I / Phase-II together with the current status of the experiment preparation.
        Speaker: MyeongJae Lee (Institute for Basic Science (Korea))
      • 267
        The MEG experiment result and the MEG II status (10' + 5')
        The MEG experiment at PSI is searching for the lepton-flavour violating decay mu -> e+gamma with unprecedented sensitivity. MEG set the most stringent experimental bound to date, based on the analysis of 2009, 2010 and 2011 data, to be <5.7 x 10^-13 with an associated sensitivity of about 7.7 x 10^-13. I will present the MEG final result which has an associated sensitivity of about 5.3 x 10^-13. I will also show the reconstruction improvements in the positron tracking code and the detector and target alignments. An experiment upgrade is conceived in order to further improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude in three years of data taking. It will take benefit of the MEG infrastructures as the beam lines, the magnet and the calorimeter cryostat and technology, while the detectors and the TDAQ electronics were re-designed to cope with a doubled muon stopping rate in the target. The MEG II experiment is currently under construction, the commissioning is foreseen between the end of this year and the first months of 2017. I will overview the new detector and describe the most important improvements.
        Speaker: Luca Galli (INFN)
      • 268
        The Mu3e Experiment at PSI (10' + 5')
        The Mu3e experiment will search for the lepton flavor violating neutrinoless muon decay $\mu^+ \rightarrow e^+ e^- e^+$ with a sensitivity down to $10^{-16}$ (90 % C.L.), i.e. a four order of magnitude improvement over previous measurements, using the world most intense muon beam at the Paul Scherrer Institute. This decay is strongly suppressed in the Standard Model, whilst several Beyond the SM models predict observable effects accessible to the new generation of LFV experiments. The search for the $\mu^+ \rightarrow e^+ e^- e^+$ decay requires a large acceptance detector capable of coping with rates of up to $2 \times 10^9$ stopped muons per second with excellent momentum, spacial, and time resolution to suppress backgrounds below the $10^{16}$ level. The required Mu3e detector performance is possible thanks to tracking detectors based on thin monolithic active silicon pixel sensors (HV-MAPS) in conjunction with an innovative tracking concept and very precise timing measurements using scintillating fibers and tiles coupled to silicon photo-multipliers. The first phase of the Mu3e exeriment aiming to a sensitivity of $10^{-15}$ has been recently approved. Following the R&D phase, the collaboration is currently preparing for detector construction. First data taking is expected in 2017.
        Speaker: Sandro Bravar (Universite de Geneve (CH))
      • 269
        Lepton flavor (universality) violation in rare kaon decays (15' + 5')
        Recent anomalies in the decays of $B$-mesons and the Higgs boson provide hints towards lepton flavor (universality) violating physics beyond the Standard Model. In this talk, we observe that 4-fermion operators which can explain the $B$-physics anomalies have corresponding analogs in the kaon sector, and we analyze their impact on $K\to\pi\ell\ell'$ and $K\to\ell\ell'$ decays $(\ell=\mu,e)$. For these processes, we note the corresponding physics opportunities at the NA62 and KOTO experiments. In particular, assuming minimal flavor violation, we comment on the required improvements in sensitivity necessary to test the $B$-physics anomalies in the kaon sector.
        Speaker: LEWIS TUNSTALL (University of Bern)
    • Strong Interactions and Hadron Physics: UE, DPS Ontario

      Ontario

      Conveners: Emily Laura Nurse (University of London (GB)) , Robert Schoefbeck (Ghent University (BE))
      • 270
        The underlying event and Monte Carlo tunes at the LHC (12' + 3')

        Merged abstract

        Speaker: Richard Dryden Field (University of Florida (US))
      • 271
        The Extremes of the Underlying Event (12' + 3')

        Our understanding of the transition from partons to hadrons in QCD has been challenged in recent years. In particular for high-multiplicity minimum-bias events at the LHC, novel experimentation techniques have revealed tantalising indications of non-trivial and possibly collective phenomena. A new wave of model building efforts has ensued, including ideas of colour reconnections, colour ropes, interacting strings, and hydrodynamics. It is essential to develop further sensitive probes of the mechanisms underpinning this fundamental aspect of QCD, to find answers to key questions such as if and how jet universality is broken and whether thermalisation is relevant in pp collisions. The answers will not only be of fundamental interest but will also impact precision studies that rely on hadronisation models, as well as the interpretation of heavy-ion results that use pp collisions as a reference. Using strangeness and baryons as tracers, we propose an extension of minimum-bias studies adapted to the environment of the underlying event which show substantial discriminatory power between several alternative models of soft physics. The applicability of this and related works to improve soft physics modelling at the LHC is explored.

        Speaker: Tim Martin (University of Warwick (GB))
      • 272
        Double parton scattering at hadron colliders (20' + 5')
        Merged abstract
        Speaker: Jason Adrian Kamin (University of Illinois at Chicago (US))
      • 273
        Associated production of quarkonia and heavy hadrons (20' + 5')
        Merged abstract
        Speaker: Jane Nachtman (University of Iowa (US))
      • 274
        Associated V+quarkonia (15' + 5')
        Merged abstract
        Speaker: Zdenek Dolezal (Charles University (CZ))
      • 275
        Multiple partonic interactions in production of four jets within High Energy Factorization (15' + 5')
        We perform the first study of 4-jet production in a complete kt-factorization framework at the LHC, discussing the onset and relevance of Double Parton Scattering contributions. We compare our results to those reported by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations for different sets of kinematic cuts. We find that care is necessary when assessing the relevance of the double parton scattering contribution in kt-factorization, as the instability of higher order contributions to the dijet cross section can easily lead to overestimate the suppression with respect to the collinear case.
        Speaker: Krzysztof Kutak (Instytut Fizyki Jadrowej Polskiej Akademii Nauk)
    • Top Quark and Electroweak Physics: 4 Huron

      Huron

      Convener: Joao Barreiro Guimaraes Da Costa (Chinese Academy of Sciences (CN))
      • 276
        Measurement of the ZZ(*) and Zgamma production cross section at 8 TeV and 13 TeV and limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector (15' + 5')
        Measurements of the cross sections of the production of pairs of electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration has measured inclusive and differential cross sections of the production of ZZ pairs in final states with four charged leptons using data corresponding to 20.3 /fb at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and data corresponding to 3.2 /fb at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The studies at 8 TeV are extended to the final state of two charged leptons and two neutrinos, which enhances the acceptance at high transverse momentum. The ATLAS collaboration has also carried out detailed measurements of integrated and differential cross sections of the production of a Z boson in association with an isolated photon using data corresponding to 20.3 /fb at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. These measurements are carried out in Z boson decays to both charged lepton pairs and neutrinos. These measurements are compared to calculations at NNLO in pQCD and provide constraints on new physics, by setting limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings. The ATLAS collaboration has also carried out the analysis of the inclusive four-lepton lineshape measurement in the 8 TeV data. The study focuses on the differential cross section as a function of the 4-lepton mass spectrum ranging from 80 to 1000 GeV where several distinct physics processes give rise to the production of 4-lepton final state.
        Speaker: Bing Zhou (University of Michigan (US))
      • 277
        Measurement of the WW production cross section at 8 TeV and 13 TeV and limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector (13' + 2')
        Measurements of the cross sections of the production of pairs of electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration has performed detailed measurements of integrated and differential cross sections of the production of WW pairs in leptonic final states and no hadronic jets using data corresponding to 20.3 /fb at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. An extension of the measurement is presented, which covers also the WW+1jet production at 8 TeV. These measurements are compared to predictions at up to NNLO+NNLL in pQCD and provide constraints on new physics, by setting limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings. In addition new studies of WZ and WW production in the semileptonic lnujj final state at 8 TeV are presented. These extend the measurements to high transverse momenta and are particularly sensitive to anomalous triple gauge couplings. A first measurement of the WW cross section at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV using data corresponding to 3.2 /fb will be presented.
        Speaker: Samira Hassani (CEA/IRFU,Centre d'etude de Saclay Gif-sur-Yvette (FR))
      • 278
        Measurement of the WZ production cross section at 8 TeV and 13 TeV and limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector (13' + 2')
        Measurements of the cross sections of the production of pairs of electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration has performed detailed measurements of integrated and differential cross sections of the production of WZ pairs in fully leptonic final states using data corresponding to 20.3 /fb at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. These measurements include ratios of WZ pairs separated by the charge of the W boson for the first time. The results are compared to predictions at NLO in pQCD and provide constraints on new physics, by setting limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings. Finally, a first measurement of WZ cross sections at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV using data corresponding to 3.2 /fb will be presented including the ratios to previous ATLAS measurements at 8 TeV and between W charges.
        Speaker: Christian Gutschow (TU Dresden (DE))
      • 279
        Multiboson production in final states with W and Z decays at CMS (15' + 5')
        We present studies of diboson production in pp collisions based on data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. These include precise measurements the production cross section of these processes at center-of-mass energies of 7, 8 and 13 TeV . The decay modes of the W and Z bosons are used. The results are interpreted in terms of constraints on anomalous triple and quartic gauge couplings.
        Speaker: Rafael Coelho Lopes De Sa (Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (US))
      • 280
        Associated production of photons and other gauge bosons at CMS (15' + 5')